Author Topic: Appletree rust  (Read 1322 times)

Offline kayjay mtn man

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Appletree rust
« on: June 18, 2013, 07:40:00 AM »
I just planted to dwarf apple trees 1 is a Golden Delicious the other a braeburn. other than that every tree in my yard is a cedar which I didn't realize caused rust. the odd thing is the Golden Delicious has not shown any signs while the braeburn is covered with it. I found some chemical rushed inhibitors I guess you'd say at the local Lowes but it was made by bayer  and I rather not use anything like that so I'm open to suggestions any help greatly appreciated thank you

Offline Cedar

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Re: Appletree rust
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2013, 10:09:58 AM »
I have not tried any of these. I make sure all leaves and fruit are picked up and fed to animals or burnt, and prune properly each winter as my prevention. Scab and such I usually do not have within 2-3 years from trees which were horrific.

Apple Cider Vinegar Fungicide: For leafspot, mildew, and scab
Mix 3 tablespoons of cider vinegar (5% acidity) with one gallon water and spray in the morning on infested plants. Good for black spot on roses and aspen trees too.

Baking Soda Spray
For anthracnose, early tomato blight, leaf blight and spots, powdery mildew,  and as a general fungicide
Sodium bicarbonate commonly known as baking soda has been found to posses fungicidal properties. It is recommended for plants that already have powdery mildew to hose down all the infected leaves prior to treatment. This helps to dislodge as many of the spores as possibly to help you get better results. Use as a prevention or as treatment at first signs of any of the diseases. To make: Mix 1 tablespoon baking soda, 2 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil with one gallon of water. Shake this up very thoroughly. To this mix add 1/2 teaspoon of pure Castile soap and spray. Be sure to agitate your sprayer while you work to keep the ingredients from separating. Cover upper and lower leaf surfaces and spray some on the soil. Repeat every 5-7 days as needed.

Garlic Fungicide Spray: For leaf spot and mildews
To make: Combine 3 ounces of minced garlic cloves with 1 ounce of mineral oil. Let soak for 24 hours or longer. Strain.
Next mix 1 teaspoon of fish emulsion with 16 ounces of water. Add 1 tablespoon of castile soap to this.
Now slowly combine the fish emulsion water with the garlic oil. Kept in a sealed glass container this mixture will stay viable for several months. To use: Mix 2 tablespoons of garlic oil with 1 pint of water and spray.

Horseradish (preventative for fungal disease)
Penn State University announced in 1995 that minced horseradish holds promise in decontaminating wastewater and now says it may clean contaminated soils as well! Penn State's center for Bioremediation and Detoxification reports that minced horseradish combined with hydrogen peroxide can completely remove chlorinated phenols and other contaminants found in industrial wastes. Experiments involve applying the mixture directly to tainted soils or growing horseradish in contaminated soil and roto-tilling the roots just before applying hydrogen peroxide! The cleansing properties of horseradish have been known for more than a decade, however creating a purified form has been far too expensive. This method has proved to be just as effective, but at a fraction of the cost!
Horseradish Tea: You can also make a tea from horseradish roots to use as a preventative spray for fungal diseases. This is especially useful against brown rot in apple trees. The white flesh of the horseradish root also contains significant amounts of calcium, magnesium and vitamin C.
To make: Process one cup of roots in food processor till finely chopped. Combine this with 16 ounces of water in a glass container and let soak for 24 hours. Strain liquid, discard the solids. Now mix the liquid with 2 quarts of water and spray.

If I tried one for my plants, this is the one I have had my eye on for years,
Horsetail Tea (Equisetum arvense)
The common horsetail plant, which is very invasive, is rich in silicon and helps plants to resist fungal diseases via increasing their light absorbing capabilities. Use on peach trees to control peach leaf curl. Use on most plants to combat powdery fungi, and on vegetables and roses to control mildew. You can use this on seedlings and plants in closed environments too! Great in greenhouses! Prevents damping off. Horsetail is one of the ingredients in Golden Harvest Fertilizer.
To make:
In a glass or stainless steel pot, mix 1/8 cup of dried leaves in 1 gallon of unchlorinated water. Bring to a boil, then let simmer for at least 1/2 hr. Cool and strain. Store extra concentrate in a glass container. Will keep for a month. Dilute this mix, adding 5-10 parts of unchlorinated water to one part concentrate. Spray plants that show any symptoms of fungal type disease once every 4 days. Spray your seed starting mixtures to prevent damping off. (The recipe I have packed away also includes apple cider vinegar).

Cedar

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Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Appletree rust
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2013, 10:14:31 AM »
Very timely, I just spotted some cedar apple rust on one of my new apple trees.  I'm going to follow Cedar's advice and keep everything cleaned up.  I will be clearing some brush, and some of this is ugly cedar trees, but most of the cedars are not mine to cut.
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Offline kayjay mtn man

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Re: Appletree rust
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2013, 11:07:22 AM »
thank you very much for the information cedar I'll try the easiest first first thing in the morning

Offline Sonarmark

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Re: Appletree rust
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2017, 07:36:32 PM »
Moving this fall, I learned about cedar apple rust because the new house has a serious problem with it. I will have 1 or 2 apple trees and a heck of a lot of juniper trees. I am planning to try vinegar based fungicide and baking soda based fungicide as well as removing infected leaves from the apple trees in the fall and removing the galls on the junipers in the winter.

I plan to chronicle my efforts to intervene with nature on my youtube channel, when I am ready to share the link I will leave an update.

:)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Appletree rust
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2017, 08:51:16 PM »
Could you post your findings here too please Sonarmark?

Cedar
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Offline Fixit

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Re: Appletree rust
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2017, 06:56:57 AM »
I don't fight cedar/ Apple leaf rust . I have Serviceberry on my place . Lots and lots of serviceberry . It leave also have the rust and it would be a losing fight .
 My understanding is that while it isn't pretty that it does no real harm . Am I wrong ?

Offline Cedar

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Re: Appletree rust
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2017, 08:28:04 AM »
I think it just affects the leaves and not the entire tree, or fruit.
Cedar-Hawthorne Rust is what is effecting the Serviceberries (which I know as Saskatoons), which is closely related to the Cedar-Apple rust diseases, but apparently will not effect your apples.

Resistant varieties: ‘Redfree’, ‘Liberty’, ‘William’s Pride’, and ‘Freedom’.
Susceptible varieties: ‘Jonathan’, ‘Rome’, ‘Wealthy’, ‘York Imperial’, and ‘Golden Delicious’.

Cedar
"Do not breathe simply to exist."

"Make now always the most precious time. Now will never come again." - Jean Luc Picard

"A person who works with his hands is a laborer, A person who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman, A person who works with his hands, his head and his heart is an artist."

Offline loodean

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Re: Appletree rust
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2017, 05:56:34 AM »
It doesn’t matter whether you have cedar trees in your yard or not.  The spores can travel up to 3 miles on the wind.  Here’s some tips regarding Cedar-Apple Rust.  Apple trees can be bred to be resistant, tolerant, or susceptible. Obliviously, the Braeburn is susceptible. I have apple trees and cedar trees.  I have planted six different kinds of apples some resistant and some tolerant. The resistant ones are Liberty, Freedom, and Enterprise. Most good nursery catalogs will indicate whether the trees are R, T, or S.  Moreover, the telial horns that produce the spores on cedar trees only develop with high humidity and temperature from 50-60 degrees. You only need to spray your trees if the temp and humidity falls within that range.  The old stand-by Bordeaux spray is still effective, and believe it or not it is considered “organic” by the NOP.