Author Topic: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles  (Read 74943 times)

Offline Zef_66

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #330 on: May 03, 2017, 10:17:44 AM »
Thanks. I haven't really done too much work lately aside from getting the car serviced (I still don't change my oil, the shop can change it, rotate tires, and look under it for problems I can't easily see). However the rear driver side window isn't going down/up smoothly so I think I may take a look at that just to do something. Depending on what the issue is and the cost to fix it I may do it or ignore it.

I use silicone spray on my window gaskets. Something like this: http://amzn.to/2qFnmN3

I spray a liberal amount on the rubber track that goes along both sides of the windows. This will help them move easier. I do this once a year or so to all the windows on all the cars. Only takes a couple minutes to do and keeps things moving better and prevents stuff inside the door from breaking.
~Derek

Go to the ant, you sluggard; consider its ways and be wise! It has no commander, no overseer or ruler, yet it stores its provisions in summer and gathers its food at harvest. How long will you lie there, you sluggard? When will you get up from your sleep? ~ Proverbs 6:6-9

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #331 on: May 03, 2017, 05:11:57 PM »
Good to know. When you say both sides do you mean inside and outside or left/right? Are you removing the door panel?


Offline ChrisFox

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #332 on: May 03, 2017, 06:01:04 PM »
Some times motor/regulator going out. They are notorious for cheaping out on those. Lucky to get 5 years out of them. Easy to fix though. I did all 4 last year. About $200 all together.

Offline Zef_66

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #333 on: May 04, 2017, 11:18:40 AM »
Good to know. When you say both sides do you mean inside and outside or left/right? Are you removing the door panel?

Left and right. But I put the window down before spraying to make sure I get both the inside and outside as well if that makes sense.

Standing on the side of the vehicle looking at the closed door, usually a rubber groove/track will run up and down the left and right side of the door frame. The window slides up and down this groove and keeps it in the same place and from moving too much. The rubber can dry out and cause the motor to work hard to overcome the extra friction of the dry rubber. Spraying with silicone lubricant once a year helps keep the window moving better.

I do this with window down, door open, and door panel on. Just turn the key to the on position, lower the window, open the door, and spray the grooves. Takes less than a minute per window.

Ah, found a good video of it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IS62LquGOUk
~Derek

Go to the ant, you sluggard; consider its ways and be wise! It has no commander, no overseer or ruler, yet it stores its provisions in summer and gathers its food at harvest. How long will you lie there, you sluggard? When will you get up from your sleep? ~ Proverbs 6:6-9

Offline alexlindsay

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #334 on: May 21, 2017, 01:10:54 PM »
A suggestion that I don't think has been covered in this thread. instead of getting an expensive code reader a more cost effective way of doing it is to get an ELM 327 dongle on eBay for less than 10$ and the torque pro app for a smartphone. I got one of these when working on my 6.0 f350. it allowed me to read outputs from a bunch of different sensors and diagnose problems without throwing parts at it. definitely worth it.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #335 on: May 21, 2017, 01:25:24 PM »
A suggestion that I don't think has been covered in this thread. instead of getting an expensive code reader a more cost effective way of doing it is to get an ELM 327 dongle on eBay for less than 10$ and the torque pro app for a smartphone. I got one of these when working on my 6.0 f350. it allowed me to read outputs from a bunch of different sensors and diagnose problems without throwing parts at it. definitely worth it.
Could you throw in some links?

Good suggestion by the way. +1
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Offline alexlindsay

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #336 on: May 21, 2017, 05:08:09 PM »
http://m.ebay.com/itm/ELM327-V1-5-OBD2-Car-WIFI-Interface-Diagnostic-Tool-Scanner-For-Android-IOS-/222325625481?hash=item33c3a3d289%3Ag%3A3soAAOSwo4pYOAop&_trkparms=pageci%253A39b73720-3e7a-11e7-9726-74dbd1800e6f%257Cparentrq%253A2d43be0015c0ab4d6c3f731ffffe3d83%257Ciid%253A12

coupled with the torque pro app I was able to read the sensors for the high pressure oil system that runs the injectors, which enabled me to determine why my truck was having a starting problem when the oil was hot. it also allowed me to test the output voltage of my ficm, which is another common problem for 6.0 powerstrokes.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 05:19:15 PM by alexlindsay »

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #337 on: May 21, 2017, 07:59:53 PM »
Good suggestion. I have seen those but haven't gotten one yet. Usually if my check engine light goes on I swing into an Auto Zone and have them pull the code for me. It's free and they usually provide a printout of everything that's involved with the code: potential causes, potential parts needed, troubleshooting steps, etc.


Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: My journey to maintaining my own vehicles
« Reply #338 on: July 12, 2017, 10:14:16 PM »
It’s been a while since I updated this thread. Honestly I haven’t done much on the vehicles and I’ve been too busy to tinker. I recently got a motorcycle and it’s going to get some work/modifications/maintenance done since I’m a) excited about it b) not sure what’s been done/not been done so I want to make sure it gets done and c) want to learn the ins and outs of the ride.

To start I cleaned my chain and checked the tension last week. It seemed loose and after looking up the specs in the service manual it is in fact loose. Specs say it should have 20-30mm of movement, roughly .75 – 1.25 inches.

As you can see from the first to pictures it had about two inches of movement:





To start I bought a neat little tool that clamps onto the sprocket help with the alignment. To install it I need to remove the chain guard. One bolt out and the guard will pivot up and be out of my way:



The tool is basic and has a long rod that runs down the chain. You site along it to make sure it and the chain are running parallel.



Next the Axel nut needs to be loosed. Out with a cotter pin and the nut will loosen right up:



After that there are two bolts that require an allen wrench to adjust on either side of the wheel. The left side adjusts the actual chain tension and the right side (pictured below) adjusts the yaw of the wheel. There are markings on the swing-arm to help line things up but the tool I installed is a better way to check.



And that’s it! Once the wheel is aligned tighten the axel nut to spec and reinstall the cotter pin. Mine’s actually incomplete right now because I didn’t have a socket big enough to fit the nut. I loosed it with a crescent wrench but I need to use my torque wrench to tighten it. I’ll pick one up tomorrow and have the job finished up then.

I’m also not thrilled about reusing the cotter pin since I have to shape it to lock so I’ll see if I can pick one up along with the socket. It’ll probably be ok but for such a cheap part I figure why not get new and unbent for a replacement.

The chain is within spec now as shown by the two pictures:





It might still be a little on the loose side but it’s really close. Since it’s my first time doing any work like this I’d rather be careful. A chain that’s too tight is just as bad as a chain that’s too loose. Even if this is still a tad loose it’s an improvement over where it was before I started.