Author Topic: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality  (Read 608 times)

Offline Carl

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The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« on: September 14, 2017, 04:12:21 AM »
  While I know few people get the isolation of my BOL,I have noticed that even days I don't have a 'bus to catch' schedule that time seems far more important than I used to give it credit as I don't just loose track of feeding time but loose 'balance' and some days are 20 hours long where others only 5 or 6 when I don't have time and or sun cycles to guide me.

  Time is a concept of man and should no be so important ,yet,at least to me and a few lab rats who spent a week in the BOL without benefit of time pieces ,cell phones etc ,in the guise of testing living conditions and stored foods. The adults were first noticeably effected by the lack of sun or time anchors. My son told me of the need for strict time schedules while he rode a sub that often spent weeks in isolation below water...I now better understand this and the need to schedule DAY/NIGHT cycles at the BOL for mental and possibly health.

  Any others lose 'balance' when time was not available to guide your day?

 
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Offline Cedar

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2017, 06:30:26 AM »
You don't even have to be underground or under water. In the winter where I was in Canada, there was only 5 hrs of light in the winter. No TV, and living alone... It skewed time. In the first winter of 2015-16 when SP and I started living in the trailer with no electricity, we went to bed at 5pm due to lack of light and heat. It really messed with time as well.

But even in the summer with nearly 22 hours of light, being so quiet that the bugs were as loud as anything.it skews time... Has it been an hour, or five minutes? Living in the bush, time and the concept of time is weird to begin with.

I did stick to schedules. Most of the time. Interaction with others is a requirement. Going to bed and waking up at the same times are important.

I disagree that time is a concept of man... animals, even in the wild often have a pattern they follow.

If we lived on another planet, we would have to work around not having a 24 HR day, because our bodies would not hold up.
Mercury - about 59 days.
Venus - 243 days.
Earth - 1 day.
Mars - about 1 day, 0.6 hours.
Jupiter - 9 hours.
Saturn - about 10 hours.
Uranus - about 13 hours.
Neptune - about 15 hours.

For instance,if more people got more sleep, their body chemistry would not be as out of whack, and they would not be buying diet pills. The human body, as well as other animals have a metabolism which has been geared for our unique selves and this planet. If we lives on another planet, or underwater, or underground, we have to create an artificial time schedule to make up for the lack of light and seasons.

Speaking of sleep, I am going back to sleep for another hour....I had a headache for the last six days, so I went to sleep too early last night, which made me wake too early this morning.

Cedar
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"Make now always the most precious time. Now will never come again." - Jean Luc Picard

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Offline Carl

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2017, 07:15:28 AM »
  But ,during the eclipse ,many noted animals and bugs go into night mode even during the very brief sunset/sunrise . The tend to react to environment out of habit ,I think. Thanks for your added insight CEDAR . My guests have gone home after 7 days ,they thought it was only 4 days they were here as I continue to isolate myself and enjoy the open cans of meat and other good foods while I study the power and air circulation plus humidity of the higher occupancy for future modifications to the peppermint mine.

 I think I will put some lighting on a timer for night/day regulation in event of serious occupancy situation.
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

Offline David in MN

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2017, 07:51:35 AM »
I don't know if it relates perfectly but being in da Nort seasonality has a big effect on me. In June the sun rises before 6 am and sets well after 9 pm. I sleep maybe 5 hours every day and feel great and energized. Come January I might not see the sun for 10-15 days, sleep 10 hours and feel weak.

Oddly enough, the most out of place I feel is when I vacation in the tropics. It's very disconcerting to have exactly 12 hours of predictable sun every day. My brain can't work around an 80 degree day with a 6 pm sunset. Every time I'm down there i either can't sleep or conk out at 7 pm.

Were I to travel down to the bayou I suspect I would lose track as well. I am generally repulsed by swamps and stagnant water. I don't like humidity. After a few days of clogged sinuses I think I'd lose track of time
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Offline LVWood

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2017, 09:10:31 AM »
Yes, my first visit to Alaska one summer was disorienting and quite novel for me. To go outside at nearly midnight and see the sun was interesting to say the least.
However getting enough sleep was a problem. I had to make sure my blackout curtains were fully closed so I could get a decent nights sleep.
Over the years I would go during with winter when it was mostly dark, we did get some sunrise that just blipped over the horizon and back down again.
Being almost always dark I believe was harder to overcome than almost always light.
So setting a schedule of day and night activities is important.
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Offline iam4liberty

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2017, 09:42:29 AM »
Funny this topic has come up now.  This video came up in my youtube feed last week:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=iqKdEhx-dD4

It drove home the importance of stimulus to good mental health.  Lots of implications for shelters.  One of these is ensuring a tie to the "earth cycle".  This could be as simple as putting timers on main lighting to simulate day/night.  Another is on mental stimulation.  A few years back I read an article about how games like chess and mental fields like mathematics had big jumps after plagues while practical skills like engineering declined.  It was hypothesized that people locking themselves away turned to the more mental activities for stimulation since hands-on activities were limited.

Offline chad

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2017, 09:57:38 AM »
  But ,during the eclipse ,many noted animals and bugs go into night mode even during the very brief sunset/sunrise . The tend to react to environment out of habit ,I think. Thanks for your added insight CEDAR . My guests have gone home after 7 days ,they thought it was only 4 days they were here as I continue to isolate myself and enjoy the open cans of meat and other good foods while I study the power and air circulation plus humidity of the higher occupancy for future modifications to the peppermint mine.

 I think I will put some lighting on a timer for night/day regulation in event of serious occupancy situation.

Interesting Carl
The things we take for granted above "ground" humidity,air circulation, and the sun cycle.
I wonder if there's a dimmer switch that can somewhat match a day/night cycle.
Carl, do you have to monitor the oxygen level as a parentage I.e  .20, .18, .15

Peppermint mine haven't heard that in a long time..
Good stuff got me thinking.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2017, 10:00:03 AM »
I don't know if it relates perfectly but being in da Nort seasonality has a big effect on me. In June the sun rises before 6 am and sets well after 9 pm. I sleep maybe 5 hours every day and feel great and energized. Come January I might not see the sun for 10-15 days, sleep 10 hours and feel weak.

Oddly enough, the most out of place I feel is when I vacation in the tropics. It's very disconcerting to have exactly 12 hours of predictable sun every day. My brain can't work around an 80 degree day with a 6 pm sunset. Every time I'm down there i either can't sleep or conk out at 7 pm.

Were I to travel down to the bayou I suspect I would lose track as well. I am generally repulsed by swamps and stagnant water. I don't like humidity. After a few days of clogged sinuses I think I'd lose track of time

I'm at a similar northern latitude.  In late June it's relatively easy to wake up at 05:00 and walk the dog or whatever.  But 07:00 in January is painful.
Somewhat related, I was looking at the terms for sailboat rentals, and they are 2:00pm to sunset during the summer, but 1:00pm to sunset in winter.  While it's a nice they through in an extra hour for winter months, the difference in sunset time is 5 hours.  Remind me to book June 21, 2018 where the sunset is scheduled for 9:15pm.

Offline RitaRose1945

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2017, 10:08:28 AM »
This was from more than four years ago, but it's about medication to improve sleep in people who are completely blind (can't even see light or dark) and have trouble keeping their circadian rhythms in sync with everyone around them.

New Medication May Improve Sleep in Blind People - Medscape

I have been seeing ads for it on TV over the past month or two.


Offline Carl

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2017, 10:16:33 AM »
Interesting Carl
The things we take for granted above "ground" humidity,air circulation, and the sun cycle.
I wonder if there's a dimmer switch that can somewhat match a day/night cycle.
Carl, do you have to monitor the oxygen level as a parentage I.e  .20, .18, .15

Peppermint mine haven't heard that in a long time..
Good stuff got me thinking.

Yes,it took a lot of work to get the place livable.I just call it the BOL now for less typing.
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

Offline Zef_66

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2017, 10:48:40 AM »
Interesting topic. While maybe not exactly the same, I feel my family entered into an interesting situation recently. We moved from the city to our new home in the mountains. We have no neighbors. We don't get many visitors. I do work a regular job during the week. And the kids get the bus and get picked up a regular time. But once Friday afternoon hits, time isn't important.

We have no TV. We don't have a schedule. We don't really go anywhere on the weekends. We do work around the house. The kids help or play. We get up when we wake up. We go to bed when we are tired. We do tell the kids when it is time for them to go to bed because they won't on their own. But for my wife and I, we have no set bedtime. One night it might be 11:30pm. The other it may be 8:30pm. We don't eat on a certain schedule. We eat when we are hungry. The kids as well. It might be 11am. It might be 2pm for lunch. Then 4pm for supper.

But what happens is that we don't watch the time. We just work or play. We enjoy our time at home and with each other so much more. I honestly wish everyday could be that way. But I do need to earn money. But I have noticed this change and frankly, I love it. Losing complete track of time and enjoying where you are and what you are doing is one of the best feelings in the world. Even if it is cutting firewood on a Saturday with the kids "helping", I enjoy the heck out of it.
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Go to the ant, you sluggard; consider its ways and be wise! It has no commander, no overseer or ruler, yet it stores its provisions in summer and gathers its food at harvest. How long will you lie there, you sluggard? When will you get up from your sleep? ~ Proverbs 6:6-9

Offline Carl

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2017, 10:52:56 AM »
KARMA ZEF 66...cause you are living the dream that most people are in too much hurry to do,your new life will prevent burnout and make you live longer.
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

Offline surfivor

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2017, 11:12:21 AM »

Dalai Lama said if everything is going great then time does not matter, but if you are suffering then time matters a great deal ..

 Certain meditations can make you feel like time goes by differently than how you may otherwise perceive it.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2017, 12:21:21 PM »
coincidentally I pondered "time"  recently myself.  I was imagining other cultures with much more relaxed concepts.  They show up late for appointments, complete tasks at a pace of their choosing.
When you're in a hurry, this seems infuriating, but there may be some redeeming qualities.
On the other hand, unless your plans and goals don't rely on external factors, this laid back approach to time doesn't seem productive at all.

Suppose you want to take some advanced skills training.  That costs time and money, and you need to show up at a certain time and place.

Likewise for any advanced cooperation. 
Conducting commerce - if your livelihood depends on it, would you accept "pay me back whenever" ?


Offline David in MN

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Re: The importance of TIME as an anchor to reality
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2017, 12:38:28 PM »
Self-employment radically changes time perspective as well. When I drove downtown for work every day I was a bit of a hothead with a case of leadfoot. Now I drive the limit and wave to people happily.

On the other end of the spectrum when I have time in my shop now I USE THE TIME. No stopping, no eating. Only breaks for water. I'll chew nicotene gum to keep working without food.

It's nice that I've learned to relax in everyday life but have a high work standard when I need it. Those lines used to be blurry.
Livin on a thin line, tell me now what are we supposed to do?