Author Topic: Dry Yeast  (Read 3826 times)

Offline Rookinde

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Dry Yeast
« on: November 12, 2009, 06:11:41 PM »
The wife and I was just discussing the self life of dry yeast in packets. Does anyone know off the top of their head?

Rook

Offline mamabear

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2009, 08:33:22 PM »
It's not an overly long time, but the packet should have an exiry date stamped on it somewhere to go by.

Offline Roknrandy

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2009, 04:10:26 AM »
I've used it six months past the expiration date and it was fine. I keep mine in the fridge after opening. I buy the Fleischmann's Instant Yeast - 2/16 oz. bags from sams

Offline Rookinde

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2009, 04:29:44 AM »
Now what can we do to have yeast, if/when SHTF happens?

Rook

Offline Roknrandy

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2009, 06:45:39 AM »
I use one pound per year so I have around two years (at current usage) worth. If TSHTF then I've probably got a six to nine months worth.

Offline Shadowrider

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2009, 03:29:35 PM »
Rookinde, it's my understanding that yeast will last just about indefinitely in the freezer. I can't prove that, but I do keep a large bag (I think it's one pound -- from Costco) in the freezer. I've had it for about 7 months now.

I also kept the last jar I bought yeast in and store that in the fridge, refilling from my freezer supply. I take that yeast and other refrigerated ingredients out of the fridge and let them come to room temp overnight before making bread in the morning. It's worked so far.

Offline 96Charlie

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2009, 06:38:48 PM »
Picked up some Red Star in 1/4 oz packets on 11/09 - expiration date Apr 11


Offline SurvivalKing

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2009, 06:55:32 PM »
I buy yeast in bulk on sale (jars or packets) therefore I use freezer to store yeast. I never had a problem keeping yeast long term in the freezer, but there are things to keep in mind.

1) I look at the dates of expiration (saved myself some significant storage time by doing so).
2) I store it in old purpose built jars (fleischmann's 1 lb jars). If I buy new yeast I open them up and stir em in with the old yeast, then shake the whole jar when its closed.  I see this as a form of rotation
3) You must let the yeast come up to room temperature before you use it.

If I follow those three rules I've never had any issues.

As to what I would do in a SHTF scenario.  I'D LEARN TO BAKE SOURDOUGH before the SHTF (sounds like homework).

[EDIT: Fritz beat me by 10 seconds on the Sourdough suggestion, great minds think alike.]

marmoset

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2009, 01:07:15 AM »
By the way, Karen Hood (Ron's wife, he's been interviewed on TSP recently) shows in one of her videos, Cave Cooking #1,
how to get yeast in the wilderness and how to keep the starter from drying out.

http://www.survival.com/cavecooking-1.htm
EDIT: Don't know if the "Jack Spirko" code for getting a rebate is still valid, but it never hurts to ask  ;)
Or you might try "marmoset made me do it"

In my own experience, dry yeast lasts a lot longer than the expiration date stamped on it. I've used dry yeast that was
5 (five) years past expiry and it worked just fine.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2009, 01:15:05 AM by marmoset »

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2010, 06:40:24 AM »
Before the last move, I kept sourdough starter going in the refrigerator all the time. I got my starter here:

http://www.thewilbournegroup.com/Sourdough/index.html

I found I used it not only for bread, but also for whole wheat waffles (the kids loved them) and other recipes. Have I mentioned that moving around a lot can be very disruptive? lol

I also keep a couple of pounds of yeast in the freezer at all times. I use a smaller jar kept in the refrigerator for regular use. And, I have never let it get to room temp before using it for bread and have always had good results. YMMV.

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2010, 12:18:11 PM »
Anyone looking to get started with sourdough, you can get some good sourdough cultures on the Carl Griffith Sourdough page.  I made several batches of this sourdough but it was way before I became interested in preparedness.  So I didn't continue.

I'll get back into sourdough after I get back up to speed with yeast bread.

BTW, the last of that yeast from 5 years ago was finally not viable.  I couldn't get it to proof.  So I dumped that down the drain and have another pound in the fridge.

Offline perseus_m31

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Re: Dry Yeast
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2010, 07:06:18 PM »
Yeast post SHTF will be easy.  Just propagate your own.  A kit to do it is here:
http://www.midwestsupplies.com/master-yeast-culturing-kit.html
Any homebrew store will have the basics of what you need.  I just use a couple of beer bottles with stoppers and airlocks to make my starter solution for brewing.  With good clean technique it should be possible to keep yeast cultures going forever.