Author Topic: Woodworking Forum\questions.  (Read 14180 times)

Offline Theswerd

  • Repeat after me...
  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 760
  • Karma: 41
  • New TSP Forum member
Woodworking Forum\questions.
« on: April 06, 2015, 10:00:55 AM »
Hey all!


I am going to be looking into the world of woodworking an I was thinking we had a sub-forum for this. I can't find it, so maybe I was wrong.


I am interested in muscle-powered woodworking, more akin to ye-olden days style work. Does anyone have any ideas of where I can start? I found a youtube channel for Paul Sellers, and I really like what I see there. I have a project in mind, which is what spurred this, but I have no real work space. Living in a small apartment with the patio belonging to the garden means I can't get a nice big work bench. Is it still viable to get some tools and work on small projects (boxes for jewelery etc) in a small space?

Offline David in MN

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1259
  • Karma: 103
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2015, 10:34:31 AM »
No power tools... You're going to get a workout.

You could Youtube Jimmy Diresta, Izzy Swan, Matthias Wandel, The Drunken Woodworker, The Wood Whisperer, Steve Ramsey, etc. for inspiration.

If you intend on all human power, I'd recommend getting some good handsaws (maybe Japanese), chisels, planes, carving knives, etc. The $$$ adds up quick but you'll want good quality. Carving might be a good starting point. Master carvers are amazing.

Consider a scroll saw or benchtop bandsaw as a low cost introduction to power. My first tool was a scroll saw and I made ornaments, picture frames, bowls, etc. on it.

Do you have a Rockler or Woodcraft nearby? They're the 2 big suppliers and it's nice to get their input. They also sell wood in a less intimidating way than the local mill. If possible, you could try a maker space or take a community college class. Even getting shop time to rip stock will make your life easier.

If you were closer, I'd invite you over to my shop. (I mean you're totally invited but the commute up I35 might be long). Can you hook up with a friend locally? There's so much to learn that's pretty easy to quickly pass on.

Offline Theswerd

  • Repeat after me...
  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 760
  • Karma: 41
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2015, 11:17:09 AM »
Well, I imagine at some point I will have to comprise on the no-power-tool thing. But I think hand crafting something has a certain charm to it.


I have never heard of those two companies, but I will take a look.


Part of my thinking is that if I can learn enough to make good stuff, maybe I can sell it...
Thanks for giving me a place to start!

Offline strangetanks

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 202
  • Karma: 6
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2015, 11:23:59 AM »
Boy oh boy, going old school.

You can buy lots of things at flea markets, lots of pretty good quality old school stuff out there that no one wants anymore.  Hand planes are the one thing that are hard to find there though as they are somewhat collectible.

First skill I would tell you to pick up if you want to go that way is learning to sharpen things.  To compensate for muscle power they would keep their tools RAZOR sharp.  And I mean, crazy cut the hell out of yourself if you slip sharp. 

If you can sharpen and rehab some old tools you will have some pretty quality stuff at a really good price.  If you're looking to make jewelry boxes and such, you just need a few chisels and a dovetail saw.  Get a few clamps you can use at your kitchen table.  I wouldn't bother hand ripping any lumber, borrow someone else's shop or something.

nkawtg

  • Guest
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2015, 11:25:35 AM »
Check yard sales and swap meets for good used hand tools such as planes. They may have a little surface rust, but with some TLC can be brought back to life.
Also your hand tools will need sharpening, so look into a good sharpening system such as Tormek or Worksharp to keep the edges nice and sharp.
Check out Stumpy Nubs at: http://www.stumpynubs.com/
Lumber Jocks at: http://lumberjocks.com/
Highland Woodworking at: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/
and
The Unplugged Shop: https://unpluggedshop.com/

There is a ton of YouTube resources out there to help you get started.

Offline Theswerd

  • Repeat after me...
  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 760
  • Karma: 41
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2015, 11:47:43 AM »
I just found a woodworking school here in town! OMG!  :excited: :excited: :excited: :excited:

Offline Theswerd

  • Repeat after me...
  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 760
  • Karma: 41
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2015, 12:14:23 PM »
Aaaand crap. They actually moved to Austin. Lame.

nkawtg

  • Guest
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2015, 12:46:20 PM »
I hate it when things like that happen.

Offline David in MN

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1259
  • Karma: 103
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2015, 01:01:01 PM »
With scant more than a razor blade and a cheap veneering pack you could learn inlay. I've messed with it but lack the patience.

I think you could start small, expect mistakes, and grow in skills.

Offline MauserK98

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: 0
  • Go ahead, ask me where I'm from.
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2016, 07:50:31 PM »
Check out Paul Sellers stuff on youtube.

Offline BillyS

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 416
  • Karma: 39
  • TSP Forum member
    • Scarydad
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2016, 07:02:41 AM »
For small pieces, hand tooling is almost easier and can be less expensive. Dovetails, for instance, can be achieved with a saw and a chisel, whereas to do them mechanically involves a router, router table, and a jig. Don't kid yourself though, just like with any hobby, it can get expensive fast. The best advice I can give you is to choose a project and then acquire the best tool(s) you can afford to get the job done.

Offline alan123

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 154
  • Karma: 4
  • Prepping just makes sense
    • Made by Alan
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2016, 08:59:20 AM »
Find a woodworking club in your area. Just about all the members are going to be retired. Don't let that put you off, they have the experience and will help you. At my club we are always looking for younger, enthusiastic people. I just had a guy email me that wants to teach some younger person intarsia before he dies. You can often get used tools and hardwoods cheap through the club members too.

Offline Lockdown

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 35
  • Karma: 2
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2016, 10:43:30 AM »
I agree with strangetanks. Learn to sharpen everything, even your hand saws. its not that hard and will save you much labor and many trips to the sharpening guy. I work almost exclusively with hand tools. I sharpen my plane irons and chisels on three steel diamond plates and can resharpen a plane blade in just a few minutes with a finish on a leather strop. Key to a razor sharp edge is a perfectly flat back on the iron or chisel. Key to a great plane and smooth surface is a perfectly flat sole. A well sharpened tool will make woodworking a joy. An even slightly dull tool will make it a nightmare. I may sharpen my irons 5-6- times a day on a project, but the few minutes I spend sharpening saves much time on the bench. Also resist the urge to take too much material at one time. After you become good at sharpening, you will need to work on making your stock square, flat, and smooth. This is key. You need surfaces that are flat and square to each other or you are wasting your time. Don't count on the material you buy at the lumber store to be flat or square enough to make good projects. You will need to learn how to take problem boards (twist, cup, bow,) and make them flat and square to be usable. Paul Sellers is one of the best I have seen in the instructional video realm. This slab of walnut became this clock (and three others) with just hand tools. Hand working wood is very satisfying but takes a lot of patience. 




Offline Lockdown

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 35
  • Karma: 2
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2016, 11:02:42 AM »
Hey all!


I am going to be looking into the world of woodworking an I was thinking we had a sub-forum for this. I can't find it, so maybe I was wrong.


I am interested in muscle-powered woodworking, more akin to ye-olden days style work. Does anyone have any ideas of where I can start? I found a youtube channel for Paul Sellers, and I really like what I see there. I have a project in mind, which is what spurred this, but I have no real work space. Living in a small apartment with the patio belonging to the garden means I can't get a nice big work bench. Is it still viable to get some tools and work on small projects (boxes for jewelery etc) in a small space?

Yes, very much so. When I was stationed in Germany, we lived in Government quarters. No table saws, planers, band saws in housing so I put a work bench and my hand tools in a small bedroom and turned out some decent pieces. I have pretty much given up on the noise, dust, and safety issues of machinery to focus on hand tools. It is quieter, cleaner, safer and more fulfilling. A small bench with a head and tail vice, a few chisels and a couple bench planes will do a lot of work. Search the web for small wood working shops. I have seen guys working wood with one end of a board on a bench and the other end sticking out a window because space was so tight. There is very little you cannot do with hand tools and you will get a workout.

Edit: Also get some scrap wood and start learning how to cut joints. Dovetail, mortise and tenon, and dadoes are where you should start. These are the three you will use most and a well fit joint will make or break a piece. Watch as many of Paul Sellers videos as you can. You will learn a lot just by watching them and I believe it will give you a direction on how to start.

Lockdown
« Last Edit: January 04, 2016, 11:12:00 AM by Lockdown »

Offline SelfSufficientPath

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 27
  • Karma: 3
  • selfsufficientpath.com
    • Self Sufficient Path
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2016, 12:17:12 PM »
I'd say i depends on what your goals are.  In short, it depends.  What kind of work are you looking to do?  You mention small jewelry boxes.  You won't have room for a jointer or planer, and won't have space for a workbench either, which means you'll probably be working with dimensional lumber.  Next, you'll need to figure out how your boxes are going to be constructed.  Are you going to be doing dovetails?  Finger joints?  Splined or biscuited miter joints?  I've probably lost you already.  So my first investment recommendation would probably be either some classes, or probably more feasible, some books.  Get acquainted with the terminology, tools, and methods.  Then you can plan out your work, and as a result plan out your methods and tools needed.

Offline Bolomark

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 460
  • Karma: 28
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2016, 03:21:31 PM »

Offline machinisttx

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 833
  • Karma: 47
  • yay
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2016, 08:09:52 PM »
I've been watching quite a few woodworking videos on youtube. I like "the samurai carpenter", among others.

Woodworking hand tools are, at least around here, incredibly easy to find and usually quite cheap. Yard/estate sales, flea markets, etc. are the best places to look.

Offline DheereCrossing

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 65
  • Karma: 5
  • Who am I again?
    • OMG Leatherworks
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2016, 07:33:20 PM »
I didn't come here to be commercial, but I noticed your thread just at the time that I need to start getting ready to move.  I'll have to sell 98% of the woodshop, so anyone in the North Texas area that is looking for tools or supplies or storage, I'm your man.

I've got a good selection of old school hand tools but I'm going to keep more of that than anything else out there.

Offline Theswerd

  • Repeat after me...
  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 760
  • Karma: 41
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #18 on: June 17, 2016, 10:07:20 AM »
If only I had money and space. Sigh.

Offline David in MN

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1259
  • Karma: 103
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #19 on: June 17, 2016, 10:18:39 AM »
If only I had money and space. Sigh.

My problem is time.

nkawtg

  • Guest
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2016, 10:23:12 AM »
If only I had money and space. Sigh.
My problem is distance.

Oh well...

Offline David in MN

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1259
  • Karma: 103
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2016, 10:36:46 AM »
My problem is distance.

Oh well...

I'm guessing to a wood mill as they seem to not be plentiful in the desert. Have you looked at Amazon? Goofy as it sounds I order plywood sheets off Amazon. I don't get to fuss in the store over which is straightest but I get dimensional sheets delivered for free that simply don't fit in my VW. Most of my precious jigs and shop furniture are Amazon plywood.

nkawtg

  • Guest
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2016, 10:41:36 AM »
I'm guessing to a wood mill as they seem to not be plentiful in the desert. Have you looked at Amazon? Goofy as it sounds I order plywood sheets off Amazon. I don't get to fuss in the store over which is straightest but I get dimensional sheets delivered for free that simply don't fit in my VW. Most of my precious jigs and shop furniture are Amazon plywood.
You're right about that!
We have one wood supplier in town and their prices are outrageous.
I've given up on big box stores.
Can you name a supplier or two from Amazon?
And has the plywood you've gotten been reasonably straight?

Offline David in MN

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1259
  • Karma: 103
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2016, 11:32:01 AM »
You're right about that!
We have one wood supplier in town and their prices are outrageous.
I've given up on big box stores.
Can you name a supplier or two from Amazon?
And has the plywood you've gotten been reasonably straight?

I've used several with no problems. Most I get is reasonably straight unless I shell out the big bucks for Baltic Birch or something like that for higher end projects and get the really good stuff.

You might want to look into bulk suppliers. I have a place in town that offers domestic hardwood with free delivery on orders over $1k. But they only deliver to businesses which doesn't bother me as I technically own a small woodworking business. I might not do as much as I like but forming an LLC has benefits like this. And while $1k sounds like a lot it doesn't begin to fill my storage, especially when its split up on different woods.

I'm spoiled and have 2 really good mills near me (in Nordeast Minneapolis) but a mill run still takes half a day. My shop time is  really dear these days and ordering as much as possible is a real lifesaver. The regional hardware stores (Menards, Fleet Farm) are OK but the orange and blue stores are worthless. I also have a Woodcraft and a Rockler within 30 minutes of me but I still end up ordering from Rockler who use a courier to deliver usually within 2 days. Pay $5 to save an hour of driving and God only knows how long wandering the shop? Yes, please.

You'd be surprised once you let go and start ordering how easy it is. There's an old joke with machinists that you're not good until you receive a McMaster Carr Catalog. Well, I already get Uline. I'm working my way up.

Offline alan123

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 154
  • Karma: 4
  • Prepping just makes sense
    • Made by Alan
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2016, 09:45:28 PM »
I was never able to get across to the Home Depot manager that they were storing the plywood wrong by storing it on it's side. It was stored according to shelf schematic so it must be right. You pull it out and put it on the floor- It was so warped you could only build a canoe out of it. Idiots.

nkawtg

  • Guest
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #25 on: June 18, 2016, 07:58:21 AM »
The BORG stores need to stop buying Chinese plywood. Their equivalent of 3/4 inch plywood is warped, delaminates, and has a paper thin outer veneer you can't sand or you'll blow through it.

Offline Bolomark

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 460
  • Karma: 28
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #26 on: June 18, 2016, 11:51:46 AM »
I learned something today  :clap: never knew Amazon sold small pieces of plywood. also  knife scales!
Now if they would only carry a Mr. Fusion reactor.

Offline machinisttx

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 833
  • Karma: 47
  • yay
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #27 on: June 18, 2016, 01:07:48 PM »
I learned something today  :clap: never knew Amazon sold small pieces of plywood. also  knife scales!
Now if they would only carry a Mr. Fusion reactor.

You already have the Delorean to put it on? ;D

Offline Cedar

  • ...just aDD water...
  • TSP Supreme Galactic Ant
  • ************
  • Posts: 28429
  • Karma: 1396
  • Dont wait for the storm to pass, dance in the rain
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #28 on: March 28, 2017, 10:55:44 AM »
TSP Woodworkers!!!!

I need some help and opinions, advice and maybe tell me how to restore these items. Most of SP and my belongings were destroyed, but there are a few I would like to attempt to try to fix before they have to go onto the burning pile.

#1 The Oak dining table and 6 chair set which has been in my family for 4 generations. I would like to be able to pass this on to the next generation after SP. The top two photos are of the table and one of the chairs before they were "injured" to show you what they normally look like. I was quoted $5,800 for restoration from profession furniture guys.. I cannot afford that, so I am turning to you all...

Before destruction:




After destruction: There is blue-green mold on all of the chairs and table. You can see the water stains and the path of the water taken on the chairs. The table top has a slight warp and possible split in it. I will get better pictures of the table, but they were dark, and it currently is in the very back of a storage facility. But you will probably get the idea from the chairs. They do have what I believe to be shellec on them. I know Oak is a pourous hardwood..








#2 Ashford Spinning Wheel. It is not what I consider an antique, but made in around 1980.

Before:


After I got it back:




Joints coming apart. The brake is swollen from water and will not turn or move. The wheel itself did not want to move the last time I had my hands on it, as the wood was that swollen. It has been in a dry spot for the last year after I got it returned. I have no idea what the black drippy goo is. There is white mold, as well as that blue-green mold on it. The driveband missing is no huge deal, I can easily make another one of those, but wheel itself was one of my special presents to myself 20 years ago, and I would like to save it.


Burn or give them a go??

Thanks guys..

Cedar

Offline David in MN

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1259
  • Karma: 103
Re: Woodworking Forum\questions.
« Reply #29 on: March 28, 2017, 01:33:35 PM »
Cracks... I put a vacuum behind the crack and squeez in CA (super glue). Then clamp as best as possible. The vacuum sucks the glue in.

If you have shellac finish, denatured alcohol will remove it. Test on the surface and if it ruins and rubs off you're in business. Shellac is the easiest repair. Strip with alcohol, clean, reshellac. Done. If it doesn't think you might have varnish which is much harder.

I will follow up as I can so keep posting issues.