Author Topic: Tactical Fitness Plan  (Read 10084 times)

Offline PrepperJim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1059
  • Karma: 54
  • Prepping Means Resiliency and Redundancy
Tactical Fitness Plan
« on: February 06, 2016, 12:07:00 PM »
All -

I am trying to improve my "tactical fitness" from a very basic level of couch potato to whatever is above couch potato. I am wondering if there is some sort of fitness plan that the military uses or can be adapted to fit my needs.

Max Velocity sells these plans for $99 to $129. That seems a little pricey and not a good value for my money. But, this looks like something like what I want.

http://home.trainingpeaks.com/products/trainingplans/plans/mvt-improve-your-tactical-fitness-plan-weeks-1-12-beginner?DCI=55&DSC=55

Anyone help?
Member Support Brigade Canceled

Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.


Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Offline ncjeeper

  • Most Noble Order of the Garter Snake
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4616
  • Karma: 124
  • Oooops!
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2016, 12:35:13 PM »
I would start with an entry level crossfit program. Any places close by you where you could sign up for a months worth of classes?
The early bird gets the worm.....But the second mouse gets the cheese.

Offline theBINKYhunter

  • Does not fall well with plastic guns...
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 5890
  • Karma: 181
  • Not a tactical baddass
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2016, 12:42:34 PM »
My advice is to drop the 'tactical' from fitness and just focus on fitness. When I hear tactical fitness I think running round with a full rucksack, body armor, and a rifle. Unless you're in the military or we're in TEOTWAWKI I think there's little place for using that term.

I see a ton of other plans on this site for a lot less that $100 and you can get all kinds of 'couch to 5k' programs for free. I would suggest looking at a cheaper or free alternative to start. The other thing that stands out to me with the particular program you linked is the time commitment for each workout. Going from nothing to 1 hour a day and more on the weekends is going to be a huge change and a very hard transition. I'm not saying you can't do it, but I do think there might be better ways to get to that level.

Years ago I bought P90x thinking I would get ripped. Not even three weeks in I quit because I didn't have the time for a 60-90 minute workout because my lifestyle didn't allow it. My wife and I have both gotten serious about our health and fitness and have been working at it since Nov/Dec last year. She recently bought a different workout program that I've been doing with her. It's workouts are 15-25 minutes (so far) and are much easier to fit into our lives.

I'd strongly suggest some workout programs that ease you into things and then take a look at some high intensity interval training and/or strength training depending on what you want. There have been some studies that show HIIT training to be just as if not more effective that steady state cardio.


Offline fritz_monroe

  • The Defenestrator
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 7783
  • Karma: 140
    • The Homestead Fritz
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2016, 01:24:06 PM »
If you want to get running, I'm a big fan of the Couch to 5k programs.  It gets you up to 5k distance in aobut 8 weeks.  Follow the plan and it works.  It is also flexible enough to work with you if you are more advanced or less advanced.

I don't like the "typical" workouts.  I've always been one that wants something a little different.  So I decided I wanted to do kettlebells.  I bought adjustable kettlebells for about $35 and an extra 5# plate for another $5.  There are several workouts floating around online for free.  But I ended up getting the Skogg Kettlebell workout to start.  It's really good to start with and will last a long time.  But it's only 4 exercises worked into several different workouts.  So I got tired of it.  That led me to the RKS program.  I have been doing that one for a couple of months.  It's really good.

I wanted a to broaden my workouts, so I picked up P90x3.  I don't do all of them because I don't like pull ups and push ups.  But there's 4 or 5 that I rotate into my workouts.  I also take these with me when I travel so I can workout in my hotel.

Years ago I bought P90x thinking I would get ripped. Not even three weeks in I quit because I didn't have the time for a 60-90 minute workout because my lifestyle didn't allow it. My wife and I have both gotten serious about our health and fitness and have been working at it since Nov/Dec last year. She recently bought a different workout program that I've been doing with her. It's workouts are 15-25 minutes (so far) and are much easier to fit into our lives.
This is a huge issue for most people, just don't have the time.  That's why Tony Horton re-did it and came out with P90x3.  Each workout is about 30 minutes. 
F_M
Links currently broken. Will fix them shortly
Check out my blogs at The Homestead Fritz and Camping With Fritz

Offline PrepperJim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1059
  • Karma: 54
  • Prepping Means Resiliency and Redundancy
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2016, 06:29:56 PM »
My advice is to drop the 'tactical' from fitness and just focus on fitness. When I hear tactical fitness I think running round with a full rucksack, body armor, and a rifle. Unless you're in the military or we're in TEOTWAWKI I think there's little place for using that term.

I guess I should have more clearly stated my goals and why I wanted some sort of military approach.

If things really go south, I think some sort of practical fitness will be incredibly necessary. By practical, I mean walking distances carrying loads (20-40 lbs) and being prepared to utilize firearms including a rifle. Guns and ammo are heavy as is water. I live in a subtropical climate so water will always be key to survival.

Additionally, should something happen during the workday that prevents car transport, I need the ability to walk to my son's daycare center and then get him home. It is about 5 miles to the daycare and 5 miles home. I can imagine carrying enough water, pistol, ammo, and other supplies that will end up being approximately 30 - 35 lbs. If it is hot, then I'll have to carry more water. Then, I may end up carrying him for some distance since he is small (I have an improvised means of transporting him without carrying him.  I can put my pack on that until it is time to convey him.)

One day, there was some localized flooding and all car routes were cut off between the daycare center and him house. I got within a mile of my house and pulled off into a parking lot.  It was still raining so I put on my rain gear, got the umbrella out and we "walked home" which was a combination of walking and me carrying him. I left my computer bag and get home bag in my car since we were so close. By the time we got home, I was very tired from carrying him. At the time, I cannot imagine walking 2, 3 or 4 miles in those conditions. Since then, I added the improvised means of conveying him if necessary so I would not have to carry him. 

So this is my reason for wanting to train the way soldiers train and getting that level of functional, tactical fitness.

Right now, I would be hard pressed to hoof it 5 miles in any sort of acceptable time frame carrying 20 lbs.  If I pushed hard, I could probably do it in 80 minutes in the best of conditions. What if it is 100F or raining, or both? Another consideration is that my fitness level right now is couch potato or a smidge above. I am also in my mid 40's and overweight so something that starts slow and builds up is probably best for me. I also do not belong to a gym and all the equipment I have is an elliptical machine.

I guess I can merge carrying a backpack and doing pushups, situps and other strength exercises to get to where I want to be. Maybe I will create my own program. ;-)


 
Member Support Brigade Canceled

Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.


Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Offline r_w

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1265
  • Karma: 35
  • On my way
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2016, 06:45:45 PM »
How much extra are you carrying in your spare tire?

I dropped 50-60 lbs.  I can carry a pretty heavy pack and still be lighter than I was two years ago. 

Offline theBINKYhunter

  • Does not fall well with plastic guns...
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 5890
  • Karma: 181
  • Not a tactical baddass
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2016, 08:26:27 PM »
Jim, I get what you are saying and I don't mean to sound disrespectful at all. What you are describing sounds to me like being generally fit. My point with dropping the 'tactical' part was aimed at the marketing of that program. I think you could do a letter better for a lot less. Also since you're entirely out of shape doing something that ramps you up is what you need, and that may take months. I can't see someone in your condition (based on your description) becoming 'soldier fit' in 12 weeks.

Getting into shape is like getting out of debt. People generally get into debt over the years and it takes years to get out of. Being lazy and becoming overweight can take a long time and you're not going to get in shape in a short time. It's going to take months and possibly even years depending on how motivated you are. The biggest thing that I would stress is to go slow and take your time so you don't injure yourself.


Offline PrepperJim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1059
  • Karma: 54
  • Prepping Means Resiliency and Redundancy
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2016, 07:18:40 AM »
How much extra are you carrying in your spare tire?

I dropped 50-60 lbs.  I can carry a pretty heavy pack and still be lighter than I was two years ago.

If I am being honest, I could drop another 30 lbs of fat and still be overweight. I've already lost 10 lbs so yeah, trading the fat for pack would be doable.
Member Support Brigade Canceled

Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.


Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Offline fritz_monroe

  • The Defenestrator
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 7783
  • Karma: 140
    • The Homestead Fritz
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2016, 10:09:44 AM »
If I am being honest, I could drop another 30 lbs of fat and still be overweight. I've already lost 10 lbs so yeah, trading the fat for pack would be doable.
Keep in mind, weight is NOT lost in the gym.  You lose weight in the kitchen.

Run a 5k and you are down about 300 calories.  If you have a protein bar and a Gatorade after the run, you probably just consumed more than you burned.  Yes, exercise can help you lose weight

I lost about 30 pounds just about a year ago.  In the past I did the weight watchers online thing.  It wasn't for me.  But I started using a scale to ensure that I'm actually eating a serving.  I also use an app to track what I'm eating(myfitnesspal).  It works wonderful for me since I am not limited in what I consume.  If I want to eat a bucket of lard, I can as long as I track it.
F_M
Links currently broken. Will fix them shortly
Check out my blogs at The Homestead Fritz and Camping With Fritz

Offline PrepperJim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1059
  • Karma: 54
  • Prepping Means Resiliency and Redundancy
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2016, 08:00:34 AM »
Keep in mind, weight is NOT lost in the gym.  You lose weight in the kitchen.

 I also use an app to track what I'm eating(myfitnesspal).  It works wonderful for me since I am not limited in what I consume.  If I want to eat a bucket of lard, I can as long as I track it.

This is 100% correct. I am also tracking my calories by myfitnesspal and have that connected to my fitbit. They are pretty good tools. One thing I do is before I put food in my mouth, I see what the "cost" is (ie calories) and where I stand for the day. I target a deficit of 750 to 1000 calories a day. I don't always make it (Superbowl Sunday was a tough one, but I could have eaten more). I put in some extra time on the eliptical machine so I could have a few extra beers and watch my Broncos win the Superbowl! It was worth the cost.  :D

Member Support Brigade Canceled

Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.


Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Offline theBINKYhunter

  • Does not fall well with plastic guns...
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 5890
  • Karma: 181
  • Not a tactical baddass
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2016, 08:41:38 AM »
Fritz is spot on with a scale. We started using a scale to measure portions and I was amazed at what the correct portion size was with most of the foods that we ate. Some were smaller and some were bigger, but what I learned is that what I thought was the correct portion amount was in fact not the correct amount.


Offline r_w

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1265
  • Karma: 35
  • On my way
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2016, 09:02:06 AM »
Ok, sorry in advance for the soapbox tangent...

Typical American diet is calorie rich and nutrition poor.  Worse is that it is sugar loaded, which feeds bad gut bacteria and fungus--causing nutrient malabsorption, leaky gut, etc. Downward spiral! Antibiotics make this worse, as they kill all the gut microbiome and, just like spraying your yard, it is the bad stuff that grows back faster.

If you kill the bad stuff (by cutting sugar and adding the right supplements) and simultaneously jumpstart and feed the good stuff (probiotics and prebiotics), you will have a much easier time.  The difference between fat people and skinny people isn't in their own genetics, it is in the microbiome of their gut. 


Offline Chemsoldier

  • Pot Stirrer
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 5226
  • Karma: 507
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2016, 11:58:02 AM »
There are a lot of ways that one could go with this.  One place to start would be basic calisthenic style fitness. This is all predicated on the idea that you are already doing cardio and ab work.


For instance, three basic movements are pushes, pulls and squating.  For pushes you can start with push-ups, pulls could be pull-ups/chin-ups (in an ideal world, if you are not there you can do other variations) and for squating just start with body weight squats.

Start doing sets of them three times a week with ascending numbers of reps per week or session.  Throw in some abs.

MON: 3 sets of- 10 Push-ups, 10 body pulls (using TRX system), 20 body weight squats  (30,30 and 60)
WED: 3 sets of- 11 Push-ups, 11 body pulls (using TRX system), 22 body weight squats  (33,33 and 66)
FRI: 3 sets of- 12 Push-ups, 12 body pulls (using TRX system), 25 body weight squats  (36,33 and 75)

MON: 3 sets of- 15 Push-ups, 15 body pulls (using TRX system), 27 body weight squats  (45,45 and 60)
Etc

If you get stuck, do a few sessions with the same rep structure before you step up, or hit the protein a little harder after the work out.  The goal is to help increase your muscle tone and mobility even if this does not cause you to lose weight.  This is also supposing you are doing some cardio along with it.

There are a million other exercises, progression methods, etc that can be done. This type of approach is just one that is not terribly equipment intensive and I am familiar with from the military.

Once you are used to the air squats, if you want a kick in the junk on the last work out day of the week you can always try "Sally Ups."  Its pain...with music!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CswK7e_Bep8

In the same vein, there is always "Roxanne."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39NVwBpcSKg
 
A decent push-up progression program can be found here:
http://hundredpushups.com/test.html
You can ignore all the stuff where it is trying to sell you stuff.  Just concentrate on the training method.
"You can always count on Americans to do the right thing, after they've tried everything else"
-Winston Churchill

"You think health care is expensive now? Wait until its free!"
-P.J. O'Rourke

"Is it dangerous to enter the Forum?"
-Seneca

Offline fritz_monroe

  • The Defenestrator
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 7783
  • Karma: 140
    • The Homestead Fritz
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2016, 06:01:24 PM »
They are pretty good tools. One thing I do is before I put food in my mouth, I see what the "cost" is (ie calories) and where I stand for the day. I target a deficit of 750 to 1000 calories a day. I don't always make it (Superbowl Sunday was a tough one, but I could have eaten more).
Great to have the tools available.  I set it up saying that I wanted to "lose 2 pounds a week"  It didn't make me lose that amount, but did give me a good calorie goal.  I also knew that I needed to stay "around" that goal.  If I was over by 100-200 calories, I was still good.  It got rid of the stress.

Fritz is spot on with a scale. We started using a scale to measure portions and I was amazed at what the correct portion size was with most of the foods that we ate. Some were smaller and some were bigger, but what I learned is that what I thought was the correct portion amount was in fact not the correct amount.
Isn't it incredible how much is 5 ounces of grilled chicken?  I was WAY off on what a serving of almost everything.
F_M
Links currently broken. Will fix them shortly
Check out my blogs at The Homestead Fritz and Camping With Fritz

Online David in MN

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 680
  • Karma: 63
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2016, 06:13:47 AM »
Couple of things...

All diets work. If you select a diet it will make you think about food choices. Merely being conscious of food choices will have an effect.

As far as choosing a new workout, I'm kinda on board with Chem. The old wrestlers used to "warm up" with hundreds of body weight squats, pushups, and pullups. Not the easiest of tasks. My opinion for a purchase would be a kettlebell and a jump rope. Those two will push you.
Livin on a thin line, tell me now what are we supposed to do?

Offline PrepperJim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1059
  • Karma: 54
  • Prepping Means Resiliency and Redundancy
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2016, 06:24:41 PM »
Thanks everyone for the good comments.

I am still nursing a torn calf muscle that keeps tightening on me when I walk more than a mile, even slowly. I feel like I need to take a complete week off of no workouts and then try again. *sigh*

It is hell growing old.
Member Support Brigade Canceled

Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.


Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Offline RitaRose1945

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 5609
  • Karma: 403
  • Asking the uncomfortable questions since 1964
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2016, 06:46:23 PM »
Agreeing with some of the others.  Bodies are built in the kitchen and refined in the gym.


There's a great video on YouTube that shows one man eating a pizza and a soda while the guy next to him runs on the treadmill.  Each calls out the number of calories consumed or burned.  Pizza Guy calls out "300!" while Treadmill Guy gasps "75!"  And he's running WAY faster than most of us ever would.


Having said that, weight lifting (as well as body weight exercises like squats, pushups and pullups) increase muscle mass, and that makes your body burn more calories while at rest.  The effect of cardio is basically while you're doing it and tapers off very quickly.  Lifting burns for most of the day.

Offline artephius

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 147
  • Karma: 4
  • Recovering forum lurker..
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2016, 08:55:02 AM »
One thing I used to do before I hurt my shoulder that was kind of fun was load up my ruck with 60-70lbs of random crap, and set the incline on my $10 garage sale treadmill and "hike" for a while. I was thinking along the same lines as you.. what if I need to do this...

This way you don't have to look like a tactical dork hiking around your neighborhood!

Of course if you access to wilderness, going for some day hikes would probably be preferable. I think hiking is a great way to get in shape, at least legs and cardio anyway.

Offline theBINKYhunter

  • Does not fall well with plastic guns...
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 5890
  • Karma: 181
  • Not a tactical baddass
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2016, 09:03:38 PM »
Jim if you're still hurting consider 'active rest'. It's doing something active that isn't normally in your workout routine. Lots of football players will spend time in the pool for a day of active rest... it's not their normal workout but they're still doing something.

If your calf is prohibiting you from working out then I would strongly suggest you take it easy and learn a lesson from this. Don't overextend yourself. You said yourself it's been a long time. Take your time getting back into this and don't overdo it. A pool might be a great way for you to get some good workouts in without all of the stress that walking/hiking places on your body. I've done some water aerobics classes and some of them are tough. Sweating in water sucks but it's a great way to workout.


Offline surfivor

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 5842
  • Karma: 72
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2016, 11:32:54 PM »
 Jim,

I see from your profile that you are in Houston. I have researched that area a bit because I have considered spending time down south someday assuming I make it to retirement. I happen to know that Texas has some good surf and you are close to Galveston and other places. That is one reason why I would consider Texas to spend time in retirement - because there is surf

 Surfing is hands down the best sport in the world and way more fun than any of the other lame sports out there with coaches treating you like you are in boot camp or screwing up your knees running. I don't care what anyone says, they can go ahead and do whatever they want, I am headed for the beach with my board as soon as the temps around here get into the 50's. Exercise should be fun, and all that stuff at the gym sounds pretty monotonous to me .. Once you learn to surf, you can then head to better breaks in Mexico or Central America. Surfers have a word for what surf makes you feel like: "Stoked" .. Other sports don't have that ..
Surfing is great exercise and the salt water is good for you .. You may still need to do some other types of warm ups .. My neck or shoulders sometimes get stiff from all the paddling and I have to do kung fu or thai chi exercises to work out the stiffness ..

 Also SUP (stand up paddleboarding), a type of surf board .. is the fastest growing sport in the world. Those things tend to be harder to turn on a wave though


This is a picture of surf in Galveston. It is not hard to learn to surf, it just takes some time and you don't need to be a super athlete or anything .. If you are older, you may want a longboard .. I like longboards in general .. I never a rode shortboard



http://www.wannasurf.com/spot/North_America/USA/Gulf_Coast/Texas/galveston/photo/index.html?wdaction=lib.WDPagePhoto.show&file_id=76973



http://magicseaweed.com/Texas-Surfing/272/

http://surfingintexas.com/texas-surf/surf-in-texas-north-texas-gulf-coast/surfside-2/

« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 11:45:23 PM by surfivor »

Offline surfivor

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 5842
  • Karma: 72
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2016, 07:28:26 AM »






Port Aranasas:



Offline PrepperJim

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1059
  • Karma: 54
  • Prepping Means Resiliency and Redundancy
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2016, 07:02:44 PM »
Jim,

I see from your profile that you are in Houston. I have researched that area a bit because I have considered spending time down south someday assuming I make it to retirement. I happen to know that Texas has some good surf and you are close to Galveston and other places. That is one reason why I would consider Texas to spend time in retirement - because there is surf

The last place that I would retire is this area. Galveston water is dirty brown and the beaches are not that great. You might consider someplace like Alabama which is much nicer.

Plus, when the SHTF, Houston will be unpleasant.
Member Support Brigade Canceled

Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.


Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Offline surfivor

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 5842
  • Karma: 72
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #22 on: April 01, 2016, 01:58:14 PM »
The last place that I would retire is this area. Galveston water is dirty brown and the beaches are not that great. You might consider someplace like Alabama which is much nicer.

Plus, when the SHTF, Houston will be unpleasant.

 I was not necessarily planning to retire there permanently, it's just a place I could spend time. What about further south towards Port Aransas ? What is making the water brown or how bad is it ?

 yahoo answers indicates the water is shallow and there is mud from the river or some pollution. If  you go down the coast a little ways maybe it's not as bad .. Texas may get good swell exposure for gulf storms and hurricanes

 Whether or not there is a beach doesn't matter neccessarily. I surf rocky points sometimes where there is no sand 
« Last Edit: April 01, 2016, 02:27:35 PM by surfivor »

Offline surfivor

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 5842
  • Karma: 72
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2016, 06:23:53 AM »
The surf in Alabama is not that good which I checked online sources to make sure they agree .. better waves are formed by having a long fetch or distance to travel. Some of the swell from Hurricanes in the Caribbean and Atlantic can make it to Texas, but Florida would block much of what can make it to Alabama. If the source of the waves is too close, you get more of a wind swell which is short period and not as desirable .. 

Offline Zed

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #24 on: June 29, 2016, 07:52:16 PM »
Amazon Kindle has a book I purchased called Tactical Barbell, 2nd Edition, by K. Black... apparently written by ex-SF and FBI Tactical member.  There is also a Tactical Barbell - Conditioning book I grabbed as well.  Information seems pretty solid from my experience.  Here are the links;

https://www.amazon.com/Tactical-Barbell-Definitive-Strength-Operational-ebook/dp/B01G195QU2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1467251230&sr=8-1&keywords=tactical+barbell

https://www.amazon.com/Tactical-Barbell-II-Conditioning-Black-ebook/dp/B0143HDCWS/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1467251230&sr=8-2&keywords=tactical+barbell

Offline shadowalker_returns

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 275
  • Karma: 15
  • MSB Member
Re: Tactical Fitness Plan
« Reply #25 on: November 28, 2016, 08:21:52 PM »
One thing I've learned during my recovery is that "Fitness Plans" are bullshit. Start with Fitness Goals. What do you want to accomplish. Be specific as you can. Then you can develop plans and milestones to get you where you want to be. If your current level of Fitness is "Pure Couch Potato" then start with a simple goal. Something like walk one mile in thirty minutes or lift and carry 30 pounds for 500 yards. As you reach each goal you can set new goals. By choosing what you want to accomplish you can find a hundred different training regimes to help you attain that goal. I found out there is nothing like having a major medical event that takes away all the things you took for granted. That leaves you unable to do what you could once easily do and forces you to prioritize you health and Fitness goals... Like "today going to put my pants on by myself"  :) Or "lets see if I can pee standing up again"  :-\ or any of the things I once took for granted... It took me almost a year to get back to some semblance of Fitness. I did it by setting goals and developing a plan to attain each goal. As my health and fitness improved I evolved my plans to encompass and build upon the improvements. For me this worked far better and more quickly than utilizing the one-size-fits-all approach of someone's pre-developed plan. If you have no idea where to start then its worth investing in some professional assistance. The less fit you are the more important it is to get some assistance from someone who understands your fitness goals and has a proved record of helping people like you reach their goals. We spend hundreds and thousands over the years getting our gear, supplies and knowledge together for harsh times but damn near nothing on ourselves. You are the most important part of your Preps. Spend some money on you.

Regards,
Shadowalker

PS: If you really want a "Tactical Fitness Plan" You can get one for free. Just download the Army or Marine Corps Physical Readiness tests and/or training programs. Its free and they work.

Marines:
[urlhttp://www.marines.mil/Portals/59/Publications/MCO%206100.13%20W_CH%201.pdf][/url]
http://www.marines.com/becoming-a-marine/how-to-prepare/cft

Army:
http://www.military.com/military-fitness/army-fitness-requirements/tradoc-revises-army-physical-fitness-test
Want proof that the worst Disasters all begin with man: Godzilla = 28, Tokyo = 0