The Survival Podcast Forum

Finance and Economics => The Money Board => Topic started by: dep190 on December 23, 2009, 03:08:29 PM

Title: Financial scams (online, phone, mail, etc)
Post by: dep190 on December 23, 2009, 03:08:29 PM
Scam Artists Strike In Summit

Con artists are stretching their schemes to all ages in a slew of recent scams. Within the last 45 days, the Summit County Office of Consumer Affairs has received numerous reports of fake checks being sent in the mail.




(please click link for full article - post was edited by Alpha Mike, in accordance with DMCA rules and regulations)

http://www.akronnewsnow.com/news/itemdetail.asp?ID=36690&section=news&subsection=localnews (http://www.akronnewsnow.com/news/itemdetail.asp?ID=36690&section=news&subsection=localnews)






Title: Credit card phone scam - beware!
Post by: mash on February 21, 2010, 09:45:48 PM
This is a scam that is going on is Australia right now, but it could happen to anybody anywhere.... Of course if you have eliminated credit cards from your life it's not an issue right?  ;)


This one is pretty slick since they provide YOU with all the information, except the one piece they want.

Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it... This information is worth reading. By understanding how the VISA & Master Card Telephone Credit Card Scam works, you'll be better prepared to protect yourself.

One of our employees was called on Wednesday from 'VISA', and I was called on Thursday from 'Master Card'.. The scam works like this: Caller: 'This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My Badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for $497.99 from a Marketing company based in ?'

When you say 'No', the caller continues with, 'Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from $297 to $497, just under the $500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?'

You say 'yes'. The caller continues - 'I will be starting a Fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 1- 800 number listed on the back of your card and ask for Security.'

You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. 'Do you need me to read it again?'

Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works.


The caller then says, 'I need to verify you are in possession of your card'. He'll ask you to 'turn your card over and look for some numbers'. There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security Numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, 'That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?' After you say No, the caller then thanks you and states, 'Don't hesitate to call back if you do, and hangs up.
 
You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number.. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question.. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of $497..99 was charged to our card.

Long story - short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card, don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or Master card directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a 'Jason Richardson of Master Card' with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this Scam is happening.

Please pass this on to all your family, friends and neighbors. By informing each other, we protect each other.  
Title: Re: Credit card phone scam - beware!
Post by: luke on March 08, 2010, 11:15:22 AM
I've received calls from my credit card companies in the past offering me more services or a deal to pay down my balance. Every time, I don't give them any information and tell them that I will call them back at the number listed on my card. I think they've all been legit calls, but you never know.
Title: Re: Credit card phone scam - beware!
Post by: ColdHaven on March 08, 2010, 11:24:45 AM
I don't keep credit cards. Hopefully I will never use one for the rest of my life.  Good info though. +1
Title: Re: Credit card phone scam - beware!
Post by: Chris70 on March 08, 2010, 11:35:29 AM
Mash Thank you!
Title: Re: Credit card phone scam - beware!
Post by: luke on March 09, 2010, 06:16:25 PM
I don't keep credit cards. Hopefully I will never use one for the rest of my life.  Good info though. +1

I'm in the process of getting rid of them, but I've noticed that even with cards that have been canceled for years, I am still getting emails about them, even after I asked them to delete my account. Will it never end?!
Title: heads up
Post by: womule on April 21, 2010, 01:53:43 PM
We need this thread so we can give each other a heads-up about scams.

I just received a call from 973-735-5438. Its clearly a scam. The first time they called I didn't answer because I don't know the number. They didn't leave a message so I returned the call. No one answered but a pre-recorded message from verizon wireless explaining that "this number is invalid or no longer in service".

I googled the number and found out that others had the same experience.

1 hour later I get a call from the same number, a indian man answered the phone explaining that I won a vacation and needs my info.

Obviously a scam, you all don't really need warning about this one in particular but I think we should post scams to warn others.

Again the number is 973-735-5438
Title: Scam of the week
Post by: dep190 on June 23, 2010, 11:03:31 AM
http://www.cleveland.com/consumeraffairs/index.ssf/2010/06/lakewood_police_round_up_illeg.html (http://www.cleveland.com/consumeraffairs/index.ssf/2010/06/lakewood_police_round_up_illeg.html)

The "grandma" telephone scam continues to make the rounds. That's the one where con artists target older women and men and pretend to be a grandchild in trouble. their Social Security or bank account information to anyone who contacts them about the checks.

Of course, the department could help consumers enormously by not using people's Social Security numbers in their Medicare account number. Just a thought


Edited in accordance with DMCA rules and regulations by OKG
Title: Re: Scam of the week
Post by: SnugInMyPod on June 23, 2010, 12:20:06 PM
Dep190,

You mean there's just one a week?  That would be manageable if that were the case.

 ;D  ;)

Quote
Of course, the department could help consumers enormously by not using people's Social Security numbers in their Medicare account number. Just a thought

I'm with you and I've said it for years.  If people want to stop identity theft, simply stop using the Soc. Security Number as a universal identifier.  I mean, it's not like businesses and government agencies can't generate new numbers for their data bases. 

IIRC, It's actually supposed to be illegal even under the Soc. Security Act for anyone to use the Number for any purpose other than witholding and drawing Soc. Security.  But then again, illegal immigration is supposed to be illegal too...

 :)


Title: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: JerseyVince on October 02, 2010, 03:27:27 PM
I just got off the phone with Citibank's fraud dept, luckily I keep close tabs on my credit cards. They called me about a $1.00 charge that went through fri morn from the "SOE" corp which I didn't make and wanted me to dispute it, then informed me of a charge from South Africa this morning for $1350 which the Computers caught and flagged as fraudulent because neither have the card verification number entered and they figured it wasnt me charging in person. They informed me this was a card number that was just generated at random and have a large block of card numbers that are being scammed. Be on the lookout for a $1 charge first from the SOE corp for music then the biggie hits later on your bills. even if your guys don't use them much or at all, it's all the more reason to watch your bills for these dirtbags.

New card coming monday and new passwords just in case
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: DeltaEchoVictor on October 02, 2010, 04:39:44 PM
Thanks for the heads-up Vince.  ;)

Stickied...
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: PAGUY on October 22, 2010, 07:32:37 AM
Thanks for the heads up about this. 
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: grizzman on November 10, 2010, 01:31:29 PM
Sounds like another great reason to pay the cards off and cut them up. Thanks for taking the time to share the heads up!
Title: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
Post by: Mr. Bill on January 20, 2011, 09:19:00 AM
A new telephone scam (http://spokane.bbb.org/article/new-phone-scam-twist-reflects-2011-buzz-headliner-wikileaks-24851), courtesy of the Better Business Bureau:

Quote
...A caller reported she received an automated phone call telling her that her computer and IP address had been noted as having visited the Wikileaks site, and that there were grave consequences for this, including a $250,000 or $25,000 fine, perhaps imprisonment. It left an option for leaving a message as to how she was going to handle this and the fine payment. She figured it was a scam, and did nothing but hang up. ...

The article notes that phone scams like this generally use VOIP (Internet) phones, and the caller-ID number is fake and therefore useless in tracking down the scammer.
Title: Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
Post by: endurance on January 20, 2011, 09:59:11 AM
The worst part of that is the VOIP caller ID part.  How would you like it if someone used your phone number as the source of the calls to hundreds of people?  You'd have every local, state and fed knocking on your door to question you. 
Title: Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on January 20, 2011, 11:43:00 AM
This is something I have talked about since the government "solved" the telemarketing problem with its stupid "Do Not Call List".
The people most likely to be fooled by scam phone calls are the people that assume that since they put their number in the Do Not Call registry they are somehow protected from scam calls or that there are no more scam telemarketers.
The scam artists don't care about the list or the law. They are thieves.
I'm not saying not to use the Do Not Call list. My number is on it. Just don't assume you won't be called by a scam artist.
Title: Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
Post by: sludgy_nixer on January 22, 2011, 01:19:30 PM
"It left an option for leaving a message as to how she was going to handle this and the fine payment."

a) i'm making wikileaks my new homepage
b) i'm sending you 250 pennies you can shove up your xxx
Title: Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
Post by: Nicodemus on January 22, 2011, 03:36:41 PM
I'm not usually one to dabble in conspiracy theories... OK, that's a total lie, I look at that stuff all the time...  :D

Anyway, the gub'ment could whip up a scam like this for nothing more than an attempt to keep just a few more people from reading wikileaks.

"You know I would like to read that wikileaks, but I hear you can get fined for doing so."

Eh... Probably not.

It struck me as somewhat similar to a couple of suspiciously similar op-ed pieces that were floated not so long ago which eluded to the idea that someone reading and visiting a site that disclosed government secrets, such as wikileaks, was committing the actual crime of treason.
Title: Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
Post by: SnugInMyPod on January 22, 2011, 06:39:02 PM
Fellow Survivalists,

Five seconds of thought (or less) will tell any thinking person that this pure BS.

I mean, how do the TV, radio, print, and blogosphere outlets find out about Wikileaks if not by browsing the Site?

Even if it was a crime, they'd still have to present you with search and arrest warrants, set bail, indict you before a grand jury, convict you before a judge and jury of peers, and the ruling would have to survive the appeals process.  Hell, I'm not a "Patriot Movement" habitue of the court system and I knew all that!  WTF does this scam artist take us for?

???

This scam artist probably also scans curbsides for old matresses without tags.  If I got a call from an operation like that, I'd leave a message counter-charging the proprietor with owing unassumed debts and order him and unto his third generation to report to the nearest debtor's prison.

;D ;)

Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: PistolWhipped on May 02, 2011, 08:47:44 AM
Odd.  Thanks for the heads up. 

I had something similar happen last week.  It was 2 charges for exactly $13 for Radio Shack exactly 24 hours apart, and then 2 more charges, one for flowers and one for an escort service.

Apparently someone wanted to feel  like a politician, and buy hookers on my dime.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: Thox Spuddy on May 22, 2011, 09:05:23 PM
Thanks for the heads up. My credit card issuer allows me to place an alert for a charge over any amount that I set. Once we made a charge across the country for a reservation via phone and got a call from the credit card issuer asking if we made it.

Scams over credit/debit cards will get more sly, as "skimmers" are now showing up.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: mobilus on June 07, 2011, 08:38:02 PM
Can they do the same with debit cards? 

Seems reasonable that they could, but maybe they see a greater opportunity to increase someone's debt without them noticing as much as if the funds in a bank account were diminished. 
Title: Lottery/Sweepstakes phone scam with NV phone #
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on June 27, 2011, 01:04:42 PM
I received two calls today from these scammers.

The Number Displayed ~ 1-702-765-4362
The caller asked for me by name, says the name of the fake company in Las Vagas that he works for, and claims I have won $2,000,000. He only needs to verify some personal details then he can transfer it right into my bank account right now.
He then reads some basic info that is all available in public records.


It appears this scam has been going on for at least two years now using the same number. Since the displayed number in a Caller-ID can be tricked into displaying anything you want, the number above is likely fake.
Be advised, police forces know about this scam but local police don't have the authority or the resources to go after these scum.
The FCC created a National Do Not Call data base and set up a weak system of investigation and prosecution some years back, but they work on the assumption that scam artists will volunteer to obey the Do Not Call list, will display their real calling number, and will stay in the same location using the same scam for long periods of time while the FCC investigates. Guess what, the FCC can't seem to catch the bad guys.

No real mechanism of stopping phone scammers exists except you and your watchful eye. When anyone calls me, if I don't know them I assume they are calling to rip me off.
Guard yourself and those you care about.

These same cautions should be used when answering the door.
One door to door scam involves a younger looking man or woman who comes to your door under any number of excuses, and tries to figure out if your house is a good target for a home invasion. All they want to do is talk to you, do a survey, buy a candy bar to help them through collage, etc., but their real goal is to collect info on weaker targets so they know which houses to target with a forced entry.

Be aware and stay safe.
Title: Re: Lottery/Sweepstakes phone scam with NV phone #
Post by: JerseyVince on June 27, 2011, 01:35:46 PM
contact these guys  www.ic3.gov maybe they need the eye-searing spotlight of the FBI on them for a while
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: thorquest on February 07, 2012, 05:11:05 PM
Sounds like another great reason to pay the cards off and cut them up. Thanks for taking the time to share the heads up!

Absolutely, and if you have shop on-line, they say a credit card is better to use than a debt card because it's easier to get your money back.   Fraud is on the rise everywhere in fact I'm getting a little nervous because it's been almost 3 weeks since I filed my taxes and no refund yet.  They just said on the local news that my town is a hotbed of tax fraud.  They're getting most of the SSNs from the health care industry of which I'm not a part.  I purchased Identity theft insurance through my bank but that might be a scam too.  Lastly some company just sent my kid an 'internship" offer asking for $3,000 for a 4 day trip to Washington.  In the envelope, they had her name and student ID which I find disturbing an it has me wondering about the legality of releasing student info to outsiders.   
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: chickchoc on February 07, 2012, 08:53:06 PM
My Visa card was recently hacked and I simply cancelled that account and opened another with better security.  In addition, credit cards are not the only things:  my Hotmail email was hijacked and it's caused all kinds of headaches since my entire address book was stolen and then erased from the account.  I have since learned that Hotmail has been subject to many hacking incidents since at least 2009, but of course no warning was given to customers. 

Regarding buying things online, I am very cautious about using my credit card at all.  I prefer to use PayPal so my number is not going over the internet at all.  In fact, I keep no balance in my PayPal account, but it is linked to my checking account.  So far, I've had no problems...  (crossed fingers)
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: thorquest on February 10, 2012, 07:20:39 AM
And no sooner did I get done reading this when a brand new story popped up on twitter.   I hate to post links to other sites when something might be sensationalized but this one seems important.  It's about new attacks at restaurants where a virus is steeling debit card information originating out of remaining.  Don't be alarmed informed.  Who knows if this is all fact or sensationalized but I'm using identity theft insurance, and paying only with cash or pre paid credit cards where possible.  Also if you cant afford a paper shredder, soak the paper in water for a few days and it will dissolve into paste.  Thats what the NSA does allegedly.

Here's the link or you can search for your self:


http://www2.tbo.com/news/breaking-news/2012/feb/10/cyber-war-continuing-at-local-restaurants-ar-357191/
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: FrugalFannie on February 10, 2012, 07:49:22 AM
In another thread I asked if a bank account was really necessary.

About 10 days ago our bank account got breached. I saw the charge 'pending'  (hundreds of dollars)and called the bank it was not ours. They said they couldn't stop it. It would have to go through then I could dispute it and once it was resolved (if in my favor) I would get my money back. How long? They can't tell you that! I decided right then and there I wasn't just closing my account but finding another bank! And you cannot close the account while anything is pending.

Big worry was that 2 days later my husband's paycheck was due to be direct deposited. His company said there was no way they could cancel the DD on such short notice and get him a live check. So we crossed our fingers and I showed up first thing on payday. Again, they wouldn't let me close the account because the deposit hadn't 'physically cleared.' (don't get me started on that stupid answer) So I withdrew all the money (on a Friday) and closed it as soon as I could after that but I couldn't get there until Tuesday. I actually left $90 in it which was good because I had my electric bill  scheduled to come out on Monday. As it turns out Tuesday was the earliest I could close it 'according to their rules' and nothing else was withdrawn from our account.

Sunday night I see a charge on the credit card my husband uses only for business travel. As soon as it clears on Monday morning I call the cc company, dispute the charge, and close the account. New cc in the mail the next day. Not responsible for the bogus charge.

So all this makes me wonder if the risk is worth having these types of accounts. After buying a couple of money orders to pay bills that were due after I closed the bank account, but before I could get a new account set up, I decided to find a fee- free checking account only so we could atleast pay our bills.  Went to a credit union, opened a checking account and had to open a savings account (don't have to keep any money in it). So the plan going forward is to have my husband cash his live check from now on during his lunch break. Deposit what we need to cover checks for that 2 week period and keep the rest in cash. I will do the same with my check. We got a debit card only to be able to make deposits of cash to cover checks. We will no longer use it for POS. Going back to writing checks and mailing them in so my account number isn't floating around anymore than it has to. And back to the 'envelope method' of budgeting. Our savings will be locked in a safe. We won't be losing anything as the banks don't really pay interest any more on deposits.

Unfortunately we have to keep a credit card for my husband's travel. And we have a seperate one with a balance from a LARGE expense we had just before my husband went back to work this fall. But everything else is going to be paid in cash from here on out and when the credit card is paid off it won't be used again.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: chickchoc on February 10, 2012, 10:30:53 PM
Wow, Fannie, you folks have been through the ringer!  I have often thought of going back to a cash only basis simply because it prevents overspending.  (Obviously one can't spend what one doesn't have!)  But you bring up some good points about the hassles of paying bills.  We've got accounts at three different credit unions and one standard bank.  The bank account is kept only for my PayPal purchases online.  Paying bills out of a credit union account seems OK for right now, but you've got me thinking about hacking scenarios.

Thanks for posting your story.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: lettuceman on April 26, 2012, 01:02:58 PM
We had the same kind of activity with a Chase card approximately on year ago.  Unfortunately we still have cards in the payoff mode and have not closed the accounts yet.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: JerseyVince on June 25, 2012, 08:23:31 AM
News of another email phishing scam

if you have a citicard be on the lookout for an email thanking you for applying for a new card, it looks like a real citicards email and almost fooled me. i just spend 2 hours on the phone with Citibank's fraud, customer service, applications and internet security depts making sure i have no applications and that my card and identity are secure.

look for a confirmation number on the email as per citibank no number is the first sign its bullshit

citibank confirmed to me the last email they sent and they can monitor any they send in realtime so if another dept sent one a sec ago the security dept can find it as its sent

the scammers are getting smart watch your stuff
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: LJH on June 27, 2012, 02:06:30 PM
I got an e-mail this morning regarding my Citi Bank credit card, something about confirming information by clicking a link. Had the Citi logo and looked really legit. Delete.  ::)

I don't have a Citi Bank credit card. I don't have ANY credit cards.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: wraithe on February 12, 2013, 04:42:04 PM
Got a USAA notice in email today, sent it on to their fraud department. I knew it was phishing since it didn't have my name on it. USAA won't send out email asking for information, and they always have my name on the email.

Got a text from them on Christmas eve, are either of these charges fraudulent? One was a fairly sizable amount that I had just done at Target to buy my Mother groceries and staples. The other was for $1.36. I called and got the fraud department, someone had tried to float a charge at a "motel" in Dearborn, MI. Of course, the account had to be closed, and reissued. Huge PITA, wish that scammers could be given a public flogging when caught and prosecuted.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: osubuckeye4 on June 14, 2013, 10:13:20 AM
Sounds like another great reason to pay the cards off and cut them up.

Someone can pickpocket your wallet, is that a reason to burn it along with all of your physical cash?

Look, if you're a responsible person, credit cards are great. The major companies are all fighting for your business and you get cash back, airline miles, hotel rooms and all other kinds of free stuff (assuming you pay your balance in full every month, like I do).


Just make sure you do your homework and verify that the card you're signing up for has 100% fraud protection (most of the good ones do).

Yes, it's a pain in the behind when fraudulent charges are racked up on your account (I had it happen with one of my cards), but the major companies are used to it by now and they just shut down your current account, open a new one, send you a new card and you're back up and running in 48 hours without any charges assigned to you.

The key is that you monitor your account and notify the credit companies immediately. If you have time to check your wallet every day to ensure it's still in your back pocket, surely you have time to log onto your credit card and view your statement to make sure no fraud charges posted?


I've made thousands of dollars over the last ten years by having a credit card and using it responsiblity, I've also been able to take trips to visit relatives and friends that I never would have booked without my free miles.

This whole, "all credit is bad" notion is crazy. Credit is bad if you let it control you... if you control it, it's good and you can benefit from it. Just be smart.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: BlueHound on July 07, 2013, 11:27:48 AM
Capital One's fraud department has contacted me a number of times about similar activity.  It's good to know that the credit card companies are keeping an eye out for these scams.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: CKMe on July 16, 2013, 04:31:43 PM
I do pretty good with my cards too. I have a cashback option on my main credit card - have gotten $75 back so far this year, there are better ones out there, but I've had this one for a while so am keeping it.

I don't have a credit feature on my ATM card - that scares the bejesus out of me, if I lose my card someone can go to walmart and drain my account without a pin #. I can get the $$ back, but it will take a while and why should I wait?

I also have a low threshold set for my daily withdrawals, max of $300 - after that I have to write a check, trips me up every time I'm at Costco (love that store!) but I'd prefer to have a manager come over and sign on my check than have to wait for my bank to reimburse me because I got robbed and besides if I need more I can always go into the branch.
Title: Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
Post by: allofthemonkeys on September 25, 2013, 06:33:04 PM
I check my checking history at least once a week.  I don't have a credit card, just a debit, but I choose good credit unions that back me up all the way.  I caught once a couple of dollar purchase, made in Mexico.  I called the credit union, they sent me the fraud paperwork and I got it stopped in the small test purchase phase.  You guys are right, I had a class when I was an officer about credit card fraud and that is a classic card thief move.  They do it to see if you catch it, if you don't then they hit hard and fast, and try to take everything they can then hit the wind. 
Title: Stock Gumshoe and the gasoline rebate scam
Post by: AZDuffman on March 01, 2014, 02:49:27 PM
I heard Jack talk about a site called "Stock Gumshoe" a few months back.  He stated they have a section where they look at the latest scams and figure out from the ad copy what they are really selling.  For example they used to say "Obama's secret income" which was nothing more than book royalties.

I received an email from a legit source but with a link about some kind of rebate on gasoline.  I know it is a scam but can't figure out what they are really talking about.  Usually I either see right through it to the real thing or don't care.  But this time my curiosity is up enough to just wonder.

Problem is, I cannot find where on stock gumshoe they do this.  Can someone point me, or even just does anyone know what the scam is?
Title: Re: Stock Gumshoe and the gasoline rebate scam
Post by: inconel710 on March 01, 2014, 04:08:37 PM
Like this?

http://www.stockgumshoe.com/reviews/oxford-club/claim-your-gas-rebate-check-oxford-club/
Title: Re: Stock Gumshoe and the gasoline rebate scam
Post by: AZDuffman on March 01, 2014, 05:45:47 PM
Thanks.  Looks like it, and if they are going to send a scam email they could at least make it a new one!
Title: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: oktheniknow on August 06, 2015, 08:43:45 AM
Got a recorded message from 509-295-6815 supposedly from the IRS stating that we were being sued by them. It left a phone number to call. Just something to be aware of.
Reported it. Was tempted to call the number and tell them they have been reported and government agents are aware of their location and recording their movements.
Wonder how many people fall for it.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: nkawtg on August 06, 2015, 09:27:24 AM
Lots
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: gopack84 on August 06, 2015, 09:40:47 AM
I got a variation on this a few weeks back. Mine offered the opportunity for me to call back and settle to avoid the unpleasantness of the sheriff serving me papers to seize my house and arrest me by the end of the week.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: osubuckeye4 on August 06, 2015, 10:28:52 AM
A co-workers wife got a call like this last year and answered it. Guy (with a thick accent) tried to get her to pay $500 over the phone to him, very pushy and at one point threatened to have her arrested. Fortunately she called her husband before divulging any pertinent information and he put the scammer in his place.


The people trying to pull off these scams are true scum.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: inconel710 on August 06, 2015, 11:31:41 AM
Had a voicemail on my cell phone a few weeks ago from (646) 918-5883 saying that I needed to call back or have my attorney contact them. Apparently the idiot doesn't realize we have this thing called the Internet. Googled his number and its a known scammer. Claims you have a bad debt and you need to pay now or all kinds of bad things are going to happen.

It pays to be suspicious.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: Bonnieblue2A on August 06, 2015, 11:37:33 AM
Hope you reported the call to your Secretary of State's office.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: endurance on August 06, 2015, 12:00:05 PM
What!?!  I just went down and bought a prepaid Visa card and mailed it to them like they told me to do. ;)
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: archer on August 06, 2015, 12:19:58 PM
What!?!  I just went down and bought a prepaid Visa card and mailed it to them like they told me to do. ;)

i hope they told you to use my address this time.. last time it was re-directed to some african prince.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: CKMe on August 06, 2015, 02:05:05 PM
What!?!  I just went down and bought a prepaid Visa card and mailed it to them like they told me to do. ;)

Why would you do such a dumb thing..

The only time I ever sent money to someone who wrote me a letter was because of an inheritance I was to receive, I didn't even know I was part Nigerian royalty.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: Mr. Bill on August 06, 2015, 03:09:24 PM
...Claims you have a bad debt and you need to pay now or all kinds of bad things are going to happen. ...

Sometimes these are for-real, but the debt collector has a fake or outdated phone number for the person they're trying to find.  We've had 4 or 5 collection agencies call here, looking for the same guy.  Annoying, but they've always promptly removed our phone number from their call list when we explained.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: Hurricane on August 06, 2015, 03:45:35 PM
I used to get calls about department store credit cards I never had. Seemed quite apparent they were calling everyone with a similar name in the area.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: Carl on August 06, 2015, 03:54:06 PM
Why would you do such a dumb thing..

The only time I ever sent money to someone who wrote me a letter was because of an inheritance I was to receive, I didn't even know I was part Nigerian royalty.

We must be related then because I gave them a bank account number to put the 60 million deposit in and now I wait......
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: The Spartan Dad on August 06, 2015, 04:58:24 PM
Last year, I interestingly enough got a call on my cell phone for my mother-in-law from the "Royal Bank of Scotland". Any ideas how they linked my cell number with her? I can't think of any document or place that would have linked us together other than a newspaper clip on the wedding or a genealogy search on my kids (either of which would be quite an effort if doing for all of their targets).

It took me about 5 minutes to actually get the RBS name as I couldn't understand the thick Nigerian accent and then I started laughing because it was just so absurd. News to the small-town America inlaws that they apparently have an untold fortune waiting for them in the RBS vault.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: Beetle on August 06, 2015, 08:25:14 PM
Doesn't anybody own a whistle anymore?
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: oktheniknow on August 06, 2015, 08:37:07 PM
That would be a good thing with a live person scammer.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: Carl on August 06, 2015, 08:40:18 PM
I have a tale to add:

My father got a phone call from a 20ish young man saying what state and city my son was working in...telling 'grandpa'
not to tell me that he got drunk and had an accident and needed bail money...but NOT TO TELL ME..

The caller knew my son's name ,where he had JUST started working in a new state as his wife and kids were still in Norfolk
cleaning and packing to move to the new house my son had just bought...they knew my name and my dad's name..

BUT my dad didn't get old without having a bit of smarts...he asked the person acting like my son what his MOTHER'S family
name was...an easy question for my REAL son...that and the fact my dad has NEVER OWNED A CREDIT CARD saved some grief.

Somebody put in some time and study to attempt such an elaborate scam .... 
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: CKMe on August 07, 2015, 05:36:52 AM
Last year, I interestingly enough got a call on my cell phone for my mother-in-law from the "Royal Bank of Scotland". Any ideas how they linked my cell number with her? I can't think of any document or place that would have linked us together other than a newspaper clip on the wedding or a genealogy search on my kids (either of which would be quite an effort if doing for all of their targets).

It took me about 5 minutes to actually get the RBS name as I couldn't understand the thick Nigerian accent and then I started laughing because it was just so absurd. News to the small-town America inlaws that they apparently have an untold fortune waiting for them in the RBS vault.

This is from something called skip tracing. It is a technique used by debt collectors to track down someone they suspect is related to the person who owes the debt. What they do is attach someone to you from a credit report being ordered in both of your names, i.e. when you and your wife bought a house together or signed up for your first credit card together. They then back trace it to everyone your wife has ever had her credit pulled with, i.e. if your mother in law cosigned for a car or a student loan for your wife. They can use this data to determine everywhere you lived (if you had credit pulled there, or had your address changed on an existing credit account) who live with (as they will have their credit accessed from the same location) any aliases you have (i.e. John Spartan, Jon Spartan, Jack Spartan etc).

The skip tracing 'system' is already up and in place. Those who provide data to the skip tracer don't always verify fully the data before they release your information. When I started in the mortgage industry we would get 20-30 calls a week from someone who was hunting down our customers for a bad debt, we never provided information to the tracer as we wanted to do business with the customer. If we had wanted to provide them with information we wouldn't have verified if the debt was valid, we would have just given out current name, address, phone number etc all of which were freely provided by the customer to us already.

It's actually pretty scary when you think of it.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: inconel710 on August 07, 2015, 06:13:26 AM
Hope you reported the call to your Secretary of State's office.
Nah. He never called back and I'm not calling him. His MO is to troll for easy marks and he's not in my state. Not worth my time.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: gopack84 on August 07, 2015, 07:18:34 AM
This is from something called skip tracing. It is a technique used by debt collectors to track down someone they suspect is related to the person who owes the debt.

[snip]

It's actually pretty scary when you think of it.

Similar to its evil cousin call "the nearby". This was a report we used to pull back in my days supporting a computerized collection business database. If you had an address that was no good you could pull a nearby contact report (all happily provided by the big 3 credit bureaus) that would give you name and phone numbers of the 5 or 10 nearest adjacent addresses. Then you could call them to see if you could get updated contact info for the debtor. All completely legal and above board provided you followed the law. You couldn't discuss the reason for the call (ie, you can't say, "I'm looking for deadbeat Joe Somebody that skipped out owing $10k to the Penile Enlargement Surgical unit in Anytown USA". But you could simply say you were trying to track down Joe Somebody and wanted to know if he still lived at address X and had phone number Y. And you could only do it (legally) if you're trying to get an updated phone number or address because you got a mail return or disconnect type event.

You'd be amazed how many times that would net some confirmation one way or the other. But yeah, that one was easy compared to a skip trace. A skip trace was labor intensive and required a bit of dedication and skill on the part of the collector.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: The Spartan Dad on August 11, 2015, 11:09:08 AM
This is from something called skip tracing. It is a technique used by debt collectors to track down someone they suspect is related to the person who owes the debt. What they do is attach someone to you from a credit report being ordered in both of your names, i.e. when you and your wife bought a house together or signed up for your first credit card together. They then back trace it to everyone your wife has ever had her credit pulled with, i.e. if your mother in law cosigned for a car or a student loan for your wife. They can use this data to determine everywhere you lived (if you had credit pulled there, or had your address changed on an existing credit account) who live with (as they will have their credit accessed from the same location) any aliases you have (i.e. John Spartan, Jon Spartan, Jack Spartan etc).

The skip tracing 'system' is already up and in place. Those who provide data to the skip tracer don't always verify fully the data before they release your information. When I started in the mortgage industry we would get 20-30 calls a week from someone who was hunting down our customers for a bad debt, we never provided information to the tracer as we wanted to do business with the customer. If we had wanted to provide them with information we wouldn't have verified if the debt was valid, we would have just given out current name, address, phone number etc all of which were freely provided by the customer to us already.

It's actually pretty scary when you think of it.

Thanks for that explanation. Seems like a lot of work by the scammers for random spitballing as opposed to a known lucrative target.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: outoforder2day on August 11, 2015, 11:47:35 AM
I got a call from the "IRS" threatening jail time if I didn't immediately call them back. The guy left a badge number and everything. Called him back and played with him a bit. "I filed my taxes on time, I have the receipt somewhere...", "Gosh, I don't want to go to jail.", "What did you say your name was again?". After about 10 minutes of messing around, I told him I knew it was a scam and that I'd already reported his first call and would be reporting the second one as well. He acted tough, and threatened me, which I also put in the report.
Unfortunatly, nothing will ever come of it. Since I didn't actually give them any money, the issue goes to the bottom of the IRS pile. They get flooded with this stuff and don't do much to combat it.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: oktheniknow on August 11, 2015, 11:52:19 AM
You could have always said after exposing them that you were recording the conversation and was sending to the authorities. That would have got their attention.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: outoforder2day on August 11, 2015, 11:57:57 AM
You could have always said after exposing them that you were recording the conversation and was sending to the authorities. That would have got their attention.
This is true... I'll have to remember that for the inevitable next time.
I did use their phone number when signing up for some extra-spammy stuff. At least that's something.
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: surfivor on August 11, 2015, 02:24:19 PM

 The government, police, etc do nothing to stop these scams
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: Carl on August 11, 2015, 02:28:34 PM
The government, police, etc do nothing to stop these scams

They just like to listen......  :tinfoily:
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: surfivor on August 11, 2015, 02:33:09 PM
They just like to listen......  :tinfoily:

 No, it's like the powers that be are happy that all these crazy scams are going on. Don't we have all this surveillance capability yet they can't catch IRS scammers ? Even you or I could probably track them down and they are clearly breaking the law so why nothing has been done is pretty crazy
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: Carl on August 11, 2015, 02:44:09 PM
No, it's like the powers that be are happy that all these crazy scams are going on. Don't we have all this surveillance capability yet they can't catch IRS scammers ? Even you or I could probably track them down and they are clearly breaking the law so why nothing has been done is pretty crazy

It is not uncommon for LEO's to ignore illegal activity ,until and unless it is reported.
It also is outside the scope of their job to chase phone scams ,etc.
Just my opinion..
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: endurance on August 11, 2015, 03:15:41 PM
Why would you do such a dumb thing..

The only time I ever sent money to someone who wrote me a letter was because of an inheritance I was to receive, I didn't even know I was part Nigerian royalty.
It got them to stop asking for money, so it had to be legit, right?
Title: Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
Post by: surfivor on August 11, 2015, 08:40:58 PM
It is not uncommon for LEO's to ignore illegal activity ,until and unless it is reported.
It also is outside the scope of their job to chase phone scams ,etc.
Just my opinion..

if you made phone calls claiming to be a police officer it would be big trouble. No 1 at the federal or state levels has address this whatsoever. when it seems so rampant and blatant?
Title: SCAM ALERT !!!!
Post by: IKN on August 27, 2015, 10:10:53 AM
SCAM ALERT
I was recently looking at my credit card statement and saw a charge I didn’t recognize. After looking into it, it was a recurring charge of $12/month from ShoppersDiscount.com. Further research shows this to be an International scam from a company that piggy-backs other sites.
It appears by using certain discount codes or offers authorizes them to charge your credit/debit card on a monthly bases without telling or warning you. Small charge that doesn’t pop a red flag and easy to miss on a statement or write it off to something forgotten about.
When I contacted my credit card company and mentioned their name, they knew all about it, even had their contact number which apparently is almost useless. Starts with automated message asking about credit card info. DO NOT DO THIS. WAIT TO TALK TO A REAL PERSON !!!!
While I’m pissed about the scam, I’ve become more pissed at the credit card companies that, apparently know about this and have did NOTHING to stop it. Not even informing their customers.
So make sure you check your credit/debit card statements carefully.

Wasn't sure of best place to post this. Spread the word.
Title: Re: SCAM ALERT !!!!
Post by: nkawtg on August 27, 2015, 11:23:54 AM
Thanks for the heads up.
Title: Re: SCAM ALERT !!!!
Post by: Carl on August 27, 2015, 12:56:59 PM
That's the cheapest scam I have seen on todays market...I might want one too.   ;D
Title: Re: SCAM ALERT !!!!
Post by: osubuckeye4 on August 27, 2015, 02:15:12 PM
Variations of this have been operating for awhile.

When my wife and I booked our honeymoon (this was close to 6 years ago) we used a discount code and ended up on some scam travel companies "discount subscription service".

They billed my card something like $5.99 or $6.99 monthly and I didn't pick up on it till the 3rd month.


I got the companies info and tried to call them to unsubscribe, and could never get through. I ultimately had to go to my bank and put a stop on the charges.

Important to take 2-3 minutes and look over every statement and make sure that you actually made each purchase.


As far as the credit card companies/banks not notifying their customers... it's because a lot of these scam companies actually have a (much smaller) legitimate wing/entity service that they also operate. If the bank notified every person who had a charge from the company, they would run the risk of accidently contacting people who made legitimate purchases as well.
Title: Re: SCAM ALERT !!!!
Post by: Sunshine on September 02, 2015, 09:02:40 AM
Great, a new flavor of the month.  Seems like they come up with something new all the time.  Thanks for the heads up on this one.
Title: Re: heads up
Post by: Carver on January 26, 2020, 02:42:13 PM
A person I know of requested to be my Facebook friend, a very unlikely choice, but I okayed it. Next:
This is the message I received from a scam posing as a Facebook friend this morning (note the poor English): "l was wondering if you have heard anything about the community service Block Grant (CSBG) helping program? It is international finance cooperation. They are helping the Deaf, Retired, Disable, Widowed, Military, Employees, Unemployees to maintain a good standard of living. I got some cash from them and I saw your name when I was signing with the delivery agent, So I wanted to know if you have gotten yours too from them? I got $100,000.00 from them the on- going program when I apply, and it not a loan you don't have to pay it back I thought you've gotten yours from them. DO you know how to apply??" got my winning money delivered to me in my doorstep by the UPS after 4 hour l apply for the program and l saw your name on their winning list I thought you've gotten yours too from them"

It included a photo of an open grocery bag with 4 stacks about 6 inches tall of one dollar bills. The scammer was referring to Community Service Block Grant that has a page on fraud alerts and specifically says it does not provide grants to individuals. The person that this scammer was claiming to be lives a block away and so I responded by asking them what color their house was and never got a reply.
But I do like the term "unemployees".

Title: Re: Financial scams (online, phone, mail, etc)
Post by: Mr. Bill on January 26, 2020, 06:06:33 PM
MODERATOR NOTE: Just merged ten old threads about various financial scams.
Title: Re: Financial scams (online, phone, mail, etc)
Post by: Mr. Bill on January 26, 2020, 07:02:02 PM
"Who's Who" scams...

These are aimed at older folks who are a little bit famous, maybe just in their own field.

Marquis Who's Who is not a scam.  Well, not really.  They've been publishing the well-known "Who's Who" directories for ages, and have branched out into specialized directories and special honors.  Listings and honors are free.  But you might want to buy a copy of the book.  And you might want to pay for a press announcement.  And (etc etc etc).  But they're not a scam.

However, there are REAL scammers who are much less honest.  I'm not going to name names, because these guys are professional con-men, and they've been doing various scams for decades, and I don't want to get sued.

How it works:  They contact a person who has recently received some honor or award, e.g. from Marquis Who's Who.  They might not exactly claim to be associated with Marquis but they will probably give that impression.

They will tell the target person about yet another honor that he/she has been selected for.  And they won't make it entirely clear what, exactly, you're signing up for, but once they have a credit card number, there will be a charge for a quarter-page press release ($1500).  Or a half-page press release ($2000).  Or a radio interview ($2500).  Or quite possibly all three.

The "press release" (if ever published) will be on a blog that nobody reads.  The "radio interview" (if ever recorded) will be on a podcast that nobody listens to.  The claim that your info will be sent to all major search engines merely means that Google can index their blog/podcast.

Just something to watch for if you have elderly relatives who are a little bit famous and a little bit easy to trick.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who%27s_Who_scam

https://www.aarp.org/money/scams-fraud/info-10-2012/beware-the-whos-who-directory-scam.html
Title: Re: Financial scams (online, phone, mail, etc)
Post by: Carver on January 26, 2020, 08:39:37 PM
That reminds me of the modeling school scam. Our neighbor's fell for that one. They flatter dad & mom on what a beautiful model their daughter would be and sign them up for modeling school. Our neighbor's daughter is knock-kneed and trots like a duck and has a face that is less than ordinary. I suppose there are variations for little boys too, "your son would really be good at martial arts and we've got a school for that".
Title: Re: Financial scams (online, phone, mail, etc)
Post by: Mr. Bill on February 14, 2020, 05:07:38 PM
Here's a medical billing scam.  You get a call from "Consumer Collections" or some similarly-named outfit.  They say you had medical lab work done by US Diagnostic Labs on a specific date in March or April 2018, and they may have lots of believable details about the blood tests that were done.  Some of the tests weren't covered by your insurance, and you now owe a specific amount of money which will be between $300-$450.  And you have to pay today, over the phone, otherwise a judgement will be recorded against you (or some similar ominous thing).

They will be polite and helpful, or threatening and rude, depending on your reaction.

It's a scam.  They almost caught my parents today (and nearly tricked my brother, who happened to be the one who answered the phone).

They use many different phone numbers (in our case it was 909-358-6165), and several different generic-sounding names, and claim to be collecting for several different generic-sounding labs.

Here's an example with lots of reports of the same scam:
https://800notes.com/Phone.aspx/1-480-573-8225