The Survival Podcast Forum

Farm, Garden and The Land => Gardening and Agriculture => Show Us Your Garden => Topic started by: cohutt on January 18, 2010, 05:54:01 PM

Title: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 18, 2010, 05:54:01 PM
Chapter 2 has begun

Last year after Jack made the little light go off in my brain, I decided to undertake a project that would allow me to produce a little food at home and begin the journey to a more self sufficient and satisfying life.  I started posting about my progress and ended up journalling pretty much the whole process in the thread "Cohutt builds a garden chapter 1" linked here: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=6314.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=6314.0)

Unfortunately, I hadn't done much more for weeks really until the last few days.  My momentum died around thanksgiving when I tore a muscle in my back, followed by a lovely ass kicking by H1N1 after Christmas, the whole time during the unusually cold run of weather.   My back is better, I have finally stopped choking and coughing on the remnants of the H1N1 and my strength and endurance has finally returned.

Before I update on the progress outside, I wanted to share some success I've had inside.  Back before Christmas I pulled a few squares of lettuce and transplanted it into some cheapo window boxes from China Mart.  I eventually got the shelf cut, painted and installed in the large window at the back of the house, a southwestern exposure.

The lettuce has done well except for the occasional snacking on it our dog and cat both did before i got the shelf up.   We like the way this turned out and will probably add another eventually.

The wide angle:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010017.jpg)

A close up of one of the planters:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010018.jpg)


And tonight's indoor lettuce harvest:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010020.jpg)


We both can't believe we haven't been doing this until now.  It is easy and the greens are almost as good a quality as those grown outside this fall.   I haven't fertilized as this is grown in mature compost; all I do is water.


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on January 18, 2010, 06:21:09 PM
Glad to see a chapter 2 to your garden project.

As for the Fritz garden project, now that we are in the house and will have the entire season, it should be more productive.  I'll be adding in several more raised beds to increase my space.  Add in to that that the wife has really shown an interest in it this year, means we should have some good progress.  Just this afternoon, she was drawing up what she envisions for the bottom half of the yard.  We have between a half and 3/4 acre that's not fenced and is just another place I have to mow.  That will become the orchard with a bunch of fruit trees and bushes.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 18, 2010, 06:30:28 PM
Going into Thanksgiving I had started clearing my back property line in preparation for the next leg of my fence.   This was a frickin bear; substantial stumps to cut down but first removal of old wire fencing intertwined with English Ivy, privet and saw briers.   I got the corner posts in and had started in on digging the post holes when I hurt my back.  

I now have the posts set, the stringers up (except for 2 short bottom ones) and have started installing the 8' fence boards. Today was a fantastic day for the middle of January- it was crystal clear and 60 degrees.  I even have some red tint on my skin after absorbing all that vitamin D.

The back is 65 ft and there are 10 posts including the corners; I had to space them irregularly in the upper section due to some stumps (yeah I was too cheap to have them ground up).  The drop in elevation from the upper to alley corner is almost 3 feet; i decided to do what I did in the first section of fence up by the original garden beds and keep the top level and have the btoom follow the contour of the ground.

3 courses of stringers were up by yesterday evening; you can see the first two sections of side fence looking up the alley and the back of my house and the lettuce window is in the background.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010008.jpg)

The whole back section from the alley; note that the vines and logs and other junk piled up around it will be hauled off when I get the fence completed.   The top rail is a little over 9' from the ground at the alley corner and a little over 6 at the other.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010007.jpg)

From the upper corner down the back line towards the alley, it should be obvious why I want a tall fence around my narrow downtown lot.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010009.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 18, 2010, 06:48:44 PM
Fritz i know what you mean; I'm looking forward to a whole season this year; my first seeds didn't get into the ground until mid June last year.  That may not seem very late to some but that's 60+ days wasted after our average last frost date here.   

I'm humping it to finish this so i can clean up and install at least 200+ sq ft of beds before the middle of March.  I had small plans last year and got way more done than I thought I would, but this year I have big plans for sure. 

BTW ever since you posted the link to the "you bet your garden" podcast last summer I've listened to every one.  He is corny but knowledgeable and I'm sure it has helped me.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 18, 2010, 06:58:50 PM
I got the bottom stringers installed and was shot but I wanted to get a couple of sections of boards up.  The first two sections are enough to block the visual into most of my yard from cars driving up the alley, so I started on that corner.
I spaced them the same as the rest of the fence, 5/8" apart to allow for some air flow and to let a little light through.

Damn that's a tall fence!  Check out the sky in the background; I probably won't see another day like this until March.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010010.jpg)


Mrs C was worried about the corner and how it would look vs the 6' fence along the alley towards the back of the yard.  A big difference for sure but it doesn't bother me- besides, I won't be looking at it from the alley very much....

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010011.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on January 18, 2010, 07:17:54 PM
Cohutt... seriously inspiring!!!

I purchased my first home this late summer/fall and only got a half - ass garden in before things got wintery here in Taylor (NE of Austin TX).  Over the Christmas and New Year days off I showed your thread amongst other thing to friends and family to get some plans down for a serious raised bed garden experience.  I had some days off, and some help from my Dad and made it happen.

I want to say thanks for inspiring me, I used your post as an example of what I wanted to build.  Look for a thread from me soon re: AK builds a garden, I would love to post some pics and share notes on what we learned even though we are in different climates.

cheers,
ak
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 18, 2010, 07:29:26 PM
Last post for this series-

From the inside it looks like it will do what it supposed to and block out the ugly assed garage apartment behind my yard.   

Looking down the back part of the alley fence:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010016.jpg)

From the center of the boxwood garden:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010012.jpg)

The big bush to the left is an ancient Camellia that is in bloom right now.  Several of the open flowers got some freeze damage but there are still a lot of buds opening.  I was encouraged to see that all day long there were honey bees working the bush - it got me wondering where their hive is.  How far do bees travel for pollen? 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010014.jpg)

I have started spreading the wood mulch leftover from my tree masacre last fall but still have piles of it where my first beds are going in soon.  I figure I have enough to go 4-5 inches deep over the entire back area; hopefully this will do the job in choking out the odd crap that has been growing back there for years.

I cut a path through this big pile to make it easier to move around back there then used it as a base for my saw station. 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010015.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 18, 2010, 07:40:27 PM
AK,

I'm humbled that my project has helped you get your vision on paper and now on the ground.   That's nice of you to share.
a
It is good of you to get moving on it after only a few months in the house.  Had i started when I bought this house (waaay back when I was 27) not only would I have enjoyed annual gardening for 23 more years, I could have had a mature permaculture system in place by now.

+1 for taking the plunge and you are on the hook for posting the season's progress & "pay it forward" as they say.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: CenTexPrep on January 18, 2010, 09:19:34 PM
Yeah!  :D
I couldn't wait for Ch2.

You really are an inspiration.  I'm 27 and just bought my house a couple of months ago as well.  I'm also only a few miles away from AK and I might even be getting in touch with him to see what he's growing this season.  I'll be starting out with probably 3 4x24' raised beds and should be canning, dehydrating, and freezing the surplus in no time!

I'm really digging the pics of your updates.  Keep em coming.  You're a good example to the rest of us!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on January 18, 2010, 09:38:19 PM
CENTEX... would be rad to share... I set up 3 X 12 beds for now and they are NEW just finished after new years.  All I have planted right now is some awesome cabbage, some frail broccoli and some onions --all transplants from the old set up.  I build a little greenhouse contraption for starting some seeds early, like next weekend.  More cold weather stuff but I might risk some warmer stuff in there too.

Cohutt... your garden is awesome love all the work you did...

all... since I am ON THE HOOK as it seems, look for thread AK builds a garden 2010
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 19, 2010, 04:36:53 AM
Interesting:    2 miles.   

Bees will travel up to two miles for nectar/pollen, and will only fly when it is over 55 degrees f.   So, there is not telling where yesterday's Camellia bees' hive is located.  hmm.


centex and AK, 

What did you do/ will you do for soil prep?    I used the SFG Me's mix formula in my first beds but am not sure how I will fill up 2x as much in this expansion.   All I have done so far is make arrangements to pick up more dairy cow manure as well as composted yard waste from my city public works dept, as right now I have no place to put it.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: CenTexPrep on January 19, 2010, 05:07:59 AM

centex and AK, 

What did you do/ will you do for soil prep?    I used the SFG Me's mix formula in my first beds but am not sure how I will fill up 2x as much in this expansion.   All I have done so far is make arrangements to pick up more dairy cow manure as well as composted yard waste from my city public works dept, as right now I have no place to put it.

I'm a little hesitant to use Mel's mix to the the T since everyone I hear from in the organic gardening world says that peat moss is not good for bed preparation. 

This is what mine will mostly consist of... and ratios are yet to be determined:
Organic matter in the form of COMPOST (as many different kinds as I can find, including my own)
Lava Sand (Small amounts)
Green Sand (small amounts)
Will probably try to find vermiculite but expanded shale and decomposed granite are 2 very viable alternatives
"Rock Dust"-- won't go into it now but it's a fine crushed rock that returns minerals and trace elements back to the soil
Dry Molases- organic gardening's best and most gentle fertilizer... Also stimulates microorganisms
Blood Meal

I'll regularly be adding seaweed and fish emulsions as well

And probably some other stuff I can't think of right now off the top of my head.  Most important is that it's based on a SOIL FREE MIX of mostly organic matter, which means COMPOST!!!   ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on January 19, 2010, 06:07:45 PM
I REALLY should have written down exactly what went in there...

here it is "close enough for rock and roll" style.

put topsoil and leaves in to even things out and get a layer in there.  Just straight up TX topsoil.

THEN EACH BED GOT:

4lbs of peat
40lbs of compost
20 or 30 lbs of cow manure
40 lbs of organic "garden soil".

I mixed everything up, put some water in it, put some more water in it, and then let it sit.

I forget the brands here but I tried to go TX native and got everything at Lowes.

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 24, 2010, 07:45:53 PM
Not a lot to report from this weekend...

I wasn't as lucky this weekend with the weather.  Saturday was really windy and fairly cool but I got all the 8' boards I had up using the finish nailer. (I use it as a temporary way to attach the boards with proper spacing etc only because I don't have 3 arms).  I also go the back gate built and tacked in waiting for hinges to be purchased.

This is the area where my new beds will go; this is looking down the side fence towards the new back fence.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010023.jpg)
Today I was going to try and get the permanent nails in (using my good old fashioned hammers) and spread the rest of the wood mulch out.  

It was 50 degrees but unfortunately it rained a total of 2.64 inches today.   The only problem is I have decided I AM going to have this ready by spring, so I worked in the monsoon for several hours today.  I had a hunting rainsuit on and it did pretty well but eventually 2+ inches of rain just gets you wet.  

It was too wet to take pictures but I did get the bulk of the nailing done.  I had to take time out to sink two 4x4s once i remembered that the two bags of concrete I bought Saturday were still in the bed of my truck. I covered them with a small piece of plastic but they were sufficiently wet to set up regardless.  The posts will do two things
1- provide the anchor for the middle of the run fence cross braces
2- provide the front corner posts for a trellis I plan on having up by summer.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 27, 2010, 07:44:31 PM
Finished tacking up the fence boards tonight.   

I missed the correct number of board by a small amount (36 DOH!) and went by to pick up some more this morning from a friend's builders supply store.   While I was in the yard I noticed they were out pulling weathered boards off of all types of treated lumber and using a forklift to stack a couple pallets with them  These were the season's culls- the ones that has a little damage here or there or cosmetically were not 100%.

They put the pallets up front on the highway with a "make offer" sign on them.   I talked them into letting me select some stuff from what they had pulled off and I have a load of stuff coming tommorrow or Friday that I picked up for $25, which is maybe 10 cents on the dollar.  mainly 2x6, 2x8 and 2x12 pressure treated in lengths from 10 to 16 feet.  There were 6 16 ft 2x12s alone that were in damn good shape, just weathered a bit- these boards cost a fortune at homeboy depot.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on January 27, 2010, 08:05:36 PM
DANG!  what a FIND!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on January 27, 2010, 08:08:09 PM
Nice!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on January 28, 2010, 06:59:35 AM
Looking good Cohutt! You really are an inspiration to us all.  I am going to be starting my thread soon too. I plan on building some beds today. I kind of did something similar to what you did. My father-in-law just built a new porch. So, he had all this old pressure treated lumber sitting around. So, I went over there last week pulled nails for about an hour. Now, I have enough free lumber to build 40 feet of SFG beds.  I can't imagine how awesome your 200 SFG will be. Don't hurt your back again (you're making the rest of us look bad)

I look forward to Chapter 2.  :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 28, 2010, 08:35:39 PM
I've been known to either pull the nails out or cut them off with a grinder or sawzall.   Free beats cheap every day.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on January 29, 2010, 06:25:09 AM
Yeah I got really lucky. Right place and right time.  :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 30, 2010, 05:53:11 PM
I got the wood delivered today, then had to carry and /or drag it about 150 feet to the back of my lot, where i will store/use it.

First off they only charged me $20 for the pallet, not $25 as I remembered.

The total: 451 board feet or treated wood @ $.04/ft.
2x6 - 38'
1x8 - 128'
2x12 -  164'

:)

Not bad except 16' treated 2x12s that have been outside in a lumberyard during a wet winter weigh a frickin metric ton.  I swear I think they are all well over 100 lbs.   (I ended up McGuyvering a  strap and shoulder harness that allowed me to skid them the distance without too much trouble. )

There was a misty drizzle all day long and it never got above 38; I stayed out in it all afternoon hauling the wood, banging in the permanent nails to the fence boards, then taking down the temporary welded wire fence that I put up several months ago,
Tommorrow I plan on finishing the bracing and nailing then perhaps start building beds.

Woot!  Progress!


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: teton traveler on January 30, 2010, 06:05:19 PM
I am excited to get going again on this years garden. I have started some plants in a window planter, but we have four more months of winter to go.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on January 30, 2010, 06:15:25 PM
That's an outstanding deal Cohutt.  I'm very envious.

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 30, 2010, 08:02:34 PM
4 more months of winter.  brrr.

i will be able to sow some spinach and lettuce outdoors here in another 4 weeks or so and I can hardly wait
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: teton traveler on January 30, 2010, 09:36:15 PM
4 more months of winter.  brrr.

i will be able to sow some spinach and lettuce outdoors here in another 4 weeks or so and I can hardly wait

As much as I like Idaho, I due envy the longer growing season others have elsewhere. I think it was two years ago that it snowed 9 out of the 12 months of the year. January to June, then October through December. Needless to say, I am going to do more with window plantings like Jack shows in the MSB videos. That way I am not limited to fresh produce during the brief summer months.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on January 31, 2010, 05:35:41 AM
Incredibly pretty area with good no bull-chit people though.  I assume you're you on the "back" side of the Tetons - Driggs, Tetonia, Ashton area?  I've spent some time there, a friend has a house at the confluence of Henry's fork and the Warm River.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: teton traveler on January 31, 2010, 01:07:23 PM
Incredibly pretty area with good no bull-chit people though.  I assume you're you on the "back" side of the Tetons - Driggs, Tetonia, Ashton area?  I've spent some time there, a friend has a house at the confluence of Henry's fork and the Warm River.

That's the area. We are roughly 7 miles directly east of where the main fork of the Snake River and Henry's Fork meet and I went duck hunting on the Henry's Fork last year.  Since we are in zone 4, I am trying to organize things to take full advantage of the heat and sun. Last year I planted flowers and useless "pretty things" on the south side of our trailer.  I want to use areas like that to grow things that actually produce something and need the full sun and warmth.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 01, 2010, 05:06:50 PM
 had some time to start laying some boards around to get perspective on how I will max the beds out. I have a couple of designs on paper but until I "see" kind of how they look in the space I don't want to start building them

Anyway, I took some shots at lunch today of the finished fence, the beginning of the arbor and the mock beds.   I do plan on cutting the giganimus old camelia bush back this spring.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010029.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010030.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010032.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010035.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010037.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 01, 2010, 05:07:53 PM
Looking back up towards my original beds you can see the blueberry bushes and the tool shed I braced the fence with. The wire fencing crap next to it will be removed and doors will be added. 

I took this from standing on the same bench I took the last photo above from, just looking the other way.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010038.jpg)

Nuther one from in front of the shed. 

I have been instructed to build a barrier to hide the 5th blue water barrel from vew btw.   Yes ma'am.

The plastic in the garden is the hack job cold frame roll-a-greenhouse system that is keeping my lettuce thriving this winter.

Damn, I didn't hold the camera very level did I?

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010039.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on February 01, 2010, 05:13:12 PM
This is going to be intense when its all green and full of food etc...  you have really got some expansion on your hands dont you!  Can not wait to see it develop!  as always awesome work!

(will run into same instruction in regards to rain barrel system...will be interested in seeing your solution.)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on February 01, 2010, 05:22:32 PM
Lookin great!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 01, 2010, 07:54:03 PM
AK,
I don't have any raincatch back there.  I know if I talked to my neighbor he'd let me repair the gutter of the ugly garage apt behind his house (and now behind my back fence) and put a barrel there, but I'd still be draggin a hose back in. 

I don't know, we'll have to see.  The elevation is low enough that I could connect a hose to the raincatch spicket in the first garden and draw from it way back there.   First things first though, gotta get some more stuff done first.   Tonight I buried 3/4 pvc conduit back to the tool shed at the half way mark. :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on February 02, 2010, 07:24:48 AM
I wonder... could you relocate the camelia bush (or half of it) to be in front of that barrel? two birds and one stone  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: swamp man on February 02, 2010, 09:31:13 AM
A good idea, but mature camelias don't transplant well....very unlikely it would survive. cohutt might not survive the transplant, either, as the roots are expansive and real damned hard. I looooooove those old camelias, and have tried to rescue lots of them during the renovation of the historic district in downtown Hattiesburg, MS, but with very minimal success, even with the aid of a min-trackhoe.

Awesome, awesome work, cohutt!...that's very similar to how my raised beds are laid out. If you don't mind my asking, what part of the country are you in?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 02, 2010, 05:18:49 PM
Ros, No plans to move it; I've done enough boxwood moving here to nix that idea.

swamp man:
Funny, I'm in a historic district in North GA and have this in my yard, a few feet from the 90 year old boxwoods.  I figure this old Camellia is about the same age.  I'm going to shape it and reduce it; this ought not be an issue if I leave the roots alone.

I learned that a friend of mine is carrying on his father's Camellia propagation  mission; I'll see him Thursday and invite him to get some of this one when it starts putting out new growth in a couple months. I hear they have a farm with several acres of these old types in rows, all from old bushes in Georgia and Alabama
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: swamp man on February 03, 2010, 12:25:50 AM
Nothin' like camelias blooming in the winter when everything else is all brown and dreary.

 I did some growin' up in north Georgia, in Bartow county, and in Cobb county. My folks moved up to Dalton a while back, but I ain't been up there yet.

 Those camelias feed real heavy on iron, much moreso than most plants. Get you a few scraps of rebar, hammer 'em into the ground around the rootball, and the leaves will get greener than green. Makes for a happy, pretty camelia, just make sure and counter-sink the rebar so's you dont tear up a lawn mower blade or bust a toe on it.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 04, 2010, 05:09:29 PM
More CRB (Cheap Rat Bastard) activities line up today- the practically free wood has me on a quest for free or nearly free stuff in prep for spring.

Today I have think I have the following all lined up:

1 free composted dairy cow manure, the load into my truck. Same source as last year except i asked if they had any that was more composted than the load I got last year.  Answer- Yes, I'll arrange for you to pick it up whenever you want. :)

2 free composted yard waste (last fall's leaves).  The city composts it for free pickup but the good stuff goes quickly.  My contact says they have a bunch at the closed landfill here that they turn and keep for municipal use; he said they had plenty and he'd arrange for me to pick it up whenever I wanted.  :) :)

3 Vermiculite- the place where I got my cheap wood has a pallet of vermiculite someone ordered a couple years ago then welshed on.  My buddy says it is in the way, come get all I want.  I still have a few bags from last year when I was trying not to appear greedy.  :) :) :)

4 A client of mine is a retired florist who ran a greenhouse as a part of his operation; he has a pole barn full of stuff (he said he never threw anything away and tried to reuse most of it).  He said I could have all the 2", 3" and 4" plastic pots I wanted as well as trays to hold them.  He said he was too cheap to use peat posts for his truck garden operation for the local farmers market and used these to start all his plants.   He claims you can use these higher quality plastic pots several times without a problem. :) :) :) :) 

So it appears before spring I can fill the monster beds currently under construction in the back. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: teton traveler on February 04, 2010, 05:54:14 PM
Now THAT is how to do a garden. Thanks for the ideas on how to get free stuff
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on February 04, 2010, 06:58:15 PM
Very resourceful my fellow ant. +1
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on February 04, 2010, 07:04:11 PM
D A N G !

nice work!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 04, 2010, 07:25:08 PM
The stuff isn't in my possesion yet, so we'll have to see if it all comes in.

;)

Still, sometimes I feel like the sun shines out of my........
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 07, 2010, 07:26:14 PM
It was cold & damp all weekend here but I got some stuff done.
-Installed the hardware and hung the back gate
-Cut and installed the two cross braces in the middle of the fence on along the back
-Built 3 more raised beds from the big 2x12s - 2 16x4 and 1 12x4
-Dragged the beds around and got them into position running north/south.
-Cut off some of the fence posts that stuck up over the fence line.
-Built the frames for the garden shed doors and got them hung.
-cleaned up some

Here are the beds (cell phone pic) with the 2x4 skids i put under them to make moving easier.  The boards tacked to the top edges are to keep them square until I get them leveled.  The short posts were what i held the long boards upright with when assembling, then used as pivot points when aligning the beds.

(The large Camellia will be trimmed back a good bit in May and won't be all over the beds this summer)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010041.jpg)

The doors were pinned in with the cross boards so I could get everything square and install the hinges. Hinges are installedand the doors swing true; I will put the other boards on the face of the frame this week if it doesn't ferkin rain every evening.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010040.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on February 08, 2010, 11:12:23 AM
Looks real, real good there C.

I jes happen to have a 6.5 HP Troy Bilt Bronco tiller that you need. I a prolly let ya have it right.  ;
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 08, 2010, 12:01:46 PM
I bet you do. Welcome to the forum :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on February 08, 2010, 02:47:34 PM
I bet you do. Welcome to the forum :)

I do.

Thanks for the welcome.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on February 08, 2010, 04:13:10 PM
(http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g194/jawjaboy/IM000217.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 08, 2010, 08:01:33 PM
Look at that you do have one, I'll chat with you about it maybe later towards spring. 


OK, update of the day-

I finished the toolshed doors, except for hardware.  Kind of a pain in the arse to do this at dark-thirty, especially since I had to rip 1/4" off of the middle two boards.  Anyway, Mrs C says it wildly exceeds her expectations (or something like that) so she is cool with it.  I'm just happy it and the gate are done, I hate hanging these things.....

I'll put some hooks and shelves in there eventually.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010046.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010048.jpg)

I also took a picture of the new beds with a real camera -  i still have a lot of leveling and adjusting to do as well as make a couple more smaller ones

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010042.jpg)


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on February 08, 2010, 08:18:52 PM
Very nice!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on February 08, 2010, 08:59:00 PM
Nice job on that shed Cohutt! It looks nice and sturdy as hell Best of all nobody will ever know your lair lurks beneath it. Shhhh I didn't say that. Nothing to see here, move along.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on February 09, 2010, 07:04:20 AM
Nice job on that shed Cohutt! It looks nice and sturdy as hell Best of all nobody will ever know your lair lurks beneath it. Shhhh I didn't say that. Nothing to see here, move along.

The picture Cohutt didn't want anyone to see...

(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh199/fark_bomII/CohuttsGardenStairs.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on February 09, 2010, 07:58:16 AM
That is awesome HOC! Cohutt has been exposed at last!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 09, 2010, 12:10:17 PM
frolicking lmoa hare! 

funny!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on February 09, 2010, 10:10:44 PM
a/ hilarious...

b/ looking good.  Gotta love all that free/almost free lumber man.  great find.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on February 11, 2010, 06:27:48 PM
The old barn has been torn down Mister C. It all been piled up ta burn. They a lot a good 80-100 year old cypress in them piles. If ya need it, ya welcome to it. I a burn it when things start turning green here again. Too brown ta burn now.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 11, 2010, 07:53:05 PM
Thanks Jawja, that'd be cool if I could ever find the time to escape way down there to get it.   Ask me again before you put a match to it.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Mel on February 12, 2010, 07:37:04 PM
I want to be like Cohutt when I grow up.

Mel
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 14, 2010, 08:18:26 AM
lol....Mel, you need to know the whole story before you start saying stuff like that.


We got snow Friday here in N GA and by Saturday morning I had a 3" coating over my project:

From inside over a cup of hot coffee:
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010049.jpg)

The beds that were going to get some work:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010054.jpg)


My firend at the city called Friday to confirm they had some compost that had been out for 6 months and turned regularly, so i went ahead and got a load Friday afternoon in the snow.   While it was fairly well composted, it has another couple of months.  It was made up of shredded yard waste and still had some fairly large pieces of wood; it included pine and hardwoods as well as the needles and leaves that were on the tree tops when they were processed.
It wasn't what I was looking for but i didn't want to burn bridges since my firend had arranged for the arborist to meet me out at the compost yard in the snow late on a Friday.

I left in my truck overnight the unloaded it into a makeshift compost bin by forking it over the fence.  It was steaming like it was about to burst into flame so I know it will continue to compost:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010056.jpg)

I also hooked up for a deal on vermiculite and had to do something with it, so now I have a Vermiculite tower against my back fence. (yeah it is a lot but I'm not going to need all of it and am sharing with fellow SPF member Roswell.):

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010058.jpg)


TODAY:

Level the last nes bed in the back
Interior storage work on the shed (shelves and ?)
Mel's Mix making since my aparagus will be here next week
Seed starting






Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Mel on February 14, 2010, 10:06:46 AM
Good lord, cohutt!  That's looks like at least 50 cu ft. of Vermiculite!  I hope Roswell has a big garden as well.

Mel
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 14, 2010, 11:08:12 AM
Actually, 46 bags x 2cf/bag = 92 cf total

Yeah I kind of went overboard on it, but a friend is cutting me a deal to get it out of his warehouse and I'll need up to half of it just for the 224 sq ft of new beds I have built now (1/3 of volume @ 10" deep) and I plan on building more......



Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on February 14, 2010, 07:29:25 PM
I saw your Vermiculite pile and only one word came to mind...

(http://pix.motivatedphotos.com/2009/6/10/633802202918840145-excellent.jpg)

You rock Cohutt!  +1 Big Time!

Cohutt,
Did the walls on your original garden get injured in the snow. It looked like they were sagging. I saw it is supposed to snow a couple inches tonight too. Also, do you have a cover on one of those beds in the left corner or is that a big pile of snow?  How is your indoor lettuce doing?


And Mel, my garden isn't very big... yet  ;)  Cohutt though is giving me a big jump start for my own garden and thread. The man is an inspiration to us all, that's why he's the Guru.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 14, 2010, 08:11:25 PM
The garden is fine=

I have the remnants of the deer netting around the orignal garden; it keeps cats and dog at bay and apparently it catches wet snow better than anything.  That's what is sagging around the border.
the front left is a little 3x3 cold frame i made to cover the lettuce still in the garden. it held up fine.

indoor lettuce is ok, it is a little leggy now.  We've been taking a leaf or two off of all the inside and outside plants a couple times a week for a fresh salad.  the outside lettuce has better texture and more intense flavor though.

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on February 14, 2010, 08:17:17 PM
I saw your Vermiculite pile and only one word came to mind...

(http://pix.motivatedphotos.com/2009/6/10/633802202918840145-excellent.jpg)

You rock Cohutt!  +1 Big Time!

Cohutt,
Did the walls on your original garden get injured in the snow. It looked like they were sagging. I saw it is supposed to snow a couple inches tonight too. Also, do you have a cover on one of those beds in the left corner or is that a big pile of snow?  How is your indoor lettuce doing?


And Mel, my garden isn't very big... yet  ;)  Cohutt though is giving me a big jump start for my own garden and thread. The man is an inspiration to us all, that's why he's the Guru.

I spied that pile as well Mister Ros. Ain't no man alive need that much vermiculite, none. Get me some while ya at it.   ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 15, 2010, 06:40:12 AM
It isn't so tall now- 2 1/2 of them are gone off the top with 5" of Mel's mix now down in the asparagus bed.

It's ok though-  I found 5 more stowed under the house from last summer.  Doh!

:)

No snow here, just some serious rain overnight and some cold gales blowing this morning. (I'll do some indoor work this morning...... Brrrrrrrrrr.  )
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 20, 2010, 06:51:36 AM
This morning I managed to get the free load of dairy cow manure I was after; unfortunately is is nastily fresh so I'll need to compost it before adding it to the new beds.    I'm about to got start after I think about how I'm going to do the composting.  I think at the end of each bed I'm going to put a 3' diameter wire cage to do it so I won't be moving this heavy wet stuff all over my yard. 

Off to fork manure before the springs on my truck warp lol.  Can you guys smell it?  (I can. )

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010059.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on February 20, 2010, 12:20:12 PM
I have manure envy!
:hare:
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 20, 2010, 05:56:02 PM
I got to meet Roswell today- he used a few bags of cheap vermiculite as an excuse to escape in-laws at his house.    He can testify that the stuff was "fresh"; some real barnyard funk was in the air while the stuff was drying in the 3 temporary compost cages I threw together to hold it....

It was a beautiful day here today- Ros and I were comfortable in short sleeve tee shirts while we toured cohutt gardens :)

Besides meeting a fellow TSPF prepper....
I got the manure picked up and unloaded
I cleaned up my original garden, getting ready to sow the first early greens of the season (spinach)
I scavenged some decent cardboard and finished lining the remaining mega beds ahead of soil mixing tommorrow.
And I got some seeds started inside (a little later than I should have).

random shots at the end of the day:

cardboard and manure stacks

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010061.jpg)

More cardboard and another manure stack

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010062.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010060.jpg)

Cardboard base installed in the short (12')  bed after removing and leveling some of the chipped tree mulch:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010063.jpg)


how much better was today that last Saturday?  Substantially

Last Saturday:  :)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010054.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on February 20, 2010, 06:20:48 PM
I spy a perfect spot fer chikins, Ma did too.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 20, 2010, 07:06:45 PM
I spy a perfect spot fer chikins, Ma did too.

Yeah I haven't made any plans for the area up above the Camellia other than the 3x16 asparagus bed that's allready tucked in behind it.  
There'd be plenty of space for a little coop and run, even with a wad of raspberry and/or blackberry canes up there too.  I think the open area is around 30x40 ft at a minimum.

The only other place is right up next to the house which would also be right under the screen porch/deck of my close neighbor. They're friends and I figure it'd be better to put a little space between domestic fowl and their outdoor living space.  The area in the back doesn't intrude on anyone's space, either visually or olfactory-wise.

Not saying we'll do it, just keeping options open.  :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: CharlieFoxtrot on February 22, 2010, 11:42:12 AM
Newbie question here:  why did you line the base of the raised beds with cardboard? 
PS thanks for these posts they are very motivating!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on February 22, 2010, 12:34:28 PM
I believe it was to ensure that no grass or anything will come up through his garden. You can use landscaping cloth too. However, cardboard will decompose and compost over time so, after a while all the good little worms can break through. Grass in garden bad, worms good.  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 22, 2010, 04:54:18 PM
Newbie question here:  why did you line the base of the raised beds with cardboard? 
PS thanks for these posts they are very motivating!

Thank you, posting it motivates me as well.....

Roswell is right- to give a barrier for the early part of the growing season.   

Personally I don't like landscape cloth anymore- I had some leftover that i edged an area with last year but the cardboard works as well if not better.  I have had bermuda, zoysia and that awful nutgrass stuff all push through landscape cloth before.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: trucker larry on February 25, 2010, 06:59:03 PM
Something I have used in the past is the "bubble wrap" solar cover for a pool. Lay the solar cover out on the grass, add 4 hours of sun, and you have dead grass. Worked so well not even weeds grew that year.
(For those guessing, yes, it was "unintentional" when I found out how well this method of grass-killing worked  ;D )
This method is particularly good for large-ish  areas (say, 18' x 24').
 I have also used clear "painters plastic" to scorch-earth smaller sections. This has the advantage of
a) not needing a pool
b) cheap
c) being able to tailor the size/shape of the area being killed
Using the latter, you do need more sunlight, 12 hours of full sun would be enuff to do the job. I don't know if it burns seeds, I just know that after doing this, not even crabgrass/clover/weeds will sprout for months.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: trucker larry on February 25, 2010, 07:09:34 PM
Cohutt,
 Considering your problem last year w/ Dog Vomit Fungus, have you considered getting rid of the woodchips? When I first saw the picture of the back area w/ all that great (and free) wood chip mulch, I was seriously envious. But I started thinking of the potential problems, not only with fungus, but as a breeding ground for pests. Not too many beneficial insects would use it to nest, i think. And once the pests make a home in all that mulch, it would sure be a bitch to try to get them rooted out of there...
Don't get me wrong: I have no experience with that type of problem, but I also have never mulched that large an area, especially with a soon to be buffet a short crawl away.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: trucker larry on February 25, 2010, 07:28:00 PM
After looking at your pictures showing the cardboard, I noticed the shadows and the way they are falling across the 3 new beds. It appears to me that you won't be able to grow vertically except in the box closest to the fence (without seriously shading the other boxes). The picture with the snow probably shows it best. Granted I don't know the time the pic was taken or the exact orientation of the yard so I may be completely off base here... But just take the corn you grew last year: If you planted that same corn in the middle new box, how much sunlight would it "steal" from the box to the left and right before and after noon?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 25, 2010, 08:03:12 PM
Good points Larry-

My first year of trying this gave me quite a bit of education on seasonal sun angles and alignment.  Yes I was aware of the general conditions before but it is amazing how much you remember it when you are horrified to realize the tree you thought wasn't a factor starts casting shadows on parts of your garden in Late August.   I promise you will learn a lot about it this year too lol.

Orientation of the beds vs true north is important when it comes to interplanting and working around the different heights and sun requirements of whatever you are trying to grow.

The beds in the original plot are all along N/S/E/W alignment and have a little space between them so.

The new longer beds all run due north and south. I could have fit more in if they had the same alignment of the fence but that wasn't the main goal.   Taller plants will be on the north ends and shorter on the southern. 

In regards to the fence shadows, I'm not concerned.  The snow pictures were taken at 9:30 in the morning in the middle of Feb- the sun is low on the horizon still but the angle improves dramatically after the last frost date here in April when I'll need sunlight.  The fence is around 8' high but there is a minimum of 12 feet to the closest corner of the beds.  The cardboard pictures were taken at 4:58 PM on the 20th of Feb.  During the summer the sun will be cooking the same ground still even at 5:00. 

So since I don't grow much in Feb I can live with it although it is cold as hell in the shade sometimes while I'm trying to build this out. 

BTW i found some odd corn i am trying this year that supposedly grows only 2 1/2 to 3' tall.  It is the heirloom variety Jade Blue (or Blue Jade?) available at seed savers and other heirloom providers. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 25, 2010, 08:16:57 PM
I just noticed the mulch post in there too

On fungus- the dog vomit slime mold was a gross, somewhat novel intruder into my beds but was harmless.  The whole cycle was only 48 or 72 hours.   I'm sure I'll have some more invasions this year too but I'll just deal with it I guess.

I think the mulch will accomplish what I want it to do as it decays over the next couple of years.  I want it to smother all the junk that was growing back there and give me a somewhat clean slate to work with. 

I guess my biggest concern is with slugs but didn't have any issues last year with them in the bagged mulch. 

A couple of people I know locally actually have the tree service guys dump the mulch in their yards every couple of years for similar use and they haven't complained of issues in their gardens. 

I guess I'll observe and find out as the year progresses, which is pretty much the same for everything else too.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 28, 2010, 07:03:30 AM
It was a nice day here but I spent no time on this project- had to head north to find out why the power bill jumped 400% for the month ending Feb 17 @ the mountain bol.   
I had some ideas what might be causing this but still halfway expected to find that someone had moved in since nobody had checked it out since before Christmas. 

Once there the problem was apparent; I didn't even have to get out of the truck to figure it out LOL:

(sorry for the larger pics but i wnated to inspect everything more closely from my chair here before i went back up.)
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Feb2010001.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Feb2010003.jpg)

Insdie the pumphouse, an artesian well that gobble up $5 of power per day; the good news is that we seem to have an unlimited supply of water available from this well. Also I should be able to fix it for under $10 the next trip up...
 
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Feb2010004.jpg)

While I was up there I took care of a large fallen oak; having a new large chainsaw makes life so much easier- the base of the tree was 28" and the new Stihl gobbled it up without pause.  I retired a 20 year old woodboss 026 and put a meatier 390 with a 20" bar in service. :) :) :)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Feb2010005.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Feb2010007.jpg)

Today is back to garden work at home.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: monkeybird on February 28, 2010, 07:20:56 AM
Cohutt - I need you at my house!  Great inspiration.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on February 28, 2010, 07:24:10 AM
Wow.  So, any idea of the cause of the break?  I'd assume the short term fix was unplugging the pump?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on February 28, 2010, 07:58:18 AM
Frozen pipe a do it erry time C.

BTW...who is ya electrician?  :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on February 28, 2010, 10:23:50 AM
One of the snows up there that had some ice in it must have knocked the power out to everyone on the road for a while.  With the little space heater off line, eventually there would be problems.  I'm just glad it was the pvc and not the expensive stuff.

All I did was take the pump offline by throwing the only breaker box lever with my boot.

Jawja, I figured you might accuse me of that work lol; I promise none of that is mine.  The main stuff is from the early 70s when the setup was installed; some might have come from when we upgraded the pump and added a filter a few years ago.  My fil rigged the wire off of the box on the house side of the breaker so we could shut off the pump but leave a heater or light going.   I figure the mice help out a little along the way too. ;)

I think I'm going tear the whole thing down and build one that is better insulated this summer.  The bottom logs are rotting away and the shingles are about shot too.

It is on the list.

I'll hire out when my own to do list is finished.  ha like that'll happen.....
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: nimzy88 on March 02, 2010, 07:40:26 PM
Atleast that lawn is lookin green  : ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: pappabear on March 02, 2010, 08:09:12 PM
wow cohutt, that was a soggy mess.  I'm glad to see that you have a good attitude about the whole thing.  And by the way, I have a strong case of BOL envy...  hopefully soon, but no dedt and paying the debt down is more important at this time.

+1 buddy.

Pappa Bear
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 02, 2010, 08:26:56 PM
At least that lawn is lookin green  : ;)
LOL...
Funny but this really will be a good thing.  The wild hogs tore that part of the yard to hell 3 or 4 winters ago (See below) and the ground was as smooth as an artillery range after that. I noticed some of the rougher spots had been softened enough to settle back into grade some.  

pappa bear, be patient and you will find your spot if you kill debt first.  I'm almost 50 so it didn't happen the year I entered the work force.((understatement.  ha. ))

after the rooting- any wonder I hate hogs?  the pump house would be just out of the picture to the right.
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Hog%20damage%20dec%202006/IMG_0234.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on March 03, 2010, 06:30:46 AM
I keep trying to tell you Cohutt. You don't have a hog problem. You just have a shortage of BBQ sauce  ;) 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 03, 2010, 07:18:54 PM
My wife asks me why I won't do things like everyone else anymore. 

I don't know really.  In this case I had seen a security light at a friend's house and asked about it. Flourex - some sort of high output fluorescent.  I need to add another flood light at the house and decided to try one-
After reading some about the quality of the light these put out (google kept pulling up dope growing forums on "flourex grow light" searches lol) I figured I take the shop light back to the basement and do a temporary rig with the flourex.

It is a lot brighter than it appears in the pic and just might work, especially with some reflector boxing around the flats...  will let you all know.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010072.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: trucker larry on March 03, 2010, 07:37:10 PM
Cohutt,
  After seeing what the hogs did to your yard, I ain't gonna complain about the tunnels the one vole I have creates again!

  For the shop light rig you have, how long do you plan on keeping it on? I have read other places about 17 hrs for flourescents but since your light is so much brighter, was wondering if you plan on adjusting the time... Not an idle question, since I plan on stealing your idea.  ;D
I just happen to have a quad 500 watt shoplight but hadn't thought of using it for starting my seeds and am now thumping my head on why it hadn't occured to me!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 03, 2010, 07:51:50 PM
Honestly i don't really know how long I sould leave it on.  I have a great "wall of window" that catches the southern sun to the right of the picture; I guess I'll give them more of a rest from the lgiht on days they get a lot of natural sun.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on March 03, 2010, 08:19:15 PM
I wanna see your tan after you check on the seedlings   ;D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 04, 2010, 06:13:13 PM
This morning I moved stuff around since it looks like the sun will be out for 3 or 4 days in a row here.  I came back by the house at lunch to make sure the seedlings weren't wilting.  I think I have my system for the rest of the seed starting stage worked out now.

Good sun from around 9:00 AM until around 4:00. 
Electric oil filled radiator for gentle local heat supplement (mainly at night). It fits conveniently under the plant shelf I out up last fall for lettuce so it can help warm soil from underneath too.
high output fluorescent flood light clamped to an adjustable tripod for supplemental light.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010073.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010075.jpg)


The lettuce gets a little leggy inside with no supplemental light and it isn't as robust as the outside lettuce protected under plastic, but it still beat the hell out of Kroger bag "lettuce".  (I just realized you can see the outdoor lettuce patch and the rigged cover in the background)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010074.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 04, 2010, 06:28:22 PM
This evening after work I put the season's second direct sowing of seeds out - 4 squares or 64 each of St Valery & Dragon carrots from SSE-
Last Sunday I put 3 types of spinach in, a total of 10 squares or 90 plants (assuming the sprout). 

It is finally beginning to feel like spring is coming. These plantings compliment what is already in having overwintered successfully- 9 squares of lettuce, 5 of Spartan's gifted garlic, and 6 of Bloomsdale spinach that has come back to life. 

A minute ago I couldn't help messing with the light set up some more to see how it cood hone in on one flat of plants, so the lettuce seedlings that are up are currently soaking it in:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010076.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KnoxMan on March 04, 2010, 06:49:21 PM
Hey cohutt. the set up looks great .... the only thing that troubles me is that I believe that you usually put garlic out in the fall . Sometime around September ... I could be totally wrong .... might want to check into it .... Just trying to help out ...
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 04, 2010, 06:59:46 PM
True dat Knox. 

It must have been lost in the grammar, but all this was planted last fall  ;)


These plantings compliment what is already in having overwintered successfully- 9 squares of lettuce, 5 of Spartan's gifted garlic, and 6 of Bloomsdale spinach that has come back to life. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: pappabear on March 04, 2010, 09:18:47 PM
Cohutt... ur lettuce looks great.  When do I get my invite for a salad?   :P

Pappa Bear
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on March 05, 2010, 05:40:48 AM
Looking good C.

That roll of tape looks very familiar.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KnoxMan on March 05, 2010, 07:30:35 AM
Sorry . I must have been skimming again ..... I do that when I am in a hurry ...... and with a 2 year old , I am always in a hurry LOL..... Looks great man .
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 05, 2010, 11:48:11 AM
Looking good C.

That roll of tape looks very familiar.

:) it should. :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 06, 2010, 09:10:31 PM
pretty day here.
got some stuff done

the only thing documented was some more soil mixing slowly filling the mega-beds before planting next month.

I lay the tarp over the bed then layer the compost, vermiculite and peat on it.  To mix it up really well it only takes a couple rolls of the tarp. the mix always looks light colored due to the dry vermiculite and peat; after it rains the color changes to a nice dark potting soil look.

This was early on and by the time i quit I had all the beds to 8" deep or so. I may go a little further but this will do it I can't.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010077.jpg)

after:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010078.jpg)

I managed to mix almost 25 cf of it today. This doesn't sound like a lot until you do it, but it gets old.

I also chainsawed some stuff for a neighbor and moved a bunch of brush and limbs to the curb.


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: pappabear on March 07, 2010, 06:59:13 PM
sounds like a fun day cohutt, had to mostly get running done with Momma, so I didn't get much done.

Pappa Bear
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on March 07, 2010, 07:20:41 PM
The fence and beds look fantastic, Cohutt. I can tell you really enjoy your work.

Thanks for the tip on mixing large volumes of soil using a tarp, I'll be using that method later in the spring.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: nimzy88 on March 08, 2010, 01:46:46 PM
Cohutt thats a great tip for mixing soil, I mixed mine to day, and it being my first sfg I had already put the twine across the box before the soil so I ended up mixing the soil by hand on a tarp next to it and then dumping bucketfuls into the sf box.
I was also happy to see you mention the soil will get darker with some water. I was a little worried that I put to much vermiculite in the mix as it looked really light compared to regular potting soil.
Great job and thanks for letting us learn with you.
Nimzy
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 08, 2010, 05:39:22 PM
Great nimzy, glad you are taking the plunge.  Mel's SFG book has lots of pictures on tarp mixing; made sense to me after I tried a bed by hand last year.  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on March 08, 2010, 06:36:36 PM
Chapter 2 has begun

It rained here today, so I was able to spend more time on the forum reading. I finally made the time to read "Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1" from beginning to end.

I laughed out loud at some of the banter between you and commenters  :D   (and your "Shazam!" comment still has me laughing  :D :D :D...goober peas!)
I cried at the windstorm damage :'( and was disgusted by the Dog Vomit Slime Mold  :badgarden:)

I felt your pain and your joy as I read each entry.

Now, I have a better idea of how to integrate my rain barrels into this year's rainwater harvesting project. I have a similar run and grade to my garden patch and also have been wanting to extend my potable, pressurized line to the same area.

I will be on the lookout for one of those Weed Wrenches...the native mesquite here in central Texas is a tough, repeat, unwanted customer on my property...at least the deep-rooted ones are. I will likely have my neighbor with mad welding skills fabricate a "grubber" of some sort...this will be the concept I take to him.

After seeing pictures of your carpentry jigs, and the way you work, I have to say that I would loan you my tools any day of the week. (High praise, and you know it.  ;D)

The trellis netting is something I will incorporate this year.

Finally, seeing pictures of your lush veggie garden from last summer has given me a much needed kick in the pants to broaden my horizons even further.

Thanks for opening up your world to us, Cohutt. The word 'inspirational' is not quite powerful enough, but it will suffice for now. You certainly imparted volumes of experience, research and knowledge in that excellent thread. +1
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: CenTexPrep on March 08, 2010, 06:54:31 PM
...the native mesquite here in central Texas is a tough...

Where abouts in central TX.

Georgetown here
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 08, 2010, 07:31:15 PM
Crispy Critter,

I wondered where Karma #50 came from ;).

Seriously, that's all very kind of you to say.

When I started I really had no idea; I still don't know exactly where it will lead but I do know I'm not there yet. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on March 08, 2010, 07:37:52 PM
Where abouts in central TX.

Georgetown here
The closest town between us is Lockhart. I'm in the northern tip of Gonzales county, in the southern section of the Texas Post Oak Belt. That means I've got native oaks and pines and rolling topography...at least a 2-acre slice of it.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 09, 2010, 07:17:09 PM
Strawberry pyramid ??

I came up with this idea last night as I was dozing off and actually remembered it today.

The center bed of last year's project is 4x4 and I always figured I could do something a little different with it and figured some sort of strawberry pyramid might work.  

I put some Pythagorean brain cells on the idea and came up with the dimensions to cascade each square 45 degrees off from the one below it.   The scrap came from the fence project, tonight cut it to length+ then ripped it all to 2 1/2".  

I stacked it roughly where it would be and asked Mrs C for an opinion.  She said "cool, when can I pick strawberries?", so it is officially a "go" now.

Crackberry picture is phuzzy but it was what I had before I moved the wood out of tonight's approaching rain and ate some dinner.   The existing bed kind of disappeared into the dark; hopefully you get the idea.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010079.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on March 09, 2010, 07:27:52 PM
Looks good.  I have a strawberry pyramid coming.  I didn't even think about building it myself.  Good show.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on March 09, 2010, 07:41:14 PM
Very nice sir. That is going to look awesome when they are in full bloom.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: CenTexPrep on March 09, 2010, 07:43:39 PM
I was planning on putting a pyramid in the center of my raised beds.  Now I'm doing that!  Wife loves it too.  Thanks.

I feel I should be paying Cohutt a consulting fee for all the great info over the last year
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 10, 2010, 05:11:58 PM
Cash or precious metals only please.


:)



6 inches of rain here since bedtime last night.

It made for some cool plump lettuce for dinner tonight.  (I'm still just clipping the bottom leaves off of the 3x3 grid I planted last October. )

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010081.jpg)

The speckled leaves might look a little spoiled or something in the light, but it is just speckled Romaine ( "Forellenschuss" from SSE)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: CenTexPrep on March 10, 2010, 06:29:12 PM
Do you accept prepaid phone cards?  :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: buddha on March 10, 2010, 09:06:27 PM
you're making me hungry, cohutt.  looks delicious!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 11, 2010, 08:49:12 PM
The rain stopped this afternoon.  

This evening I felt productive and made 2 more beds.  

One is 3x3' and was made from the leftover 2x12" I had.  Potatoes maybe?

The other is the first of maybe 3 I plan to build this size - 2x8'.  These are for pole beans; I have an idea for trellissing and narrower beds work better.  Pictures to follow this summer. :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: DeltaEchoVictor on March 11, 2010, 09:33:06 PM
That's good stuff Cohutt.

Very inspirational & I should have stickied these threads ages ago.  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: OKGranny on March 13, 2010, 11:54:23 PM
I have read all of chapter 1 and now am caught up on chapter 2. It looks wonderful and so productive but totally exhausting to even contemplate that much work. Of course I'm nearly a decade older and definitely out of shape so maybe that 'splains it. I love the looks of you BOL too, it's going to be awesome.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 14, 2010, 06:13:28 AM
Thanks OKgranny, it has been more than I intended on- I'll slow down pretty soon and enjoy the "fruits and vegetables of my labor".


Yesterday I got the lettuce seedlings into the garden, then made the finish cuts on the strawberry pyramid and got each layer screwed together. 
In the afternoon I made the trip to the mountains to repair the pump plumbing; i had to go back into town to get a part (watch male vs female and vice versa when dealing with threaded pvc lol) then it took forever to get the old pvc threaded section out of the brass valave threads.  I had to scribe the brass threads with a framing nail several times to partially repair the damage to the threads where I cut the pvc out too.   Eventually i got it repaired but I had to soften the new male pvc threads with some pvc cement to get it to thread.

While I was letting the repairs cure some before testing I attacked part of the overgrown grape trellis - underneath I found several  "vinezillas" that out to produce this year once i finish the pruning and touch up the training a bit.  Sorry for the quality- it was raining and almost dusk when i took these with my crackberry.

The queen of the vines, bigger around than my forearm 3 ft off the ground:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/IMG00260.jpg)

others

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/IMG00261.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/IMG00263.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on March 14, 2010, 10:10:52 AM
vinezillas....

yeah those should produce!!!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on March 14, 2010, 10:12:57 AM
wow
I bet those vines were producing even before that cabin was built.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 14, 2010, 06:58:02 PM
I staiined the parts to the strawberry pyramid this morning then put it in this afternoon.

Easy on the back painting hanger:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010082.jpg)

El Cheapo Cohutt removed the mix from the center of the bed (in wheelbarrow in background) and then tacked old bricks and rocks in a pile underneath the pyramid so I wouldn't waste a bunch more Mel's mix

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010089.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010088.jpg)


I filled it back with the excavated mix and still needed to to add a partial wheelbarrow more to get it level. I soaked it after the picture and lit settled a good bit so I'll add more and repeat this week before I plant next weekend.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010090.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 14, 2010, 07:10:21 PM
I also made a couple more of the 2x8 beds out of some of the 1x8"s.  I'm going to use two of these for pole beans and one for potatoes.  The 3x3 bed I made the other evening from the last 12' 2x12 bed is in the foreground.  I will try and place these this week now that I'll have some daylight to work in when I get home in the evening.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010087.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010086.jpg)



(Also noticed my the spinach perked up since last week)


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010084.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: OKGranny on March 14, 2010, 08:06:50 PM
Those are some grape vines, wow. My husband insists on calling them "wait a minute vines" cause if you're out in the woods and you get tangled up in them all you can do is yell wait a minute to the people you're with while you try and hack your way through.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 16, 2010, 08:48:40 PM
I haven't posted much on my first seed starting attempts seed starting cuz I really wasn't sure how it was going. 

I opted to start the seeds in vermiculite and then transplant the sprouts into peat pots.  It actually went pretty well I guess; I had decent germination and maybe a 90% + survival rate once in the peat pots.  I lifted a 2 bulb 48" shop lit from my basement initially and then rigged the high output fluorescent outdoor floodlight to a tripod.  My window gets enough sun to have grown lettuce in the winter and it seems to be doing OK with these.

OK so here you are:

3 types of tomatoes and a bunch of teeny ground cherries sowed in the vermiculite on Feb21 and transplanted a week or 10 days later maybe.  The ground cherries are the smallones in the front, the big ones in the back right are Roma VF, the smaller ones in the back left are Martino's Roma and Red Brandywine are in the middle right.
I had the light supplementing the tray to the right all afternoon and the plants all started leaning that direction after the sun passed (left to right as well). 




(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010091.jpg)

This tray has some odd stuff in it- The back is one Tommy-Toe cherry tomato that was sprouted at the same time plus 4 pots that I just moved some more germinated seeds into last night.  I tried the "seed in a wet papertowel in a Ziploc under the refrigerator method" and it worked like charm.  The seeds are about to push out.

The bunch in the forground are the surprise grab bag of tomatoes that sprouted from the consolidated vermiculite after i had given up on any more germinations.  About 3 days after I emptied all the little Tupperware sprouting containers into one larger one they appeared.  I figured they deserved to live if they fought that hard to find the surface after being 1 or 2" deep and about to be discarded.   They were part of the 2/21 sowing; the all had very small sprouts but 2 to 3" tap roots.  I moved these survivors to peat pots last night and they all seem to be responding to the attention very well.
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010093.jpg)

The Romas and brandywines were getting a little leggy so I started to transplant them to 4" pots.  I put the peat pot on the bottom of the empty plastic pot then filled in round it and brought level of the soil up the stems a good bit; I'll finish this tommorrow...

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010092.jpg)

Finally, a picture of my mini "Little Shop of Horrors" seedling- an Emerald artichoke.  These are my oddball experiment this year; Mrs C is Artichoke crazy and if I get any yield I'll be a hero.  But the real reason is these thistle are spectacular plants and an interesting addition even if there are no 'chokes to harvest.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010094.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on March 16, 2010, 09:05:56 PM
Lookin' good Cohutt!  You are a busy man.  What are the toothpicks for in the artichoke pots?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on March 16, 2010, 09:14:48 PM

"Feed me, Seymour Cohutt"!   ;D

I can definitely see the resemblance to Audrey Junior!

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: pappabear on March 16, 2010, 10:48:13 PM
cohutt...

i noticed that you were "painting" ur boards for ur beds.  What are you using and are you at all concerned about the chemical leeching into the soil around, in, and under your beds???

Let me know, i would like to put some type of coating on my beds as well but was concerned about the chemicals and decided against it.

thanx,

pappa bear
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 17, 2010, 04:36:13 AM
johngalt the toothpicks were just pot IDs - half of one pointed up = artichoke .   I am too cheap to put a nice 2 cent white label stick in each pot lol

pappa bear-

on the the original beds that I put in last year i used a water based stain on the outside of the boards strictly to make them more eye appealing from the house.  Since the strawberry structure was added to this I used some of the last of the stain to match it.

As far as leaching chemicals, no, I'm not really worried about it  (Now someone may jump in and tell me definitively all the awful things I'm going to be ingesting).   I think we all are hyper tuned to be sensitive to this when we wake up an and realize what we have been eating from the food factory all these years and desire to have "pure" nutritious food in our backyards.   We have control over things for the first time and it is empowering-  Nothing wrong with this, it is just that at some point I believe it all follows the law of rapidly diminishing returns.   

So for the record I used treated lumber with commercial water based stain on the outside.  I water my plants with raincatch that comes off of a new roof with architectural asphalt based shingles on it.  Birds and squirrels crap on it too I'm sure.  the ground under my beds were lined with cardboard probably made 10 miles west of my house @ the Temple Inland mill using the kraft process which is a really harsh sulfate bath. 

Despite all this I feel much better about food grown in may backyard than food grown in California or south Florida or Argentina or .......  :)

 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on March 17, 2010, 04:56:01 AM
...snip...
Despite all this I feel much better about food grown in may backyard than food grown in California or south Florida or Argentina or .......  :)
 

Well said, Cohutt. I went through the exact same thought process just a few days ago when putting pieces of cardboard down in my garden expansion. One of the larger pieces was some Chinese cardboard. The discussion I had with myself at that moment followed the arguments you put forth above.

I haven't had the ability to divert finances for purchasing wood treatments or the more expensive hardwoods for my raised beds. I am just using untreated pine planks left over from a friend's large shelving project. They have lasted two years with only minor warping. My long-term plan includes harvesting thornless honey locust for future ground-contact timber...but that will take a few more seasons to implement.

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on March 17, 2010, 05:04:34 AM
johngalt the toothpicks were just pot IDs - half of one pointed up = artichoke .   I am too cheap to put a nice 2 cent white label stick in each pot lol

I have 2 words for you about cheap plant labels, Mini Blinds.  If you are taking one down, cut it into 5" strips and you will have enough labels for several years.  You can even go out of your way and get new mini blinds for about $5, not bad for several hundred labels.

I'm very impressed.  Hard to believe that you are only a year or 2 into gardening.  Quite a lot of progress. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 17, 2010, 12:20:25 PM
My long-term plan includes harvesting thornless honey locust for future ground-contact timber...but that will take a few more seasons to implement.


Funny you netion that- one of the plant species that gets in the way at my BOL is black locust. I made looked around Saturday when I was up there to find a couple that might be good bed borders.  They aren't thornless but they aren't as bad as an angry honey locust...


[/quote]
I have 2 words for you about cheap plant labels, Mini Blinds.  If you are taking one down, cut it into 5" strips and you will have enough labels for several years.  You can even go out of your way and get new mini blinds for about $5, not bad for several hundred labels.

I'm very impressed.  Hard to believe that you are only a year or 2 into gardening.  Quite a lot of progress. 

I threw out some mini blinds last year at work. :( 

Yes Fritz, everyone should remember that I didn't even decide to do anything until 11 months ago in April 2009.  I started by getting my compost in order and adding a truckload of manure to the mix.   I didn't even get seeds in the ground in the new beds until midJune, 2 months after the last frost.

I'm not saying this because I think I'm special or anything; I think it is good to point it out to reinforce to anyone considering starting a garden.  Most any of us can do a LOT in a short period if we make the decision to move ahead with it.  Personally I think this is truly a journey vs a destination, so incremental progress is all I am after, a little each day mostly.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on March 17, 2010, 12:33:15 PM
Quote
I am too cheap to put a nice 2 cent white label stick in each pot lol

My wife came up with a great use for all the yogurt containers I've been saving...she cut them into strips for using as plant labels..they actually work really well.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on March 17, 2010, 12:40:57 PM
I'm not saying this because I think I'm special or anything; I think it is good to point it out to reinforce to anyone considering starting a garden.  Most any of us can do a LOT in a short period if we make the decision to move ahead with it.  Personally I think this is truly a journey vs a destination, so incremental progress is all I am after, a little each day mostly.
Exactly what I meant by it.  You decided to make a change, and you followed through.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: OKGranny on March 17, 2010, 02:00:12 PM
Oh my gosh I hadn't even considered trying artichokes as we don't live where they are 'suppose' to grow but if you get even one I'm planting them next year. I love, love, love artichokes and they are much better right off the plant than they are from my local stores.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 18, 2010, 07:38:14 PM
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010095.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010096.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010098.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010106.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20Feb%202010/Garden2010103.jpg)



Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on March 18, 2010, 07:44:40 PM
Strawberries!  What variety did you get?

VERY nice Cohutt. +1 for Cohutt's Eden
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on March 18, 2010, 08:07:23 PM
I'll be glad when my strawberries come in.  I sure would like to get them started.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 18, 2010, 08:42:03 PM

Honeoye June bearing. 

I have no idea how this will work out and I'm sure some innocent plants will sacrifice themselves for the sake of my education.  :)

Still the best way to learn eh?

Mrs C said she'd rather have a short strawberry orgy in early summer vs picking a berry or three here and there over a season.







Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on March 18, 2010, 09:04:26 PM
Looking good man. You are really opening things up back there. You can see the bell!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 18, 2010, 09:22:39 PM
Yes Ros I even drained it and got the bird skeletons and leaf goo out of it; it was pretty nasty so i figured it had to be a good addition to my compost piles :)  I am planning on grabbing a couple of comet goldfish to eat larvae all summer.  I've had some live several years without me having to feed anything to them

I was using the crowbar you see there to probe for the shale flagstones covered up by years of leaves and mother nature's composting; It actually rings the bell pretty well even when it is full of water.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: pappabear on March 18, 2010, 11:40:57 PM
looks outstanding cohutt... keep it up.

pappa bear
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: CenTexPrep on March 19, 2010, 08:01:55 PM
I'm off to the Tin Foil Hat forum to discuss the location of the REAL Liberty Bell.  Who would have thought is was so far south of Philadelphia...

Seriously looks good tho...  I like the roof on your tool shed
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 19, 2010, 08:27:53 PM
lol

The bell is the original fire bell for my town.  Back before radio, if a fire broke out the bell would be rung from its spot on top of one of the downtown hills to garner the volunteer firefighters. It is huge and has to be 2 or 3 inches thick  It was here when I bought the house in 1987; the house has been here for a little while- this old house celebrates its 140th birthday this year.

BTW I used white vinegar to take some of the sheen off of the metal roofing before I put it up-.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: CenTexPrep on March 19, 2010, 08:33:00 PM
good idea for the vinegar treatment.

That's awesome to have a bit of history in your house as well as your backyard.  lookin gooooooooooood
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 20, 2010, 08:38:07 PM
this afternoon i worked on the beds along the fence line.  My plans for them are to put cardboard down and then some decently composted woodchip mulch.  I have to do something cuz  else the privet and god knows what else will wake up.  Besides Mrs C said I needed to clean up the fence line before Easter, when her family descends upon us.

First I ripped out 8 6" x 8' strips from the composite plastic roof decking I scavenged.  This stuff is pretty stout but flexible; i think it is 1/2", maybe 3/8" thick.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010109.jpg)

Then i measured and set a line 30" off the fence and dug out under it.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010107.jpg)


Cardboard

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010110.jpg)


mulch


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010111.jpg)


more, with a curve at the corner post to make some room for passage of lawnmowers and wheelbarrels


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010112.jpg)

Found some more carboard around the corner behind a store

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010113.jpg)

I plan on sticking a few plants in it- what exactly I'm not sure.

tommorrow I actually plant some stuff.



Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on March 20, 2010, 09:10:09 PM
Once again, very nice cohutt....with all that structure, you've got your own little English garden going.  Looks great!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 21, 2010, 07:38:57 PM
I'm glad asparagus only needs to be planted once then is good for 10 or 15 years or more; this was more work that I thought just because of all the awkward bending over to get the plants just right before covering. 

I had already prepped the bed, a long 16x3 one built from 2x12s.   4-5” of Mel's mix with some bone meal added over cardboard over woodchips.

First step- soak the crowns for and hour or two before starting.  If you haven't ever seen a bundle of crowns, it is an odd dead looking clump of roots:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010115.jpg)

I had two bundles of 20 for this bed; I figured a 3x13 grid would work.  I started by setting a center line to work off of for the center row. After spading out a wide level trench a couple inches deep,  I marked the side board ever 14” of so and then dropped the crowns in roughly where they would be set:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010114.jpg)

The next step is to cup up some of the soil into a little pyramid or cone and then set the crown on it so that the roots radiate down and around fairly evenly.  You can sort of see this with the small one the left that is in place.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010117.jpg)

The center row is set:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010116.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 21, 2010, 07:43:02 PM
To cover the crowns I mixed 1 part vermiculite, 1 part mushroom compost and 2 parts composted cow manure plus a good dose of bonemeal.  (As usual the dry vermiculite is almost white and makes the mix look light.)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010118.jpg)

Next, the two outside rows

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010120.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010119.jpg)


It started raining some as I covered the rest of the crowns with the manure mixture; not how much darker it looks now with the vermiculite wet.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010121.jpg)

The rain stopped and I finished by adding another couple inches of Mel's mix made with my “regular” yard waste compost.   ( there's that dry vermiculite again....)

Done.  :)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010122.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on March 21, 2010, 07:56:49 PM
Wow, I had no idea asparagus was such a pain in the ass to get planted.  Mrs. C will be happy though I bet.

Good job on the fence line bed by the way. Nice foresight in the curve around your post.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on March 22, 2010, 11:16:10 AM
Thanks for the step by step.  Unfortunately since I'm at work, I can't see any of the pictures.  I'll have to take another look once I get home.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on March 22, 2010, 12:16:34 PM
Thanks for the step by step.  Unfortunately since I'm at work, I can't see any of the pictures.  I'll have to take another look once I get home.

fritz, One of the pictures looks like the final resting place for a bunch of beached sea anemone's.  :D

Cohutt, have you considered planting a fragrant bush at the little curved passage? That way, each time you roll by with a full wheel barrow, sweating from all the exertion, you'll be awarded with a pleasant scent. Just a thought. I live in ranching country, so the smell of other people's profit wafts onto my property every now and then. :P  :P 

I am learning to populate my outer zones with fragrant species that my GF and I both like. No specific recommendations here since everybody's tastes are different, but I'm willing to entertain any suggestions.

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Ori on March 22, 2010, 01:56:29 PM
I am learning to populate my outer zones with fragrant species that my GF and I both like.

I did that with a rosemary bush right next to my door.  It's taken over part of the sidewalk, but it smells so good I just let it grow at will
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 22, 2010, 04:00:46 PM
Actually I bought some lavender seeds and was thinking of putting some it along the fence.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on March 22, 2010, 04:27:25 PM
I am impressed C. That looks really good. 

Granny says "he's working hisself to death".   8)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 22, 2010, 05:27:34 PM
Death by work is OK as long as it is work by choice, right?

And it beats death by sitting on my arse watching a lawn maintenance crew cut my grass, for sure.

No chikins yet though. :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Cheeta68 on March 22, 2010, 06:04:01 PM
Great Progress Cohutt. I was in the back yard over the weekend working on my green house and planting some potatoes is a SFG and remembered Chapter 1. So I looked up Chapter 2 tonight for some inspiration. I got started last year about 2 months later than you did. Thanks for sharing the progress and the tips on asparagus.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 22, 2010, 06:19:25 PM
Thanks and keep digging cheeta.  :)
That reminds me to check on my first potatoes, they're on the dining room table getting some wake up air and light.....
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: evilphish on March 22, 2010, 06:53:38 PM
absolutely amazing.  I'm jealous
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on March 23, 2010, 02:31:01 PM
And it beats death by sitting on my arse watching a lawn maintenance crew cut my grass, for sure.

I agree, as long as you are able. I sure don't enjoy paying ta get da yard work done.  :(
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 28, 2010, 08:00:43 PM
A few things to report on

First, I re-potted some more of my tomatoes, this time Red brandywine and Martinos Roma.

The problem:  even with good southern window sun and a grow light rigged up, some of my tomatoes were getting floppy. (I haven't been running a fan any and think i will start a rotation)


before:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010127.jpg)

After:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010128.jpg)

I just put the peat pot on the bare bottom of the plastic pot and filled in around it.  (I also snipped the 2nd place finisher in this pot)   This worked well with earlier transpants an they are coming on strong:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010125.jpg)


I've been taking the seedling out for some sun and air; Saturday I moved these e out and thought I found the perfect sheltered spot on my patio in a corner where a fence terminates at the house.   A few minutes after i took the picture below, a gust of wind flattened the whole lot.  I moved the smaller ones in to recover then put the others under a plastic sheeting tent.  All foe them we OK by the end of the day and standing straight again.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010129.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 28, 2010, 08:21:47 PM
The artichoke seedlings are slowly coming along; the larger one is the same one I posted the "little shop of horrors" picture of a few days back.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010126.jpg)


Also the potatoes from SSE started budding up and sprouting over the course of last week; I cut them Friday night and let them stand for a couple days before I planted them.  This is the end result- 2 1/2 lbs each of Purple Viking, French Fingerling and German Butterball after the deed:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010123.jpg)

I ended up with 16 pieces for the Purple Viking (BIG potatoes- only took 3 to weight 2.5 lbs) and 28-30 pieces each of the smaller 2. 

I had already ordered from SSE when the Ronniger catalog came in; It is one of the most helpful catalogs I have seen. It isn't all pretty and glossy like some but it has very good planting instructions for the  main 3 types of plants it sells- Potatoes, onion & garlic.   I will order from them next year just because of how helpful this was. (Their selection is great too.  Ronniger's potato planting help page:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010124.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 28, 2010, 08:39:29 PM
Most of the weekend work time was spent doing unglamorous work like finishing the border bed along the fence, finishing the boxwood pruning and generally cleaning up

I did get the chance to cut a few pieces of bamboo from my friend's property.   I cut these just to experiment with a little; if i like what I can do with it I plan on cutting a lot more and to use it all for structures and support.   I didn't even cut the biggest pieces and all of what I brought home was at least 15 feet long after being topped.  I cut 9 1/2 foot poles and then trimmed the leftover top portions:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010131.jpg)

The bases were a lot sturdier than i thought; time to brainstorm on uses for this.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010130.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on March 28, 2010, 08:46:07 PM
Dang. just got done reading chap 1 and 2 all the way through. I am glad I did. One of the things sitting on my counter is a bag of asparagus crowns. The other? Strawberries. Good info on the asparagus. Thanks
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on March 28, 2010, 09:26:31 PM
Cohutt... I've been watching the permaculture class online that Jack recommended awhile back... the instructor has build a very nice bamboo gazebo-type structure in his backyard... pictures shown in one of the early lessons (3,4, or 5, I think). If you have access to a lot of bamboo, it would be a great idea! Very attractive. He was also using it as a vining structure (kiwi, IIRC) to add shade in the hottest summer months.

PS: do you feed the seedlings once they sprout? If so, what do you use and how often? Thanks!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on March 28, 2010, 09:38:48 PM
Cohutt,

You had mentioned chickens in the future. If you make a coop out of bamboo it will be super easy to move around the yard. That is one use for the bamboo in addition to bamboo trellises and bamboo supports. You can even eat it. The Chinese do every day.

As always, excellent work.


Lvschant,
Isn't that class awesome. I am on Ch 4 right now.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on March 28, 2010, 09:40:18 PM
Cohutt, those bamboo sticks are awesome....how about using them to stake your plants...are they flexible at all?  if so maybe use them in place of PVC for hoophouses?  Definitely turn one into a "survial kit" walking stick like in John McCann's = "Build the Perfect Survival Kit".  They look to be beefy enough that you could even cut them to 18" lenghts and pound 1/2 way into the ground for some decorative raised beds?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 29, 2010, 04:47:12 AM
sweetheart's mom, how did in the heck you have time to read all that junk with the kitchen garden project underway?  :)

Lvschant,
The potting soil i fill in with when putting them in the larger pots includes a little compost - that's about it as far as feeding. I don't know if this is good or bad; it was something i didn't think about until they were well hatched.

At a minimum, I plan on using the bamboo for trellis frame for my pole limas and for staking my vining tomatoes. .  Also, I'm sure I can figure out a way to incorporate it with the birdhouse gourds that will be up the back fence.

Bamboo chicken tractor?  gotta get chickens first lol and that's not this year I am afraid.

JG, it seems flexible enough to bend a little but I'm not sure the thicker stronger stuff would be flexible enough for hoop houses.   I'm afraid it I pounded the fresh cut stuff into the ground it would root, sprout and take over my plot like it did my friend's vacant lot. :)

Lots of ideas out there, thanks for the suggestions and if you see anything else bamboo based that is cool let me know.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on March 29, 2010, 06:13:46 AM
Cohutt,

Thanks for posting the new photos. I know it breaks up the work flow, stopping to take meaningful shots which depict a process, but they are motivational and get the creative thoughts flowing.

I've seen young forest bamboo used for scaffolding skirting 4-story buildings in Asia...everything but the planking and dust screen was constructed with bamboo. I have faith you will find a multitude of uses for the stuff. I'm even considering planting some non-clumping bamboo at the lower, north end of my property. I really, really need a windbreak and I am almost willing to suffer another bamboo invasion if it will convert my property from "wind-swept" to "cool breezes".

It looks like Cohutt's Garden 2010 is going to be 'Standing Room Only'   ;D

@lvschant and Roswell: are you referring to the iTunes University videos Jack mentioned? I have limited bandwidth and couldn't justify downloading the chapters after seeing the first one. I know they get better, but I'm relying on folks like you to do the preliminary reviews. Do you have a resource which rates the various chapters or describes what is included in each?

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on March 29, 2010, 07:10:03 AM
Yes... I've been watching the iTunes vids jack mentioned on the show... I admit they are a bit slow-moving on the first couple, but are getting better now that all the introductions and potluck details are out of the way :)

I had forgotten just how much wasted time there is in a college course... we are getting training and information in a much more condensed way with Jack's podcasts!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on March 29, 2010, 07:39:15 AM
Yeah, the first few are more the instructor getting to know the students and them getting to know him. About ch 3 they really start to get into it.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: WoG on March 29, 2010, 09:40:49 AM
I'm glad asparagus only needs to be planted once then is good for 10 or 15 years or more; this was more work that I thought just because of all the awkward bending over to get the plants just right before covering. 

First step- soak the crowns for and hour or two before starting.  If you haven't ever seen a bundle of crowns, it is an odd dead looking clump of roots:
I had two bundles of 20 for this bed; I figured a 3x13 grid would work.  I started by setting a center line to work off of for the center row. After spading out a wide level trench a couple inches deep,  I marked the side board ever 14” of so and then dropped the crowns in roughly where they would be set:
The next step is to cup up some of the soil into a little pyramid or cone and then set the crown on it so that the roots radiate down and around fairly evenly.  You can sort of see this with the small one the left that is in place.

So you just sit them with the part where the strands come together out of the ground (pointing up) and let the stands spread out? Jeez, I almost put them in with the clustered part in the ground...><
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on March 29, 2010, 02:48:54 PM
Quote
Bamboo chicken tractor?  gotta get chickens first lol and that's not this year I am afraid.


But, but...what if a box with a pair of cute lil biddies, heat lamp, waterer, feeder, and feed were delivered to your doorsteps next week? Gratis.  ;D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 29, 2010, 04:14:50 PM
Jawja, that's funny but it's really not funny

Mrs C says she knows where you live and the "favor" would be returned .....you might wake up to find another litter of puppies at your back door.

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 29, 2010, 04:16:57 PM
So you just sit them with the part where the strands come together out of the ground (pointing up) and let the stands spread out? Jeez, I almost put them in with the clustered part in the ground...><

lol, like a school of squid that head-planted into the dirt..... 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on March 29, 2010, 05:31:38 PM

But, but...what if a box with a pair of cute lil biddies, heat lamp, waterer, feeder, and feed were delivered to your doorsteps next week? Gratis.  ;D

haha... better get to work on that bamboo chicken tractor!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on March 29, 2010, 06:25:19 PM
Cohutt,
You gave me an idea. My parents have a bunch of bamboo taking over their backyard that they'd be happy to get rid of. One of my ideas is to cut a couple in half and use as gutters to divert water away from a couple beds I have on a slope.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: sclindah on March 29, 2010, 06:41:28 PM
Quote
You gave me an idea. My parents have a bunch of bamboo taking over their backyard that they'd be happy to get rid of. One of my ideas is to cut a couple in half and use as gutters to divert water away from a couple beds I have on a slope.

I have another idea for you.  I have some friends who are Hmong and every April they go out to the wild bamboo around here and cut the new sprouts coming up and can them in jars or eat them fresh. It tastes a lot like asparagus!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 29, 2010, 09:22:32 PM
Ros I will buy you a pipe if you want. :)  Sometimes just going to homedepot is worth it lol....

This evening I messed with getting the potatoes in and will post details later when I have a little more time.

For now I'll share something i have discovered-

when I plant tiny seeds like lettuce and carrots, i have had spotty germination in part from the soil surface crusting over but also form seed getting moved about by heavy rains or critters.  I have some shade cloth scrap and tried using it as a bed cover immediately after sowing these little seeds.  I wet it every day and it does a good job of keeping the soil surface from drying out.  I've tried both lettuce and spinach this spring with and without the shade cloth covering and the results were much more consistent "with".

The two little side beds I have get cat traffic if not protected- on one I used bird netting to surround it and the other i used shade cloth.  The shade cloth wins hands down


covered:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010132.jpg)

underneath (for perspective on the "boulder" in the foreground, there is about 1/3 of a pecan shell to the left behind the seedling in focus)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010133.jpg)


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on March 29, 2010, 09:25:22 PM
Wow! What a great idea! I'll have to give that a try.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 29, 2010, 09:30:11 PM
Meanwhile, back at the pyramid, the strawberry plants have taken root and are noticeably growing after 1 week....  


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010145.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on March 30, 2010, 07:40:36 AM
Ros I will buy you a pipe if you want. :)  Sometimes just going to homedepot is worth it lol....

Now, Cohutt, we wouldn't be survivalist if we ran to home depot every time we need something. You're such a slacker (Yeah, Right!  :D ) Seriously though, you had me thinking big time about the 1/4 acre bamboo forest in their backyard and all the uses they have. I'm visiting my parents this weekend to celebrate my birthday and Easter. I am so cutting some for gutters around one of my beds and around my compost heap. Not to mention tomato stakes for the ones I'll be growing in containers. I'm even going to try to grow some small shoots in containers for home made chinese dishes. I've seen what they do to a yard when not in containers. Hopefully, I will be able to cut and eat, cut and eat like with leaf lettuce.

BTW, the strawberry pyramid is looking sweet! pun intended
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on March 30, 2010, 08:26:39 AM
Quote
afraid it I pounded the fresh cut stuff into the ground it would root, sprout and take over my plot like it did my friend's vacant lot

Cohutt, how long do you think you'd have to let it dry out so that it would "de-activate"?  Just wondering....I have some arundo(sp?) - not really like bamboo - that I cut and use, and it always makes me think that I should get some bamboo for lots of potential uses - homemade trellises, pea sticks, etc.  I need to do some research on what types will grow in Ohio though.  Homestead is lookin' good.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: nimzy88 on March 30, 2010, 05:47:21 PM

I have faith you will find a multitude of uses for the stuff. I'm even considering planting some non-clumping bamboo at the lower, north end of my property. I really, really need a windbreak and I am almost willing to suffer another bamboo invasion if it will convert my property from "wind-swept" to "cool breezes".


Crispy Critter and the whole gang, have you found many other ways to create a windbreak for your garden? I only have a small 4x4 and 4x2 gardens one is the gf's with just decorative flowers, we live in Vegas which is just a huge valley and the wind tears through our backyard, any suggestions? FYI, I rent so whatever I do must be reversible if needed.
Thanks
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 30, 2010, 07:39:17 PM
Last night I got the potatoes in (or really "on") the ground.  They are scattered about in 1 dedicated bed and a few squares in 4 other beds.

Disclaimer: I have never grown potatoes before nor have I even seen a potato plant growing

I'm trying the straw method for two reasons.

1 it sounds like a good way to do it from all I have read
and
2 I currently have more beds than dirt and this solves my problem

The dedicated bed is stuck out of the way in the currently being renovated boxwood garden; it is 2x8' and made from 1x8s.  I put about 4 or 5 inches of Mel's mix in a while back and tonight I measured off and plopped the tater pieces in.

The far end of the bed is purple viking and the close half is German butterball.   

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010134.jpg)
 
The straw added; I'll put some sort of retention up around the bamboo stakes on the corners for more consistent coverage - from what I have read a second layer of straw is added after the plants grow through the first layer.  BTW the first layer settled down a good bit when I watered it.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010136.jpg)


More in the end of one of the new beds

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010139.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010140.jpg)

And some in last year's beds

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010143.jpg)

tbc.......
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 30, 2010, 07:55:12 PM
The 3 sections of last year's beds that got potatoes left me with some work to do.  There aren't any sides to contain the straw and it would spill into the next squares if I piled enough on to keep the light off of the tubers in a couple months.  Same issue with hilling up although i could build a second story to contain the dirt like the carrot section has.

So I figured I would use some of the bamboo and left over plastic fencing to build "potato straw baskets" to hold it all together.... I strung 3 of these together tonight, one of the others is visible in the background.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010147.jpg)

Still some shoring up to do but I think this will work and it has the Mrs C seal of approval....  


While I was playing with the bamboo I built a cat-guard frame for the freshly hatched lettuce and spinach that was under the shade cloth.  I have learned that the cats around here hate the nearly invisible birt netting and stay away once the run into it once or twice.   cat crap and greens don't go together ;)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010150.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on March 30, 2010, 08:39:01 PM
   cat crap and greens don't go together ;)

... words to live by... Great looking setup, Cohutt!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on March 31, 2010, 04:46:41 AM
Cohutt, how long do you think you'd have to let it dry out so that it would "de-activate"?  Just wondering....I have some arundo(sp?) - not really like bamboo - that I cut and use, and it always makes me think that I should get some bamboo for lots of potential uses - homemade trellises, pea sticks, etc.  I need to do some research on what types will grow in Ohio though.  Homestead is lookin' good.


JG, from what I have read true bamboo doesn't root and  grow from cuttings; with the reputation some running bamboos have for taking over I was joking about it rooting...

Most all the propagating info I see involves getting a rootball with a couple of the stalks in it and transplanting.  Running bamboo has to have the pesky underground lateral rhizomes to root and take hold.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on March 31, 2010, 09:51:52 AM

I really like some of your engineered solutions, Cohutt. I'm getting the urge to offer my bamboo-clearing services to a neighbor after seeing your clever contraptions.

Meanwhile, back at the pyramid... 
I couldn't help but laugh out loud when I read that. It immediately conjured up a mental image of Cohutt standing at the edge of an Egyptian pavillion, admiring the pyramid being built in honor of the lowly strawberry.... Well, you get the idea. Funny how word combinations can sometimes create completely unrelated mental imagery.


Crispy Critter and the whole gang, have you found many other ways to create a windbreak for your garden? I only have a small 4x4 and 4x2 gardens one is the gf's with just decorative flowers, we live in Vegas which is just a huge valley and the wind tears through our backyard, any suggestions? FYI, I rent so whatever I do must be reversible if needed.
Thanks

Nimzy, I started a thread just now in hopes that we can gather some good, affordable ideas for windbreaks. Here's a link to that thread which includes two pics of my temporary solution which is ugly, but gets the job done (for the time being...always looking for a better way!).  http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=15855.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=15855.0)



Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 04, 2010, 08:48:39 PM
I did a lot of the last few days both in a final push to be ready for the season as well as to host family for Easter today.

I'll report late this week with pics; besides cleaning my yard of all the fence removal and construction debris the following progress was made:
Installed the two "pole bean" beds
went on another bamboo raid (see below)
built (or should I say overbuilt) a bamboo trellis frame for the beans
built and filled a "custom" bed curving around the stump from the beech tree I removed last fall.  This area was too good to not use this summer- it gets great sun and the area is where I composted leaves for the last 20 years
discovered crickets and other vermin had moved in under the straw in 3 of my potato beds and were enjoying themselves; I removed the straw and buried the seed potatoes.  Once they sprout I'll add straw a little at a time.  (or not, I have some research to do)

latest bamboo haul against  8' high fence:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010163.jpg)

The seedlings at the end of an afternoon sunbath:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010164.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on April 05, 2010, 05:56:22 AM
Dang C, everything is looking great.  I really like the strawberry pyramid.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 06, 2010, 08:22:30 PM
Thanks for the kind comments CC and AK- much appreciated.


The bean beds.   I wanted to max the production from a small space so I needed to go vertical. To keep shade from hitting other plants decided to build 2 little beds (2x8') and put them relatively close together. Once i picked a spot I watched the sun angles and path for a couple of days with some of the bamboo stuck in the ground for shadow tracking.  
I decided that the beds shouldn't be oriented north south or east-west under the circumstances; they are further over towards the tree canopy from my neighbor's yard and the eastern sun is pretty much blocked out all morning. ( In the pictures below you can see how they are off kilter with the north-south running asparagus bed. )

I raked back the woodchip mulch and then roughly busted  the soil below with a maddock.  I was surprised how good the soil looked- it was definitely clay based like everything around here but years of leaves and other organic matter decomposing had it a dark brown almost black color vs the normal red. There were more earthworms in that dirt that I have ever seen anywhere on my property including under my compost piles. I guess they were there before the chips and have gone crazy on the new food source.

Lining them up parallel to the back fence:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010151.jpg)

One in and the turned soil smoothed back out (mel's mix going over it with no carboard).

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010152.jpg)


Trellis is next
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 06, 2010, 08:42:26 PM
At first i figured I would basically put two "V"s at the ends of each bed and pull trellis netting between them.  But noooooooooooooo, I decided I would improve on that idea and maximize production from a smaller space, so i decided to put the beds a little closer and turn the Vs one the beds into "W"s by connecting them at the top between the beds.  I cut some spare 2" pvc conduit and screwed two pieces to the end of each bed using a single screw about 1" below the top edge of the bed.  (Lol, I did this so that the conduit could pivot to suit the needs of the "fluid" trellis design that was going on. )

By the time I was done I had a massive bamboo 'thing" that used 6 9', 4 8' sections, and 4 5' sections of bamboo.

 Here is the "rough in" (stick with me it will hopefully make more sense down the page a bit):

 (http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010166-1.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010168.jpg)


After I shored up the joints using baling wire and then cross braced the panels with paracord, the plan was to string trellis metting from each top cross section down into the beds.  This wasn't easy and I learned a few things as I went, one of them I recalled from helping a friend string field fence up one time.  It is easier to stretch and align if you put a board through a few of the end squares to pull evenly:     

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010170.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 06, 2010, 08:52:52 PM
OK, so i figured 60' of 5' wide netting would work, but discovered that it would be about 4 or 5 feet short.

Still, you can get a pretty good idea of the almost completed end product below (I am going to finish the trellis when i get another secton of netting and will tie it all down better.)

A couple of notes:

The "W" isn't symmetrical and this is by design.  I wanted the two panes that leaned towards the back fence to be further off of 90 degrees than the other two.  I can't really explain except that by watching shadows as the sun tracked I figured this would give more uniform sun coverage, especially late in the season when the sun is lower and the trellises are full of shade making bean leaves.
Also, I will tie the bottom of the trellis down to have it uniformly convenient to the surface of the soil for the young bean plants to catch and start climbing upon.

It is pretty square when looking at it from the house so Mrs C approves.


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010174.jpg)


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010175.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on April 06, 2010, 09:27:04 PM
This is freaking brilliant!!! Where the heck do you come up with these ideas???? And is that a cast iron bed? What are you going to do with that? Because I was just given one.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on April 06, 2010, 09:44:31 PM
Lookin good Cohutt.  I like the idea of making the trellis angle out... it might help out with getting at the stuff in the middle.  Last year I made a folding a frame trellis 10' long, and thought is was the best idea ever...until I couldn't reach anything on the inside past about four feet.  This year I'm cutting and welding to make sure they are only four feet wide, and splitting the climbing items to 1 half of the bed.  It did work well, and was easily folded up and put away however.  This year I'll have two that are 4' wide x 5' tall.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: JustinChase on April 06, 2010, 11:01:30 PM
Now there's a nice mix of engineering and art for ya, looks great!

I really hope it works anywhere near as good as it looks.  I'm sure we'll see the progress, and for that I thank you.

This thread (and last years) have made me want to post my own progress.  I've started looking and have over 100 photos of what I've done over the last 2 years in the dog run, garden area  :o  I'm trying to whittle them down, and write short explanations for guidance.  Maybe I'll post the beginnings of that this week and we can compare notes.  I certainly have a lot to learn, but it's been pretty fun and rewarding so far.  I know you know this, and I bet it drives you too.

Keep up the good work and let us know how your (soon to be ) new CSA project comes along  ;)  With all that produce, you're gonna have surplus I bet.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 07, 2010, 04:25:35 AM
:)

Sweethearts mom,
Good eye. what you see is actually two iron gates that I plan on incorporating somewhere in the garden as a trellis or screen.  At one point though we used them as a headboard on a bed and that's why they are painted white; will be repainted soon.

Johngalt,
the theory is that a lot of the picking can be done from underneath the trellis.  However, you have just pointed out an accidentally engineered feature that will probably come in handy for picking them from the top as well.   

justinchase you hit the nail on the head.  documenting it encourages progress and keeps it going.  As far as a lot to learn, there is no time like now to start.   Remember this project won't be a year old until June so it isn't like I'm some master gardener or anything.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on April 07, 2010, 09:20:27 PM
Hmmmm Those angled trellis seem just the right hight for grand boys to harvest under!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: JustinChase on April 07, 2010, 10:21:50 PM
Cohutt, I was just looking at your trellis again and trying to figure out the orientation of that in your yard and noticed how well the tall fence blocks out the view of the buildings behind you.  I bet that makes you and the Mrs happy :)

I also noticed that the boards are not dog eared, which makes me think you may have bought stock 1 x 6's and not fence boards, or perhaps they just sell them different where you are.  I don't remember seeing other than a passing mention of them in your 2 big threads, can you tell me what you used, and how tall that fence actually is?

thanks
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 08, 2010, 04:26:19 AM
SHM-

Or for 50 year old gardeners to harvest sitting on a stool in the shade…..

justinchase-
The boards are treated 1x6 pine I got at a local building supply run by a friend.  They had 8' and 12' which served me well; the 8' worked for most of the tall sections of fence, the 12' I cut in half for the 6' section.

How high depends on where you are standing.   I decided I wanted to have a level top on the fence in both places where the ground has a modest slope to it on the line.; this vs having a constant board height that sloped or stepped down with the grade.

In the back, the side alley fence is 6' @ the corner.  I went low on this since the view is less important back there and the shorter fence blocks less late afternoon sun.  You can see below the back fence is almost 10' or so at the same corner. The ground falls  off to the corner pretty fast but there is a pretty modest slope along the rest of the back line too, so at the other corner the fence is only 7' or so from the ground.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010010.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: trucker larry on April 08, 2010, 02:13:25 PM
Cohutt, I am really looking forward to the "Cohutt stores food" thread.  ;D   I am sure that is gonna be a fair amount of food at harvest time.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on April 09, 2010, 07:42:19 AM
Cohutt, I am really looking forward to the "Cohutt stores food" thread.  ;D   I am sure that is gonna be a fair amount of food at harvest time.

Sounds like a fun/inspiring thread to me  :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 09, 2010, 12:03:21 PM
lol this year ahasn't produced much of anything (yet).

My lovely spouse isn't planning on us canning. 

ha.

ha ha.


hahahahahahahhaha.....  sorry
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on April 09, 2010, 09:31:44 PM
lol this year ahasn't produced much of anything (yet).

My lovely spouse isn't planning on us canning. 

ha.

ha ha.


hahahahahahahhaha.....  sorry

Key words there "isn't planning on us canning."   Something tells me there is gonna be some canning or dehydrating or something will going on this year in the Cohutt household or the compost pile will be getting lots of veggies that could be stored.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on April 10, 2010, 06:39:23 AM
Those are some intensively planted potatoes--love it!  I can't wait to see that jungle when it grows. 

At least if your wife doesn't plan on canning you are planting something that will store well while she changes her mind!

J

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 10, 2010, 07:04:04 AM
Those are some intensively planted potatoes--love it!  I can't wait to see that jungle when it grows. 

At least if your wife doesn't plan on canning you are planting something that will store well while she changes her mind!

J




LOL, KYD you are observant and have busted me....
 
I have never done spuds before but came to the same conclusion after the dilemma of where to put them all- just 2 1/2 lbs of 3 types.  Mel of SFG all but says put them on top of each other, basically the same as with everything else in SFG compared to traditional row planting/spacing.

What I neglected to consider is how many usable pieces I would get from each 2 1/2 lbs.  The purple viking order came to 3 huge spuds.  The German Butterball was maybe 12 or 4 and the French Fingerling was even more than that.  Cut a couple of the small ones in half and you end up with 25 or 30 seed pieces.....You get the picture lol.

In the end I stole one of my 3 2x8' bean beds and called it a potato bed.   I decided to go almost as close as Mel suggested; from what I have read, the downside is I have smaller potatoes on average.  I think I can live with this as we will probably raid new potatoes out of the straw from the day we find them until the final harvest.

As with everything else I am trying,  I will take notes and adjust next time...
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 10, 2010, 08:33:35 PM
Tomatoes go in tommorrow.

I started the seed on 2/21; most of the plants have been re-potted twice. 

I learned something in my first seed starting endeavor.  Once the plants get started the window shelf i installed in my sunroom gets a boatload of sun.  Roma vf plants that are a stout and stable 17" tall 6 or 7 weeks after sowing will go in tommorrow.

Also -
Ground cherries
Basil
dill
cilatro
marigolds
sunflowers

\
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 11, 2010, 07:49:43 PM
I got distracted today and didn't get much in the ground.   

I'm finally finishing off the back left corner of the fence; I'm building a storage area where I can stick stuff that doesn't need a roof over it.  The idea is to have it match the back fence and laid out so that you can't see into it form 90% of the yard (or from the house).  Anyway, post holes, concrete etc again...

I almost did a "Fritz Monroe" on the Romas I was bragging yesterday about being so stout.  On the way out to the patio for some sun this morning I snapped a  shot of them with a 24" framing square behind them (not a level shot but you get the idea).

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010177.jpg)

Anyway, I got all the flats in the sheltered corner of the patio and went back to work on sinking the posts.  When I came back up about 90 minutes later the flat of romas pictured above was flat & wilted so badly I thought they were toast.  I moved them up to the shade and watered them; by late this afternoon they had reconstituted themselves pretty well.  Since I stressed them pretty badly I figured I'd put off getting them in the ground for a couple more days.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 11, 2010, 08:10:19 PM
I did set out my ground cherries (Aunt Mollie's) in the oddball bed I stuck in a couple weeks ago.  It has wood ends but I used some of the flexible plastic roof decking that I ripped and had been using as edging. 

This bed came about when I loaded up the last of my compost pile and moved it to the back as part of the cleanup Mrs C had me do before her family visited for Easter.  After I moved it I decided to build the bed over the spot and start doing something about the low spot that gets so soggy when it rains.

I trenched the area and ran a pipe under the garden shed to the alley and sunk another piece of the edging to divert water away from the Blueberry bush that sits in the lowest spot.  I figured I'd have problems with it eventually if I didn't do something to divert and drain the water.

So here is the bed with the ground cherries ready to be planted;  I read that you can bury them deep like with tomatoes so put them as deep as I could.  (Forgot to take an after picture).

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010179.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010181.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on April 12, 2010, 06:05:27 AM
Quote
I almost did a "Fritz Monroe" on the Romas
So glad that I've become a verb.   ;D

How did you manage to plant the ground cherries deep?  Mine are always spreading and not getting tall, so I don't have much of a stem to plant deep.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 12, 2010, 11:35:18 AM
So glad that I've become a verb.   ;D

How did you manage to plant the ground cherries deep?  Mine are always spreading and not getting tall, so I don't have much of a stem to plant deep.

Be glad your verb isn't like mine; cohutt became a verb in a couple of reloading forums after I burned the bizzzicky out of my foot smelting a while back.......

As far as the ground cherries- the aunt Mollie's i got from SSE all grew up in a single long stalk and didn't start branching until recently.  In the the second photo above only the top left and right corner plants are ground cherries. I was able to put them fairly deep, from 4-6" I would guestimate.
iirc you had cossack pineapples and not aunt mollie's- right?

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on April 12, 2010, 01:19:56 PM
I had Aunt Mollies last year.  This year I have Cossack Pineapple. 

Speaking of, I'm hoping that you will be saving seeds.  I'll be the first to ask if you want to trade some Aunt Mollie's seed for some Cossack Pineapple seeds.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on April 12, 2010, 01:29:34 PM

LOL, KYD you are observant and have busted me....
 
I have never done spuds before but came to the same conclusion after the dilemma of where to put them all- just 2 1/2 lbs of 3 types.  Mel of SFG all but says put them on top of each other, basically the same as with everything else in SFG compared to traditional row planting/spacing.

What I neglected to consider is how many usable pieces I would get from each 2 1/2 lbs.  The purple viking order came to 3 huge spuds.  The German Butterball was maybe 12 or 4 and the French Fingerling was even more than that.  Cut a couple of the small ones in half and you end up with 25 or 30 seed pieces.....You get the picture lol.

In the end I stole one of my 3 2x8' bean beds and called it a potato bed.   I decided to go almost as close as Mel suggested; from what I have read, the downside is I have smaller potatoes on average.  I think I can live with this as we will probably raid new potatoes out of the straw from the day we find them until the final harvest.

As with everything else I am trying,  I will take notes and adjust next time...

Ah, no busting to it at all my friend.  I think all the guidelines on spacing are too tight and I'm just too happy to prove them wrong when I can.  If you got 'em, burn 'em; that's my philosophy.

That curved bed is too neat.  I really like the looks of that. 

You are exactly right about those ground cherries.  I buried mine last year up to the first true leaves and some deeper.  They loved it.  I could barely pull the wilted vines out last fall the roots ran so deep.

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 13, 2010, 04:33:30 AM
Last night's dilemma:

Beans or taxes? 

Taxes or beans?


Definitely beans.   

I put off finishing up my tax returns last night by soaking and planting the two type of pole limas under my mega trellis contraption.  "King of the Garden" and "Christmas" are now in the soil.  Note to self:  Don't tie down the low part of the trellis netting until after the seeds are planted next year....  the odd angles made for some awkward squatting and leaning but they are in....
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 13, 2010, 04:42:57 AM
Also:

The comment about trellis netting reminded me- I found a source for netting that has good prices as well as several available widths. 
http://www.nylonnet.com/merchandise/?cat=560&top_cat=&cat_nav=&sub_cat=&sub2_cat= (http://www.nylonnet.com/merchandise/?cat=560&top_cat=&cat_nav=&sub_cat=&sub2_cat=)

They have a lot of stuff I haven't seen elsewhere that might be of use to some of us in the future.   I ordered some of the green high tensile twine as well; not sure exactly what I am going to use it for but I think it will be handy training the gourd vines and providing some fall over support to the sunflowers that will hopefully be along my fence line in a few weeks.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on April 13, 2010, 05:38:02 AM
Those are good prices C.

Nylon Net Co. has been around a long time. Good folks to deal with in my time.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Mel on April 13, 2010, 09:14:12 PM
Wow, I can't wait to see pictures of your yard this summer.  Oh, and buy a dehydrator.  A big one.

Mel
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on April 14, 2010, 08:23:44 AM
Last night's dilemma:

Beans or taxes? 

Taxes or beans?


Definitely beans.   

I put off finishing up my tax returns last night by soaking and planting the two type of pole limas under my mega trellis contraption.  "King of the Garden" and "Christmas" are now in the soil.  Note to self:  Don't tie down the low part of the trellis netting until after the seeds are planted next year....  the odd angles made for some awkward squatting and leaning but they are in....

Yes defnitely beans, good to see your priorities are in line since you have till Thursday to get the taxes postmarked.

I couldn't tie down my trellis netting yet if I wanted too, I have lettuce in the way right now till it comes out and the cucumbers go in.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 14, 2010, 02:46:44 PM
outdoorlady,
i transplanted planted 12 tomatoes last night including the 2 that were in the middle of one of lettuce patches.  I figure they can coexist until it is hot enough for the tomatoes' growth to really jump (and the lettuce slowly gets eaten in the meantime).  I figure some overlap in the season means some overlap in my squares as well.  The tomatoes in that bed are dead center in the middle of 4 squares ( bush roma VF's) and when i transplanted the lettuce and seeded some more a month ago, I left the tomato's spot open in anticipation. picture later maybe if i finish my taxes tonight Lil.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on April 14, 2010, 03:13:13 PM
Quote
if i finish my taxes tonight Lil.


 ::)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 14, 2010, 08:06:07 PM
Finished taxes but it was too dark for pictures. 

So some from last night.

Got a dozen planted; 10 romas and 2 red brandywines.

The big Romas I almost fried last weekend :

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010182.jpg)

I dug as deep as I could, all the way down to the cardboard under the mix.  Garden scissors in the hole for reference. (I trimmed leaves that would be buried before putting the dirt back in.)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010183.jpg)

New crackberry camera test when I was close to finishing;  you can see the ones about to go in the lettuce at the bottom.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010184.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on April 14, 2010, 10:50:40 PM
I'm thinking my buttercrunch (bibb type) lettuce is too spread out to have room in the middle to stick a tomato, I have empty squares for them and the lettuce is supposed to be done before the Cantaloupe goes in next month.  I just need to figure out how to secure the middle of my trellis netting to the bottom for the time being. I'm thinking a metal tent stake.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on April 15, 2010, 10:18:53 AM
How about a double row of Carrots?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on April 15, 2010, 06:32:26 PM
Okay first - I love your strawberry bed!  It's so adorable and I'm completely jealous.  DH has been standing here reading over my shoulder as I went through the last few pages of this thread and he's jealous of your tomato plants.  Thanks for all the wonderful pictures - I think you are a great encouragement to many!
If you need any canning recipes or helps just yell - I love to can and I am planning on teaching a canning class here in Colorado soon. I also think it's great encouragement to keep track of all you harvest as you will be surprised at the amount you really produce. Then if you price the stuff at the grocery store you will be amazed at the savings. Wishing you a bountiful harvest this year! TBM
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 15, 2010, 07:39:01 PM
Thanks tbm, I'll be looking for some salsa and general tomato sauce recipes this summer. :)

Oh and tell DH that I am overly proud of my tomato plants and that his jealousy stokes my agri-ego.  

I need a good basic scale for weighing produce. Maybe a hanging one?  Ideas?  

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on April 15, 2010, 09:15:36 PM
I actually bought my scale at the big McGuckins Hardware in Boulder Co. a long time ago.  It's just a very large kitchen scale (I originally bought it to weigh chickens at butchering time) but I use it to weigh all my veggies. I would try a hardware store but you might search online.  Yeah our tomatoes are looking kinda sad right now.  We left someone in care of all our plants while we were in California for 10 day and they drowned them all.  Oh well - hopefully they'll snap out of it.   
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on April 16, 2010, 04:40:26 AM
Cohutt, just visit any kitchen gadget store for the scale.  You will want to make sure there is a tare button.  This allows you to zero out the scale once there's a bowl or other container on it.

For the salsa, last year we made Annie's Salsa (http://www.thathomesite.com/forums/load/recipex/msg0821121827919.html?8) and it was really good.  This isn't the exact recipe that we used, ours was set up for water bath canning.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 18, 2010, 08:25:59 PM
I worked like a dog this weekend.  The weather was good and I have several things I wanted to get done since next weekend I'll be moving my daughter down in Atlanta.

I ended up building 4 more beds, all small ones.  One was in the way back next to the asparagus, 2' x 7', and will have 3 squash plants in it soon.  (I have no pictures of this one)

The other 3 were 2'x4' and are for cut flowers @ the request of Mrs C.  They are in front of the curved ground cherry bed, which got some straw mulch this afternoon as well:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010195.jpg)

I also sunk the last post for the storage blind I'm adding to a back corner then framed it in and put some of the 4' pickets up.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010192.jpg)

from across the yard:
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010190.jpg)

Tomato cages:
I picked up 150' of 5' concrete reinforcement wire Saturday - my friend had it for $80 at his building supply store vs well over $100 (something like $130 maybe) at the two big box ones here.   This stuff is frikin heavy; I about busted a gut getting it out of the truck and into the back yard.  May plan was to roll it out in the grass where I would have lots of room but i abandoned that idea and started cutting it were it lay:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010191.jpg)

I made 10 Roma cages that are around 20" diameter.  I cut the bottom row of squares off and left the verticals to sink into the ground.   The end result was probably taller than I'll need for the Romas but I figure I can cut them down one more next year if I need to.
I also made one skinnier one to try for the Red Brandywines back there. I left it whole and used two less squares vs the other cages (10 including 1 overlapping vs 12).   This one is fastened to the bed frame and is purposefully very tall as a result.  You can see it in the front here vs the Roma cages -

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010194.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 18, 2010, 08:34:08 PM
OK, but how are the plants doing?

The strawberries are doing well; here is an updated picture of the pyramid:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010188.jpg)

The transplanted lettuce is so nice looking I don't want to cut any of it; can anyone see the wasp that gave me a buzzzing for disturbing it?

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010187.jpg)

All the potatoes got moving and broke through the dirt in the last couple of days. I'll slowly adding straw back on to the 3 beds in the front part that had cricket issues.  Here is one section before the straw was added: 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010186.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 18, 2010, 08:44:57 PM
Funny, I took a couple of pictures of the backyard from the house today and compared them to the one taken in June last year:

Last year:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden/garden002.jpg)


Today:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010196.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010185.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on April 19, 2010, 03:07:45 AM
Fantastic.   :o
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on April 19, 2010, 05:29:17 AM
Amazing transformation
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on April 19, 2010, 05:57:20 AM
Cohutt, by my estimation you are a force of nature not to be reckoned with. (Especially if you happen to be a tusky, rootin' feral hog!)

You've taken the plunge with both feet and it is, I must admit, entirely motivating and inspirational for the likes of me. I hope you get the chance to relax and enjoy the fruits (and veggies  ::) ) of your labor with Mrs. C on a regular basis.


About your tomato cages: I've seen pictures (from Acres Magazine...can't find the hard copy just yet) of a gentleman who used the thicker gauge concrete reinforcing wire mesh in the same manner as you, but he kept adding sections to the tops as his tomatoes reached over 15 feet tall. I really do need to find that article since it also describes his method of pruning/pinching new growth in order to attain such massive plants. I don't aspire for 15 foot tomatoes, but it IS something to behold...even in photographs.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on April 19, 2010, 08:54:40 AM
Cohutt - the transformation from last year to this year is absolutely incredible.  Shows that anyone can produce food in the space that they have.  This is amazing and so wonderful and I hope that it inspires a bunch of new preppers and maybe some old preppers too to rethink their yard and growing capabilities.  If you and your wife are like us we're already dreaming of the end of summer's bounty!

Nice work - I gave you a plus 1 but wish it could be so much more.  Oh and we are still so very jealous of your tomatoes! TBM (& the DH reading over my shoulder again).
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on April 19, 2010, 09:17:02 AM
Awesome pictures!

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 19, 2010, 11:41:53 AM
:)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 19, 2010, 08:31:05 PM
I opened up the visio "yard map" drawing I had started a while back and tinkered with it some more.  The scale is close but something is a little off; regardless this is a good mock up of how it all lays right now.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Yard15.jpg)

Since last season I have added 13 beds (excluding those along the fence) ranging in size from 3x3 to 16x4.    This is kind of funny; I have had my head buried so deep into getting as many in as I can beofre the season that I really hadn't realized they had added up so much. 

Only the 3x3 one near the back fence has to still be leveled and fiiled; I figure I'd use it a a gourd "hill" and try and get 6 or 8 plants running up the fence from there,
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on April 19, 2010, 08:55:17 PM
Cohutt, you have performed an amazing and beautiful transformation on your lawn. Even in the short time since I visited, the changes you have made are astounding. Seriously dude. You rock. This thread makes me smile and inspires me every time I see it. Big +1 for the latest update.

Btw, give me a buzz this weekend on your way back from atl if you and your wife want to meet for a bite  or if you want to see my homestead. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on April 19, 2010, 09:55:33 PM
Wow what a great inspiring update to come home too after a weekend away.  Looking great as usual Cohutt.  Every time I see new cool stuff that you, Fritz, and some others are doing in makes me want ot so so much more here.  I just hesitate to do too much as we don't plan on living here long term.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Cheeta68 on April 20, 2010, 06:41:53 PM
That is a wonderful transformation. Your yard looks twice as big and at least twice as inviting.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on April 21, 2010, 08:07:16 PM
Cohutt, what are the small bushes that run down the middle of the yard?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on April 21, 2010, 08:40:55 PM
Pretty sure they are boxwoods, he's talked about the boxwoods and the towns original fire bell being in that area in some other posts.  But I could be wrong.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on April 22, 2010, 06:36:42 PM
oh ok, for some reason I thought that was over in a corner. I was hoping those were cool little blue berry bushes.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 22, 2010, 07:20:39 PM
yep boxwoods

i have started the drastic multi year pruning & renovation process to change the layout and bring it back to 100% English boxwood.  when done there will  be plenty of room in the squares for larger veggie & herb beds 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 22, 2010, 08:12:38 PM
Picture update time
Bronze Arrowhead lettuce

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010200.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010199.jpg)

More heirloom lettuce borrowing space around a Roma for a couple or few more weeks

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010201.jpg)

Aunt Molliie Ground Cherry - a baby fruit among the tiny flowers

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010203.jpg)

The softneck Garlic Spartan sent me last fall is now 3 ft tall

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010206-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: JustinChase on April 22, 2010, 08:34:02 PM
Looking good.  I wish I would have gotten my garlic in this year, but alas, I'll have to wait.

Keep us posted on the lettuce in with the Romas.  I'm curious how well they combine, both with space and shade.  I'm hoping they do well like that, in fact, I'm kinda planning on it :)

I noticed a few things just starting to fruit here too.  rainy and too dark for photos tonight, but this weekend.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 22, 2010, 08:35:07 PM
Spuds are gaining some momentum:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010205.jpg)


"Christmas" & "king of the garden" Limas awoke after the rain earlier this week:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010197-1.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010198.jpg)

Speaking of limas-

I had some Henderson bush limas (a tasty baby lima) to plant and soaked the seed this evening.  When I planted the allotted squares I realized I had soaked way more than I needed and that these extra would be sprouting in a couple days wherever they were.

I'm kind of tired of building beds and mixing soil so I decided to experiment a little.  I had a small secondary compost pile that got covered by the wood chips; a while back i located it under the chips and excavated most for one of the beds.   I decided to scrap back the chips and drop these into the ground right where the pile had been just for the hell of it; I marked the spot with 3 tomato cage scraps so I wouldn't trample the seedling when they pop up>

Who knows, but I am betting these will do well. ;)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010207.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010209.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on April 25, 2010, 06:35:12 PM
Great idea. I love limas. I didn't plant any this year. Maybe I will try some in some of my free space.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on April 25, 2010, 06:50:22 PM
Great idea. I love limas. I didn't plant any this year. Maybe I will try some in some of my free space.

Wow, that's not something you hear every day.  When I tell people that i love lima beans, they look at me like I'm crazy.

We planted 3 rows that are about 28' long with Fordhook lima beans.  Those are our favorite limas.  We've never really had great luck with limas, so I don't know if I can pull off a second harvest in the Fall or not.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on April 25, 2010, 07:13:33 PM
The Bronze Arrowhead lettuce from 4/22 is really pretty.  What kind of flavor does it have?

I just have Buttercrunch I'm eating now and Black Seeded Simpson is sprouting and planted some sweet mesclun mix today.

What are your favorite lettuces varieties?  Do they have specific sweet/bitter/spicy/etc flavors that you really like?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on April 25, 2010, 08:55:27 PM
odl79,

I have a bed planted with each of those that i cut a few leaves from this evening to top off a salad.  The BSS was what opened our eyes to how good home grown stuff can be last spring. (Tip of the day: It is slow to bolt and even when it starts getting hot and it goes bitter a bit you can sweeten it up.  Water heavily the evening before then cut it early the next morning and leave in the crisper drawer for 48 hours.  It will be delicious again.)

I've liked most everything I have planted except for one of the burpee Romaine varieties that just didn't hit the spot.

The Seed Savers Exchange "SSE Lettuce Mixture" http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=1024 (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=1024) has been a terrific introduction to heirloom varieties I wouldn't have ever tasted otherwise.

The mixture has the following varieties; I'll do my best to describe but you really have to taste them yourself to believe how damn good they are:

Amish Deer Tongue, http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=626 (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=626)
Good in warm spring weather but even better grown in my sunroom window last winter.  It was thinner and leggier but tasted like a baby leaf; it did much better in the limited light than those varieties that have a thin leaf under normal conditions.   Someone here has grown a variety of deer tongue that has some red in it; maybe they will pipe in a revue. (I don't recall who).
Australian Yellowleaf, http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=377(OG) (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=377(OG))
This is a lot like the simpson varieties but a huge leaf and an unusually bright green color
Bronze Arrowhead, http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=378 (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=378)
same as with the deer tongue- a fairly robust & think leaf in normal conditions made for a tender winter leaf in the window....
Forellenschuss, http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=105 (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=105)
Fantastic romaine with interesting color- bronze specks on a delicate light green leaf.  It is the variety to the left of the Bronze arrowhead in the picture above.
Lollo Rossa, http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=219(OG) (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=219(OG))
Tasty; we are bad to snip new growth off of this one before it matures. Nice sweet flavor when cut this way
Pablo, http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=627 (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=627)
Beautiful, tasty, tender. Top of the leaves are one color and the bottom are another, looks almost painted
Red Velvet http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=977(OG) (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=977(OG))
Deep red, (what we grew over the winter was almost purple) Tender tasty colorful, not bitter
Reine des Glaces. http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=631(OG) (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=631(OG))
The best part of this is the heart of the head once you’ve worked on the outer leaves.  The inner leaves are curled together and are the sweetest tastiest morsels out of any of these; they had a nice crunch and are 3-d as they keep their shape after you separate the individual leaves of the core head.

We snip leaves off of multiple heads of each variety every evening and mix them all together for fantastic salads; the flavor and texture is out of this world and the colors makes for a visually pleasing presentation.  I've been giving friends and neighbors a couple salads worth mixture of the lettuces over the last few days; they are well received to say the least.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on April 25, 2010, 09:50:50 PM
Thanks for the in depth lettuce review :-)

Since my garden was a last minute decision this year I only have store bought Burpee and Ferry Morse seed right now.  Looking forward to expanding my options.  Quickly running out of squares but maybe I'll think about getting a few containers to try some of them out in.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on April 25, 2010, 09:56:30 PM
Cohutt you are correct about the red deer tongue.  Very similar texture and flavor...I have also found the deer tongue lettuce to be a great keeper...it remains crisp and fresh after cutting with no extra effort required, other than refridgeration
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 02, 2010, 07:28:20 PM
I'm back from spending most of last week in St Louis for bidness... 

Not much done this weekend other than finishing the junk corral, cleaning up some,

I noticed the birdhouse gourds were coming up so I needed to figure out a training system for them. I looked on the interweb at all sorts of funky trellis systems people had put in; I decided I wasn't that ambitious this year and just threw up a bamboo teepee with some twine up to the fence.

 
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010216-1.jpg)


The bed is 3x3 and has a 6" layer of cow manure compost with Mel's mix for the rest.   I figured if the vines find something to run on they would make it to the fence as well as up the teepee trellis, so I strung some nice green 300 lb twine from all over the box to all over the fence.  The box is staked down and the bamboo is staked to the bed.  The piece of re-bar across the top has several leads running up the the fence plus I circled the bamboo a few times to give more things for the vines to grab.  May work, may not.

We'll see.....

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010219.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 02, 2010, 07:57:02 PM
While I was cleaning up I set up a ladder i was moving and took a couple of panorama shots now that most things are in place. This is from half way back in the yard moving from front to back; you can see the  back of the commercial stuff I border -

Last year's beds and the blueberry bushes:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010222.jpg)

The blueberries, garden toolshed, ground cherry and flower beds....

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010223.jpg)

The bell & boxwood garden with a small potato bed hidden in it:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010224.jpg)

The back, with the bean trellis, the asparagus bed and the three beds loaded with tomatoes; you can see all 20 ft of the gourd teepee.  

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010225.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on May 02, 2010, 08:05:17 PM
Daggumit.   :o
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on May 02, 2010, 09:19:20 PM
Love it! I'm drooling with envy :P
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 03, 2010, 11:26:38 AM
The beans in the back are coming along

First, one of the Henderson Bush Lima plots popped out of the ground while I was gone:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010214.jpg)

The "Christmas" and "King of the Garden" limas are almost ready to start climbing:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010217.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010218.jpg)


An aerial shot from the A11d squirrel killing drone that perpetually circles my plot:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010221.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: joeinwv on May 03, 2010, 11:39:50 AM
I envy your supply of bamboo stakes...
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 03, 2010, 11:43:05 AM
When I posted a few days ago I think i said the tomato was "borrowing space" from the lettuce; recent podcasts and slideshows posted by Jack learned me a new term - "succession planting".

Succession planting of tomato in lettuce

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010215.jpg)

I actually did the same thing here with spinach but nearly missed the tomato to the right.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010210.jpg)

I am hell bound determined to grow and artichoke (or an artichoke plant at a minimum). I'm not particularly fond of artichoke myself but I do like the look of the plant and would be Mrs C's hero if I pull this off.   I have found these to be fairly fragile when transplanting and have killed two of the 6 that sprouted.   The two against my fence seem to have taken and hopefully will grown faster than the bugs snack on them.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010213.jpg)


Finally I have to post another shot of the spring heirloom lettuce patch.  We are nomming these plants pretty hard every night and their growth is outpacing our consumption so far.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010212.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: bartsdad on May 03, 2010, 11:46:55 AM
If I may ask a question as a COMPLETE NEWBIE gardener, how much time do you spend "out in the garden" ?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 03, 2010, 11:49:48 AM
I envy your supply of bamboo stakes...

I have found two other backup sources since I cut these - there are several groves around that the ;and owners generally don't care if some is harvested and actually are leery of it taking over.

I like messing with it and plan on cutting some more in the next few days.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 03, 2010, 11:52:22 AM
If I may ask a question as a COMPLETE NEWBIE gardener, how much time do you spend "out in the garden" ?

"Most all my spare time" considering the building and prep work I have been doing for several month now- beds, soil, fence, etc.

The planting/maintenance/harvesting going forward will be a lot less based on my experience last year.   This assumes I'll stop building chit. ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: swoods on May 03, 2010, 01:13:15 PM
Oh cohutt, that is some beeuteeful lettuce! I have lettuce envy.  ;D

I have planted some lettuce which is just now showing signs of producing a crop to eat. Took awhile for it to take off. Should be able to harvest some soon. Tried growing it indoors under a grow light and it did not work very well.

Your yard/garden is inspiring and I really like how creative you are with solutions!

Keep up the good work and pictures!
 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on May 03, 2010, 02:23:18 PM
This assumes I'll stop building chit. ;)


When pigs fly.   ;D

Dagummit. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on May 04, 2010, 10:26:52 AM
I'm back from spending most of last week in St Louis for bidness... 


Say its not so, Cohutt was in my backyard practically and didn't even bother to say hi :-(  Make it to St. Louis often?  You didn't exactly pick a nice week to be in STL, it's been tornado city the last week and a half.

I'm very envious of that lettuce!!  I have soem lettuce sprouts I finally got to grow inside and put in couple small pots (since I resorted to planting seeds outside in their squares already) but not sure if they are going to make it.  I ordered a packet of seed from SSE for your lettuce blend, gonna pick up some window box planters and some more compost to fill it with mel's mix and cross my fingers I can get some decent eating out of it for a while before it gets to hot. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 04, 2010, 12:22:38 PM
LOL,
When I go to St Louis (4-5 times a year) it usually is for a crammed schedule day or two downtown with intense HQ politicking & schmoozing before, after & in between.

Re the lettuce:
You might get away with it if you keep it out of the hot afternoon sun.   As it gets hotter, water heavily then cut in the morning. If it begins to taste bitter before it bolts, leave cut leaves in the fridge for 24-48 hours and it improves dramatically.  Not surprisingly,  the condition of the leaves after 48 hrs is better than any grocery store lettuce you'll ever see.
If you don't want to wait for the SSE pack go to Home Depot or Lowes & pick up some Simpson leaf type lettuce (two I have grown are "Black Seeded" & "Elite")  Last spring we were cutting it until mid to late June on the hot side of our house- slow to bolt and manageable bitterness in the heat.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on May 04, 2010, 01:05:10 PM
I have some Blackseeded Simpson and some kind of Mesclun mix sprouted that I got the seeds from home depot, but "sprouted" is as far as they have gotten so far, hoping they take off soon.  The stuff that's sprouted is in the areas that I planned on transplanting my inside sprouts too but gave up and put seeds outside when I was having so much trouble inside.  I figure I can move the window boxes around as needed to adjust the amount of sun as it gets warmer.

Your trips to STL sound about like all the business trips I've ever taken.  The only down I ever have on them is the flight delays at the airport trying to get back home.  If by chance you ever have free time in the area hit us up and I'll see what Outdoorman's schedule looks like.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on May 04, 2010, 08:56:33 PM
cohutt how deep is your asparagus bed?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 04, 2010, 09:02:29 PM
cohutt how deep is your asparagus bed?

the bed is made of 2x12s;  I turned the ground underneath a little, layered carboard down, added about 4 or 5 inches of mel's
mix, laid the crowns in, threw in a couple bags of bone meal and topped off with another 4 or 5 inches of mel's mix.   It has all settled in some since then and is probably about 7-8" of mix.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 09, 2010, 09:37:27 AM
Ground cherries- Aunt Mollies

They are really filling out and spreading nicely.

Sneaky these little buggers- there are multiple little fruits growing up fast in their little green Japanese lanterns:

 (http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010231.jpg)

Didn't turn out like i thought it would but if you look you can still see several:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010230.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 10, 2010, 08:11:12 PM
Tomatoes coming along from last Saturday (some tiny fruit is set on the Roma VFs and Tommy-Toes)
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010232.jpg)


"King of the garden" and "Christmas" limas are beginning to run 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010234.jpg)


The "gourd tower from hell" bamboo yard-art thang has some baby climbers coming up

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010233.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: OKGranny on May 15, 2010, 11:22:26 PM
It's looking wonderful.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on May 16, 2010, 08:16:58 PM
So awesome you have tomatoes already. Garden is looking so great!

We F I N A L L Y got ours planted today.  Stupid Colorado weather.  Now we just have to hope it doesn't get really hot really quickly before they get established.  Snow one week and 75 the next. This has been one weird spring. 

So I may be begging Cohutt send me some tomatoes please ;D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: QuiltingB on May 17, 2010, 12:17:43 AM
Nice tomato cages - I'm seriously considering getting some of that rusty rebar fence-like wire stuff and making cages.  I currently use those small cheapie cages and use a stake to hold the cage upright and tie the tomato branches up when it quickly outgrows the small cheapie cage - and use ribbon to tie the tomato vines up.

My main concern were does the metal continue to rust and do the welds holding the wires together stay welded when rusty, ( don't wand the cages to start falling apart after a year or 2) and are the openings large enough to pull tomatoes thru?  It does seem that it would be easier to just keep pushing stray tomato branches into the large cages - not have to spend hours tieing them up.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 17, 2010, 04:16:19 AM
OKG,

:)



TBM,

I think we ought to wait until they are harvested.  Bird in the hand etc..... ;)



QB,

From what the old timers tell me around here, the re-mesh cages last forever.  
The wire rusts to a nice coating and stabilizes.
I have never heard anyone say anything about the welds not holding
the openings are 6" squares, so I expect everything I could possibly harvest to fit through.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Crispy Critter on May 19, 2010, 04:10:30 AM
+1 for your continued hard work, Cohutt.

I hope you are ready for the incredible bounty you are about to reap!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 19, 2010, 08:07:14 PM
Thanks critter.  I've coasted for a couple weeks though. :)

Ground cherries have 'sploded; Red Brandywine tomatoes are coming on at the front corners.

Mrs C's 3 special request cutting flower beds are progressing nicely in front of them.  (You can see that I had to plant parts of them a second time thanks to marauding tree rats.  Things got better when I strung some netting over them.)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010241.jpg)


Beans continue to act like beans, healthy ones even.....


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010240.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 19, 2010, 08:14:28 PM
Romas are bushing out in the back plot.    Potatoes in foreground.  This season's new tomato trellis experiment in background.


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010239.jpg)


And my favorite garden picture yet this year- from the end of the big Roma bed looking back towards the house:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010238.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 23, 2010, 08:20:57 PM
Gourds.

I posted earlier I that I am attempting to grow some gourds for birdhouses for use in the 2011 garden.


It appears they are starting to wake up.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010251.jpg)

The tendrils are reaching out for anything to grab; these are cool.

They reach out straight until they hit something, then they start bending to wrap around what ever it is they touch.

Funny thing is that after they get a grip they coil up like a spring too.  It's like they are not only attaching but are pulling up too.

You can see how this one has grabbed the string

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010252.jpg)

and these two have started coiling up after getting a good grip.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010254.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010253.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 24, 2010, 10:29:09 AM
The Romas are multiplying

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010259.jpg)

The first year asparagus is steadily sending up more shoots and they are looking a little better than the twiggy shoots that were the first to appear.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010256.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: joeinwv on May 24, 2010, 02:08:12 PM
Cohutt - the tomatoes in the cages, do you need to tie these to the cage or do they just kind of hold on to the sides
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 24, 2010, 05:57:54 PM
Cohutt - the tomatoes in the cages, do you need to tie these to the cage or do they just kind of hold on to the sides

The point of the cage is to avoid having to mess with the tying- the weight of the fruit leans it against the inside of the cage and it supports pretty well.
I just go in and make sure the new sucker stalks are contained and not shooting through the side.


here is another angle that might help, although the plants aren't loaded yet.  The green out of the cages is just the long leaves of the romas, no stalks

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010257.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on May 26, 2010, 06:18:09 PM
dang dude, really kicking some butt out there.  Have not been able to log on for a while-- I am amazed at your work.  fantastic job, you continue to inspire me!

thanks!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 26, 2010, 07:58:08 PM
Gras

I'm slowing down some now that stuff is growing and the rush to beat the warm weather is behind me....

Even gonna head to bol this weekend for bush hogging and sighting in a new rifle and scope. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on May 26, 2010, 08:33:39 PM
Gras

I'm slowing down some now that stuff is growing and the rush to beat the warm weather is behind me....

Even gonna head to bol this weekend for bush hogging and sighting in a new rifle and scope. 


Film at 11:00?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on May 26, 2010, 08:51:35 PM
mmmmm BBQ
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 26, 2010, 09:04:20 PM
Bought a ruger 77/44 a while back and have been lazy getting a scope for it.  I ended up with a pretty reasonable Burris 2-7x that has a nice bullet drop type reticule that should help with the big fat slow bullets this gun will be launching. 

The hogs haven't been bad in the last few months and we are pushing a full moon right now so I doubt there will be much opportunity to slay anything other than a couple milk jugs.

OK back to gardening.... have I shown you Mrs C's artichoke lately? :)
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010262.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: pappabear on May 30, 2010, 12:06:41 PM
Cohutt, I continue to look over both chapters and am continually amazed and inspired by ur garden and ideas.  Thank you for taking the time to share and document this with us.  Truly awe struck +1

Pappa Bear
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 31, 2010, 04:00:08 PM
Thank you pappabear

If I can do it, anyone can.  

The 1 year anniversary of the start of this project is coming up in a couple weeks.  I think I'll celebrate by building a bed or something. ;)

Hey Spartan, if you see this, I just pulled two of the garlic plants that were from the handful of cloves you sent me last fall.  
I just roasted the softneck and squirted the delicious garlic goo onto some fresh french bread drizzled with olive oil.  Mrs C was in heaven and I nom'd it down pretty quickly myself.
I was amazed how big both of them were- 1 hardneck and one softneck.   I'm going to leave them in a little longer and do the full harvest in a week or two.  Pictures to follow.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 31, 2010, 07:20:55 PM
Things are growing like crazy here now (and I'll be travelling some this week) so I figured I'd post some updates.

My Bamboo yard art is now functional and seems to be holding up pretty well so far.

Bamboo Bean trellis (with a new long piece across the top to let the beans trail out some more)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010279.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010280.jpg)

Bamboo frameTomato trellis with Red Brandywines starting to take advantage of it (the picture leaves a lot to be desired depth wise- the tomatoes and sunflowers in the bed behind the trellis make it blend into a green mess):

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010276.jpg)

Bamboo teepee gets swarmed by multiple Birdhouse gourd vines:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010281.jpg)


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 31, 2010, 07:56:28 PM
Aunt Mollies Ground Cherries...

The Ground Cherries are growing like weeds.  It looks like they are going to try and give the Red Brandywines in the front corners of their bed a run.

Front

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010273.jpg)

back (and my excavated soda and beer bottle collection from the fence project lol)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010274.jpg)

And side from the tool shed when a squall jumped me:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010284.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 31, 2010, 08:11:11 PM
Experiment in tomato staking:

The majority of my tomatoes are in the concrete wire cages and several are vining up the trellis pictured a couple posts back.

This is what I came up with for the balance of them, 8 or 10 Red Brandywine and Tommy Toes-

It is sort of like a Maypole - I kept the branch nubs on the bamboo stakes I cut for easier tying.  The loops on the plants are made from the fat plastic garden tie stuff that comes in rolls available at Home Depot and other garden centers.   ( I'm already fairly certain I'll be tired of tying these up before the season is 1/3 of the way through).

Seems to work though, and spreads the plants out from the based up. Of course I'll add additional loops along the way as these grow, especially near where the fruit sets.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010272.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on May 31, 2010, 08:24:07 PM
This is my first year with potatoes and I've not really known what to expect.  The plants are a little leggier than I expected and most of them collapsed over when a thunderstorm hit a couple weeks ago.

Here is one of the patches - note how they all fell over the sides and started growing up from the ends vs righting themselves up.   You can see the plants to the left of the bed behind the tomato plant- they actually are rooting under the straw bed and just fell all the way over there.   These are just plain floppy plants, French Fingerlings I think. :)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010269.jpg)

These are getting to be in the same shape and I decided to try and corral them up a bit with some stakes and string.   It didn't work perfectly but it works enough to satisfy me for mow.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010270.jpg)



My midget Blue Jade corn is up and running; it isn't supposed to get but 3 feet high so I figure they will slow down and start putitng energy into producing soon.  (Center of corn squares is a bamboo stake to tie the sunflowers to)

The lettuce patch is running its course in the heat; the shade frame is slowing down the bolting well enough but the days are counting down now that June is here. 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010271.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: pappabear on May 31, 2010, 09:23:32 PM
cohutt,

I spoke to my grandmother about your potatoes.  She said leave them where they lay, they will take over like ground cover.  She also said that the vines will through (sic?) off roots in places and make more potatoes where they root up.  I hope I explained that well enough.  Let me know if not and I'll try and get a better explination from her.

Pappa Bear
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 01, 2010, 04:12:22 AM
That makes sense to me PB- I thought about hilling up over them where they touch another part of the bed. i just cut all the spinach from beside them so there is space.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: martomic on June 03, 2010, 11:56:24 PM
Do the ground cherries require any staking or are they like a little bush?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 04, 2010, 04:30:48 AM
As far as I know, no staking required.   They are bushes that seem to be sprawling out more and more as they grow.  The stems are soft and look a lot like the potato plant stems.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: digitalartranch on June 04, 2010, 07:12:14 AM
dang man, looking good.

Sadly I have to list my house, and move.  (not a financial thing like so many fellow Americans), transferring due to work.  Hopefully someone digs the 120 SQ foot I have worked so hard to get going.

... next time we buy we are buying for good and I will always remember this post / and last years post.  So much great info, great design, its just awesome.  Keep up the good work.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on June 04, 2010, 08:18:55 PM
Outstanding Cohutt!  I have been really busy and just caught up.  It is awesome watching everything come together.  I just came back from vacation to find my garden devastated by rabbits, chipmunks and probably squirrels.   >:(  But I digress,  looking good Cohutt.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 04, 2010, 08:22:16 PM
Thank you for the kind comments AK; I hope you land on fertile ground :)

Ros you need to fire that leetle kitteh of yours if the rodents are taking you out.....  ;)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 04, 2010, 09:29:11 PM
I was out of town from Tuesday evening through last night and found something not good tonight when I finally got to inspect things:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010299.jpg)

As much as I hated to do it, I cut it at the base and got it the heck out of the yard.  Fortunately none of the others have any sign of this yet.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on June 04, 2010, 10:10:26 PM
Ros you need to fire that leetle kitteh of yours if the rodents are taking you out.....  ;)

Ironically, my cat, Hunter, is an indoor kitty.  However, I put some traps out tonight so, hopefully they will help me out.  I have thought about adopting an old tom recently just to live outdoors.  I was hoping our new puppy would scare them off, but when we took her with us when we went on vacation. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 05, 2010, 05:30:44 AM
Ironically, my cat, Hunter, is an indoor kitty.  However, I put some traps out tonight so, hopefully they will help me out.  I have thought about adopting an old tom recently just to live outdoors.  I was hoping our new puppy would scare them off, but when we took her with us when we went on vacation. 

I have a hefty new outdoor tom that has adopted us that I will offer up. If you are interested I might even spring to make sure his cat balls stay here.  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 05, 2010, 05:46:46 AM
The only thing I've seen that grows faster than these gourd vines is kudzu.   

By yesterday evening some had made it to the top of the fence and well up the teepee frame (about a month ahead of when I thought they would. uh-oh)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010296.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010295.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 05, 2010, 06:38:22 AM
Quote
As much as I hated to do it, I cut it at the base and got it the heck out of the yard.  Fortunately none of the others have any sign of this yet
Good move getting that out.  You put that in the trash, not the compost pile, didn't you?  If you compost it, it could spread to next year's garden.

Quote
They are bushes that seem to be sprawling out more and more as they grow
That's what I've seen as well.  Mine last year were much wider than tall.  They are also pretty hardy, the ones that the cold seemed to kill off are doing much better now.

Quote
I thought about hilling up over them where they touch another part of the bed
I've never grown potatoes, but from everything I've read, if you mound over them, they will root just like tomatoes.  Then you'll have potatoes all along that stem.

Garden is looking great, keep posting those pics.  My squash plants are starting to take off like those gourds.  Not a lot of length yet, but there is a noticeable difference from day to day.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 05, 2010, 06:41:12 AM
The one infected Roma plant that was  one that was planted later and wasn't caged for a time due to the lettuce growing around it; I'm hoping the setting or timing was the cause and that it will be the exception to the garden rather than a omen of bad things to come.

In the meantime the Roma VF plants are loading up heavily; each plant has at least 30 tomatoes set and what seems like double that in blooms continuing to pop out.   I've never grown determinate varieties before; assuming this crop doesn't fail from here, I'm going to have to contend with a couple thousand juicy plum tomatoes ripening in a relatively short period a few weeks from now.    This is the problem I've been working so hard over the last year to be able to have.... :)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010301.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010300.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 05, 2010, 07:18:15 AM
Good move getting that out.  You put that in the trash, not the compost pile, didn't you?  If you compost it, it could spread to next year's garden.
Yes, I am careful of inadvertently helping disease and weeds spread via compost.   From what i have read, the fungus type issues like this that get tomato plants can and will "over winter" in the soil, so I am anal about removing any leaves that look remotely like they have spores on them, whether yellow brown or black or....

We have been distributed big yard waste bins were in the city, the "Herbie curbie" type.  I keep mine way up on the side of the house away from the garden in full afternoon sun.   It gets any and all crap that doesn't go to the compost piles, including potentially diseased cuttings and all weed and woody stemmed stuff.  Being in the sun, it turns into a super heated digester of plant material in the week or two between pickups.  
Confession time:  
I thought about torching it with some accumulated gunpowder from reloading spills and reclaimed rounds, but it was wet and drizzling here last night.
This plant rattled me so I put it in the commercial dumpster behind the restaurant a couple hundred yards over in the commercial block I adjoin.  Code says these have to be emptied daily here and lord knows I hear them banging at 5:30 in the morning so I know it is true.  Therefore, the spotted plant in the picture above is by now composting with food scraps and garbage in the landfill 12 miles south of here. :)  

Garden is looking great, keep posting those pics.  My squash plants are starting to take off like those gourds.  Not a lot of length yet, but there is a noticeable difference from day to day.

I took a couple shots of my modest squash bed last night too- two crooknecks with a zucchini in between, all of the bush variety.  Funny thing is the soils is the same and the seeds for the two yellow crookneck plants came from the same packet, but look at the difference between the two plants ((the left and right ones) both in overall size and leaf size:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010289.jpg)


LOL, I think I have an explanation though; it is a mutant plant on the left- look at the male double blossom it has developed......  

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010298.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010297.jpg)


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 05, 2010, 08:13:54 AM
My bush squash aren't doing well right now.  The vining types are growing like gang busters.  The zucchini is doing ok, just not like the vining squash.

We always get hit by squash vine borers about half way through the summer.  So this year I looked for an alternative to zucchini.  I found the trombocino squash that is supposed to be a good alternative to zucchini.  It is also supposed to be fairly hardy against SVB since it will root along the stem as it touches the ground.

Here's a random picture I found on the web of it.
(http://pics.davesgarden.com/pics/2003/12/08/Horseshoe/e7c36d.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 05, 2010, 07:11:26 PM
Artichokes finally seem to be taking root and growing

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010303.jpg)


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010302.jpg)

Asparagus continues to send up spears and bush out

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010287.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010288.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 05, 2010, 07:18:53 PM
Garlic harvest morning

Falling over and browning

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010305.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010306.jpg)


Harvest in process and then the curing solution :

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010307.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010309.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 05, 2010, 07:24:08 PM
And for the final post of the day, beans


Off the top of the trellis already.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010293.jpg)

Bush beans stuck in the ground where an old compost pile had been  are doing better than the beans actually in the sfg:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010275.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 05, 2010, 07:30:23 PM
Garden still looks great, Cohutt
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on June 06, 2010, 08:14:44 PM
Yours is so much better than mine. Good job.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 07, 2010, 04:15:04 AM
Yours is so much better than mine. Good job.

Stop that.  ;) You have already eaten tomatoes from yours.

Plus, like everyone else I am bad to only post about the good parts. :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on June 07, 2010, 09:35:59 AM
Just catching up on the posts from the last week or two, looking great Cohutt.  I think I'll refrain from showing my other half your romas, right now we're happy to have a fee small fruits on the "Sweet 100" plant that is growing.   

Fritz where did you find seed for that trombocino squash?  Might have to try some next year or maybe instead of putting some flowers in the bed the Zucchini is in after the cabbage come out I could squeeze one in there.

Glad that only one tomoato plant was infected with that nastiness.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 07, 2010, 09:53:59 AM
Fritz where did you find seed for that trombocino squash?  Might have to try some next year or maybe instead of putting some flowers in the bed the Zucchini is in after the cabbage come out I could squeeze one in there.
Got them from Territorial Seeds.  Here's a link to the Tromboncino squash (https://www.territorialseed.com/product/1100/222).  So far the plants are doing pretty well.  Each has 6 or 8 leaves on the vine.  One observation is the cucumber beetles seem to leave them alone.  So far, they are a repeater, but final will come down to production and taste.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 08, 2010, 04:48:09 AM
More trellis this weekend.....

The birdhouse kudzu gourds are growing a foot a day it seems.....

I decided that more for them to climb on would be a good idea, so out came the netting....

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010314.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010313.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on June 08, 2010, 07:35:50 PM
More trellis this weekend.....

The birdhouse kudzu gourds are growing a foot a day it seems.....

I decided that more for them to climb on would be a good idea, so out came the netting....



What are you putting in the water there Cohutt, LOL.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 09, 2010, 04:49:13 AM
Yeah these things worry me, at this rate my neighbor's garage apartment is in danger.  ;) I think it may be the 6" of composted manure under the bed that has taken hold.

They are flowering now too, a dozen or so of these open in the evening and then close when the sun comes back up.  By the looks of things about 100 are in about to come online.  Geez.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010318.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on June 09, 2010, 08:23:42 AM
Great pic :-)    I'm envious of your compost now, how sad is that.  I've been stuck buying bagged compost from the local places so far.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 11, 2010, 07:27:08 PM
I stirred the composting poop pile a little this evening in honor of you outdoorlady. :0




My beans have overrun their trellis already- not what I was expecting before summer solstice on 8 ft trellis.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010327.jpg)


I came up with a rig to extend them a little using a bamboo pole to anchor new twine run from the top.  As always my gardening continues to be a series of makeshift experiments literally strung together.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010328.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on June 11, 2010, 08:53:37 PM
Hey cohutt,
I haven't posted on this thread much, but I check it every time its updated. Great stuff. I show it to almost everyone who comes into my house.

I know this has probably been covered before, but where do you get your netting for your trellises? Do you buy it or make it?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on June 11, 2010, 11:14:25 PM
 8)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 12, 2010, 04:53:21 AM
HoC,

The square grid stuff on the bamboo bean trellis is from pogo there who just posted a smiley face between this post and yours.  :)  He figured he wasn't gonna need it and graciously sent it to me so he could watch me make a mess of my yard with it.
You can get it online, it is a whole lot cheaper than buying it at Home Depot.  The square grid is easy to work with.

The diagonal running stuff on my tomato trellis and gourd canopy thing I found @  www.nylonnet.com (http://www.nylonnet.com) - they have a lot of interesting stuff (The drawing had the square running stuff like Jawja sent me but it was the other type. ) It has a learning curve since it "accordions" some when you start hanging it.


The green twine that is in some of my pictures came from there too- tough stuff, UV resistant 300 lb and avaiable is several colors.




Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on June 12, 2010, 10:38:28 AM
jpg[/img]

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010307.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010309.jpg)


Cohutt - I thought this was one of the best ideas ever for curing!  DH hangs ours by tying them up in bunches but I thought this was truly a great way to let them dry and so much less tedious work to tie and untie.  Thanks for the idea!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 15, 2010, 05:22:31 PM
Thanks TBM, my best ideas usually sprout from some degree of laziness.
:)
______________________________________________________________

I wonder sometimes- it seems any time I have the opportunity my default mode is to start the installation process for a new bed.   My next door neighbor has been pouring some $$ into their old house lately, including the demolition of the old collapsing retaining wall and installation of a new monster deluxe version.

The soil there in my front yard was hardpan chert before it got uber-compacted and trashed by their equipment.   I told them not to worry about the repairing the grass since I was going to abandon fescue and have zoyzia sod installed; as hot as it is here in the summers the fescue has suffered greatly due to the loss of a couple of large oak shade trees to the west/sw of my front yard.

I blinked and crabgrass was well on its way to taking hold on the bare ground so I hoe'd it up some then went and pulled some furniture boxes out of a recycle bin down the street.  A few wheel barrels loads of compost later and the foundation for my new FRONT yard bed was laid.  (((insert sinister laughter here)))
I assured Mrs C that I would make it look good once constructed and after all it wasn't like I was going to plant corn in it or anything (well, maybe not)   Still a long way to go but this will stake a claim to the spot, suppress the weeds, and provide a base for the real bed coming later.

I really like the heat sink wall behind it- it might come in handy for winter greens eh?

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010342.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010343.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 15, 2010, 05:35:52 PM
General garden update:

A couple of the very few acceptable carrots from the spring planting

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010353.jpg)

"Christmas" pole limas will be coming soon

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010351.jpg)

As will the Henderson bush limas - i hadn't realized they were so far along til I noticed the pods showing in the far left background of this Sheepnose Pimento Pepper picture.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010349.jpg)

Artichoke plants have not been killed by me yet:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010348.jpg)

And it seems this patch of Romas might just put out a tomato or two this year. :) :

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010350.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: joeinwv on June 15, 2010, 05:59:09 PM
Nice looking carrots. I have a few still in the ground. They are doing good, but just moving sloooow. Most are less than 3" long right now. I did get a half dozen turnips yesterday - hoping that now they are out of the way carrots will get more sun and take off.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on June 15, 2010, 07:22:40 PM
What kind of carrot is that? It looks like a red potato carrot or something, lol.   Those Romas are freaking amazing too.  :o
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 15, 2010, 07:47:39 PM
St Valery and Dragon from SSE

;)

The few carrots that germinated this spring have been putting some significant tops up.      Germination was decent last August and the carrots were a sweet treat for most of the winter.  When I seeded again this April I got spotty germination (time to actually read up on the proper planting times for North Georgia I guess).   

I was impressed with the superior growth of the few tops this spring vs last fall although the first carrots pulled were long and skinny.  (Edible, but not of braggadocios picture posting quality.)

Here is the rub:

At least one, and actually probably most, of the robust topped carrots were not spring germinated seeds.   

DUH

Carrots are biennial, in that the flowering and seed cycle takes part of two seasons to complete.  In other words, seeds planted this spring might generate some tasty carrots but if left to grow the tops would not flower this year.   The carrot has to remain in the cool ground over the winter in order to turn on the flowering switch. 

So in my slackness, i must have missed a few carrots last winter because I have a carrot stalk almost 3 ft tall about to flower:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010345-1.jpg)

God sometimes rewards the incompetent eh?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on June 15, 2010, 07:49:42 PM
Missed a carrot?  Trust me, you can't get them all. 

I've got two with huge flowers on right now.  I did not know a carrot plant got that big.

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on June 15, 2010, 07:52:37 PM
 :o
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 15, 2010, 08:01:02 PM
Missed a carrot?  Trust me, you can't get them all. 

I've got two with huge flowers on right now.  I did not know a carrot plant got that big.

J

Yeah, after all my carrot box is a HUGE 2' x 3'; only someone with special skills could find all the carrots in a space that large.  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on June 15, 2010, 08:29:33 PM
St Valery and Dragon from SSE

;)

The few carrots that germinated this spring have been putting some significant tops up.      Germination was decent last August and the carrots were a sweet treat for most of the winter.  When I seeded again this April I got spotty germination (time to actually read up on the proper planting times for North Georgia I guess).   

I was impressed with the superior growth of the few tops this spring vs last fall although the first carrots pulled were long and skinny.  (Edible, but not of braggadocios picture posting quality.)

Here is the rub:

At least one, and actually probably most, of the robust topped carrots were not spring germinated seeds.   

DUH

Carrots are biennial, in that the flowering and seed cycle takes part of two seasons to complete.  In other words, seeds planted this spring might generate some tasty carrots but if left to grow the tops would not flower this year.   The carrot has to remain in the cool ground over the winter in order to turn on the flowering switch. 

So in my slackness, i must have missed a few carrots last winter because I have a carrot stalk almost 3 ft tall about to flower:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010345-1.jpg)

God sometimes rewards the incompetent eh?


I have a parsnip doing the same thing -- I'll have to post a photo. Beautiful thing!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on June 15, 2010, 09:24:43 PM
Yeah, after all my carrot box is a HUGE 2' x 3'; only someone with special skills could find all the carrots in a space that large.  ;)

LOL, I tend to put things wherever I have space.  Sometimes I forget where that spot is later.  May you break an errant root and it comes back later to haunt you.   :P

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 16, 2010, 05:37:02 AM
Aunt Mollie flops again


Earlier I posted something about how the ground cherries seemed to grow tall, spread a little then "flop over" and start the cycle again.  I guess I assumed that the initial episode of this was going to be the only one and that the plants would be more stable as they grew. 
Wrong.

The weight of the individual fruits has been increasing as the plants grow and season rolls on.  It is easy to look at them and thing "paper" weight since they even rattle like dry paper when you pick them up after they've ripened and hit the ground.   However, once a couple of dozen are collected the cumulative weight becomes more obvious.

So anyway, the plants had all grown to be 3-4' tall and were spreading out as they grew.  Two days ago most all the plants on the fence side of the bed just flopped over towards the fence.  No rain, no wind, even water application.... hmmm... 

The stems of the plants were all healthy, no crimps or breaks or weak spots, they just rolled over.

After 48 hours it looks like everything is growing upwards again (imagine that, towards the sun) but the foot print of the bed has greatly increased.  Sneaky these things are....... 

The big flop and resulting mid-bed gap:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010346.jpg)

The little culprits collectively clinging to the underside of the exposed plants:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010347.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on June 16, 2010, 05:48:20 AM
That is interesting.  I grew the Pineapple variety for the last two years.  I grew them spaced quite a bit apart and with no support.  They seemed to bush out quite well and I didn't worry too much about any fruit touching the ground because they have that nice little wrapper on them. 

That's pretty effective use of upward growing space though.

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on June 16, 2010, 07:12:18 AM
Are you going to put any supports in or just let them be?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 16, 2010, 12:04:25 PM
I'm going to leave them as they are- it might actually make picking the fruit up easier once they start growing vertical again.  I have flower beds on the other side and the two big Red Brandywine plants staked at the ends; if they gravitate from the bed there is a lot more room the way they fell....

Ros, the thing on the right side of the picture is the edge of the stump that had the yard salvaged bottles on it, right in front of the tool shed.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on June 16, 2010, 12:42:09 PM
Wow those things really have grown.  When I last came up they were a pretty good distance from that stump.  BTW, what are you going to do with that stump? make it into a sundial.  Major PITA to move and the way those bed are I don't think you can. Sundial might be kind of cool  though.


Let me know if you need any help with those ground cherries come picking time.   ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 16, 2010, 09:10:11 PM
The stump will become a soft depression filled with compost prolly by about 2016.....  in the meantime it displays the vintage collection of beverage bottles from the 60s and 70s uncovered in the privet removal effort last fall.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 16, 2010, 09:11:17 PM
"Dragon" carrot cross section for the curious:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010363.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: martomic on June 17, 2010, 07:22:22 PM
Awesome! How does the carrot taste compared to the "regulars"?  I planted some cosmic purple this week. They are supposed to look pretty similar.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 17, 2010, 08:03:46 PM
They are pretty good actually.  The ones we left in the ground last fall were smaller and sweeter.  This one was a beauty for the camera but was a little big for my tastes.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on June 18, 2010, 02:02:27 PM
"Dragon" carrot cross section for the curious:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010363.jpg)

Thnking I shouldn't let me daughter see this picture :-)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on June 19, 2010, 08:07:07 AM
Nice carrot!  We ended up leaving a section of carrots in the ground all winter (deep snow hit early in October and DH was headed hunting and so it went).  As soon as the ground thawed a little DH dug them up with the intention of giving them to the chickens.  I made him bring some inside and they were so sweet and good and surprisingly not harmed by the terrible winter weather we'd had so he dug them all and we ate some and canned some. Yum!

Thanks Cohutt for taking the time to update with pictures.  Your garden is so wonderful - I think I could walk around out there for hours and plan dinner!  Blessings TBM
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 19, 2010, 09:04:08 AM
  Your garden is so wonderful - I think I could walk around out there for hours



Not in the mega humid heat wave we're having right now    ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on June 19, 2010, 02:22:40 PM
Yeah this Mama doesn't do heat AND humidity very well - that's why I ran out of Nebraska as fast as I could (well that and those pesky tornados).    It's been humid here for Colorado - but I like to go out early in the morning when it's just me and the birds and the sun isn't real hot yet.  Nice time of the day.  Anyway again thanks for taking the time to post pictures - I love seeing them.  Blessings!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 20, 2010, 08:06:56 PM
I was away from the garden most of the weekend due to work commitments

When I came home this evening Mrs C said the 3 squash plants wilted badly this afternoon so I went out to inspect.  I was hoping that I wouldn't find what I already knew it was-

Unfortunately, the signs were there on all three- the bases had been bored into noticeably and in 2 cases the cheesy "frass" was accumulated at the holes.  If you haven't figured out what frass is yet, it is bugchit.

Even though the plants are probably too damaged to survive, I decided to try and surgically remove the grubs by slitting open the vine longways and physically removing the invaders. ; even if it doesn't work there is some modest satisfaction to be gained in destroying the destroyers.

I took a mug shot of one of the guilty and have graciously used the clickable thumbnail format instead of embedding the full sized picture.   Don't open this picture if you are planning on eating cheese grits or anything similar in the next 48 hours.   Consider yourself warned.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/th_Garden2010370.jpg) (http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010/Garden2010370.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 20, 2010, 08:18:27 PM
Oh, man.  That sucks.  Hopefully those are the only victims of the SVB.  I'm losing a zucchini to what appears to be cucumber beetles.  I'm working on it, but not having much success.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on June 21, 2010, 08:17:28 AM
Ugh! I can't stand SVBs.  I haven't gotten any this year but they slammed me hard last year.  Next year I am going to try, "Zucchini Rampicante"  Allegedly they are basically completely resistant to SVBs. I also heard that you can cut it half and it heals in a way so that it doesn't even need to be refrigerated.  I heard about it on that iTunes U Permaculture class.


http://www.kingsseeds.co.nz/shop/Vegetables/Alpha+Search+for+Vegetables/Veges+T+to+Z/Zucchini+Rampicante8740.html (http://www.kingsseeds.co.nz/shop/Vegetables/Alpha+Search+for+Vegetables/Veges+T+to+Z/Zucchini+Rampicante8740.html)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 21, 2010, 08:19:50 AM
Interesting.  I'll have to keep that type in mind.  I'm trying Trombocino squash as an alternative to zucchini.  That's the squash that Jack dehydrates in that one video.  They are supposed to be less susceptible to SVB because they put down roots along the vine.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: evilphish on June 21, 2010, 01:46:09 PM
Cohutt.  now i'm really jealous

between the rabbits, bad germination, and now a horrible thunderstorm, there is hardly anything left of my garden.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 21, 2010, 08:15:02 PM
Welcome to my moment of zen this evening, when I took a break and sat on a garden bench.  I've lived here for 23 years and as far as I can recall, this is the first time I've actually put my rump on the bench.  go figure.


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010371.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: pappabear on June 21, 2010, 10:01:12 PM
wow...what a photo, and let me be the first to say, from what i've seen you deserved a well earned break.  keep it up.  you continue to be an inspiration.

pappa bear
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on June 22, 2010, 06:36:22 AM
You really have a nice little slice of heaven up there Cohutt.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: outdoorlady79 on June 22, 2010, 11:27:36 AM
You really have a nice little slice of heaven up there Cohutt.

I second that thought, I'm continually amazed by what he's doing on his city plot.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 22, 2010, 07:34:55 PM
Thanks.
You guys are just a few months behind me that's all; my garden project just now finished its first year earlier this month.

Tonight:
Squash bug egg patch discovery and elimination x 5.  All on the gourds. 

(the bastiges!)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010376.jpg)

Gourds made a break over the fence lol

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010392.jpg)

I have a nice gourdish christmas tree now too:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010386.jpg)


squirrel patrol in action:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010380.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 22, 2010, 07:37:48 PM
I almost forgot- the vine borer emergency surgery didn't help much with the yellow squash, but, (keeping fingers crossed) the zucchini looks remarkably good two 95+ degree days after the "procedure" 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010384.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 24, 2010, 08:49:50 PM
The squash continued to improve, including the one I didn't even want to show a foto of.
I really expected all 3 to be composting by now but it looks like the emergency field surgery may have worked. 


Also, this is what happens in my back yard if I spend too much time inspecting squash and picking up ground cherries:

What a kitteh sees (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qu_5r7LZu0M#normal)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on June 24, 2010, 10:29:44 PM
 :o
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 28, 2010, 08:16:00 PM
Quick update:

It is beginning to rain Romas here - I picked these yesterday and had some sauce made before i went to bed. 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010393.jpg)

Looks like the birdhouse gourds are finally pollinating-

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010395.jpg)

And I discovered a Brandywine Mr Tomatohead lurking in one of the plants.  Nice proboscis for a tomato......

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010394.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on June 30, 2010, 05:34:42 PM
I'm really impressed with those romas. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 30, 2010, 09:00:10 PM
I'm really impressed with those romas. 

It's raining romas here right now.  It won't last all summer but i counted that I've picked almost 120 already, mainly in the last week :)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010420.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010399.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on June 30, 2010, 09:04:19 PM
The tomato cavern

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010402.jpg)


and the Tommie Toe heirloom cherry tomato bushasaurus standing 7+ feet tall and 4 feet wide.  LOL, this is one frickin plant and it isn't July yet. 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010401.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 01, 2010, 06:55:31 AM
That is awesome Cohutt! I am so jealous  :o  Curious, how much of your garden is being watered by your raincatch system and how much by city water? Or did you use Brawndo?  Those things are huge!

Idiocracy Brawndo's Got Electrolytes (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1fKzw05Q5A#normal)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 01, 2010, 05:12:06 PM
lol WTF is that.....

I've been mostly using my barrels for the whole deal but something happened in the last couple of days that drained the frickin system.  either dummy here left a hose open by accident or the system has developed a leak I haven't seen.  I think it was the first- i've been busy and worked til dark Monday and Tuesday and must have missed the fact that I left the valve open monday morning. 
Kicking myself and hope that is the issue.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 01, 2010, 07:32:53 PM
I might suggest that more attention needs to.................................................. ;D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 02, 2010, 11:49:59 AM
yeah yeah i know. 

________________________________________________________

When do you guys harvest bell peppers?  Never grown them before.....


Napoleon bell peppers:


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010428.jpg)

(note the supervisor sitting down while the laborer toils)
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010432.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 02, 2010, 02:55:04 PM
Quote
(note the supervisor sitting down while the laborer toils)


I see, I see.

Supervision requires rigorous thought, which is much enhanced by a comfortable point of view. Smart, IMO.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on July 03, 2010, 05:34:16 PM
Quote
(note the supervisor sitting down while the laborer toils)
As long as you know your place...
 ;D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 03, 2010, 06:27:45 PM
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010459.jpg)


:)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: martomic on July 04, 2010, 02:41:54 AM
are you going to can, paste, salsa, or a little of each?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 04, 2010, 06:05:32 AM
All this is new to us and we are trying things as we go.

We plan to put up some sauce mostly, plus some experiments with fresh salsa as soon as my latest cilantro planting grows a few more inches.   
The newspaper lined bucket is Martino's Romas, which have a much better fresh flavor than the Roma VF.  These are what will be used in the "fresh" projects.

I've been counting and logging when I inspect the harvested tomatoes - this harvest was 165 total and it looks like we'll get that again before tomorrow evening.  I think I'll cook them down on the grill's side  burner otherwise my kitchen will hit 90 degrees.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 04, 2010, 07:15:55 PM
The bottle or "birdhouse" gourds are starting to fix and grow all over the trellis and fence; none up the tower that I can see so far....... 

This is the leader of the pack:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010467a.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 04, 2010, 09:23:00 PM
 8)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 05, 2010, 06:37:03 PM
lol WTF is that.....

I've been mostly using my barrels for the whole deal but something happened in the last couple of days that drained the frickin system.  either dummy here left a hose open by accident or the system has developed a leak I haven't seen.  I think it was the first- i've been busy and worked til dark Monday and Tuesday and must have missed the fact that I left the valve open monday morning. 
Kicking myself and hope that is the issue.

Brawndo is a drink from the movie Idiocracy (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/) by Mike Judge who did Beavis and Butthead, King of the Hill and Office Space.  You really should see it.  It is a hilarious take on America's culture. Seriously, check it out. hilarious and thought provoking.


I posted more Brawndo vids on the awesome video thread.  And yes it is real, but hard to find.
http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=4781.msg207049#msg207049 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=4781.msg207049#msg207049)

Back on topic.

I have noticed a big difference between the plants I water with rain water vs the ones I watered with city water.  Have you noticed or do you not have anything to compare it to?

Those romas look awesome! I hope Mrs. Cohutt is up to making sauce.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 05, 2010, 07:21:19 PM
Mrs cohutt?

I am the sauce maker. ;) 


I may be imagining it but yes the plants do seem to like the rainwater better.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 05, 2010, 07:23:04 PM
I forgot your Mrs is just like mine. A specialist in supervision.  :D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 05, 2010, 07:32:46 PM
Actually I'm a much better cook that she is and she would tell you the same thing. 

I'm experimenting with a base sauce to put back and am doing it by "nose".  I Cuisinarted  the tomatoes, skin, seeds & all after halving and removing the white stem center.  Added A head of garden garlic, a cup fresh of oregano and sweet basil, salt & pepper.

Cooked down by about a third and I have a thick base sauce that's good on it's own. 

(No onion in this one.)


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 05, 2010, 07:43:04 PM
OMG!  That sounds delicious!  :o

I'm the cook here too. I don't think my wife has cooked since 2005.  LOL  :D   I just enjoy doing it. She does the dishes.  I hate doing those so, it works out good.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: tamo42 on July 06, 2010, 08:37:14 AM
Weird.  I'm the non-dishwashing cook as well.  Is it a GA thing? :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on July 06, 2010, 09:42:51 AM
Nice haul Cohutt!  We've had one very tiny red 'mater so far!  :D - Hopefully if we don't get more hail before the end of the season we might get a few.

I thought I'd share a link to this little gadget http://www.amazon.com/Palmer-Wholesale-250-Victorio-Vegetable/dp/B001I7FP54/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1278430502&sr=8-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Palmer-Wholesale-250-Victorio-Vegetable/dp/B001I7FP54/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1278430502&sr=8-1) I love to use this for making tomato sauce - it makes it so easy.  I saw you said you use your Cuisanart and wondered how that did with the seeds. This is one of the best things I ever bought to process tomatoes and grapes.

So happy for you that all your hard work - blood sweat and tears - is paying off in yummy food. Keep up the photos - I love to see your garden.  Blessings TBM
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 06, 2010, 04:43:08 PM
TBM,

I looked at tomato presses; the Williams Sonoma one was what I was considering based on price and reviews.  However,  I ended up passing.  Before I sprang for one, I wanted to see 1-if growing gobs of tomatoes was for me and 2. if i could stand to eat seeds and skins
After reading up on various sauce making methods and prep I decided that I wasn't going to worry about skin and seeds; I use the chopping blade in the Cuisinart and pulse the Roma halves a few times then run it wide open for a few seconds.

The difference in the flavor of the batches I did this way with skin & all vs 1 skinned batch was noticeable.  I really didn't notice the seeds either way; maybe it is the relatively low seed to pulp ratio of the Romas.   Or maybe I'm just ignernt and don't know better. :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: martomic on July 06, 2010, 06:27:52 PM
I bought the Williams Sonoma press. Just waiting for it to arrive and for the tomatoes to ripen!! I'll let you know how I like it.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 06, 2010, 06:36:31 PM
Quote
The difference in the flavor of the batches I did this way with skin & all vs 1 skinned batch was noticeable.  I really didn't notice the seeds either way; maybe it is the relatively low seed to pulp ratio of the Romas.   Or maybe I'm just ignernt and don't know better.  

Roma's do have a low seed/pulp ratio, but little juice...IMhO. You ain't ignert, dang.  ::)  

Ma is a seed/skin anti-. I'm a put it on da table and I a eat it type. She wastes a lot of 'mater IMhO. Skin 'n seeds processed like you mentioned is in erry can of commercial sauce we ever ate from da market out of a can or jar...most likely.

Lotta folk can't eat/digest seeded fodder for health reasons, which is fully understandable.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 06, 2010, 07:39:16 PM
If you just want to get rid of the skins Cohutt, you can put them in boiling water for a few minutes and then immediately transfer them into ice water, then peel. Here (http://www.ehow.com/how_4450366_skin-tomatoes.html) are complete instructions.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 06, 2010, 07:49:07 PM
I'm a peeler when it comes too big fat slicing tomatoes, but that's about it.

Jawja tell Ma that Mrs C gets the willies from just thinking about tomato skins BUT admitted that with yesterday's batch of sauce the long simmer took care of them to her satisfaction.  She declared this evening that the skins were what give the sauce "a burst" of tomato flavor like she hasn't ever tasted before.  Might have even said "explosion". ;)  ( I'm lucky it is easy to impress a woman who grew up eating out of a can heated up by a bad cook to boot.)

Ros,  I give them 1 minute in the boiling, tops.  You really don't even need the ice water althoug it helps if you are doing 100 or so at one.  Cool tap water works fine as does just letting them sit in the A/C for a minute.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 06, 2010, 08:39:34 PM
(http://www.bbrclub.org/baragecardington.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010479.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 07, 2010, 03:38:03 PM
Quote
Jawja tell Ma that Mrs C gets the willies from just thinking about tomato skins BUT admitted that with yesterday's batch of sauce the long simmer took care of them to her satisfaction.


I told her. She jes  :D and said "she's smart too."
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 09, 2010, 08:47:35 PM
These guys are doing the job for me this year.   I've only seen one honey bee this whole season but am covered up with bumbles and they are definitely getting it done: squash, gourds, beans, tomatoes, everything.....

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010489.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: OKGranny on July 10, 2010, 12:24:48 AM
Gorgeous garden. It just gets better and better. I've really enjoyed keeping up with your fantastic gardening.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 10, 2010, 04:56:40 AM
Thank you okgranny.

I'm sipping coffee looking at several hundred Romas that have to be sauced today.   I was afraid I'd get tired of it but it hasn't happened yet.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 10, 2010, 05:00:21 AM
These guys are doing the job for me this year.   I've only seen one honey bee this whole season but am covered up with bumbles and they are definitely getting it done: squash, gourds, beans, tomatoes, everything.....

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010489.jpg)


I would be happy to send you a FRB full of happy pollinators from the honey hole if I had a suit Cohutt. Honey included.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on July 10, 2010, 05:38:52 AM
We have tons of bumblebees in the area.  It's funny, but just about any evening, I can stroll around the yard and find a bumblebee sitting on a plant for the night.  I know they nest underground, but maybe the males (do they have drones?) sleep where they can find a protected place.

As for honey bees, we still have them in this area.  I see them all the time on the clover.  There should be more next year, I'm planning on starting a hive.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 10, 2010, 07:59:03 PM
Jawja, post a picture of the "honey hole" for everyone- it is the coolest thing I've ever seen when it comes to bees
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 10, 2010, 11:22:37 PM
Jawja, post a picture of the "honey hole" for everyone- it is the coolest thing I've ever seen when it comes to bees


Well, since you insist......


(http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g194/jawjaboy/IM000751.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on July 11, 2010, 03:14:18 PM
Very cool.  Thanks for sharing the honey hole.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 11, 2010, 04:25:35 PM
No problem Fritz.   :D

I wish somebody would come get them, I'm tired of getting stung.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roamer on July 11, 2010, 04:37:51 PM
Cohutt,
     All I saw was Bumble Bees on my eggplants also.

     A friend at church has bee hives and has been asking me to get one because I think he has an extra queen or something like that. But I am hesitant and do not know why.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 12, 2010, 07:22:21 PM
Today's tomatoes 110

Brandywine 13
Roma VF 54
Martino's Roma 28
Tommie Toe 15

The total is now 1037 for the season.  :)
(A lot of sauce has been put up so far.)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on July 12, 2010, 07:47:21 PM
I'm envious.  I always have trouble with tomatoes.  This year was no different.  My tomatoes that we started from seed didn't do well at all.  Then when planted in the garden, they were mostly eaten by the rabbits and the others didn't take off.  The only ones that we are getting tomatoes off of are the 6 that we bought, 3 grape, 3 mortgage lifters.

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 12, 2010, 08:17:11 PM
My wife is in heaven- this is more than I've grown cumulatively in the other 49 summers of my life.  Of course I worked my arse off all winter to be able to do it (and likewise have had quite a bit  good luck so far ).  The rest of the garden is "OK" but not bang up;  I think i put too much emphasis on the tomatoes this year to the detriment of some other things.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 13, 2010, 07:15:32 PM
"Sheepnose Pimento"

(and fresh rain, hallelujah)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden524cut.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 16, 2010, 03:50:26 PM
Waiting waiting waiting

The cell that is parked over us right now is a doozy

the gourd tower is down.

damnit

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010539.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on July 19, 2010, 08:21:38 PM
Bummer.  Hopefully it is strictly the tower that is damaged and the gourds are still doing fine.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 19, 2010, 08:45:25 PM
Worked out OK-

this was what i found after the rains stopped- the 550 cord line kept it from falling straight back, instead it rolled to the left:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010540.jpg)

It took two extra lines to hoist it back up, or at least off the trellis and fence lol

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010545.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010547.jpg)

The reason (besides poor engineering) for the topple-

I wasn't able to see what was under the foliage up top, but afterward I found some monster gourds.  There were  lot of gourds up there, at least 40 or 50 lbs and the light colored ones in the insert have to weight over 10 lbs each.  The heavier they got, the more it leaned and then a little wind was all it took.  Over the weekend, the top of the tall bamboo has bent and broken under the weight- amazing actually.  I never thought i would actually get anywhere close to this many. 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010544.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: tamo42 on July 20, 2010, 08:47:01 AM
Maybe a squatter pyramid next time :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 20, 2010, 11:06:08 AM
tamo,

I've got all winter to come up with some odd yet sturdy structures; cattle panels are among the potential components :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 20, 2010, 12:18:46 PM
You should do a sphinx.  LOL


However, you may have enough gourds for a while after that crop.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 21, 2010, 04:34:34 AM
I haven't been posting as much 'cuz I'm toiling both before and after work these days taking care of the garden as it is producing.  When you put in almost 30 tomato plants and they all mostly thrive, well, you have to do something with a lot of tomatoes.

As of this morning the tomato harvest is over 1400 excluding Tommie Toes, which are raining on us to the tune of 25-40/day. 
I've been freezing the Romas whole lately after skinning and removing the stem scar - it the mast week I've put up 10 or 11 quart bags like these

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010534.jpg)

Also, peppers have been floating in- here is a tasty little Sheepnose pimento and a Napoleoin Sweet Bell pepper that came in last night:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/WellHouse021.jpg)

My wife says I get stranger as the season goes on.  Maybe she is right- I felt like pulling some tiny antique toy doll glasses out and taking some shots of this tomato.  Why?  Who knows, it seemed like the thing to do at the time.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/WellHouse030.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on July 21, 2010, 08:06:19 AM
Definitely the right thing to do...

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on July 21, 2010, 08:10:55 AM
Never thought about freezing romas whole.  Hopefully the next time I try to grow Romas, they will thrive like yours.  Keep us posted.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 21, 2010, 05:03:35 PM
Never thought about freezing romas whole.  Hopefully the next time I try to grow Romas, they will thrive like yours.  Keep us posted.

My mother and grandmother say it works well.  From what I have read, expectations should be that they will be suitable to be cooked but not thawed to eat "fresh" from the freezer.  This being said, i know a couple of folks who say they put them on a salad thawed (which probably would taste like crap in July and August but the same thing might be delicious in the dead of winter.)

They say they can be frozen with or without the skins; the skins supposedly fall off when thawed.

The skinned, cored romas compress into freezer bags nicely. I partially seal them then suck the last of the air out then finish. (poor man vacuum sealer)

Ask me again in January ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on July 21, 2010, 08:42:43 PM
If you have a dehydrator, try drying some of the tomatoes.  You can do a few trays at a time, and less prep work than canning.  They are good rehydrated, but even better when made into tomato powder (you can add spices to make "instant" tomato sauce.  We also added it to some tomato sauce/barbeque sauce to help thicken the sauce without cooking it forever. 

Glad to see the gardens survived the thunderstorm.  Everything's looking awesome.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 21, 2010, 09:26:19 PM
+1 for the tomatohead because it made me laugh  :D

That is interesting to know about the process of freezing tomatoes. I am going to get an outdoor cat in about 3 weeks or so. Hopefully, it will scare the bunnies away and I'll actually get tomatoes next year. It would be awesome to have your dilemma of too many and what to do with them.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Rosesandtea on July 22, 2010, 06:04:07 AM
Things look so lovely Chez Cohutt.   I'm amazed at your tomato production.   

I really have to try harder, for my dd's sake (who has been wanting them for a couple of years now) to find some room for some sunflowers.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 22, 2010, 05:35:47 PM
Thanks rosie, you reminded me that I have one gimeganormous Arikara that needs measuring tonight. 
I'm estimating it is close to 10 feet tall right now as it is towering over the 6 ft fence it is next to-

Results to follow
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 22, 2010, 08:02:24 PM
A 128" (+/-) Arikara sunflower (nearing dusk - sorry for dark photo)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010554.jpg)

Another patch of "Mammoth" that has been battered by storms lately.  These only get a half day of sun -

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010549.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on July 22, 2010, 08:50:41 PM
Pretty cool.  About how big of a head of seeds do those mammoth sunflowers get?  I have some of those that are up in the 8' range.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: joeinwv on July 22, 2010, 09:22:14 PM
Cohutt - the closest I have found to having a 'fresh' tomato canned, is to use wide mouth quart jars and cold pack large tomatoes whole. These usually get skinned before going in the jar. Still not a fresh tomato, but nothing is...

This year I have just been coring and cutting into chunks and freezing. Your whole romas look perfect for sauce / chili this winter. The height factor definitely hurt me this year - I had brandywines that were 8' - post-storm they fell over about 1/2 way. Definitely hurt production. My pole beans and snow peas also got waay taller than I ever thought. If I had better support / more room, could have produced a hell of a lot more.

Next year I need to improve on my mismatch post / jute cord and staple gun methodology. Cattle panels / trellis look promising.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 22, 2010, 09:38:13 PM
I haven't measured any of the mammoths yet as they are just now reaching maturity. I'd estimate some are going to be almost a foot across, but supposedly they can be much larger.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 23, 2010, 07:22:20 AM
That sunflower is awesome!  :o  No wonder your garden is doing so good.  That thing is so big it probably pulls every bee within a ten mile radius to your yard.  :D   very cool.  I am going to try that next year.  I haven't seen any bees this year and I think it hurt me.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 23, 2010, 02:40:19 PM
I haven't measured any of the mammoths yet as they are just now reaching maturity. I'd estimate some are going to be almost a foot across, but supposedly they can be much larger.


They big as these Cohutt?


(http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g194/jawjaboy/IMG_0663-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 23, 2010, 07:21:50 PM
bout as tall as telephone poles

for real

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010554a-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 23, 2010, 07:30:28 PM
Cohutt - the closest I have found to having a 'fresh' tomato canned, is to use wide mouth quart jars and cold pack large tomatoes whole. These usually get skinned before going in the jar. Still not a fresh tomato, but nothing is...


I had read that cold packing is no longer considered safe- how do you do it?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on July 23, 2010, 07:43:08 PM
 :-\
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 25, 2010, 12:03:25 PM
Tomato count, excluding tommie toes which are running amuck right now, is 1700 after this mornings harvest of Brandywines #s 202-237.

:)

Didn't count the one below though-


For the record I hate all the frass creating creatures I've personally met so far-

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010561.jpg)



Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on July 25, 2010, 01:18:45 PM
Tomato count, excluding tommie toes which are running amuck right now, is 1700 after this mornings harvest of Brandywines #s 202-237.

Wow.  Impressive.  I'm going to push for many more tomato plants next year.  I doubt that I'll be doing the grape tomatoes.  They are very prolific, but other than eating them on salads, what to do with them?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 25, 2010, 03:12:29 PM
Thanks fritz, it has been a good year.   
Some thoughts:

A spring warm snap raised soil temperature significantly in the 3 weeks before my average last frost date.  The plants I put in were huge and had been repotted 2 times prior to being planted.  Big plants + warm soil = early growth and flowering (my theory anyway.)

Mid april is my average last frost date so the plants have been in for about 100 days.

It wasn't a damp june like last year when disease spread easily and the plants lagged due to few sunny days.

Every tomato plant was grown in soil mix that had never had a tomato (or potato) plant growing in it before.  This gave me pretty much a disease free plot starting out.   I did have one plant get swamped with a black fungus but I immediately pulled and destroyed and dodged a bullet.

Small = More. Roma VF was chosen due to fair disease resistance and a reputation for being prolific.  It hasn't disappointed, with the 16 main plants putting out over 85 each on average, but remember these are 2-3 ounce paste & sauce tomatoes.


I can't keep up with the tommie toes at this point- I have two gargantuan plants that are now putting out dozens every day.   They actually have a function in the garden I didn't expect though; ever since the birds figured out I was serious about netting up the bigger varieties, they gave up mostly and moved to the tommie toes.  In this case, there are enough for all of us. ;)




Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on July 25, 2010, 06:56:58 PM
I had read that cold packing is no longer considered safe- how do you do it?

My Jackie Clay cookbook has a method for raw pack:

Fill jars with peeled, cored, raw tomatoes, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Add 1/2 tsp. salt, if desired and 1 T. lemon juice to each pint and 2 T. lemon juice to each quart. Ladle boiling tomato juice over tomatoes, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rim of jar clean; place hot, previously-simmered lid on jar, and process pints for 40 minutes and quarts for 45 minutes in a boiling water bath canner.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on July 26, 2010, 09:36:24 AM
My Jackie Clay cookbook has a method for raw pack:

Fill jars with peeled, cored, raw tomatoes, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Add 1/2 tsp. salt, if desired and 1 T. lemon juice to each pint and 2 T. lemon juice to each quart. Ladle boiling tomato juice over tomatoes, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rim of jar clean; place hot, previously-simmered lid on jar, and process pints for 40 minutes and quarts for 45 minutes in a boiling water bath canner.

Because during harvest I'm overworked and definitely underpaid this is the method I've always used (or maybe I'm just lazy because I pretty much raw pack everything).  The key is the lemon juice - it's what brings the acidity up and makes it safe.  I sometimes find science annoying in all the "new" ways to do things - are they trying to scare people off canning their own food?  Ah well - sorry to rant but you know how I am. 

Ick on the tomato worms - too bad you can't find a use for them -  grasshopper hor d'oeuvres? ;D  Awesome sunflowers - I love love love sunflowers - my favorite flower.  Send some my way as DH took over my sunflower bed for strawberries - food or pretty? Dang, food wins out every time - just haven't found a new place to grow some.  Hope you are enjoying all your abundant harvest.  Blessings TBM 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 26, 2010, 09:56:11 AM
Is there an easy way to shell all those sunflower seeds? Like a sunflower gin or something.  The other day I was at Cracker Barrel and saw shelled sunflower seeds that were chocolate covered.  I thought it sounds very good, but man that would be SO tedious.

BTW, about how many seeds do you get from one of those big ones?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 26, 2010, 06:33:04 PM
Ros,

From what I have read, the commercial sunflower seed shellers are air/impact oriented, causing the shell to split open then the hull is blown or vacuumed away.  

Haven't counted seeds yet, a few baseball park packs worth at least. :)

lvschant and tbm, thanks, my mother basically said the same.  Lemon juice or absorbic acid takes the risk out.

I should learn from her more but I guess I'm just pigheaded.  She is pretty talented at all this stuff, she wrinkled her nose when we were talking about making jelly/jam and I asked about pectin.  She said she won't the grocery store stuff, that only home made stuff works the way she likes.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on July 26, 2010, 09:33:39 PM


I should learn from her more but I guess I'm just pigheaded.  She is pretty talented at all this stuff, she wrinkled her nose when we were talking about making jelly/jam and I asked about pectin.  She said she won't the grocery store stuff, that only home made stuff works the way she likes.

Dang Cohutt - I wish I had a mother who knew any of this stuff - my mother's idea of canning is to tell someone how to open a can of soup.  I think you'd be wise to pull up a chair and listen as some of our older folk know tons of stuff we don't and it's becoming harder to find anyone who knows the old ways. And yeah I understand that it can be difficult as our parents get older (trust me I do know!) but maybe you'll learn something really useful especially if SHTF and there are no stores and no place to buy pectin - it would be great to know how to make your own.  I know I've read about it years ago but never thought about it again until you brought it up. Please ask her how she makes her own and share with us. Thanks and blessings  (okay I'm done giving you a hard time - although I hope you know it was done with love and good intentions).
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Remman on July 26, 2010, 10:43:38 PM
WOW cohutt you are an inspiration.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on July 27, 2010, 06:21:59 AM
Yes... we had a thread on making our own pectin somewhere... but I never tried using it after I made up a batch (got busy and it got too old in the frig). I'd love to hear about someone who really knows what she's doing...
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 27, 2010, 10:17:56 AM
I'll ask her when i get back in town next week.   She grew up in northern VA apple country and everyone there used apples or apple skin somehow.

Thank you Remman- I always remind folks I just started this project 13 months ago.  If I can do it anyone can. ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: swoods on July 27, 2010, 07:47:47 PM
I'll ask her when i get back in town next week.   She grew up in northern VA apple country and everyone there used apples or apple skin somehow.

Thank you Remman- I always remind folks I just started this project 13 months ago.  If I can do it anyone can. ;)

I just read about making your own pectin using apples. The book is called The Complete Book of Small Batch Preserving by Ellie Topp and Margaret Howard. Some great recipes in there for when you don't have a bushel of something to preserve.

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 28, 2010, 02:31:04 PM
Thanks swoods- +1
That might be a good resource for me since I really want to try it "a little" before I invest in a lot of equipment (and time).
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 28, 2010, 02:33:46 PM
Cohutt, you are always welcome to borrow my pressure cooker if you need it.  Just let me know.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 28, 2010, 02:46:23 PM
Cohutt, you are always welcome to borrow my pressure cooker if you need it.  Just let me know.

Now that's an interesting offer. THANKS. Will talk to you this weekend hopefully.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on July 28, 2010, 06:24:59 PM
Now that's an interesting offer. THANKS. Will talk to you this weekend hopefully.

PM sent  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: martomic on July 29, 2010, 05:27:41 PM
I know you posted the pic a little while ago, but how did you cook the sheepnose pimento?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on July 30, 2010, 09:37:16 AM
Really only freezing them so far and doing a little nibbling along the way.  A good pimento cheese is the goal.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 02, 2010, 08:08:53 PM
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010565.jpg)



Jack has nothing on me when it comes to succession planning- these pecans growing out of one of my potato beds will be dropping nuts in no time, maybe 10 years lol

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010576.jpg)

The ground cherries that flopped earlier are fighting back, have escaped the bed and are trying to cover my dug out of the garden bottle collection.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010574.jpg)


The Goliath tommie toe plant just keeps on growing and producing

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010587.jpg)


Artichokes don't look like they will be providing much (the fire ants let me know that it was time to move on.)


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010588.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 02, 2010, 08:44:43 PM
The asparagus put out some serious growth in July after a little rain came and is now taller than me in several spots.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010579.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010578.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on August 03, 2010, 07:28:57 AM
wonderful stuff! I am jealous of your ground cherries... I tried a couple at Jack's when I got the tour of his garden (really yummy!). I never got anywhere trying to get mine started from seed this year. I'll try again next year in GA. Your asparagus looks terrific, too.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on August 03, 2010, 07:45:20 AM
Once again I'm impressed with your garden - pretty amazing for someone who started gardening what - a little over a year ago? I quote you from an old post:

I started from zero last may-
zero gardening expertise
zero garden space
zero local mentors
zero idea where it would go

Shows everyone what hard work and planning can do and that everyone can grow your own food.  Nice job Cohutt - you've definitely done an impressive job and Mama doesn't impress easily.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 03, 2010, 10:08:05 AM
Welcome back and glad to see an update.

LvsChant, definitely give those ground cherries another try.  I can't kill them, and believe me, I tried.  Mine were out in the frost and all that was left was a 4" stick.  They have come back and are producing like mad.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 03, 2010, 05:43:32 PM
Thanks tbm.   I'm just stupid enough to try something and just smart enough not to ruin everything.

lvschant,  ground cherries seem to do well here.   They got giant then flopped over and exposed the ground at the base of the plants to sun which set them back a bit.  I snapped the picture above just because I noticed they had started really creeping and growing again, even (or especially) in the 100 degree heat.   
I have discovered that that the only thing tastier than a 97 degree Tommie Toe straight off the vine is a 97 degree ground cherry straight off the ground.  They just melt in your mouth. 

Like fritz said, I think I have them for life now due to the hundreds that fell under the plants after they flopped;  I got lazy (tired of scrounging for them as the tomatoes were going full bore).  They are notorious self seeders from season to season so I'm probably just going to let them run by themselves next year.

I am getting my plans for the winter in order now too-  some rearranging of the boxwoods and opening up room for more efficient and aesthetic plantings.

In the meantime, peppers:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010570.jpg)



(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010567.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: sclindah on August 04, 2010, 06:54:02 PM
Here in South Carolina my artichokes look about the same as yours as does our asparagus.  Maybe we'll have artichokes in the late fall???  This is our first year growing them and so far no signs of buds.  The heat has been insane!  At least the okra loves it.  Our tomatoes and peppers are still going strong.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 04, 2010, 07:26:33 PM
From memory so it should be verified -

'chokes normally need a certain number of cooling hours to flower and around here that means wintering over.  The ones I planted are allegedly a hybrid that is a first season flowering variety but I'm not banking on it.   Regardless, they are hardy enough to winter over @ the root level with a little mulch so if not this year, maybe next year we get them. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 09, 2010, 04:37:50 AM
Transition time has arrived-

The Roma VF and Martinos Roma are determinate varieties (meaning an unbelievable flush of tomatoes then little or none afterward) and are pretty much spent.  There are a few green tomatoes on each plant still but their work is done and I need the space for the fall garden.

So yesterday was "phase one" tomato removal. 

I wanted to get every last remnant of them out- including any fallen tomatoes and dried fallen leaves.  Why?  I have enjoyed a virtually disease free season this year in a large part due the fact that there was nothing over wintering in or on the soil in the tomato beds. This is why it is important to clean up everything that hits the ground around your tomato plants as the season goes along too.

The Romas flled the large cages so what I ended up doing was cutting the plants at the base and then lifting the whole cage out. I moved them away a bit then shook/pulled the plants out and put them in the city yard waste bin that I rarely use.  Normally most yard waste becomes compost but I want all traces of this years tomato crop out of here.

This is a painful picture for me- in the past I have pulled frost wilted plants out- never robust (but effectively spent out) plants.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010594.jpg)


The spot where this plant was is now an open  2x2 square.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010593.jpg)

 I continued and up pulling the rest of that side's row of 6 caged VFs before i decided it was just too damn hot.  I carefully picked up all fallen fruit, branches and leaves then raked up the straw mulch that was under the plants.  This all was disposed of with the plants as well.

I pulled the roots and left them to dry a bit in the sun; this evening I'll shake the soil mix off and dispose of them as well.   These roots were impressive- they were as thick as pencils and some ran laterally 3 feet
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: martomic on August 10, 2010, 10:21:05 AM
Will you plant tomatoes in the same boxes next year or will you rotate the location every year?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Orion53 on August 10, 2010, 01:35:37 PM
Cohutt,

With the philosophy of removing everything to prevent disease, will you be using the cages again or making new ones next year?  I have some really nice galvanized cages I used this year, but wonder if I need to clean them or just use them without worry.

Thanks,

053
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 10, 2010, 01:45:21 PM
So yesterday was "phase one" tomato removal. 

I wanted to get every last remnant of them out- including any fallen tomatoes and dried fallen leaves.  Why?  I have enjoyed a virtually disease free season this year in a large part due the fact that there was nothing over wintering in or on the soil in the tomato beds. This is why it is important to clean up everything that hits the ground around your tomato plants as the season goes along too.

The Romas flled the large cages so what I ended up doing was cutting the plants at the base and then lifting the whole cage out. I moved them away a bit then shook/pulled the plants out and put them in the city yard waste bin that I rarely use.  Normally most yard waste becomes compost but I want all traces of this years tomato crop out of here.

Great idea to keep things disease free.  I don't remember if you did potatoes this year or not, but keep in mind that relatives to tomatoes can harbor the tomato diseases.  Late blight over winters in missed potatoes.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 10, 2010, 05:04:36 PM
I plan on rotating but just HOW I'm not sure.  If I clean out as much remnants as possible I might get away with a couple years or more in a row but I'd rather not press my luck.

The good news is all these beds had tomatoes for the first time this year so I have had a decent year from a disease standpoint without doing much of anything.  I had one plant turn up with a really funky black mildew or fungus on it and I pulled it immediately but it did hit anything else.

The cages will be reused as is.  I won't be storing them inside so they will get the benefit of many freezing nights over the course of the winter.  From what i have red a lot of the holdover diseases that get tomatoes are sensitive to cold so really hard freezes should take care of this, right?

Fritz, I did potatoes in straw on top of the beds and it was a disappointment.  Cricket nymphs moved in an had fun with any tubers trying to develop in the straw but I did get some in the unhilled Mel's mix underneath.   Live and learn eh?  I'll do them again but will use traditional hilling methods for sure.   I was cognizant of the crossover diseases from taters to maters and vice versa so I will be considering this in my rotation schemes.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 11, 2010, 08:14:01 PM
Crap, the gourds were rocking then I have a whole section wilt and pretty much die in 2 days.

Cucumber beetles in the area, I was wondering what they were eating.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010601copy.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on August 11, 2010, 08:35:29 PM
Surely not cucumber beetles.  I dunno you might have them worse than me.  My garden is crawling, I can't imagine them doing that much damage. 

The ugly vine borers didn't get you again did they?  I only had two pumpkin vines survive and they are hanging on for dear life.

Well, whatever got ya, I hope you hunt em down and teach em a lesson.   >:(

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 11, 2010, 08:40:51 PM
looks like bacteria wilt- no vine borers on these, I've inspected plus the season is past down here.

I may still be able to harvest and save the gourds from what i read.  If that's the case, fine, I have about 3x what I needed/wanted from this experiment.  

same area a few days ago

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010585.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on August 12, 2010, 08:42:41 AM
Wow, that was scary quick.

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 12, 2010, 04:45:38 PM
:)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 16, 2010, 05:16:16 PM
Confession time:

I completely missed something about bush beans last year and only learned it this year because I wasn't so pressed for space.

Bush beans put out a second set of blooms after the first big flurry.  Duh.  Last year I pulled mine before the second set took place. Double duh.

These are Henderson baby limas in their second bloom session.  Boy, glad I was slack this year.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010617.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 16, 2010, 06:24:59 PM
Learn something everyday, don't we?   I haven't been able to get any lima beans this year.  I know 2 years ago, we pulled them after the first picking.  But we always leave the green beans for multiple harvests.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 16, 2010, 07:18:36 PM
I also learned something else new.  

There are moths almost as big as hummingbirds; one visited my garden.

It is hemaris diffinis aka Snowberry Clearwing or Bumblebee Moth.  I found the match on this site http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com/hdiffinis.htm.  

It wasn't easy to get these shots; check out the long nectar sucking tweeter extending into the flower:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010625.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010624.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010623.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 17, 2010, 05:27:46 AM
They are very cool, aren't they?  We had those visiting our flowers on the deck when we were in the other house.  I haven't seen them yet in the new house.  I was shocked at the size of these suckers.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: martomic on August 17, 2010, 07:31:32 PM
Nice pics! C, I remember in the past you planted fava beans, were yours a bush style variety or were they climbers? I just put some in the ground a few days ago. Something new to try for the fall. I was amazed at the size of those seeds!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 17, 2010, 07:53:05 PM
Technically limas, not favas. Pretty similar, seems like maybe Limas are a sub category of favas or something? 

As far as the limas, I have planted both bush and climbers.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: martomic on August 17, 2010, 08:02:40 PM
I was just getting ready to tell you never mind. I finally found your post way back in the beginning. Thanks anyways!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 22, 2010, 08:02:35 PM
The last week has been transition week- more cleanup and prepping for the fall garden as well as some seeds sown.

Somehow or another I started moving rocks today.  I have no idea why I started.   

I had probed and unearthed some of the old shale path stones in the boxwood garden a few weeks ago.   I've about busted my arse navigating the moonscape it created so I guess that's what motivated me....

anyway, some are organized around the bell/birdbath and out of the way for a little while, others are over in a transitional area between the lawn and the back garden area.

needless to say I'm already a little stiff, these monkeys weren't light.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010628.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010643.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010642.jpg)

I also noticed that the little ground cherry volunteers that spouted out of an anthill adjacent to a stump are getting downright respectable now:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010641.jpg)

The pole limas have started flowering again:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010630.jpg)

For perspective, check out the bean trellis arbor now- everything behind the Asparagus is growing out of the two small 2x8 beds. 

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010638.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on August 22, 2010, 08:39:47 PM
That moth is amazingly beautiful. I don't suppose it's offspring aren't damaging? I love the stones! I can't wait to see what you do with them. And OMG what the heck are you feeding those plants??
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: OKGranny on August 24, 2010, 01:23:22 AM
This years picture journey of your garden has been so much fun and even more amazing than last years.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 24, 2010, 04:31:08 AM
Thanks -
the plants are being fed mostly sunshine and Mels mix. The rear garden has butter soil under the beds though; even though it is clay based it had the benefit of years and years of leaves decomposing into it and no lawn to tap the nutrients out.
After two seasons of going wide open with a manic work winter in between I'm beginning to slow down and see what modest improvements or refinements might make things more productive with less work.  In other words I'm seeing what likes the space and doesn't (and vice versa) as well as what we actually like to eat AND incorporate into our food planning cycle.
Getting stuff to come out of the ground is fairly easy; getting some harvest for it isn't sure thing but is better than a 50% proposition even for a beginner like me. 

What I'm figuring out this year is making it all work together takes a little thought. 

I'm married to a "retired" industrial engineer whose whole expertise is supposed to be process and planning and all the related stuff.  Maybe I can get her to put down the plate of sliced tomatoes and baby limas long enough to help me lol.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on August 24, 2010, 05:28:23 AM
It's all looking great, Cohutt. I'd bet your IE would love that planning project... I know I like putting all that stuff to use when I get the (rare) chance at it.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 24, 2010, 05:38:15 AM
HA.  I know, she claims she doesn't but them has the google CAD program up about half the time I walk by her computer kiosk.    Either that or my daughter's facebook page doing some intelligence gathering lol.

I just set a peanut butter baited havahart trap back between the read beds.  I have declared war on the satan's spawn aka bushy tailed tree rats that have reappeared.  They have decided my rear tomatoes are an easy pick despite the occasional poodle rocket that is launched upon them.  The end of the line was when they ate the Martino's Romas I was letting ripen for seed. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 24, 2010, 07:49:43 AM
Good luck getting rid of those squirrels.  I'm pretty lucky with that, we have some, but nobody nearby feeds them, so they do like squirrels are meant to do, forage for their food, not set up shop in the garden waiting for stuff to get close to ripe.

So, any other big plans for changing the garden space?  We will be adding more beds and moving some around a little.  (of course we really means me)  I'm also thinking about putting down plastic between the beds and covering it with pea gravel.  We didn't plant as much of the space that was not in beds this year as we planed to plant.  So most of that will become raised beds.  I will leave a patch to plant corn and I found last year that corn doesn't do all that well in a raised bed, just not enough solid earth to grab onto.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Kilgor on August 24, 2010, 11:49:30 AM
Good luck getting rid of those squirrels.  I'm pretty lucky with that, we have some, but nobody nearby feeds them, so they do like squirrels are meant to do, forage for their food, not set up shop in the garden waiting for stuff to get close to ripe.

So, any other big plans for changing the garden space?  We will be adding more beds and moving some around a little.  (of course we really means me)  I'm also thinking about putting down plastic between the beds and covering it with pea gravel.  We didn't plant as much of the space that was not in beds this year as we planed to plant.  So most of that will become raised beds.  I will leave a patch to plant corn and I found last year that corn doesn't do all that well in a raised bed, just not enough solid earth to grab onto.


I had the same experience with corn.  I haven't done it yet, but it was suggested to suspend a cattle panel from t posts horizontally 2-3" off the ground and let the corn grow through it for support.  I think I read it in Mel's book.  Seems like it would work.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 24, 2010, 01:20:00 PM
I followed Cohutt's lead and suspended trellis netting from T posts.  Worked pretty well, but not perfectly.  Maybe a double hanging of trellis at 2' and 4' would work better.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: joeinwv on August 24, 2010, 02:47:39 PM
".......modest improvements or refinements might make things more productive with less work....."

This is what I am focusing on over the winter - this year I went crazy cramming plants in every bit of space I could find. It pretty well all worked, but I think I could have gotten the same yield with 75% of the plants. I also need to do better succession planning. I have had a few monster harvests with some down time in between.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 25, 2010, 05:05:07 AM
I didn't do a great planning job as far as planting what when where efficiently. It seemed like I was always rushing to get something or another done and ended up with a lot of open space in the garden that I could have used for something but then never had time to figure it out.
 
The successes were limas, and tomatoes- and gourds although I can't eat them lol.
the "OK but room for improvements" would include peppers
the dissapointments were squash (pests) and potatoes (learning curve)
herbs did great
the other stuff is/was just kind of there being evaluated.

fall garden will include lettuce, more spinach than popeye could choke down, broc and brussel sprouts, plus I plan on putting in a LOT of garlic and fall dividing onions / shallots.  I'll hoop house at least one bed for kicks, maybe 2 or thee if mrs C can stand the plastic view lol.

What else? Probably going to put in a berry or two this fall, raspberry perhaps.  will see.


 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on August 25, 2010, 06:11:08 AM
Sounds great! Looking forward to more updates.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on August 25, 2010, 07:45:15 AM
It seemed like I was always rushing to get something or another done


LOL - that's exactly what it's like - you chase the weather and the bugs but you do what you can in between working and life. 


Awesome harvest Cohutt - amazing garden and I'm jealous of you all who have fall gardens.  My fall garden is still my spring garden trying to finish before the first frost but I'm not complaining.  :D  The nice thing about winter as it gives you a few months to plan and dream and look at seed catalogs!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 25, 2010, 05:20:35 PM
tbm, not that you'll think this is amusing given your Colorado tomato schedule, but I've harvested over 2000 now :)

sometimes it is good to be where it is hotter longer than is really much fun.....
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on August 25, 2010, 05:51:39 PM
tbm, not that you'll think this is amusing given your Colorado tomato schedule, but I've harvested over 2000 now :)

sometimes it is good to be where it is hotter longer than is really much fun.....

 :o  Wow!  +1 for that bit of awesomeness.  I bet that canner is coming in handy  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 25, 2010, 07:08:02 PM

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010567.jpg)

So, what kind of pepper is this?  Looks like an ancho to me, but I'm not a pepper expert.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 25, 2010, 07:19:27 PM
So, what kind of pepper is this?  Looks like an ancho to me, but I'm not a pepper expert.

Poblano on the bush,  ancho when dried.
http://cohutt.wordpress.com/2010/08/05/poblano-ees-no-problemo/ 

It is supposed to be a mild chile but the single one I have harvested so far was, uh, ......  not mild.  Good, but NOT mild.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 25, 2010, 07:36:38 PM
:o  Wow!  +1 for that bit of awesomeness.  I bet that canner is coming in handy  ;)

I did a couple quarts of whole tomatoes Sunday evening as a test drive.  It was a little unsettling to mrc c and the pets - they were all somewhat concerned that it sounding like it was going to blow at any minute.   

The tomato table is getting covered up again in spite of the tree rat assault on the back bushes.   And almost in real time I present you with the table behind your post.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010649.jpg)
Thanks for the loaner, seriously.  Next year I'll probably be owning one and a dehydrator.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on August 25, 2010, 08:16:51 PM
I did a couple quarts of whole tomatoes Sunday evening as a test drive.  It was a little unsettling to mrc c and the pets - they were all somewhat concerned that it sounding like it was going to blow at any minute.   

The tomato table is getting covered up again in spite of the tree rat assault on the back bushes.   And almost in real time I present you with the table behind your post.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010649.jpg)
Thanks for the loaner, seriously.  Next year I'll probably be owning one and a dehydrator.


Yeah, I forgot to warn you it sounds pretty intense.  If you get one, I definitely suggest that model.  You'll definitely need one if you continue producing that many toms.  I got an air rifle too if you want to borrow that for the tree rats. Or a slingshot if you're feeling really lucky. It IS squirrel season after all.   ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 25, 2010, 08:20:59 PM
Yeah, I forgot to warn you it sounds pretty intense.  If you get one, I definitely suggest that model.

So, which model is it?  I have an inexpensive canner, but eventually I'll want to get a bigger model.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Kilgor on August 26, 2010, 06:39:01 AM
Cooking the poblano makes it milder.  I really like splitting them, deseeding, filling with cheese, and then grilling.  MmmmMmmm.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on August 26, 2010, 07:24:55 AM
So, which model is it?  I have an inexpensive canner, but eventually I'll want to get a bigger model.

I let him borrow my Presto 23 quart pressure cooker/canner (http://www.amazon.com/Presto-23-Quart-Aluminum-Pressure-Cooker/dp/B0000BYCFU). And trust me it's a beast. I love it though and highly recommend that model.  I use it all the time in making jelly.  It is the biggest one Presto makes. It holds 20 pint jars or 7 quart jars. I think All American makes a 30 quart, but it is over $300  :o 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on August 26, 2010, 07:44:05 AM
I have the presto 16 qt (iirc) that walmart sells. It has been large enough for me to be satisfied. They may also be on sale at your local store about now, too. I saw that they had the big water bath canners on sale here (GA) for only $18.97 when we cruised through the store Tuesday.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on August 26, 2010, 10:50:58 AM
I didn't know that Presto had a big canner like that.  I only looked at the All American and was shocked at the price.  We have a 12 Qt. Mirro that my mother gave me.  Works fine for now, but having to do multiple batches to can it all would be annoying.  But they all seem to do 7 quarts.

Sorry to hijack your thread, Cohutt.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on August 26, 2010, 07:14:32 PM
Thanks for the loaner, seriously.  Next year I'll probably be owning one and a dehydrator.



Be good to get ya dehydrator sooner, learn from using it thru da Winter 'n Spring. Be costing more$$ next year anyways prolly.

Last couple/three times we pressured anything, we did it outside on da lead killing machine.

Just a thought. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 26, 2010, 07:53:38 PM
Got that; don't know why i did it inside, maybe just wanted to keep mrs c company and try and teach her a little as i learned.   The side burner on the grill comes in handy for this sort of thing; I don't need all the BTUs of my lead killer lol.
I read the directions (yeah I know, but don't act so surprised, sometime I do pay attention) , and it warned about burners over something like 15,000 BTUs.

I figured 175,000 might create a downright hazardous situation.   :0

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/bermining019.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on August 26, 2010, 10:28:29 PM
Sorry a little more threadjack Cohutt - I actually taught a canning class using our outdoor burner since I ended up with 20 some people and not enough room in my kitchen for all to see.  It worked good but had to lift the canner up off the flame even on it's lowest setting (DH put some scraps of metal on the burner) and it needed watching but worked fine. Just need to make sure it's not wobbly as with 7 quarts in it it can be heavy and definitely keep a close eye on the pressure gauge.

I have two of the Presto 23 quart canners and love them.  They are easy to use and easy to clean.  Lately have been using them side by side.  I know that it's been said that these are bad because you have to replace the gaskets but I just keep an extra gasket on hand and if you oil them occasionally they last a long time.

Now we return to the Cohutt Garden thread.  Thanks for letting us hijack your thread!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on August 27, 2010, 05:47:48 PM
Ok I have a garden question for cohutt. Did you grow yard long beans? I planted a bunch and they are about a foot tall but no signs of the little curly things that hold them up and help them climb. If these are bush beans which i don't think they are they are very tall. Any ideas?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Kilgor on August 27, 2010, 05:57:52 PM
Ok I have a garden question for cohutt. Did you grow yard long beans? I planted a bunch and they are about a foot tall but no signs of the little curly things that hold them up and help them climb. If these are bush beans which i don't think they are they are very tall. Any ideas?

Not cohutt and I haven't grown yardlong beans, but the pole beans that I have grown wrapped the entire vine around and around whatever they were growing up.  They didn't have tendrils (the little curly things) to help them grab on.

I did a quick look on the net and it appears they can be either pole (climbing) or bush type.  They grow slowly in cooler climates, so maybe that's why yours are still small?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 27, 2010, 07:24:50 PM
tbm, to be honest, I'm not sure i've even heard of yard long beans before.

My pole beans are growing like kudzu now and have snaked in and out of each other and the trellis netting multiple times each.

Even though winter is still a ways off I'm definitely seeing the merits of using biodegradable twine or jute next time, as the whole mass can go in the compost pile. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on August 27, 2010, 08:38:48 PM
Ok I have a garden question for cohutt. Did you grow yard long beans? I planted a bunch and they are about a foot tall but no signs of the little curly things that hold them up and help them climb. If these are bush beans which i don't think they are they are very tall. Any ideas?

tbm, to be honest, I'm not sure i've even heard of yard long beans before.


Well Sweethearts Mom - Two Blues Mama - almost the same thing. I'm sure my boys think I'm their sweetheart mama.

But to Sweethearts Mom - I'm with Cohutt and have no idea what kind of bean you are talking about and we have a ton of different kinds of beans growing right now.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 27, 2010, 08:55:32 PM
DOH!, dang moms, momas, whatever.  I get dumber when I'm tired - sorry SHM.

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Greywolf27 on August 27, 2010, 09:47:33 PM
Sorry to post to pics to your thread Cohutt... I can move to my own thread if need be.

I have the Asian long beans going... I do not have a single twirly vine thingy on them... the "vine" just tends to reach and twist itself around the trellis.  I actually have a couple of beans that are now over a foot long... they all showed up in the past 2 days (I was out of town) and was blown away when I went out to water this afternoon.

took a couple pics, hope they come out ok... had to use a flashlight...
The final pic has a bean right in the middle... it's about 17 inches long!!!

(http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh288/GreyWolf27_photo/Picture032.jpg)
(http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh288/GreyWolf27_photo/Picture033.jpg)
(http://i259.photobucket.com/albums/hh288/GreyWolf27_photo/Picture031.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on August 28, 2010, 06:29:40 AM
Greywolf thank you very much. I feel better and now only hope I got them in the ground in time to get beans before october frost. I really hope frost holds off til Nov here this year.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 30, 2010, 08:26:29 PM
Arikara sunflower heads (sampled by squirrels)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010651.jpg)

Some grapes might actually be up for harvest soon at the bol

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20misc/Millsap005-1.jpg)

It looks like chestnuts are going to be raining from the sky in a few weeks too, maybe this is the year I harvest them and try to make something out of them

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20misc/Millsap009-1.jpg)

and looking up this is the view:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20misc/Millsap010-1.jpg)


After all something eats them eventually lol

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20misc/Millsap017-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 31, 2010, 04:56:57 AM
Odd pest/condition on a single tomato, it looks like this one has a peach pit in it lol.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010653.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010652.jpg)

I have NO idea what this was caused by, but is has not spread to other tomatoes or further along on this particular one.  It looks like a pest ate a chunk out the moved on (or in) and the tomato healed over and stabilized. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on August 31, 2010, 03:58:17 PM
I'll totally trade you range time for chestnut pick up duty, just saying.  ;)

Oh and I would burn that tomato and bury the ashes... deep.  That is scary ugly.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on August 31, 2010, 06:54:09 PM
My bet is some alien lifeform...don't stand too close! :crazy:
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: jawjaboy on August 31, 2010, 07:26:53 PM
I jes hope Bro C saw da movie SM. He got a booger man there.   8)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on August 31, 2010, 07:53:04 PM
Even the tree rats are leaving this one alone.

I might have to call in a napalm strike on that bed.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: “Mark” on September 06, 2010, 02:08:12 AM
Come spring, try planting some squash or pumpkin inside the stump. I've been told it works well for busting them up, as squash roots are strong. It would make an interesting experiment. I haven't been able to test it myself.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 08, 2010, 08:07:54 PM
It may be another season or two before the stump is ready for that sort of experiment, but I don't see any harm in trying it.

It is transition time, more clean out of summer plantings and putting in fall & winter stuff.

I set myself back a bit slicing my shin open on a stake in the garden last week (see below) and then I spent the better part of the weekend @ the BOL working on the finishing the well house.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/th_Stupiditybadge1.jpg) (http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Stupiditybadge1.jpg)

I fixed the wound myself (proud to say it worked out very well too).

What's coming:

I found a good deal on basic silverskin garlic and french red shallots (both under $5.00/lb) and plan on expanding these plantings quite a bit.  I also found some local (in state) "potato" multiplier onion sources as well, so we'll give those a try.

I also have sown lettuce, carrot and spinach seeds and am about to put out 100+ seedlings of broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts & cabbage. 

In the meantime peppers keep coming in and the pole limas have gone ape with flowers in the last couple of weeks.

I promise I'll catch up on photo updates soon.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on September 11, 2010, 08:07:26 AM
Glad your leg is getting better so you can get out there and keep working!    ;D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: OKGranny on September 11, 2010, 02:20:06 PM
I'm still trying to figure out how a poblano pepper could get hot. I finally got one the other day that was a bit warm but most of them are almost boring. I dry a lot of them whole (ancho chili's then) to add to chili and stuff in the winter. Your garden is awesome and I hope the leg is healing well. Looked painful.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 11, 2010, 04:35:55 PM
I don't know OKG, there are exceptions to the norm for any of these plants.  I've had summer squash so bitter it was inedible whole the same type planted next to it was fine. 
I picked a few more today so we'll give them another shot in a day or two.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010658.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010671.jpg)


I've been trying to get the fall garden in over the last couple of weeks but it is taking more time than I counted on.  The bed that gave me 1000 Romas is now full of broccoli, brussel sprouts and cauliflower. The landscape fabric is covering a jillion spinach seeds (helps germination dramatically in hot September sun)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010667.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010666.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on September 11, 2010, 06:49:02 PM
Please please give me step by step instructions for getting spinach to germinate because I have never been able to do it.

also beets. I love beets and just can't get them to grow.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 12, 2010, 11:08:42 AM
My experience:

Beets, never tried.

Spinach won't germinate well in warm soil, same with carrots.   Lettuce is the same but seems to tolerate more warmth that spinach.  I've also found that spinach seed isn't a great keeper and germination rates fall off significantly with time.   This very well may be due to stuff I do or don't do, so try it yourself yrmv.

Temperature generally isn't an issue in the spring for obvious reasons. 

For the "fall" plantings, I cover the soil with shade cloth or landscape fabric for a couple or 3 days and water every day.   This has a dual purpose, to cool the soil underneath ad little and to evenly distribute moisture in the top few inches. 
I soak the spinach seeds for a few hours before planting (put them in a cup of water in the morning, plant them in the evening).  When I plant, I pull back the fabric and make several shallow "V" bottomed trenches in the moist soil then sprinkle the seeds in along the trenches very unscientifically spaced (ie tight).
Without covering the seed, I re-cover with the cloth and then water heavily immediately.  This seems to cover the seeds just enough and it leaves the early sprouters with a little headroom.

This is the carrot box I seeded a few days ago; carrots take a while to germinate so I'm not worried (yet.)  You can see the "trenches" in both shots.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010672.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010673.jpg)

I also experimented earlier using straw over spinach seed planted using the "broadcast and rake" planting method.  I got great initial results almost right away and thought I was on to something.  Unfortunately, germination ceased as quickly as it had started.  Looking back I'm pretty sure it was due to night time temperatures.  We had several low 60s evenings in the week after I put the seed in but temperatures have jumped back up again since (90s in the day, barely under 70 at night).  I'm hoping when fall finally arrives to stay I'll have more sprouts.   

This is what it looks like as of yesterday; I promise you the seeds were broadcast much more tightly that this and that this is maybe 15-20% germination so far.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010664.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on September 12, 2010, 12:18:19 PM
My experience:

Beets, never tried.

Everything you said for spinach applies also to beets.  I think they are a little easier than spinach though.

Hey, you said you've had about 15-20% germ on spinach.  Have you tried using a lighter colored shade cloth such as white or green or even red.  If you can reflect back some of the sun instead of absorbing it you might have a little better rate.  Just a thought, you are doing better than me so take that with a grain of salt.   ;D

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 12, 2010, 02:28:02 PM
KYD, the 15-20% was referencing the scatter/rake bed under the straw.
I get a lot better under the shade cloth. 

I didn't have enough to do all I wanted so I am trying the landscape cloth based on recommendation in a garden blog somewhere.

I agree that lighter color would help but I haven't gotten off my butt and procured any yet.  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: KYdoomer on September 12, 2010, 03:01:00 PM
KYD, the 15-20% was referencing the scatter/rake bed under the straw.
I get a lot better under the shade cloth. 

I didn't have enough to do all I wanted so I am trying the landscape cloth based on recommendation in a garden blog somewhere.

I agree that lighter color would help but I haven't gotten off my butt and procured any yet.  ;)

Oh, gotcha.  I'm with ya, not enough time to do everything I want either.

J
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: OKGranny on September 12, 2010, 07:07:55 PM
I'm jealous. We're still way too hot to plant spinach. Days in the 90's nights in the 70's. Maybe another couple of weeks if we're lucky. By Samhain for sure.Then fresh spinach most of the winter, woohoo.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on September 12, 2010, 08:39:40 PM
Granny we are here too in N TX. I am waiting!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 15, 2010, 04:59:51 AM
A while back I ordered a "soilcube" through the MSB and have recently put it to use.

No time for detailed review at this point but I will say:  It works!  (After I read the tips and tricks again)

With the MSB discount it is about $25 shipped- a great deal cheaper than any other I've seen and it seems sturdy enough for my home use.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010677.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010678.jpg)

New cubes:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010676.jpg)

Lettuce reaching for the sun.  The roots are already to the bottom of the cubes but the cubes are holding together just fine

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010675.jpg)

I recommend this.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on September 15, 2010, 08:24:12 PM
I have one, but haven't had a chance to try it out yet... did you follow their recipe for mixing up the soil?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on September 15, 2010, 08:49:09 PM
Hey Cohutt, what size is that soil cube?  I got the 2" blockmaker(made in England) before the soilcube guy was in the MSB.  It looks to be a 4" model.  If so, I would like to get one.  Do you know if he makes a 2" dibble attachment to fit the other block sizes within (for potting on)?  If it is a 4" blocker, may I suggest you get a smaller one as well (when starting LOTS of seeds indoors space is usually limited until you can move them outside/or pot them on).  I think you will love them....you can almost throw away all of those flimsy little seed starter packs.

Finally back from a long time away from the home PC and couldn't wait to check out your garden pics.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 16, 2010, 04:18:04 AM
Lvschant,
I didn't follow the formula exactly but what I had was pretty similar.  I used what I had and didn't add "soil" or fertilizer


jg,
good to have to back checking in.....

This is a 2" model as well and it seems to be a pretty good overall size to me.

http://www.soilcube.com/ (http://www.soilcube.com/)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on September 16, 2010, 10:19:37 AM
Quote
This is a 2" model as well and it seems to be a pretty good overall size to me.

I would agree for the most part.  This year I started the tomatoes 8wks before calculated last frost, and the tomatoes got too big for the 2" blocks, so I had to pot them on anyway.  I just couldn't keep them watered well enough, or nourished enough with the 2" blocks for the last 3 weeks or so.  I need to decide whether I should start them later or get the larger block maker.  After expirimenting all year with the blocking mix, I came up with what appears to be a pretty good blocking formula...I haven't had to use soluble fertilizer on any of the starts with this latest formulation.   
One thing I did find with my earliest blocks was that I compressed too much soil into the blocks...they looked great, but after pulling some of those early starts from the ground, I noticed that the roots were similar to the peat pot starts I had a few years before....not good root penetration out of the block.  After adjusting that, I have not seen the same problem, and you will absolutely be amazed at how fast the transplants take off with the blocks vs. pots.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on September 16, 2010, 10:54:57 AM
Dang do you guys work for him or something? LOL  Well, either way I'm sold.  I just ordered one with my MSB discount. Hopefully, I'll have a lot more success next Spring than I did this one.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 16, 2010, 12:24:52 PM
I will say that Clayton the soilcube guy is OK in my book.
Apparently he was in the process of moving when I ordered and my order was delayed a bit- he thought he sent it prior to the move but discovered after wards that it wasn't shipped.   Nothing too bad; he emailed me to apologize for the delay and when the package arrived, it included a second soilcube tool to make up for it. It wasn’t necessary but a nice touch just the same.

I put the 2nd one back in case I break the first one, given my abilities in breaking stuff I thought it would be a good move.  :)

JG the lettuce in the picture above has roots out of the bottom at the time of the picture, so I'm assuming I didn't compress too lightly.

The recommendation is to water using a fine spray squirt bottle. I did this initially but then found the lower parts of the block to be pretty dry and now supplement the watering a bit.  I add maybe 1/8th an inch of water to the tray and it is absorbed up from the bottom of the blocks (as well as the spraying 2x per day).  The blocks are staying together pretty well too.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on September 16, 2010, 08:33:20 PM
Quote
JG the lettuce in the picture above has roots out of the bottom at the time of the picture, so I'm assuming I didn't compress too lightly.

That's a good sign.  I thought my early ones were ok too because I had roots coming out, but I think the blocks hardened once in the ground, and they were not always well watered.  Any way let me know if you want the soil recipe I used.  Its a slight modification of the one Elliot Coleman uses in "the New Organic Grower".

THey are remarkably durable - especially once the roots get goind.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 19, 2010, 08:41:11 PM
Ol King cole is about all in -

I have Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage & brussel sprouts transplanted int0 5 different beds

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010684.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010683.jpg)

The last of the bush limas are out including this small planting area outside of the raised beds;  it is now planted in turnip greens (which have germinated and sprouted in only 3 days.  3?  that seems fast to me, maybe it is normal.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010687.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010685.jpg)

It ought to be a good spot for the greens- site of an old compost pile and following a legume planting
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on September 20, 2010, 08:55:11 AM
You have such a huge area that is weedless. It is like your whole yard is a wonderful garden. Can I assume that you have no bermuda grass? Everytime I clear an area here w/in 24 hours the freaking stuff starts to send out runners!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 20, 2010, 04:24:22 PM
I have zoysia in the closer part of the backyard. it creeps but nothing at all like common bermuda.

In the back I had a mix of shade loving grass, weeds and ground covers.  I removed the canopy and had it ground and shot back  onto the ground vs having it hauled off.  The day it took to spread it out was a chore but thus far it has done a great job smothering everything that might want to sprout through.   Back towards the end of chapter 1 there are some pictures of the piles of chips.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 20, 2010, 08:41:24 PM
I found good prices and service @ Peaceful Valley Farm & Garden http://www.groworganic.com/default.html (http://www.groworganic.com/default.html) this year when looking for garlic and shallots.  My order came in today and the box smelled pretty damn nice when I opened it. 3 pounds each of silverskin garlic and french red shallots, plus a pound of elephant garlic.  

Even though the elephant garlic isn't a true garlic (a leek actually) I was astounded by the size of a single clove.  
Left to right = a head of silverskin softneck garlic, a clove of elephant garlic, a shallot.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010702.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010704.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on September 21, 2010, 10:34:27 AM
How many Elephant cloves are you going to plant per square foot vs regular garlic?  It's freaking huge so, I'd think you wouldn't plant as much per sq ft.  Thanks for telling me about that deal by the way.  What seeds did they send you extra? I saw they throw 2 packs in.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 21, 2010, 04:44:53 PM
I ended up with 2 types of chard, some breakfast radish, St Valery carrot and Red Deer tongue lettuce.  Maybe one more that I paid for?

My pound of elephant garlic isn't but 5-8 plantable cloves (not counted yet), a little more than one head it seems.  By contrast silverskin softneck bulbs might yield 90 decent cloves per lb.  (This is going to be a challenge since I have 3 lbs of this)

So- I think Ill do the elephant cloves in a row about 9 inches apart and effectively squeeze 4 into 3 squares - maybe, I;ll have to check my math.

I a few weeks I'll crack open the softneck heads and separate all the large cloves then evaluate the space and plant accordingly. 

Ditto with the shallots

It looks like I might have to build another bed in the next month. (oh well)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 21, 2010, 06:16:53 PM
hehe, sounds like me with ammunition...
I bought a rifle 'cause someone gave me ammo.

you're making an extra bed cause you have more cloves... I love it :P
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 21, 2010, 06:38:37 PM
i understand that formula as well gw

;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on September 22, 2010, 09:21:14 AM
Good point Cohutt.  If I order elephant Garlic I'll pretty much have to put at least one new bed in. Oh well, I guess a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do.  ;)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: swoods on September 22, 2010, 01:58:22 PM
You guys are too funny. Ahhhh, the sacrifices you are willing to make for the sake of your garden/family/desire to eat and grow your own food!!

For the record, I love the garden posts. I have learned so much from reading about all the gardens that have been created by forum members!

Thanks!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on September 22, 2010, 08:18:06 PM
I want a whole 4x8 bed full of garlic. I know I have to plant it soon too. No one carries it here any more. I will have to order some. I might try some elephant garlic too but I like  mine with more of a bite.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 22, 2010, 08:26:16 PM
I'll end up with the equivalent of a bed and then some....

I plan on inter-planting some around so thta each bed has a little, for the purported pest deterrence.

____________________________________

and now for a chest beating interruption:

mrs c's dinner plate past night, all from the garden including the parsley

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010706.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: swoods on September 23, 2010, 01:04:10 PM
There is nothing prettier than a plate full of food that has grown in your own backyard. Very nice. I hope my efforts are as productive.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: johngalt on September 23, 2010, 01:08:00 PM
A high quality meal from your own hands creates a most satisfying feeling.  Very Nice!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 23, 2010, 01:15:34 PM
I will never forget the look on the face of a friend on mine, who was over for dinner one night, when I told him I needed a few things and was going to go shopping....  He grabbed his coat and looked at me wierd as I walked past the front door on the way to the back door.  10 minutes later I returned with herbs, green beans, peppers, tomatoes, a couple beets, some lettuce and a butternut squash.

His response:
"THAT is really $*&@#*$ cool!!!!!"

I think I priced out what I had harvested the next day... worked out to something like $20.00

I agree, the feeling (and flavor) is unmatched.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on September 23, 2010, 04:39:56 PM
Beautiful dinner - what time shall I be there?  And what kind of Lima beans are those? We grew Christmas and regular - are those a mix of 2 kinds? Sure is pretty - I love to eat from the garden. 

Today I had a bunch of very ripe tomatoes and some sad looking red peppers and one little lone yellow zucchini so I made a baked spaghetti (noodles covered with beaten egg, garlic, spices and Parmesan cheese) topped with the veggies and more cheese instead of sauce.  For being almost compost it rocked.  Nothing like fresh garden veggies.  Again what time is dinner at the Cohutt household?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 23, 2010, 04:55:11 PM
LOL, if anyone takes the trouble to show up I'll feed you.

Those are "christmas" and "king of the garden" limas.   

For those who haven't grown "christmas" limas:  the beans are large and when harvested frech they have red/purple serrations and specks on an almost white surface.  When cooked, they turn the red specks dissolve into the surface to make the interesting grey/plum/purple color.  The texture and flavor are fantastic, our favorite of the 3 limas we've grown.

Normal people, not even the true "sheeple", really do look stunned when you walk out back and harvest stuff fresh out of the garden.   Saturday we had friends over for dinner (90% came from garden) and after the salad had been dressed, my wife noticed she forgot to put any fresh pepper in it.  No trouble, hold on, and in 2 minutes a small fresh bell pepper was thinly sliced and added.   They really do think it is amazing. 

Where the hell do people think food comes from? 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on September 23, 2010, 05:06:44 PM



Where the hell do people think food comes from? 

The store.  I know people who think meat comes in little packages and has nothing to do with animals. We have gotten too far from our "roots" (pun intended!) I think it's awesome Cohutt that you are sharing your garden with your dinner guests. It's how we teach others.  Blessings!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on September 23, 2010, 06:02:46 PM
The store.  I know people who think meat comes in little packages and has nothing to do with animals.

Ugh. I got in a shouting match with one of those people once. My wife's friend, who used to live with us. I was headed out turkey hunting and she saw me and asked where I was going. After I told her she asked why I didn't just go to the store. I said it tasted better, was better for me and more satisfactory. She said something like, "that's gross. You don't know what they have eaten or where they have been. At least when you buy it at the store you know where it's been." I seriously didn't know how to respond except to ask if she was serious. Of course I told her she was insane, the store turkey is injected with hormones and soaked in chemicals. We argued for a few minutes before I gave up and went hunting. As I was leaving she said,  "Well, have fun, but I hope you don't get anything." Disgusted, I slammed the door, then left.

long story short... not because of that (well, not just that)... she no longer lives with us and isn't even friends with my wife. Good riddance.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 24, 2010, 05:00:22 AM
With the gourd vines mostly withering at this point, I went a ahead an harvest some of the "crop" for drying and curing.   I didn't realize I was under surveillance at the time I was moving them to Lizzie's porch; immediately after these pictures were taken I was appropriately mocked and ridiculed by Mrs c for spending maybe a little too much time setting them up and making sure all were steady.   Hey, no use losing one of these at this point by being clumsy, right?

Anyway, here are about 2/3s or maybe 3/4 of the gourds the monster vines produced, 40 something of them:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010698.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010697.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010699.jpg)

They are in all shapes and sizes and I'll have a lot of options when considering if/how they will become birdhouses by spring.

I figured the porch was as good a place as any to dry them- it is sheltered and gets the afternoon sun increasingly as winter comes on.  Plus,  even mrs c eventually admitted she liked the way they looked there.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on September 24, 2010, 08:28:57 AM
So, how do you dry them, just like that?  When does the hole for the bird entrance get cut?

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 24, 2010, 05:38:23 PM
Dry for a few months, the wash with bleach (some use pressure washer to get discoloration/mold off. That stuff comes as they dry i believe)
Basically they say you want to keep them dry with air circulation, this was the best spot i could think of on short notice

Come January or February I'll to the cutting, will post then (after i research more).
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on September 24, 2010, 07:44:55 PM
I got 1.....yep 1....bird house gourd. But I figure a purchased birdhouse is around 5-15 dollars. So that 1 gourd paid for the seed packet.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 25, 2010, 05:38:52 AM
SHM and FM,
Gourd birdhouses and accessories  http://store.skmfg.com/ (http://store.skmfg.com/)

Purple martins would be nice to have around but I don't think I have enough gourds that are large enough.

The good news is there are plenty of other (smaller) bug eating species that would like homes in my yard.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on September 25, 2010, 08:59:33 PM
My vines are still alive and well so I guess I will leave it on for a while longer.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 26, 2010, 06:58:42 AM
Leave them on even if the gourd doesn't seem to be getting any bigger- the walls will thicken after they stop growing larger and thin walled gourds tend to shrivel or rot when drying

I've read where some growers didn't get much on the vine until very late in the season and those turned out to be good gourds.  you can leave them on the vine until after frost if you want.   I cut mine for fear they would start dropping and they'd be damaged (99% of mine were off the ground)

a good gourd tip page: http://www.amishgourds.com/site/1278922/page/441669 (http://www.amishgourds.com/site/1278922/page/441669)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on September 26, 2010, 07:04:55 AM
So, will a birdhouse gourd last more than 1 season?  I'm just wondering if this is something that needs to be grown every year.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 26, 2010, 07:36:49 AM
Fritz,

They can last a long time- many seasons, assuming:

1- Mold/fungus killed via bleach or similar solution bath/scrub
2- Outside is sealed well (i've seen several ways to do this listed)
3- water drain holes are drilled into the bottom of the gourd
and
4 - bringing them inside for the winter will extend the number of seasons they will last. also, I've read where some people will reseal them occasionally to help them continue to repel water adequately
 

I'll dig/study in more detail when the time comes to prep them and will post what I find and document the process I use, but it will be mid winter before it is time.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on September 26, 2010, 11:35:55 AM
Cohutt, I just went out to my garden and discovered that my yard long beans grew about 2 feet after the rain yesterday morning. They do not look like green beans really...kinda bumpy...have you eaten any yet? Did you grow a 3rd eye or anything as a result?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 26, 2010, 12:40:03 PM
shm,
I didn't have anything but limas this year so you'll have to be the guinea pig on those. 

I don't know much about them other than they supposedly get tough and their flavor suffers if left on the vine too long.

But this recipe looks tasty to me

http://chinesefood.about.com/od/vegetablesrecipes/r/greenbean.htm (http://chinesefood.about.com/od/vegetablesrecipes/r/greenbean.htm)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on September 26, 2010, 05:06:38 PM
We've gotten a good soaking rain starting last night and though most of the day so far today; this is the first in over a month.

Yesterday I plucked a few peppers - jalapeno, poblano & pimento

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010719.jpg)

Fritz posting a picture of his pepper poppers got me motivated to experiment a little myself.  I made jalapeno poppers with cream and cheddar cheese and then stuffed the poblanos and 3 small pimentos with the same.  After I wrapped them all up in bacon we couldn't resist and baked some samples @ 450 in the convection oven for about 10 or 12 minutes.

The jalapenos were pretty much what we expected - good (and spicy)

The surprises were the pimentos and poblano

I'll make up a bunch of the pimentos and freeze them since I have a bunch on the plants right now.  The only thing I'll do different is to saute the bacon first and mix it in with the cheese.  These peppers are shaped like little pumpkins and hollowed out they make great stuffers.

mrs c and I agreed we liked the poblano flavor the best of the three- not as sweet as the pimentos and not as spicy as the jalapenos.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on September 26, 2010, 05:19:34 PM
Ok I picked a hand full of yard long beans and ate one. I will post on my kitchen garden blog.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on September 26, 2010, 05:44:18 PM
I hadn't thought about doing the poppers with poblano peppers.  Maybe that's my next batch.  I also like the idea of cooking the bacon first and mixing it with the cream cheese, sure would make the making and cooking go quicker.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: “Mark” on September 27, 2010, 02:03:00 PM
The heat of peppers can be controlled by their growing conditions. Generally, the more stressed the plant is, the hotter the pepper.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Greywolf27 on September 27, 2010, 02:23:54 PM
Last year I grew some poblano's that riveld my jalapenos.  I can attest to the stressing of the plant (less then normal water) causes the concentration of the stuff that brings me back to them ;D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 01, 2010, 06:51:51 PM
The Napoleon bell pepper plants are really covered up with a bunch of large healthy peppers

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010730.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010731.jpg)

cole coming on strong in the beds where the Romas were earlier:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010727.jpg)

Even the artichoke plant i had given up on summoned up all its energy and has one choke on it all of a sudden

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010723.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on October 01, 2010, 09:39:31 PM
Your broccoli is so beautiful!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 02, 2010, 04:25:39 AM
Your broccoli is so beautiful!

Actually those beds have some cauliflower, cabbage & brussel sprouts mixed in as well.  It was hanging on ok then really took off after the soaking rain we got last weekend and the couple of showers since then. It also helps that it has finally cooled off a little here- highs only in the 80s last week and the 70s forecast for this week.

Last year the broccoli was almost stripped to the stem by cabbage worms before i caught on.  This year I have dusted with dipel (BT) periodically from the time I planted them and it has kept the damage to a minimum.   The poke sallet or poke weed just outside the fence is getting ravaged by them so I know they are around.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010728.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on October 02, 2010, 10:39:40 AM
lol shows you what i know
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 02, 2010, 11:18:54 AM
What, you think i can tell them apart?   At this stage they all look the same to me mostly except for the brussel sprouts.  The cabbage leaves are rounder too maybe. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on October 02, 2010, 02:49:34 PM
Last year I had collard greens and broccoli growing in the same bed..that was when N TX got 12 inches of snow...when the snow melted they took off and grew like crazy. I filled a laundry basket full of greens and cooked them and it wasn't until a few days later I realized I had cooked both broccoli leaves and collard greens. It was good though.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 06, 2010, 05:31:10 AM
Mutant pimentos, double peppers basically. The little ones were inside the big ones, basically sitting in the bottom center.  The green one in the bottom 2 pics was visible where it was plugging the hole you can see in the larger one.  Go figure, these are the 2nd and 3rd ones like this out of maybe 40 harvested.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010736.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010735.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010734.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on October 06, 2010, 07:06:48 AM
I knew you were making your own GMOs. Those tomatoes were way too productive.  :D

Seriously, that is weird.  Is it common? 3 out of 40 sounds pretty common. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 06, 2010, 06:21:37 PM
Yeah seems odd.  These are the "Sheepnose" pimentos from seed savers.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on October 08, 2010, 08:04:41 AM
Maybe the pig scarecrow is freaking them out so bad that they little ones jumped inside in fear.  :D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Greywolf27 on October 08, 2010, 08:27:09 AM
Something outa TX chainsaw.....
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on October 08, 2010, 11:23:25 AM
I've bought bell peppers that had little bells inside.  I have no idea what would cause that.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 08, 2010, 11:26:47 AM
Sidebar:

Avatar is ju-ju vs the return of the wild hogs at my bol- sample evidence below:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20misc/Millsap022-1.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20misc/Millsap024-1.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20misc/Millsap027-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on October 08, 2010, 11:32:22 AM
I've been seeing lots of shows about wild pigs and GA is one of the areas that have been hit really hard.  Have you gone out and harvested any for protein?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 08, 2010, 11:53:04 AM
I've been seeing lots of shows about wild pigs and GA is one of the areas that have been hit really hard.  Have you gone out and harvested any for protein?

Not recently.  we beat them back a few years ago after they did some real damage (hunting, trapping and also using a local who hunts with dogs, very well I might add).
I built a portable trap that caught a couple last year (donated to the dog guy live) although the activity wasn't "epic" like we'd seen prior. 
Sample damage dec 2006:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Hog%20damage%20dec%202006/IMG_0234.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Hog%20damage%20dec%202006/IMG_0208.jpg)

Sample source of this damage from early 2007.  (60g 223 behind left ear, dropped him like a turd in a puddle)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Hog/MillsapBoar004.jpg)

LOL, everyone understand the need for avatar ju-ju hex help now?   All tools available must be used ;)



Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: “Mark” on October 08, 2010, 05:25:17 PM
I've bought bell peppers that had little bells inside.  I have no idea what would cause that.

Likewise. I see it a lot.. probably in about half the bell peppers I eat.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on October 09, 2010, 07:15:49 AM
Cohutt - my dh says to tell you he'd love to come help you with your pig problem - he says he smells bacon.  ;D
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 09, 2010, 10:04:58 AM
yeah I have LOTS of volunteers lol.   remember that roswell has already been there with his Mosin and practiced on some mini-kegs

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Millsap%20misc/MillsapRosszoom.jpg)

In the meantime, back at cohutt's garden, cohutt is going to spend this afternoon maybe cleaning up a bit and planting some garlic if he doesn't get too lazy :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on October 09, 2010, 11:08:36 AM
Yeah, lol. I try to remind Cohutt at least once a month that I'd be happy to help. Lol.

I finished planting my garlic the other day as well. I'm still debating ordering some elephant garlic. Question about garlic in general.  It's a lot of bed space. Do you just tear the cloves off the bulb and put them straight in the ground? That's what I did. Or did you soak yours or anything?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 09, 2010, 12:12:44 PM
don't soak.  you don't want the clove to rot before it germinates


So build more beds. :)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on October 09, 2010, 12:48:11 PM
How moist does the soil need to be for it to grow properly?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 09, 2010, 01:52:30 PM
How moist does the soil need to be for it to grow properly?

The only things I have seen about moisture:
1. Soil should be of a consistency and location right to promote good drainage, especially in the fall / winter right after planting.
2. Late in the spring/early summer, when the plants bulb up or the head swell or whatever, you need to make sure it gets adequate water if rain is light. 

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 09, 2010, 08:10:22 PM
I busted up about 7 or 8 heads of garlic and picked out the biggest cloves for planting this afternoon.
These are the same generic "California Early" that Roswell ordered; I was impressed with how large the cloves were.    There were maybe 100 or so cloves total, these are the biggest 75:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010747.jpg)

I decided the ground cherry bed would be a dedicated garlic bed for the next 8 or 9 months   I planted  half the bed this afternoon, 4 rows 6" apart plus a couple of squares in other beds.   

I only have another 20 or so heads of this stuff.  uh oh...

While I was in the area with the camera I noticed the single artichoke is developing nicely

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010740.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on October 10, 2010, 11:09:28 AM
You can send your extras my way!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on October 10, 2010, 11:55:20 AM
Lol. Now you know how I ran out of room for the leeks. Those early whites produce hella cloves.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 21, 2010, 04:28:01 AM
Still Garlic planting time here in N GA.

I'm down to my last 8-10 heads or so including the hardneck I saved from this year's "crop".   

As far as the softneck, the "California Early" I've been planting really does have some nice sized primary cloves in each head.  I realize that there are a lot of hardnecks that are supposed tp have huge cloves (like "Music") but these heads have been a pleasant surprise. 


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010749.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010750.jpg)


With scissors for  scale point of reference:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010751.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on October 21, 2010, 04:34:47 AM
I am planting mine this weekend too. I have a black thumb lately. I hope they do well!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on October 21, 2010, 09:30:31 AM
Nice cloves.  I guess the California Early are supposed to be harvested earlier?

Sweethearts Mom, just put them in the ground and basically ignore them.  Yes, water and mulch if needed, but not a lot to do with them.  Good luck with them.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 21, 2010, 11:19:34 AM
Nice cloves.  I guess the California Early are supposed to be harvested earlier?

Sweethearts Mom, just put them in the ground and basically ignore them.  Yes, water and mulch if needed, but not a lot to do with them.  Good luck with them.

I'm really not sure.  There was also an offering called "California Late" so I suppose this early is earlier.

The main reason I bought it?   It was under $5/lb.  :) 

I was looking for a large quantity of a softneck to develop over the seasons as my own best backyard garlic strain.   It stores well and has big cloves to start, so I figured this would be a good as any (and cheaper as noted).  I'll have potentially 250-300 heads to choose my best seed cloves from next year. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: fritz_monroe on October 21, 2010, 11:42:08 AM
See, I was of the other mind set.  I got a batch with multiple varieties so I can pick which I like best.  That will become my variety to develop over time.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 22, 2010, 07:03:40 PM
Habanero heist

(coming inside for the winter)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010762.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010763.jpg)


This Napoleon sweet bell is next:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010764.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on October 22, 2010, 07:25:22 PM
Holy lord!!! Radiocative bunny poo?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 22, 2010, 07:37:43 PM
lol- with heirlooms you get lucky sometimes and get the one on the good side of the bell curve.  (pun not intended)

This one is head and shoulders above the others I planted.  It is almost 5 feet tall and has been loaded- good enough to be carefully transplanted into a 16" pot and saved for the winter.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 26, 2010, 04:43:59 AM
The broccoli forest from a worm's eye view:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010770.jpg)

From above several have small heads forming.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010769.jpg)

One of the lettuce sections is coming along enough to get snipped a little every other night

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010768.jpg)

And the arugula bed is finally getting some competition from lettuce (but still winning, in background).

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010765.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Roswell on October 26, 2010, 07:23:14 PM
nice growth Cohutt.  How far did you space your broccoli apart? It looks close, but obviously it ain't suffering.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 26, 2010, 07:42:59 PM
The broc is on a 1 ft grid (roughly). 

The arugula is on a "shake the whole pack out in a 96" line" spacing
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on October 26, 2010, 09:50:48 PM
Cohutt the shake method is my kind of planting! lol
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 27, 2010, 08:07:16 PM
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010782.jpg)

(Needed to get them off the plants;  moving them inside before the cold front arrives Friday)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on October 27, 2010, 09:11:44 PM
All I can say is wow. In a good way.....like WOW...but in an envious way like ....dammit why can't I grow stuff like that????

These look wonderful!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on October 28, 2010, 08:05:29 PM
:)

Had to put the headlight on to harvest these.  (one of the conditions of gardening in late october is doing all the work in the dark)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010787.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 02, 2010, 07:42:55 PM
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010797.jpg)


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010793.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: TwoBluesMama on November 04, 2010, 05:34:20 PM
All I can say is wow!  Your garden is beautiful (and dang it I'm soooooo jealous).  We had a few hard freezes (frosts?) and that was the end.  When I'm missing the beauty of growing things I'll just come look at these pictures. So nice Cohutt!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Greywolf27 on November 04, 2010, 07:55:21 PM
Fantastic bit of work there!!!  Looks amazing!!!  I too am awfully envious.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 07, 2010, 06:02:19 PM
Thanks guys.

First low tunnel hoop thing is roughed in as of dusk-thirty today, plus a smaller one covering the small bed of lettuce and arugula.  You can't tell from the pictures but the top one is 4x the size of the lower one (4x16 vs 2x8).

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010817.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010813.jpg)



 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on November 07, 2010, 06:07:58 PM
Cohutt can you take a picture of how you connected the pvc to the frame tomorrow?
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 08, 2010, 07:01:22 PM
I got home after dark.
Basically I used the pvc conduit brackets to secure 1" pvc to the outside of the bed. I had cut the 1" stuff into foot long lengths.
The 1/2" pvc I used for the hoops slides in and out no problem. It is secure but can be removed in just a second or two...

another pic from yesterday but not a close up- maybe it helps?

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010811.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 12, 2010, 12:03:50 PM
i roasted some of those sweet bell peppers on the grill the other night.  
It is pretty simple and delicious.  
Brush with oil (use something other than olive oil, especially if doing this inside under your broiler - it has a low smoke point compared to corn oil and others.)
Roll them around on a hot grill until they are blackened and blisteredas evenly as possible.
Remove and immediately seal them in a Tupperware container until cool enough to handle.  This allows the peppers to finish cooking by steaming themselves from the retained grill heat. At that point the blistered skin peals right off an the tops/seeds pull right out.  The remaining pepper body retains a great roasted flavor.

just starting to blister up

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010804.jpg)

approaching ready

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010806.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 18, 2010, 07:38:47 PM
All the gourds are drying now

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010833.jpg)


Broccoli is @ harvest time for the next few weeks:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010826.jpg)

A few tomatoes still ripening indoors; with lettuce and French breakfast radishes

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010821.jpg)


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 21, 2010, 07:56:47 PM
Fall leaf composting:

I had one wire compost bin set up and then decided to use some of my tomato cages for additional stacks.  (The heavy wire in front of them is part of an old trash burning bin made from a hog panel)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010843.jpg)


(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010844.jpg)

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 26, 2010, 09:33:44 PM
Some of the broccoli was about to get away from me so I cut some heads, then blanched and froze them.   So far so good this year with the broccoli; hopefully the other cole plantings will come through as well.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010869.jpg)

Cooling down between blanch and freeze

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010870.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Greywolf27 on November 27, 2010, 09:02:58 AM
Good looking broc!!!

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 27, 2010, 02:09:42 PM
Thank you greywolf, this year is working out much much better than my first attempt.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Greywolf27 on November 27, 2010, 10:55:54 PM
This is my first year with broc, your heads look about 2 or 3 times the size of what I have growing. 
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 28, 2010, 07:10:34 AM
This is my first year with broc, your heads look about 2 or 3 times the size of what I have growing. 

These were bigger than last year for sure, but I need to point out the total # in that picture is 5. 

Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Orion53 on November 29, 2010, 02:49:52 PM
These were bigger than last year for sure, but I need to point out the total # in that picture is 5. 



Cohutt,

Did you start your broccoli seeds inside or did you direct sow?  I tried direct sowing this year on broccoli and cauliflower and haven't had much luck.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on November 29, 2010, 04:49:16 PM
The environment here is too harsh at the time I would have to direct sow, it makes sense to start inside or buy plant sets
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on December 09, 2010, 04:52:25 AM
Some updates as we approach the shortest day of the year:

It has been cold here (for N GA) so I went ahead and did a quick frame up and covered the other two back beds. Now I have 3 large and 1 small "pods" is the back:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010875-1.jpg)

As it has approached 20 the last few nights I went ahead and added a modest heat source to some of the beds that contained items like lettuce and cauliflower I was concerned about.  Mostly the stuff would be ok (broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage) but I figured I'd rather have increase my margin of error a little using the modest heat from shop lights.  At night I have this weird view from by back window lol:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010904.jpg) 

(I tossed a couple of drop cloths over the plastic at night to help retain heat and dampen the glow )

I put water jugs in front of the shop lights to absorb/diffuse and more consistently release the heat from the 300w halogen bulb.  I learned last year that a shop light can dry out a pretty decent patch of a bed if it is close and shining directly.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010907.jpg)

The peppers I brought in are going well; the small ones that were set a few weeks ago are maturing now.  The habaneros (pictured below) and jalapenos are doing better that the larger peppers.

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010899.jpg)

Still, the 5' tall napoleon bell is allowing peppers to mature (smaller than outside though) as is the pimento below it.   That pimento was the size of a tennis ball and was the base for some very nice pimento cheese yesterday @ lunch.)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010896.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010908.jpg)


The broccoli harvest has continued to be better than last year as the sun exposure and richer compost/soil mix in the back beds has paid off:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010885.jpg)

And finally, one evening the dew point and temperature crossed at the right time to create a "ghost garden" that caught my eye:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden2010854.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden2010847a.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on December 09, 2010, 04:46:59 PM
Very cool... I've only got garlic planted here in the new place, but it is doing well, despite the cold nights we have had recently.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on December 09, 2010, 07:19:02 PM
Thanks LvsChant

ditto on the garlic (and shallots) here... 

A bed of both:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010890.jpg)

And some spare garlic i tossed into the holed left behind when i moved some stones in the boxwood garden renovation project.    I covered with compost and dried up grass clippings and so far it is thriving (I had to mark the holes and came up with the bamboo to avoid stepping into them before the garlic came up)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010891.jpg)
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on December 12, 2010, 08:14:24 PM
Holiday habaneros strung up to dry

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010912.jpg)

Last big broccoli harvest:

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010924.jpg)


It is supposed to be 12 degrees here tomorrow night; I'm not sure what of my remaining producing garden will survive.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on December 19, 2010, 03:42:50 PM
The pvc hoop supported covers did the trick during the freeze.

My lettuce is fine, so it the chard, chinese kale and young spinach

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010932.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010933.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010935.jpg)

(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/Garden%202010%20smaller/Garden2010934.jpg)


Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: LvsChant on December 24, 2010, 08:06:59 AM
Looking great, Cohutt. You can enjoy a fresh salad for Christmas!
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on December 24, 2010, 12:59:59 PM
That was my plan :)

Along with shrimp etoufe and fresh baked standing french loaves.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: Cheeta68 on December 24, 2010, 06:38:59 PM
Love the festive Pepper decorations.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: dwhoppy on December 26, 2010, 06:47:50 PM
Beautiful job on posting all of this. Really gives me inspiration. I just removed the plastic and havested the last of my greens for Christmas salad here in Idaho. It was amazing to see how long I could make it last. Great inspiration you have given me! Thanks
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: cohutt on December 27, 2010, 04:14:16 AM
Cheetah68- Thanks.  In-laws came it for Christmas I couldn't convince them the peppers were real and really hot. They kept touching them in disbelief....

dwhoppy- thanks for the kind comment.  I'm glad to know other people are trying new things and stretching their seasons out.  We had a beautiful Christmas day salad straight from the garden here too; it was some of the most crisp and flavorful lettuce I've ever tasted..
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: teton traveler on December 27, 2010, 09:10:52 AM
Next season I have to start experimenting with cold frames. If nothing else to warm up the soil so that I can plant before June this next year. Idaho's beautiful, but boy the winters can be long.
Title: Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2
Post by: MIZZOU_RAH on April 19, 2012, 03:12:59 PM
other than eating them on salads, what to do with them?

Dice'em up, add some lite Italian dressing, shredded mozzerella, and fresh basil. Spoon onto toasted french bread for some fantastic bruschetta!