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Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Food Preps => Processing Food For Storage => Topic started by: Morning Sunshine on February 09, 2010, 06:48:25 AM

Title: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on February 09, 2010, 06:48:25 AM
This weekend I took a small baggy of dried mushrooms and dried red peppers to a family function (3 days of continuous eating..... ba-ad idea), and they came in all sorts of handy, so I thought I would share what was done with them, and then ask you to do the same.  So, if you have dehydrated something, tell us here, and then tell us how you used them.

--------------

I get my produce mostly from something called Bountiful Baskets (if you are in the Utah/Arizona area, you might want to check them out), and for $15 I get 2 small laundry baskets of produce.  Most of the time it is stuff we eat - bananas, potatoes, etc.  Sometimes however, we get things no one in my house will eat: mushrooms, peppers, 8 onions (1-2, yeah, we would eat), etc.  So I have been drying them.

Mushrooms: slice and dry.  when done, my in-laws have enjoyed them on pizza and in salad (still dry).  My new BIL threw the remainder into a pot for stew, and they re-hydrated nicely.  I have been throwing them in my coffee grinder for mushroom powder and sneaking it into soups and stews in powdered form - no one can tell, and we get some of the nutrients of mushrooms and a bit of the flavor.

Peppers: slice and dry.  when done, my in-laws have enjoyed them on pizza and in salad (still dry).  My new BIL threw the remainder into a pot for stew, and they re-hydrated nicely - in fact, he said that they were getting so big he threw in a lot less than he had been planning on.  I am not a pepper fan, but I broke some into tiny pieces and threw them on my salad for a sweet crunch.  It was almost like the sugars were concentrated, so they were sweeter than I find fresh peppers.

Lemon/orange peels: I peeled my organic lemons and oranges, trying to get only the colored parts, and dehydrated those.  when dry - about 6 hours - I threw them into the blender and made powder.  I now have orange and lemon zest for recipes.

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your turn - what have you been dehydrating recently?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: MaddoginMass on February 09, 2010, 07:59:52 AM
I've just started dehydrating in the past month or so....it is great.  I love how much food you can store in a small space.  I've been using canning jars so far, but am now getting to the point of vacuum packing.  So far I have dehydrated:

corn - mainly used in soup/stew
mushrooms - soup/stew and pizza
beans - soup/stew
carrots - haven't used them yet but probably soup/stew
green peppers - soup/stew
bananas - eaten plain and on cereal
strawberries - eaten plain and on cereal
jerky - eaten plain

The best thing, my wife sees the value of it not just in food storage but in convenience.  We never used to have mushrooms around, now we just reach up into the cabinet and grab the jar whenever we need some.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on February 09, 2010, 08:18:36 AM
I've just started dehydrating in the past month or so....it is great.  I love how much food you can store in a small space.  I've been using canning jars so far, but am now getting to the point of vacuum packing.  So far I have dehydrated:

The best thing, my wife sees the value of it not just in food storage but in convenience.  We never used to have mushrooms around, now we just reach up into the cabinet and grab the jar whenever we need some.

I have to agree - the convenience is great.  I never have mushrooms in the house either, but my in-laws like them on homemade pizza.  Now they get their favorite toppings whenever they come up.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SigMan34 on February 09, 2010, 09:41:24 AM
Wow, that really sounds fantastic! I can't wait to get started! Thanks for the encouragement to JUST DO IT!!!

Can I butt in and ask:  what vacuum sealer do you folks use? I have to get one and just wonder.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Herbalpagan on February 09, 2010, 09:41:43 AM
Like many of you, I'm finding that with dehydrating, I can ctually have some of the things that aren't popular around our house (mushrooms and onions).
I dehydrated a lot this year, as it was my first year with my Excalibur. I did about half my green bean harvest, all the peppers (bell and hot) mostly because we got blight and I didn't have the tomatoes to make salsa with the peppers. I only did about 20 pounds of taters (bought), but went to town on things like spinach (great in soups and dips), corn, carrots etc.
We ate well from the garden, but I purchased frozen veg on sale and dehydrated that.

So far, I'm using the dehydrated mostly in stews and casseroles. Lots of slow cooking recipes. I have used the dehydrated potatoes as hash browns and fried potatoes...they were FANTASTIC!
I'm having a hard time remembering to rehydrate in time for dinner though! lol I guess it's something I just have to get used to.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on February 10, 2010, 12:35:22 PM
I have dehydrated strawberry slices - they taste like candy!!!  but they are a pain to slice.  I am going to try another method this spring.
I like dehydrated raspberries mmmmm - my husband has them for pure snacking

I like to throw dried berries into pancakes, waffles.  they give the yummy flavor without the added moisture that makes your batter too runny.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: hd45hunt on February 10, 2010, 01:11:18 PM
Wow, that really sounds fantastic! I can't wait to get started! Thanks for the encouragement to JUST DO IT!!!

Can I butt in and ask:  what vacuum sealer do you folks use? I have to get one and just wonder.

I'm using a Foodsaver by Tilia.  10 years and not a hiccup.  Also recently got the jarsaver attachments and works awesome for vacuum sealing reg and wide mouth canning jars.  They also offer large vacuum canisters which I am using to vacuum regular store bought jars with the "pop" lids.  There was a great youtube video on using the jars, but I can't find it anymore.  Hope this helps.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: MaddoginMass on February 10, 2010, 01:28:20 PM
I'm also using a Food Saver....probably been about 3 years now and now problems.  One thing is to keep expenses down is to buy the bags in bulk.  I actually buy the rolls instead of the bags.  I recently ordered from someone on Ebay that I thought had a good price on a 50' roll of 8x11.

I dehydrating potatoes right now.  First time for them.  Cut them in 1/2" cubes and sprayed them with lemon juice to keep them from turning dark.  I'm expecting that they will take quite awhile to dehydrate since they are cubes.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: HelenWheels on February 10, 2010, 01:37:04 PM
I dehydrating potatoes right now.  First time for them.  Cut them in 1/2" cubes and sprayed them with lemon juice to keep them from turning dark.  I'm expecting that they will take quite awhile to dehydrate since they are cubes.

Maddog, you may run into a problem with your potatoes turning black when drying if you don't blanch them first. My research has turned up that blanching is really the only way to keep them from turning black when they dry.

Hope this helps.

HW
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: MaddoginMass on February 10, 2010, 01:40:26 PM
Oops...I also should have said I blanched them.....:-)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SigMan34 on February 10, 2010, 03:27:20 PM
HD45hunt and Maddog, thank you.

It certainly seems FoodSaver is the most popular brand out there!

One question:  can FoodSavers use pretty much any type of vacuum/heat-sealable bag, or only their own brand?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: nimzy88 on February 11, 2010, 07:24:13 PM
Do most of you reconstitute the mushrooms before you add them to the pizza or do you just put them on as is and through the sauce and cooking they retain moisture?
Thanks
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 11, 2010, 07:44:34 PM
I have had good luck with the foodsaver also working fine with Cabela's bags, but a little better with foodsaver bags. I plan to try out the type recommended by Tammy, the dehydrating queen, once I run out of the current supply.

I got my excalibur last spring, so had a lot of fun trying it out and dehydrating last summer. I dehydrated:

tomatoes (some sliced and some cooked down to a sauce and made into rollups)
Peppers (bell, poblano and banana)
Celery (I use this all the time for cooking -- so easy when it is already dehydrated)
Carrots (same as for celery)
Herbs (parsley, basil, thyme, oregano, lavender) I plan to expand the herb garden this year
Potatoes (purchased at the store -- about 70 lbs fresh -- made into slices and cubes) The boys love them.
Hash browns (frozen, then dehydrated -- another great hit with the boys)
Apples (probably dried about 40 lbs... great snacks for boy scout campouts -- also work great for apple pie)
Peaches (great for peach crisp)
Zucchini chips (they are a great alternative to potato chips, although I haven't found a great way to get the salt to adhere after drying -- and they do need some salt)
Mushrooms (great way to be sure to use them all)
Bread crumbs (dried, rolled down to crumbs and vacuum sealed in jar -- work great!)
Citrus rinds (orange and grapefruit -- I've added them to tea and didn't think they had much flavor -- I think I need to grind them up, too)
Frozen veges:
    Corn
    Green beans
    Peas
    Mixed vegetables
    Broccoli
   
I'm hoping to do even more this summer and share with my parents and put them into long-term storage. Even though we have been using what we needed from the jar closet all winter, I still have almost no empty jars (keep refilling with something else). I've been vacuum sealing nuts, chocolate chips, dried fruits (purchased), coffee, loose teas and marshmallows to extend food life with great results... (don't vacuum seal the marshmallow in a bag - only a jar lol)

I need more jars!!!

On the list of things to try this year... more fruit rollups for the kids, pumpkin and winter squash.

Failures:  Citrus... I had severe case hardening on all my trials... never could get them to that nice hard texture -- just sticky and gooey forever. I may give it another try this year. It would be great to use them for lemonade in the winter. Or hot spiced tea, or...
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: nimzy88 on February 11, 2010, 08:16:31 PM
lvschant I would be interested in how you make fruit roll ups, are you dehydrating jelly or spmerhing to that extent?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on February 11, 2010, 08:47:01 PM
lvschant - couple of things....

on your zucchini - have you tried salting them before you dry them?  either shaking salt over the chips, or even soaking them in brine before dehydrating (yes, I know this will cause extra moisture, but a thought, anyway)

on your peaches - do you slice or wedge or what before drying?  I assume you peel them first

I dried some broccoli, and it was not so good reconstituted as a veggie for dinner.  I only did a small amount, so I don't have any left for, say, making soup or stuff.  But as a side dish with dinner, it was very tough and fiber-y.  And yes, I did blanch it first.  Maybe I will try already frozen stuff next time I see it on sale, just to see what we can do with it.  Maybe my blanching technique is wrong.   ;)

-------

oh, and I dehydrated a butternut squash - baked and dried like a roll-up - and then pureed in a blender into flour.  A whole butternut squash was less than 1/2 c powder.  GREAT space saver!!!!  I throw a tablespoon into things like stew or soups - places I would not be able to put squash in any other form.  My husband says I have become a "vegetable pusher!"   ;D
Which reminds me - I dehydrated shredded beets (I throw them into a pot of 1 qt beef stock, one pint bottle of beef, 2 c BBQ sauce and boil until ready for BBQ beef sandwiches - another great way to "push" veggies!)
also, dehydrated shredded zucchini - great for pancakes, bread and more bbq beef veggie pushing!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 11, 2010, 09:43:02 PM
Zucchini... I haven't tried adding salt before dehydrating... I think Tammy recommended against that. I'm thinking of maybe putting a bit of oil (maybe brushed on) with a sprinkling of salt with the chips in the oven for a couple of minutes before serving... I'll give that a try.

Peaches... pretty much like apples. I pealed (hot water method to make it easier), sliced and spritzed with lemon juice. They are a great snack and work well for cooking later, too.

Broccoli, I only tried with frozen type. I was thinking it would be best for soups...

Fruit rollups... I was going to try Tammy's method with blending fruits with a small amount of corn syrup and cooking first in a pan and then pouring out onto a plastic bag (duct-taped to the tray). That is basically how I did the tomato sauce (without the syrup). It worked pretty well for the tomatoes. It is really amazing how much less bulk there is once the water is removed.

I was thinking of trying to make my own tomato powder, too. On the site by Wendy DeWitt, she has an entire menu of long term storage recipes, many of which call for tomato powder... My tomatoes had trouble after it got hot here last summer. I'm hoping for better luck this year. I also want to dehydrate some of the cherry tomatoes. I didn't even think of it last year, but I think I saw something about just cutting them in half and dehydrating them (skin side down). That would be a really easy way to get that sun-dried tomato effect really easily. I actually canned most of my tomatoes last year instead of dehydrating... but with cherry tomatoes it just doesn't seem worth the trouble to can them...

The butternut squash powder sounds really good... I can see myself getting sneaky with that stuff on my kids, too :)

I've never liked beets (always thought they tasted like you didn't quite get the dirt washed off), but can see that it would be pretty innocuous in your BBQ beef recipe... Thanks!

I think I'll try the shredded zucchini this year, too (assuming my squash does better this year).
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on February 12, 2010, 07:11:18 AM
Zucchini... I haven't tried adding salt before dehydrating... I think Tammy recommended against that. I'm thinking of maybe putting a bit of oil (maybe brushed on) with a sprinkling of salt with the chips in the oven for a couple of minutes before serving... I'll give that a try.

maybe I am remembering wrong, but I think she said not to add salt before rehydrating.  The way I understand it, you are not rehydrating the zucchini, right, so a bit of salt might just help with the dehydration process... maybe canceling out the extra water from a brine  ;D  I am just thinking out loud here.  Sorting ideas and throwing them out.

what is this Wendy DeWitt site of which you speak?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 12, 2010, 07:51:26 AM
http://everythingunderthesunblog.blogspot.com/ (http://everythingunderthesunblog.blogspot.com/)

She has an entire booklet of information on storing and preparing food from stores... keep reading down the blog. I know there is someplace online where the booklet is compiled as a pdf... just can't remember where.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CO-retired on February 15, 2010, 05:56:15 PM
Hello all! my name is Dave,this is only my 3rd post.I have a question about dehydrating.I'm new to the subject and have been aquiring equipment to do same.
Can I use 1 qt ball wide mouth jars to fill with what ever I dehydrate and use the oxygen separator bags in the jar to create the right storage atmosphere?....will this method ensure me longevity?
What size oxy bag would I need assuming the product level where say....1 " from the top of the jar?
And would this method seal up and pull down the lid?

I'm sure I'll do mylar bags for larger quanity storage as I get more familiar with the Dehydration  as time goes by........Thanks,Dave.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: theadob on February 15, 2010, 06:06:24 PM
You can do that, but you would want to put your jars somewhere that direct sunlight wouldnt shine on them if you intend them for long term storage. If you use them on a regular basis, its less of an issue.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CO-retired on February 15, 2010, 06:16:16 PM
You can do that, but you would want to put your jars somewhere that direct sunlight wouldnt shine on them if you intend them for long term storage. If you use them on a regular basis, its less of an issue.

Sounds Good!!!! they would go in the basement where it's cool all year.
So am I right about the space in the jar...what about the oxy bags...what size in CC's ?
How long of a shelf life would I have?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CBP on February 16, 2010, 06:02:07 AM
Potatoes!  I dehydrated 10# of slices which I cooked first then sliced.  I made some scalloped potatoes with them last night using a recipe that calls for dried milk, flour etc.  They were so good I will be sending my store bought boxes to the food pantry.

More Potatoes!  I dehydrated some cubes for American fries but cubed these raw and then blanched them.  I think I prefer this method to the precooking above -- a little less messy for me.  I fried some up the other day for my lunch.  NIce to have a "healthy" convenience food!

And yes more potatoes!  I bought a couple of packages of frozen hashbrowns at a restaurant supply type place.  They dehydrate very quickly.  I sent my mother home with some.  She's reported back that they were great and handy as she's the only one who eats them and doesn't have to fight a bag that gets all clumped together in the freezer.  If they passed the "Mom" test, they're pretty darn good then.  So right now, I'm dehydrating the third 3 pound bag in an 18 pound case--then I'll do a batch for her.  ;D

I've been playing with frozen veggies, mushrooms, peppers and onions.  I think I prefer the mushrooms and peppers dehydrated on the pizza -- the flavor is more concentrated. 

Note to self, however, -- dehydrate the onions in the garage next time!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 16, 2010, 10:01:12 AM
Sounds Good!!!! they would go in the basement where it's cool all year.
So am I right about the space in the jar...what about the oxy bags...what size in CC's ?
How long of a shelf life would I have?

I am thinking the 100 cc's would work for the quart jars just fine... I usually use 1500 cc's for my 5-gallon bucket and mylar with bulk foods like wheat and oatmeal. I don't actually use the O2 absorbers for my dehydrated foods that I keep in mason jars, though... I just vacuum seal them with the foodsaver and this seems to work fine for me. I have only been dehydrating since last summer, though, so I can't tell you about the long-term life in the jars. For foods I didn't expect to use in the next 1-2 years, though, I packed for long term storage with mylar and O2 absorbers and have stored in 5-gallon buckets.

There are some folks on the forum who use O2 absorbers exclusively and don't vacuum seal their jars... perhaps one of them will chime in.

You can also check out the site:  www.dehydrate2store.com (http://www.dehydrate2store.com)

She uses O2 absorbers on her jars exclusively and has information about it there. She's been doing this stuff for a really long time with great success. Good luck!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CO-retired on February 16, 2010, 05:33:29 PM
What I would like to do at first is to start out with Jars...then go with the bulk.So I'm thinking do a few dozen jars for intermediate use....maybe use some of what I do in qts,taking some of what ever I dehydrate out...re-sealing with oxy bags and a new lid.
The vacuum sealed bags are a Great Idea!!!
I'll experiment with smaller quanitys and with the help of this Site I'll get squared away!!!Thank you all!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 17, 2010, 10:40:00 AM
I actually vacuum seal in the jars using this:

http://www.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0006-01-Regular-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B0000CFFS6/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1266428058&sr=8-13 (http://www.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0006-01-Regular-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B0000CFFS6/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1266428058&sr=8-13)

You can also get one for widemouth jars. I also have a large canister that allows me to vacuum seal (for dehydrated things and non-perishables) re-using jars from applesauce, pasta sauce, etc. from the store. The vacuum sealed bags are also great... I use Tammy's (Dehydrate2store.com) method for long-term storage... vacuum seal in a bag with O2 absorbers, then in larger mylar bags, or else directly into mylar with O2 absorbers. The vacuum seal bags will sometimes puncture from the dehydrated foods... if you are in doubt about sharp edges causing bag failure, just use a ziplock bag (not zipped close) inside a foodsaver bag to add to the plastic thickness... an inexpensive way to add to your success.

I like the foodsaver bags most for re-packing meat I get on bulk buys... really prevents the freezer burn and lengthens the life of the food.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CO-retired on February 18, 2010, 11:57:19 AM
Thank you!!!....I wish I had a vacuum port on my sealer to take advantage of the method your doing.
Will I be OK just doing what I mentioned?(previous post of mine)
I ordered 250 100cc. oxy bags yesterday......um startin ta get my ducks in a row ;D....once I get a quanity of wide mouth jars I'll start out with cauiflower,onions peas and carrots(frozen).
I read that dehydrated corn,peas and carrots reduce in size by about a 3rd or a 4th!!
sounds like you can get 4-6 pounds of same in a quart jar!!!

Now then......when you open your jars to remove whatever,you do the same to re-seal...right?.............throw in an oxy bag and it will reseal?

Tammys Videos are awesome!!! I think I seen one of them where she said she's really concerned about 2012.....that date sure is on people's minds.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 18, 2010, 12:16:57 PM
The dehydrated veges really do take an amazing amount less space... I think you are right in the size decrease... I use about 1/4 cup dried when it calls for a cup fresh (it does vary somewhat depending on the vegetable -- I think celery and carrots lose even more water). When you remove some for use and don't use all of it... just reseal it again with the same O2 bag. If the jar lid never pops down, you know you need a new one.

Do save your old pasta sauce and applesauce jars for this purpose... they seal up very well for me for use with dried veges. In addition to dehydrated foods, I also store up chocolate, marshmallows, dried bread crumbs (I make my own when I have stale bread), nuts, coffee...
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CO-retired on February 19, 2010, 09:30:09 AM
I just got a phone call from the hardware store....My slicer is in!!! ;D.....now all I'm waiting for is my oxy bags and I'm ready to roll,After I pick up my slicer I'm heading down to BJ's (big outlet here in south jersey)to buy 6 dozen Qt. jars
The end of this month(feb) and a good bit of March is going to be dedicated to Hydrat'n!!
Thanks for bein there for me IVSCHANT....I'll keep ya posted! 8)



Oh.....one more thing.....I made a mistake on the the size OXY bags I ordered....they are 500 cc bags instead of 100 cc
I guess they're overkill for QT. jars but I should be OK...No?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 19, 2010, 01:08:08 PM
...one more thing.....I made a mistake on the the size OXY bags I ordered....they are 500 cc bags instead of 100 cc
I guess they're overkill for QT. jars but I should be OK...No?

They should last 5 times as long :)  Don't worry... they'll come in handy if you decide you want to store wheat or other bulk items in 5 gallon buckets... I use three of those for a 5 gallon bucket (you can use more if you're the cautious type).

You're going to love it! I just posted a photo of my results in dehydrating pasta sauce in another thread... it worked really well...

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=13943.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=13943.0)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CO-retired on February 19, 2010, 09:58:46 PM
Is that you in the video?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 19, 2010, 10:53:37 PM
No... just a Youtube video I found on the subject...
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: johngalt on February 20, 2010, 08:05:15 PM
Quote
your turn - what have you been dehydrating recently?

fruit leather for the picanniny

(http://i46.tinypic.com/2ag2ryo.jpg)

(http://i45.tinypic.com/257qee0.jpg)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 21, 2010, 01:19:38 PM
Great job, jg, I notice you have the excalibur liners... looks like they work pretty well?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CO-retired on February 21, 2010, 04:18:32 PM
IVSCHANT....got a question for ya ;D'bout them fittings that you can get for removing air from qt Ball Masons......How do they work?
OK I see how it simply goes on to the top of the jar....ya run the vacuum line to your shrinker/sealer....it depleats the 02 from the jar...then what?when you remove the fitting from the jar...what am I missing here?
I hate to sound dumb but I dont understand how the removal of the fitting doesnt let the air back in to the jar! ::)
do you have the lid and seal on first?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 21, 2010, 04:40:32 PM
Co-retired... to use the mason jar attachment for the foodsaver (you have to be sure you have the correct size attachment for the size jar you have -- regular or wide-mouthed),

1. You first fill the jar as desired with dehydrated food (or chocolate chips, or whatever), place lid on top (without ring).
(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0485.jpg)
2. Push the attachment down over the top of jar and lid.
3. Attach hose... push 'canister' option on vacuum sealer.
(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0486.jpg)
4. When the machine stops, detach the hose from the attachment (it gives a satisfying sound that lets you know it was under vacuum pressure).
5. Remove the attachment from the jar and lid.
(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0487.jpg)
Your lid will be popped down and sealed on the jar.
6. Add the ring to the jar (optional) and store...
(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0488.jpg)

Works like a charm. Once you see the attachment with the way it fits over the top of the jar, it makes more sense... and it really does work very well.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on February 21, 2010, 05:52:37 PM
I feel so DUMB!!!!!

I had two of those vac seal thingies for jars, and I freecycled them thinking that you needed to leave it on the jar, and there was no way I was going to buy enough of them to make it worth having.  Not to mention, it made the jars so much bigger.  :-[

sigh


live and learn, and buy things I had once upon a time.  oh well, I like to think my posting those on freecycle was the answer to someone's prayer.   :-\
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 21, 2010, 06:30:45 PM
Put it on your wishlist for the next gift-occasion... I use this method of vacuum sealing way more than the bags now. It is just the best!

I also bought a canister (big enough for all my various sizes of jars from the grocery store to fit) and use it for sealing a great variety of things.

To use the canister to vacuum seal, you first fill the jar and put the original lid on (not too tightly) and place inside the canister.

(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0490.jpg)

Then, using the vacuum sealer and hose, use the 'canister' option to remove as much air as possible.
Remove hose from canister top... press canister lid release button before removing canister lid. At this point, you should watch the lid inside the canister... the lid should pop down, indicating it is sealed. It can take a try or two, although being sure to leave about 1 inch headspace inside the jar does tend to help -- overfilling can cause it not to seal up.
(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0491.jpg)

I sealed up valentine candy I got on half-price in this applesauce jar... you'll find it funny to see the candy bar wrappers expanding out and looking like balloons inside the jar... marshmallows do a similar thing :)

Don't beat yourself up... just get more... you'll be glad you did.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CO-retired on February 22, 2010, 08:28:17 AM
 ;DThank you SO much for taking the time to post pictures and explain the procedure for vacuum sealing!!
I got another one for ya :Dis it still a good idea to use the oxy driers in your jars when sealing them?
Where can I buy a sealer with a vacuum port....and the unit to seal the jars with?(the white round thing that goes on top of the jars.)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 22, 2010, 09:13:27 AM
Glad it helped... I use O2 in jars I don't use frequently... may be overkill, but it will probably help keep things longer (there is only so much air the vacuum sealer can suck out, right?).

I bought the foodsaver at Cabela's when they had a good sale. They sell similar units at Walmart, Target, K-Mart, Amazon... I've seen them for as little as $79, although I've heard of folks snagging them on Craigslist or freecycle for much less than that.

I bought the mason jar attachments on amazon... ditto for the canister. That is the best source for those things I've found. Foodsaver doesn't even sell them directly (they actually recommended Amazon to me when I called them). The foodsaver does have its limitations (won't vacuum seal mylar -- seals fine, just won't extract the air -- and doesn't have a wide enough heat strip to seal up the big mylar bags in one go), but I don't know that the other brands have the vacuum port, and for that alone, foodsaver would be my choice.

If you do have a problem with the vacuum tube attachment wearing out, etc., you can get a replacement directly from Foodsaver.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LICountryBoy on February 22, 2010, 12:05:46 PM
The foodsaver does have its limitations (won't vacuum seal mylar -- seals fine, just won't extract the air -- and doesn't have a wide enough heat strip to seal up the big mylar bags in one go),

Dehydrate2store has a video from a guy that shows 2 ways to vacuum seal mylar bags with a food saver using a foodsaver bag. One uses the whole bag, the other uses part of a bag.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 22, 2010, 12:54:53 PM
+1 LICountry Boy... I had not seen those videos on Tammy's site! I was hoping to see how to do this with my foodsaver (and had heard that it could be done with the right technique) but never could get it to work without seeing it... Here is the link to the video explaining how to vacuum seal mylar using a foodsaver:

http://www.dehydrate2store.com/videos/?id=58 (http://www.dehydrate2store.com/videos/?id=58)

I like method 2 best... I'll be using that method next time I do mylar sealing.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: jetta2337 on February 22, 2010, 01:53:30 PM
lvschant how do you do your pasta sauce? I did quite a few tomato's last year and I have tired a few ways to make some pasta sauce with them but haven't liked anything I have come up with. Can you give me your low down? What is in it and how you get it back to the sauce? Thanks!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 22, 2010, 02:14:18 PM
My tomato crop wasn't good enough last summer to do much more than can some diced tomatoes and dehydrate some... I'm hoping for better luck this year. I'd like to make ketchup (which I did at home with my Mom) and tomato sauce and pasta sauce... I'm hoping to do more experimentation and choosing favorite recipes for the family.

My pasta sauce experiment above was done using Ragu sauce I had in my storage.

To reconstitute, just take 3 to 3 1/2 T. pasta sauce powder and add 1 c. hot water... use as normal... I'm going to add less water to the powder for using on homemade pizzas. I think the regular pasta sauce is a little too runny for pizza sauce usually. This will actually be more all-purpose than regular sauce in the cupboard.

Here is a recipe from Wendy DeWitt's pdf that could be easily made from food in storage:

Marinara Sauce (makes 4 cups)
2 c. tomato paste plus 2 c. water (or 4 c. tomato sauce)
1 tsp. garlic powder
1-2 T dried onion
1 1/2 tsp. dried basil
1/2 tsp oregano
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper
1 tsp sugar
(Or use 2-3 tsp. Italian seasoning in place of other spices)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: johngalt on February 22, 2010, 07:01:23 PM
Quote
I notice you have the excalibur liners... looks like they work pretty well?

Yes they do.  They are teflon coated glass fabric, so I was looking for alternatives, but they really do work the best of anything we've tried.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: A mazed on February 23, 2010, 01:18:56 AM
I dehydrate just anout anything that doesn't run away  ;D Have been doing hash browns and mushrooms peas and corn a lot lately did some sliced potatoes. I got a great deal on hash browns 2 pound bags for 99 cents and the same week bananas were 33 cents a pound did I ever stock up. I got 6 bunches of bananas and deydrated them all in sliced form.Still have 10 bags of hash browns to go. has anyone done fruit roll ups? how do you do them?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 23, 2010, 07:03:51 AM
Fruit roll-ups... check out Tammy's video:

http://www.dehydrate2store.com/videos/?id=14 (http://www.dehydrate2store.com/videos/?id=14)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: luke on March 10, 2010, 05:17:28 AM
I got a dehydrator for christmas, the deal was I had to share it with my mom when she grew her veggies, but it is not yet that time. I did just get home from a vacation and am wondering if I can use my dehydrator to store some fish that I caught? It is mainly white fish from the ocean (reds - salmon grouper, sea bass, rock fish, forget what else they called them out west).  Anyone have success dehydrating fish, or any tips I should be aware of? I'll be dehydrating a lot of vegetables later this year but I'm anxious to try it out now!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on March 10, 2010, 06:31:25 AM
I have no experience with drying fish personally, although I can remember (from years ago as an exchange student in the Philippines) that dried salted whitefish was very common. Wish fish or meat, though, you are going to have to add salt and it won't keep as long as dried veges... sounds a lot more risky to me than fruits and veges...

I would recommend finding frozen veges on sale and trying them instead... potatoes are also very reasonable this time of year and work very well.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: portwand on March 15, 2010, 06:17:02 PM
Still saving for the Excalibur so I bought some dehydrated strawberries & blueberries.  Blueberries were fine on my cereal however the strawberry texture was not very good - I soaked them for about 20 minutes..Next time I will use in batter when cooking to see if that works better.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: fritz_monroe on March 15, 2010, 07:01:09 PM
I don't like the texture of reconstituted dehydrated strawberries, they always end up slimy feeling to me.  But eating them completely dry, I like that.  They remind me of that "astronaut ice cream" that they sell at museums.  And the taste is so concentrated.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: portwand on March 15, 2010, 07:21:55 PM
Yes, the strawberries were slimy - that is funny about the ice cream a friend gave me some to try and the taste was interesting...I thought it would be similiar to the ice cream dots they sell at the zoo  :P
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on April 01, 2010, 08:21:36 AM
I dried a whole head? bunch? bulb? thingy of celery last night.  It probably had around 8 thick stalks and I-don't-know-how-many smaller stalks with leaves in the middle.  Anyway, that whole thing dried to 1/2 c of dried celery  :o
WOW!!!!!  I had no idea how much that would compress......  I guess I do not need as much celery as I have been putting in things.  On the other hand, no one has complained of celery flavor, so I guess I will continue turning it into flour powder and adding it to my various soups and stews in the amounts I have been using.  celery is good for us, after all.....
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on April 01, 2010, 12:27:50 PM
Yes... celery and carrots seem to dehydrate down amazingly compared to the original size. I've not tried grinding into powder, though... might be a sneaky way to get my kids to eat them :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on April 01, 2010, 01:02:50 PM
Yes... celery and carrots seem to dehydrate down amazingly compared to the original size. I've not tried grinding into powder, though... might be a sneaky way to get my kids to eat them :)


 :D
My favorite part about dehydrated foods.  I am sneaking veggies into everything - beets, mushrooms, squash, celery, onions, zucchini - that I can hide it.  I have also been able to add berries to things - my hubby does not like "chunks" of stuff in his baked goods, but berry powder gives the flavor without the "chunk"

my husband has declared that I am a "vegetable pusher" :o
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: evilphish on April 01, 2010, 01:09:58 PM
Quote
I have dehydrated strawberry slices - they taste like candy!!!  but they are a pain to slice.  I am going to try another method this spring.


if it hasn't already been said,  try an egg slicer,  works with button shrooms as well.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on April 01, 2010, 02:12:31 PM

if it hasn't already been said,  try an egg slicer,  works with button shrooms as well.

yeah.. I have ruined egg slicers on strawberries.....  3 last year, and 3 the time before that.  The seeds are too tough for the thin wires.  I am looking for a new method this year.....
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: evilphish on April 01, 2010, 02:36:58 PM
i've never had a problem doing it that way. 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Grasshopper2Ant on April 06, 2010, 12:07:43 PM
One of my favorite things to dehydrate is ground beef.  I boil it to brown it, then drain and rinse very thoroughly until I don't see anymore grease coming out -- then dehydrate.  It comes out very light and it rehydrates very quickly.  I'm still a little squeamish about leaving dehydrated meat out at room temperature, so I store it in the freezer -- probably unnecessary.  Works great when I have something I want to cook with ground beef, it will completely rehydrate while cooking within about 10 to 15 minutes.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Koski on August 24, 2010, 11:15:15 AM
So far all i have dehydrated is spaghetti sauce, turned out ok, lemons, turned out ok, but have a slight metalic taste to them when i put them in a glass of water, and i have done some hash browns. Only problem i have right now is how do i cook the hash browns now? I did add some hot water to them but they turned out really mushy, so i just threw them in the frying pan and they turned out to hard, not sure what to do.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on August 24, 2010, 11:28:56 AM
So far all i have dehydrated is spaghetti sauce, turned out ok, lemons, turned out ok, but have a slight metallic taste to them when i put them in a glass of water, and i have done some hash browns. Only problem i have right now is how do i cook the hash browns now? I did add some hot water to them but they turned out really mushy, so i just threw them in the frying pan and they turned out to hard, not sure what to do.

when you did hashbrowns, how did you do them?  (I ask because different parts of the country seem to call hashbrowns different things.)  I boil my whole russet potatoes, peel them while hot, cool in the fridge, shred with a hand cheese grater, and dry.  I did about 100 pounds last year.
I put about 2 cups of dry shredded pots in a 6-c bowl, pour on some water, about 4 cups, maybe, not hot, not cold, just whatever comes out of my faucet right then.  I let it sit about 20-30 minutes.  When ready to cook, I melt 2 T bacon grease and 2 T butter and add salt (I like salt, so I add lots of it) and fry the potatoes until tasty brown.  works every time.  And I need to do about 200 pounds this year!! :o  (we ran out about May)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Herbalpagan on August 24, 2010, 12:41:46 PM
First - I use the canister to seal my jars, I haven't got the lid sealer to work right for me, but the canisters do a great job!

I've been dehydrating a lot so I don't have to heat up the kitchen.  I've gotten a half gallon of dried green beans, 2 gallons of summer squash chips done, a couple of eggplant, and a huge head of cabbage reduced down to a half gallon jar.  I'm going to put more things in mylar or vacuum bags after they come out of the dehydrator since I still have a bit of last years harvest left.  Next on the list to dry will be tomatoes.

Did you folks see Tammy's video on pumpkin pie? It has the easiest directions for dehydrating pumpkin I've ever seen !!!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on August 24, 2010, 03:54:00 PM
Great thread and lots of useful/helpful info btw.  :)

We use dehydrated foods almost daily.

We have a little 7 tray American Harvester and it meets our needs for now...but we're saving for an Excalibur.

I have okra and tomatoes in our dehydrator as I type this.

I am also pressure canning a vegetable soup mix (to rotate some stores out of our freezers).
I used squash, tomatoes, and carrots I dehydrated earlier this year in the soup mix.

We keep a large variety of dehydrated vegetables and seasonings (onions, garlic, and such) on our kitchen island where they are handy to grab & use.

We tend to reach for the dehydrated veggies as frequently as our canned veggies.

Prag
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: JGreene on August 24, 2010, 04:01:53 PM
Zucinni chips - sliced thin and dried

But my favorite so far has got to be Roma and cherry tomatoes.  Sliced in half and dried.  Admittedly, it took forever, pretty much all of 24 hours, the cherries a bit less.   Next time I'm going to try poking holes in the skin side and do it again.  Have you priced sun dried tomatoes lately???   Love the things.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: theadob on August 25, 2010, 08:27:51 AM
I just ordered my Excaliber this week.  I'd been saving for a while and I noticed that they sell refurb units for 100 less than new and with a 10 year warranty on the Excaliber web site.  I couldnt afford new yet, but thanks to the refurb, I was able to get it.http://www.excaliburdehydrator.com/3900-R-Excalibur-with-10-Year-Warranty-184-37-regular-prod.htm (http://www.excaliburdehydrator.com/3900-R-Excalibur-with-10-Year-Warranty-184-37-regular-prod.htm)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on August 25, 2010, 12:25:49 PM
You will love it! I had a bit of sadness when packing mine away in preparation for a move :(
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: jakematic on August 25, 2010, 12:51:15 PM
I've done just about every vegetable under the sun - mostly frozen, especially when they are on sale.

Every time we go to the grocery store I pick up another case of canning jars and enough veg to fill all 9 trays.

Just read the thread on pasta sauce and have a huge batch of homemade that I really don't want to freeze. To the Excalibur!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: ggmalena on August 25, 2010, 01:06:48 PM
Am fortunate in that I've had an Excalibur 9 tray dehydrator for about 13 years now, a real work horse, love it.  The things I dehydrate most frequently include onions, peppers, carrots, tomatoes, celery, mushrooms and greens such as spinach & chard - using them primarily in soups, stews, dips and thrown in when cooking rice.   I also make veg powder using a coffee / spice grinder.  The veg have to be really dry for this, especially the tomatoes.

The past two years have dehydrated a lot of onions due to the weather being exceeding rainy and the onions beginning to rot in the ground before totally ready to harvest.  A lot of peeling / trimming required but the results have been great – very sweet tasty dried onions, maybe even better than fresh and once the initial work is done, so easy to use.

  Several things I was skeptical about at first we now really like - okra - used in all the above ways and cucumbers which make little chips of concentrated flavor that are great for a crunchy texture salad topping.

 I tried potatoes from the garden for the first time this year, shreds and slices. The first batch I blanched after cutting up, did not work so swell, stuck together a lot and were difficult to separate to put on the racks, the second batch I cooked / blanched first then cut, much better.  Next time I will try putting in the refrigerator overnight after cooking / blanching to firm up before cutting.  One thing I am unclear on is how long to cook / blanch potatoes before drying. Would boiling whole potatoes to a point one would consider about half done and then proceeding with the drying process be enough or too much?

Tried blueberries this year, brought to boil to blanch / pop skins.  The results were pretty messy but did dry well and broke up into blueberry shreds with intense flavor. Also do tea and seasoning herbs, did a bunch of chives this spring and was amazed at how well they have kept a bright green color. 

So far I’ve had pretty good results storing dehydrated veg, but have never kept anything more than 2 or 3 years. The only losses have been peppers which became infested with bugs (not sure what kind) after about a year.  They were in plastic bags in a large plastic container. I now store most everything in glass canning jars in a dark cabinet.  Recently purchased some oxygen absorber packets. One of my next investments will be a vacume sealer.  The info in this thread re: vac sealing jars answered a lot of my questions, never understood before how that was possible.  Thanx.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on August 25, 2010, 02:13:30 PM

 I tried potatoes from the garden for the first time this year, shreds and slices. The first batch I blanched after cutting up, did not work so swell, stuck together a lot and were difficult to separate to put on the racks, the second batch I cooked / blanched first then cut, much better.  Next time I will try putting in the refrigerator overnight after cooking / blanching to firm up before cutting.  One thing I am unclear on is how long to cook / blanch potatoes before drying. Would boiling whole potatoes to a point one would consider about half done and then proceeding with the drying process be enough or too much?

Check out this thread on dehydrating potatoes... it may help with your blanching question: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=9858.0

Quote
Tried blueberries this year, brought to boil to blanch / pop skins.  The results were pretty messy but did dry well and broke up into blueberry shreds with intense flavor. Also do tea and seasoning herbs, did a bunch of chives this spring and was amazed at how well they have kept a bright green color. 

Great idea... I had some that we weren't going to be able to eat fresh before they went bad, so I dehydrated them without blanching. I knew they were notorious for being hard to dehydrate, so I cut them in half before drying, placing skin-side down on the trays. It also worked very well.


Quote
So far I’ve had pretty good results storing dehydrated veg, but have never kept anything more than 2 or 3 years. The only losses have been peppers which became infested with bugs (not sure what kind) after about a year.  They were in plastic bags in a large plastic container. I now store most everything in glass canning jars in a dark cabinet.  Recently purchased some oxygen absorber packets. One of my next investments will be a vacume sealer.  The info in this thread re: vac sealing jars answered a lot of my questions, never understood before how that was possible.  Thanx.

Vacuum-sealing works great with dehydration... you'll love it.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on August 26, 2010, 10:11:41 AM
Thanks for the link on the potatoes.  :)

And the info on the blueberries...we still have a couple of gallon bags of them in the freezer.
We have enough blueberry jam to last until next season easily, so this looks like a viable option for storage & use.



Just an fwiw/fyi;

We routinely pick our okra and pop it into a gallon freezer bag (before even washing it) and toss in the deep freezer...this is how I was taught to do it as a youngster...we just wash it prior to use.

To the point:
Since we had better than 5 of the gallon bags of okra, even after using a good bit in pressure canning some "okra & tomatoes", & eating it all summer...
I thought I'd see how well it dehydrates (see above post).

Frozen okra dehydrates very well...looks great...smells great...and rehydrates in soup without any issues.




Being able preserve your bounty for use at a later time gives one a sense of well being.


Thanks for the great info on this site.


Regards,

Prag
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SPLIT_LIFE on August 29, 2010, 10:33:14 AM
I bought a used excalibur on craigs list last winter,   $75.    At the farmers market yesterday morning.  Peaches 2.75/lb.    I went  back 2pm when they were cleaning up and was able to get 25 lb for 20$  (the very ripe and soft ones).   

My wife thought I was crazy.        But this morning,  tasting the chewy/crunchy dried peach slices, she was blown away.    Thanks Jack for the farmers market idea.   Next week I'll buy as enough to keep the excalibur running all week.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: maxhedroom on August 29, 2010, 03:09:30 PM
I have dehydrated peaches, peppers, yellow squash, roma tomatoes. NOW how do I cook with them?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on August 29, 2010, 08:12:49 PM
Your dehydrated peaches will work great for crisps, pies, chopped up in oatmeal, snacking for hikes...

Peppers... we crumble them up in chili or red beans, you can also use in dips, or other casseroles. Crumble them over the top of a fresh salad.

Tomatoes... think sun-dried tomatoes. Pretty much anything you would use those for, you could use dried romas for. I use them in soups, stews, chili, etc. I'm probably weird, but I think they taste pretty good as a dry snack.

Yellow squash... haven't had any to dry yet. I use zucchini for potato chip substitutes and also in my recipe for zucchini bread. You just need to add more liquid to your recipes when using dehydrated veges. I haven't done it yet, but also plan to use it for minestrone this coming winter.

Good luck!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LdMorgan on August 29, 2010, 09:47:24 PM
I have dehydrated strawberry slices - they taste like candy!!!  but they are a pain to slice.  I am going to try another method this spring.

This is just a thought, but wouldn't an egg-slicer slice one or more strawberries just as easily?

Might help when you have a whole flat to slice.

Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: JGreene on August 30, 2010, 06:29:43 AM
I have dehydrated peaches, peppers, yellow squash, roma tomatoes. NOW how do I cook with them?

"sun dried" tomatoes are great on pizza and in sauces.   My DW made a stir fry from other veggies from the garden that was fantastic.  It was served over pasta and only needed a little olive oil.  These things are like little packets of flavor.  wonderful.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Herbalpagan on August 30, 2010, 06:57:17 AM
Today, I'm working on shredding and dehydrating carrots from the garden!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on August 30, 2010, 07:06:41 AM
This is just a thought, but wouldn't an egg-slicer slice one or more strawberries just as easily?

Might help when you have a whole flat to slice.

that is what I have used in the past, and I ruin 2-3 slicers depending on how many flats I have.  The strawberry seeds are just too rough on the wires.  This past spring, I just sliced the strawberries in 3-4 thicker slices and did that.  Worked well enough, and the dried berries are just slightly thicker than the egg slicer ones.


****
today, well, last night, really, I cubed and steamed 2 sweet potatoes.  They have been drying all night, and by dinner time they should be thoroughly dry so I can throw them in my chicken corn chowder soup for dinner.  If it works, I will be dehydrating the rest of them that I have.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: jakematic on August 30, 2010, 08:22:44 AM
that is what I have used in the past, and I ruin 2-3 slicers depending on how many flats I have.  The strawberry seeds are just too rough on the wires.

Ditto. The slicer needs to be bladed to handle berries. While this slicer from Williams-Sonoma (http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/chefn-strawberry-slicer/) looks like it would do the trick, I use my mandolin. Just keep the blade honed and be very very very careful.

(http://www.williams-sonoma.com/wsimgs/ab/images/dp/wcm/201031/0022/img56l.jpg)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on August 30, 2010, 08:40:16 AM
Ditto. The slicer needs to be bladed to handle berries. While this slicer from Williams-Sonoma (http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/chefn-strawberry-slicer/) looks like it would do the trick, I use my mandolin. Just keep the blade honed and be very very very careful.

(http://www.williams-sonoma.com/wsimgs/ab/images/dp/wcm/201031/0022/img56l.jpg)


wow - I like that!  and only $15 - it has just been added to my "I want this, and will probably use it often, but not urgent" list.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: OKGranny on August 30, 2010, 12:22:33 PM

today, well, last night, really, I cubed and steamed 2 sweet potatoes.  They have been drying all night, and by dinner time they should be thoroughly dry so I can throw them in my chicken corn chowder soup for dinner.  If it works, I will be dehydrating the rest of them that I have.

I don't know about other people that have dogs but I cut some of the sweet potatoes like french fries and steam and dry them and give them to the boys as treats. They love them and act like they're candy or something.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on September 19, 2010, 11:16:05 AM
the sweet potatoes worked.  so I diced and dried 2 more and made french fries out of the last 2, and well, we are out of sweet potatoes again.

********

Have I mentioned radishes yet?  I just dehydrated 2 bunches that were a great deal.  they came up to about 1 c shredded and dried.  they are great on salads.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: johngalt on September 20, 2010, 10:38:50 AM
The only way to dry blueberries!  It takes a little more time, but the end result is tons better than "checking" them in boiling water.  These are dry, not gooey and pourable after dehydration.

(http://i990.photobucket.com/albums/af29/22urspiders/johngalts%20garden/100.jpg)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on September 20, 2010, 11:21:26 AM
exactly how i did it... Thanks for the photo!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on September 23, 2010, 03:13:26 PM
I've started drying my tomatoes till crisp and then powdering them in the food processor.  They rehydrate easily into paste, sauce or juice depending on how much water you add.  I'm am in the process of making up a bunch of dehydrated soups and spaghetti mixes to leave at our BOL as there is no heat there and we can't leave anything that will freeze (they explode and make a big mess!)

(http://i1004.photobucket.com/albums/af164/bluedogsmama/P1000624.jpg)
(http://i1004.photobucket.com/albums/af164/bluedogsmama/P1000627.jpg)
(http://i1004.photobucket.com/albums/af164/bluedogsmama/P1000625.jpg)
(http://i1004.photobucket.com/albums/af164/bluedogsmama/P1000628.jpg)

I fit 7 lbs of paste tomatoes into a pint jar. I love this idea.  I plan on taking the tomato powder adding dried onion and garlic and sealing into a packet with noodles for spaghetti and making another with assorted dried veggies for soup.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on September 23, 2010, 05:12:58 PM
That looks so great, TBM! Thanks for the cool photos...
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LdMorgan on September 24, 2010, 07:37:00 AM
Two days ago a friend commented that London Broil was cheaper at the local supermarket than plain hamburger. It was at $2.46 a lb.

We hustled on over and bought home several packages.
 
Jerky Day! (Yay!)

We trimmed most of the fat off, sliced everything 1/4" thick (cutting 90 degrees across the grain).

We'd picked carefully so there wasn't much trimming to do.

We chopped the slices to about 8" in length or so and marinated them overnight in my Sweetie's "Secret Seasoning".

(Some secret. EvenI know what's in it!)

Then we tossed a batch into the Excalibur for about 16 hours.

We just pulled it out and found it dried to perfection.

I had noticed that the London Broil seemed to have a coarser grain than the cuts we usually use for jerky. That has turned out to be a genuine bonus.

This batch is probably three times easier to chew than our usual jerky.

It's great for snackin', and would be ideal for cold-camping/dire times when a fire is not an option.

Ultimately, there was zero waste from the meat we bought. The fat scraps got chopped up and boiled into soup stock. (We had that for supper. It added a nice dimension of flavor to our traditional Scraped Refrigerator Soup.

Odd-shaped chunks have been set aside for stew meat, and I see beef stew and pot pies looming large on the horizon.

Come to think of it, smartest thing my Daddy said when he finally got out of prison was "You find a woman can cook, boy, you better marry her up right quick."

For once, I listened. Got one from Ohio. She's a right wonder, she is.

And a purty little thing, too.









Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on September 24, 2010, 08:20:46 AM
Sounds yummy and also sounds like you appreciate that great woman by your side. I'd say you were a blessed man who knows when he has it good. ;)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on October 02, 2010, 06:12:56 AM
TBM thanks a ton for the tomato powder pictures. I have been working on this for a while in my head.

How do you guys do your tomatoes for powder? I have tried cutting "slicers" into 1/8-1/4 inch slices but I end up with a sticky mess.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on October 02, 2010, 08:52:04 AM
Hey Newlyweds!  I have gotten lazy since we've been inundated with veggies so I just wash the tomatoes good - remove any blemishes and stems and slice the in the food processor with the 1/4" blade.  Then I put my dehydrator tray over the sink and add tomato goop and let it drain a minute and do the next tray.  Dry them til they are crispy - they'll peel right off the trays - and then cool a little and then back into the food processor with the cutting knife and whirl til powdered. Store in glass jars. 

1 c. powder to 3 c. water add 1/2 tsp sugar and whatever spices = tomato sauce.

1 c. powder to 1-3/4c. water = paste

1 c. powder to 4-5 c. water = juice.

Hope this helps!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CountryRootsCityJob on October 04, 2010, 11:07:39 AM
Well at some point I'll find the time to read all of this great information! 

Here's my attempt at a table...

*See post by Twobluesmama above on making them into powder
dehydrate         Use
strawberries      In our oatmeal, home made ice cream, snacking
peaches           see above
peppers           anything Thai and on pizza
sweet corn       plan on soups/chili
spinach pwdr*  pasta dishes
tomato            pasta's, pizza
tomato pwdr*  soups, chili, sauces
potato's           I guess we didn't steam/blanch them enough... compost
apples             so far oatmeal and snacks
fruit leather     snacking

- veggies/fruit can be sent through the mail to friends in mylar bags this way and they keep.  People in Alaska have a hard time getting fresh fruit, this is the next best thing.  What a way to say Merry Christmas, here's a salad!  (I don't imagine that dehydrated spinach would make a good salad, but it beats not having any fresh greens)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: javabrewer on October 04, 2010, 12:49:23 PM
I posted a thread on how I make dehydrated ground turkey gravel for use in soups, sauces, and other dishes.  I made my last batch a couple of days before I wrote that thread and I am almost finished using it all up.  Which means we're eating less of it than normal -- probably because we've expanded our 'prepper meal' choices.

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=19555.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=19555.0)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on October 04, 2010, 01:04:11 PM
I just dried pears.

mmmmm yummy pears

I took an apple wedger (http://www.pamperedchef.com/our_products/catalog/product.jsp?productId=10342&categoryCode=CE (http://www.pamperedchef.com/our_products/catalog/product.jsp?productId=10342&categoryCode=CE)) to a bushel of pears.  This method does waste a bit of pear on the upper core that you can eat, but I just took bites out of it as I worked or saved them for the kids, who were all over the cores!
then I spread my pear wedges on the dehydrator and 18-24 hours later (I have a junky dehydrator that took so long they almost molded!  They might have done so if I had not moved those to the excalibur when it had finished its batch).

They look like homemade french fries, and most of us are eating them like crazy.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on October 04, 2010, 05:23:59 PM
Thanks for the photo of the blueberries in your post (#80) johngalt.

Did you just slice them before dehydrating...I apologize if I missed something on this.

I ask because when I recently did a batch they turned out a bit sticky.

They are still great in our oatmeal and cereals though.

Thanks in advance.  :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on October 04, 2010, 05:32:06 PM
TBM ;

Thanks for the pics & info on making tomato powder.

Great idea and it looks like something even I could do.  ;)


Much appreciated.


Morning Sunshine ;

The pears sound delicious!

Gonna have to give this a try.


You guys are pretty darned creative.
I've just got corn dehydrating in mine for general cooking use.  ::)

I gotta get busy.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on October 04, 2010, 05:41:26 PM
hey Prag,

corn dehydrating is a good thing.  no need to feel boring.  One of these days I will get around to doing veggies we actually like to eat.  So far I have only done veggies we got from the co-op for which I cannot find any other use.

I have gotta say, though, I am liking that tomato powder idea.  A lot.

oh, speaking of good ideas - I had  acorn squash (from the co-op :P) that I knew we wouldn't get to eating before they go bad.  I am going to have to sneak them into something else, like pumpkin soup.... anyway, I followed Tammy's method of cooking the squash first, then cutting, peeling, and de-seeding.  I mashed the first batch of cooked squash onto my trays, but it kind of oozes through the mesh.  not drips, it is not that liquid, but oozes...
So then I had a great idea and sliced the squash into slices about 1/2 inch thick and laid those on the tray.  they dried perfectly.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on October 04, 2010, 06:01:13 PM
Good suggestion on the acorn squash.Morning Sunshine .

We had a decent crop of butternut squash from one of our raised beds.
We love 'em baked or steamed...Great either way.

& we still have about 20 of them...

So I might just try a few using your idea of slicing & drying a few...
when the corn gets finished.   ;)


Much appreciated. 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: maxhedroom on October 05, 2010, 03:53:46 PM
Every other day it is either apples or tomatoes. I am finishing the last bushell of tomatoes now. then more apples.

I will try jerky for the first time. Any good jerky tips?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CountryRootsCityJob on October 06, 2010, 10:44:01 AM
Every other day it is either apples or tomatoes. I am finishing the last bushell of tomatoes now. then more apples.

I will try jerky for the first time. Any good jerky tips?

Well one place you might want to check out is Save Our Skills:
http://www.saveourskills.com/smoke-homemade-beef-jerky (http://www.saveourskills.com/smoke-homemade-beef-jerky)

Jack Spirco recommended web site (It links back to the survival podcast)

~CRCJ
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: javabrewer on October 06, 2010, 11:09:04 AM
Every other day it is either apples or tomatoes. I am finishing the last bushell of tomatoes now. then more apples.

I will try jerky for the first time. Any good jerky tips?

My recipe for peppered jerky (I should add my ~new~ recipe...):

7-8 pounds of 1/4 inch sliced lean beef
2 cups worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp black pepper powder
1 tbsp cayenne pepper powder
1/2 tbsp garlic powder

Put everything in a food saver bag, mix it up well and vacuum seal it (helps to reduce marinade time) and marinate it for 6-8 hours.  If you use a zip lock bag or bowl I'd go for 12 hours and mix it half way through (the longer you leave it in there the more salty it tastes).

Dehydrate on 115F for 12-18 hours

Try not to eat it all in one sitting.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: jakematic on October 06, 2010, 11:16:39 AM
My recipe for peppered jerky:

Excellent, just what I was looking for javabrewer. Thanks!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on October 07, 2010, 06:24:50 PM
I just dried pears.

They look like homemade french fries, and most of us are eating them like crazy.

LOL MS- I dried apples, pears and peaches and just stuck them individually into quart jars and then in a box until I had time to label them and put them away. I had the same reaction to the pears - I grabbed the jar and thought what is this? it looks like french fries and I know I didn't dehydrate any of those. And I so agree - very yummy!

I always hated dried fruit until I started drying my own - store bought just doesn't taste right.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on October 07, 2010, 07:36:16 PM
Just got my excalibur dehydrator today!  I'm so excited!

I'm thinking of starting a side business selling dehydrated food at farmer's markets next year.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on October 08, 2010, 05:00:43 AM
great idea, cool blue.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: littletea on October 08, 2010, 06:39:40 AM
 Recently dehydrated frozen blueberries I picked up at Sams - easy.  Just opened the bag and placed on the tray - it was a little messy but I was pleased with the end result.  This week I made a berry crumble using dehydrated blueberries and raspberries.  It was awesome and was relieved I could still make this type of dessert without having to spend all that money on freeze dried berries!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on October 08, 2010, 07:52:29 AM
Just got my excalibur dehydrator today!  I'm so excited!

I'm thinking of starting a side business selling dehydrated food at farmer's markets next year.

Awesome idea!  I was actually thinking about selling my herbs at the farmers market along with herbed honey.  Hope this works out for you CB!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on October 08, 2010, 09:19:20 AM
I always hated dried fruit until I started drying my own - store bought just doesn't taste right.

I never did either.  Bananas are the worst, IMO.  I do not know what they do to them, but they are so much better home-done!  And home-dried strawberry slices are like sugar in your mouth.  mmm-mmmm
I remember Costco started selling these dried blueberries a dew years ago.  in the gourmet section in a cute little resealable bag, and I liked the idea.  And they were okay tasting.  Until I read the ingredients: High Fructose Corn Syrup.  Are you kidding?  seriously, HFCS?  WHY in the world would you add something so nasty in both taste and chemistry to a perfectly good berry?  I love the freeze-dried blueberries (no HFCS, thank you very much) from http://augasonfarms.com/ (http://augasonfarms.com/).  And when I get my bushes producing a good crop, I will be drying my own.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on October 08, 2010, 10:39:50 AM
I agree!  I've never liked dried banana chips but I dried some last night and the were pretty good!

A question though please.  The store bought ones are crisp and brittle, like chips, but the ones I did at home are chewy.  Does this mean I need to dry them more?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on October 08, 2010, 12:52:50 PM
I agree!  I've never liked dried banana chips but I dried some last night and the were pretty good!

A question though please.  The store bought ones are crisp and brittle, like chips, but the ones I did at home are chewy.  Does this mean I need to dry them more?

I think that if you look at the ingredients on the store bought stuff, you will find something besides "banana".  I mean, I add other things too, sometimes, like lime juice, or lemon or pineapple juice or cinnamon.  But that's it.  But, yes, they are supposed to be slightly chewy.  and they are very tasty.

oh, I would recommend next time you do bananas, try different juice baths just before.  they taste very different.  Lime is my favorite.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on October 08, 2010, 04:04:56 PM
I agree!  I've never liked dried banana chips but I dried some last night and the were pretty good!

A question though please.  The store bought ones are crisp and brittle, like chips, but the ones I did at home are chewy.  Does this mean I need to dry them more?

The ones you buy in the store are actually deep fried and that's what makes them crispy.  You might try baking them and see if that helps.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on October 08, 2010, 04:29:49 PM
The ones you buy in the store are actually deep fried and that's what makes them crispy.  You might try baking them and see if that helps.

that explains why they go rancid nasty if you keep them too long! 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on October 09, 2010, 05:22:41 AM
Thanks gang!

I'm trying out broccoli and mushrooms right now and I'll try peppers later.

The potatoes I did yesterday seemed to turn out great.  I'm going to rehydrate them today and try them out.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on October 09, 2010, 05:57:04 AM
I would have to vote dehydrated button mushrooms as the most versatile thing we have dehydrated. I slip at least some small amount into almost everything. You can just break and crumble them up.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on October 09, 2010, 08:25:57 AM
I'm amazed by how much the broccoli shrank, I did a whole bag of frozen broccoli and it now fits in half a cup!

Both the mushrooms and broccoli rehydrate well enough.  The textures aren't the same as fresh but acceptable for soups or stews.  Their both a little tougher but I actually like the mushrooms better that way.

I was surprised that the mushrooms didn't actually shrink much, but they became thin and as light as feathers!

The potatoes re-hydrated nicely.  I could see using these just the same as regular potatoes.  (I left the skins on, and they seem fine).

Doing some red and green peppers right now.  Those are shrinking up into nothing!

Also doing some carrots, grapes and celery. 

The grapes are taking a long time. I had cut them in half, maybe I should have cut them into quarters.

I'm going to be getting some mason jars from my grandmother tomorrow which I'll store it all in.  I might keep them in Rubbermaid bins to block out the light.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Mick_K on November 01, 2010, 03:59:32 AM
This is without a doubt the best thread i've read on this board. I love this and every post gives me new ideas. Thanks to all who have posted. My education has increased exponentially. 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on November 01, 2010, 04:13:53 AM
I have dried hubbard squash, wild onions, okra, jalapenos, pablanos, banana peppers and have a load of dried beef in right now. Not jerky but just unseasoned beef that can be rehydrated and used in soups and stews.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on November 01, 2010, 05:20:04 AM
We love crumbling up dried tomatoes, peppers, onions, garlic, and mushrooms onto our homemade pizza. Even though we have moved away from our garden and no longer can walk out back to pick fresh stuff, we are enjoying the bounty of homegrown food through the wonders of dehydration (lots lighter to move, too!).

The boys love, love, love the dehydrated potatoes. This weekend we had a big breakfast with omelets (rehydrated the veges first) and potatoes (they were originally frozen hashbrowns) that were rehydrated, then fried in butter.

I need more jars! All of mine are full.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on November 01, 2010, 06:24:50 AM
Yep, potatoes are pretty good but I'm having trouble creating mashed potatoes from dehydrated ones.

I did a bunch of apples and used them to make apple crisp which my family loved!  I boiled the apples to rehydrate them and you can't tell the difference from fresh baked ones.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on November 01, 2010, 08:45:23 AM
When it comes to making mashed potatoes from dehydrated foods I am pretty sure you have to mash them first. Its hard to get the rehydrated potatoes to mash, they will just chip up and you end up with something resembling cottage cheese.

If you boil them and mash them plain, no butter, milk, ect. Then spread them over the trays and let dry, you should be able to rehydrate the crumble back to a familiar consistency. I have never tried this however, once I tried it the other way I never got around to trying this one.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on November 01, 2010, 12:44:04 PM
OK... I know it is somewhere on here (maybe on the dehydrating potatoes thread), but...

One of our forum members ran the experiment to get mashed potatoes. She said that you had to mash the potatoes first, then spread out on a sheet and freeze it first. Apparently, the freezing made all the difference. Then, she dehydrated and powdered. She said without the freezing step it never turned out right.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on November 01, 2010, 12:48:44 PM
OK... I know it is somewhere on here (maybe on the dehydrating potatoes thread), but...

One of our forum members ran the experiment to get mashed potatoes. She said that you had to mash the potatoes first, then spread out on a sheet and freeze it first. Apparently, the freezing made all the difference. Then, she dehydrated and powdered. She said without the freezing step it never turned out right.

I missed that thread..... I hope you can find it.  I want to see it!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on November 01, 2010, 01:49:42 PM
Yes. It was the dehydrating potatoes thread:

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=9858.msg158884#msg158884 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=9858.msg158884#msg158884)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on November 01, 2010, 01:58:26 PM
cool.  Thanks.  I will be checking that out very soon.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on November 01, 2010, 04:10:10 PM
Yes. It was the dehydrating potatoes thread:

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=9858.msg158884#msg158884 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=9858.msg158884#msg158884)

Excellent Thread!

Thank you for linking it.  :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on November 01, 2010, 04:29:49 PM
OK... I know it is somewhere on here (maybe on the dehydrating potatoes thread), but...

One of our forum members ran the experiment to get mashed potatoes. She said that you had to mash the potatoes first, then spread out on a sheet and freeze it first. Apparently, the freezing made all the difference. Then, she dehydrated and powdered. She said without the freezing step it never turned out right.

Ah, I'll try that thanks.

I did experiment with drying some pre-mashed potatoes.  They turned out better than the unmashed ones but were still a little too thick.  I think when I dried them I may have spread it on too thick.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on November 01, 2010, 08:26:02 PM


Thanks LvsChant for pulling up that thread!  Great idea!  One I think I'll try too.

Ah, I'll try that thanks.

I did experiment with drying some pre-mashed potatoes.  They turned out better than the unmashed ones but were still a little too thick.  I think when I dried them I may have spread it on too thick.

A trick I learned from watching Tammy at Dehydrate2Store was to spread your food onto the dehydrator tray cover with a sheet of waxed paper and then lightly run your rolling pin over the top to even it out and thin it down.  Thought this might help with the potatoes. 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on November 02, 2010, 04:03:18 AM
I want to do dried mashed potatos and pumpkin. I have an old dehydrator though that has bigger holes in the trays. What can I put on the bottom before I run the rolling pin over the potatos?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on November 02, 2010, 05:13:25 AM
I've been using parchment paper.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: maxhedroom on November 02, 2010, 06:07:52 AM
Anyone try dehydrating butternut or acorn squash?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on November 02, 2010, 07:27:57 AM
Anyone try dehydrating butternut or acorn squash?

just like pumpkin.  I have 2 acorn and 2 butternut mixed up together in ONE pint jar in my pantry.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: maxhedroom on November 02, 2010, 01:51:37 PM
just like pumpkin.  I have 2 acorn and 2 butternut mixed up together in ONE pint jar in my pantry.
Where is the pumpkin recipe?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on November 02, 2010, 02:02:20 PM
See Dehydrate2Store's video here: http://www.dehydrate2store.com/videos/?id=66 (http://www.dehydrate2store.com/videos/?id=66) for pumpkin dehydration and use in piemaking.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on November 02, 2010, 07:41:38 PM
I used a roast and trimmed it and dried it. No salt. No seasonings. No marinading. No nothing.

(http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l309/sweethearts-mom/FARM%20PROJECTS/SAM_0208.jpg)

Just meat. I tried this when I was married and had a teenage boy in the house. Um an 8 # roast would last about a day after it was dried.

(http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l309/sweethearts-mom/FARM%20PROJECTS/SAM_0209.jpg)

I thought this was too marbled but I was very wrong.

(http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l309/sweethearts-mom/FARM%20PROJECTS/SAM_0217.jpg)

Yes the hole is because I took some for lunch today.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on November 02, 2010, 07:50:06 PM
[where's that slobbery smilie?]

oh, that jerky looks tasty tasty tasty.  I haven't had a good homemade jerky in years.  mmm.. if only I was not moving soon and thus trying to keep my house in show readiness.  I think I would be making some of that.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on November 02, 2010, 07:52:31 PM
Morning Sunshine is it still jerky when it is unseasoned? I love this so much better than jerky. I am going to try this weekend to shred some in the food processor. Then I can use it in lots of things; salad, soups, breakfast bars as a protein source.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on November 07, 2010, 08:58:32 AM
Shred some and put on a baked potato with some cheese and sour cream.

I think it is still jerky, I mean there are hundreds of styles and flavors of jerky, this one is just plain. How do you use your jerky besides just eating it?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Sweethearts Mom on November 07, 2010, 11:48:09 AM
Between me, my daughter and my grand boys none of it ever makes it to the cooking stage! ;D
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Polar Bear on November 15, 2010, 06:57:21 PM
I just tried my hand at Bef Jerky and, to be honest, it was a little bland.  :-\

I didn't have any soy sauce and figured I needed it with the Whirstchire sauce for the marinade, so I just threw in a little black pepper and a few drops of liquid smoke into a quarter cup of apple vinegar and then brushed it on the beef.

I will say that I am pleased with the texture of the jerky and will be trying beef again later on.

My next project will be with turkey and I will definitely maranate that before hand.  I'm thinking a terriaki version and maybe a italian dressing version.  Any and all thoughts appreciated.  :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Charley on November 16, 2010, 06:15:48 AM
I thought I already posted this, but I can't find it.  Sorry if it's a duplicate. 

This recipe uses dehydrated apples that are reconstituted. It is really easy and yummy. I think it tastes better after it sits in the refrigerator for a few hours. This recipe is adapted from Everydayfoodstorage.com. You could add 3 T red hot candies in place of the cinnamon sugar if you wanted.  Personally, I don't add any sugar.   My kids think it looks funky with the craisins in it, but I love them. 

          o 2 cups dehydrated apples
          o 2 cups boiling water
          o 3/4 cup craisins (optional)
          o 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)
          o 1 teaspoon sugar (optional)

   1. Place the dehydrated apple slices and craisins in a blender. Top the fruit with the boiling water. Add in the cinnamon and sugar. Allow to soak for about 5 minutes. Process in your blender to desired consistency.
   2. Refrigerate.

Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Joniv on November 25, 2010, 09:45:05 AM
I used a roast and trimmed it and dried it. No salt. No seasonings. No marinading. No nothing.

(http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l309/sweethearts-mom/FARM%20PROJECTS/SAM_0208.jpg)

Just meat. I tried this when I was married and had a teenage boy in the house. Um an 8 # roast would last about a day after it was dried.

(http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l309/sweethearts-mom/FARM%20PROJECTS/SAM_0209.jpg)

I thought this was too marbled but I was very wrong.

(http://i99.photobucket.com/albums/l309/sweethearts-mom/FARM%20PROJECTS/SAM_0217.jpg)

I’m new to dehydrating food, so please forgive my ignorance.  So if I put raw meat on the dehydrator that the process will cook it enough to be edible? 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on November 25, 2010, 09:55:50 AM
it is not only edible, but delicious.  I have not had good homemade jerky in so long.... sigh... one day....
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CountryRootsCityJob on February 15, 2011, 01:07:43 PM
Well at some point I'll find the time to read all of this great information! 

Here's my attempt at a table...
spinach pwdr*  pasta dishes
...
- veggies/fruit can be sent through the mail to friends in mylar bags this way and they keep.  People in Alaska have a hard time getting fresh fruit, this is the next best thing.  What a way to say Merry Christmas, here's a salad!  (I don't imagine that dehydrated spinach would make a good salad, but it beats not having any fresh greens)

Okay, BIG PROBLEM...  I dehydrated some spinach a while back and checked the bag last week... I could tell the spinach was no longer crisply dehydrated- Instead it felt mushy and soft.  So I opened it and it was!  EEEEK!!!! 

Do I have to blanch spinach before I dehydrate it?  Did I not dehydrate it enough?  Need some help here!
~CRCJ
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on February 15, 2011, 01:56:31 PM
ick!  I am sorry that happened.  I have never blanched my spinach.  I just spread it over my tray and let it go.  so, couple of questions:

are you absolutely sure you got it all "crumbly-to-the-touch" dry?
did your bag have any moisture before you filled it?
was there any way for moisture to get into the bag?
do you live in a humid environment?

I do not know how, but there was moisture in that bag with the spinach.  and it spread and multiplied like a bad virus.  sorry.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CountryRootsCityJob on February 15, 2011, 02:12:34 PM
Well it was probably September in Cincinnati when I did that... its hard to think that the humidity outside could do that though. I could be wrong.  I suppose that would mean I shouldn't bag up anything in the summer time, or at least run the dehydrator inside for a bit before I pull my green's out.

Of course there's always the fact that I could have been impatient.  Its hard to stand here today and say I did it perfectly 5 months ago.  Morn'n Sunshine: Have you tried this?  I'll have to try it again, but I don't want to waste too much of it if its not something we haven't thought of. 

-This was a good lesson to learn while I'm not depending on my stores!

~CRCJ
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on February 15, 2011, 06:31:16 PM
What type of bad did you use?

On another topic, last week I made scalloped potatoes from slices I dehydrated back in September.  I mixed some cheese powder and milk with some dehydrated onions to the potatoes.

I really liked it!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 15, 2011, 09:44:02 PM
Okay, BIG PROBLEM...  I dehydrated some spinach a while back and checked the bag last week... I could tell the spinach was no longer crisply dehydrated- Instead it felt mushy and soft.  So I opened it and it was!  EEEEK!!!!  

Do I have to blanch spinach before I dehydrate it?  Did I not dehydrate it enough?  Need some help here!
~CRCJ

Sometimes food seems dry when you first take it out of the dehydrator, but isn't quite... I had this happen with some carrot dices. They were completely hard to the touch... sounded like lego pieces when dropped on the counter... I thought they were good to go. I sealed them up in a mason jar (using my handy-dandy foodsaver vacuum sealer). Came back about a month later and they were rubbery... inside the sealed jar... I had obviously not gotten them as dry as I thought the first time.

Tammy on Dehydrate2store has recommended letting them cool to room temp in a jar or ziplock bag and watching to see if any condensation forms in the first day or two. You should be able to tell fairly quickly if they were completely dry. If, in that time, you spot condensation, just throw them back into the dehydrator and give them another round of drying...

(sorry to hear about your spinach... aren't you glad we are learning this stuff now, when it isn't crucial?)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on February 16, 2011, 12:04:35 PM


(sorry to hear about your spinach... aren't you glad we are learning this stuff now, when it isn't crucial?)

Absolutely LvsChant!

I always leave my stuff in the dehydrator for several hours to make sure it's good and cooled and then test for dryness.  If not I can easily restart the batch.  Colorado doesn't  a lot of humidity so I don't struggle with that but make sure after your stuff is good and dry to store in sealed containers as ziplocs won't cut it - your stuff will absorb moisture in those over time. Food saver bags or glass jars (air sucked out or 02 absorbers) are the best.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on February 16, 2011, 02:28:14 PM
Sorry to hear about your spinach. You're right...fortunately it wasn't a crucial time period.

We dehydrated (actually my DW dehydrated) a couple of head of cabbage recently...her first run in the Excalibur... ;D

Like the advice below, we let them sit in their jars for a few days and monitored them for signs of condensation.
After making sure there wasn't any, we added o2 absorbers and put them in the pantry.

We generally let the dehydrator run a good bit longer than the listed time.
Like Tammy says...You don't have to worry about "over-dehydrating" your foods.  :)

Let us know how your next run does. I bet it'll be fine.


Tammy on Dehydrate2store has recommended letting them cool to room temp in a jar or ziplock bag and watching to see if any condensation forms in the first day or two. You should be able to tell fairly quickly if they were completely dry. If, in that time, you spot condensation, just throw them back into the dehydrator and give them another round of drying...
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 16, 2011, 03:25:20 PM
PS. No need to blanch spinach before dehydrating...
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: reefmarker on February 16, 2011, 05:10:50 PM
Did we ever hear what kind of bag the spinach was in?  If it was a ziplock, they are not very air tight.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CountryRootsCityJob on February 17, 2011, 10:14:22 AM
Sorry it took so long- I had the spinach in a 5 mil (I believe) mylar bag... I'm fairly certain you guys were right about it not being all the way dehydrated.  I can't think of any other reason for such a problem.  Once again, my friends on the forum rock ;)

~CRCJ

(PS- do any of you know where the thread is on dehydrating red or black beans?  I tried it and they all cracked and I know there is a thread out there that talked about it.  I searched for it and couldn't find it...  PM me if you know what I'm talking about, I don't want to clutter up the forum)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on February 17, 2011, 10:59:17 AM

(PS- do any of you know where the thread is on dehydrating red or black beans?  I tried it and they all cracked and I know there is a thread out there that talked about it.  I searched for it and couldn't find it...  PM me if you know what I'm talking about, I don't want to clutter up the forum)

I think Jack discussed this on Episode 561 Building Your Own Long Term Rations (http://www.thesurvivalpodcast.com/episode-561-building-your-own-long-term-rations).

It was also mentioned in the thread Excalibur Dehydrator Questions (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=22263.msg252517#msg252517).


I don't know if this is what you were looking for, but I hope it helps.

My dehydrated cooked bean crack and crumble, but they taste fine mixed with rice or in a soup.  :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: CountryRootsCityJob on February 17, 2011, 11:26:29 AM
It was also mentioned in the thread Excalibur Dehydrator Questions (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=22263.msg252517#msg252517).

I don't know if this is what you were looking for, but I hope it helps.

My dehydrated cooked bean crack and crumble, but they taste fine mixed with rice or in a soup.  :)

@ Pragmaticprep:

Unfortunately no... I did see that though.  Somewhere is a thread where somebody has a solution to the cracking bean when dehydrating issue.

~CRCJ
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on February 17, 2011, 01:09:15 PM
@ Pragmaticprep:

Unfortunately no... I did see that though.  Somewhere is a thread where somebody has a solution to the cracking bean when dehydrating issue.

~CRCJ

Hopefully someone will post a link to it.
I'd be interested as well.  :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 18, 2011, 08:41:02 AM
I just don't recall seeing that in a topic... so perhaps I missed it. I would be interested as well.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Prag on February 23, 2011, 03:54:10 AM
The DW is moving ahead incredibly well with the dehydrating...I think I may have lost my Excalibur... ;)

She loaded up 9 trays of purple hull peas from the freezer while I was canning ham & bacon last night...They look great!

They'll be going into some jars after we finish our morning cups of coffee.

Team Work is Great!  ;D


btw...there is a slow cooker full of purple hull peas and ham...
add a little cornbread and What a great meal!  :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SoYouWillKnow on February 25, 2011, 10:53:18 AM
I actually vacuum seal in the jars using this:

http://www.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0006-01-Regular-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B0000CFFS6/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1266428058&sr=8-13 (http://www.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0006-01-Regular-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B0000CFFS6/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1266428058&sr=8-13)

You can also get one for widemouth jars. I also have a large canister that allows me to vacuum seal (for dehydrated things and non-perishables) re-using jars from applesauce, pasta sauce, etc. from the store.


Do you have directions for doing this?  I can't seem to find them when I do a search online.

Thanks!
Judy
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on February 26, 2011, 02:12:31 PM
Try this link... the thread has more vacuum sealing info. and a link to a youtube vid showing the method:

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=19892.msg215504#msg215504 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=19892.msg215504#msg215504)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Zuladad on April 09, 2011, 06:41:20 AM
LvsChant - thanks for your good info re boiling/blanching potatoes.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on April 09, 2011, 08:56:03 AM
my pleasure... hope it is helpful!

LC
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on July 07, 2011, 11:04:20 AM
I dried to heads of cabbage last night. sliced up, steamed for two minutes, trip through cool water and towel dried. They look like dead brown grass now. Any ideas what went wrong?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on July 07, 2011, 03:31:24 PM
They're probably fine... did you try reconstituting a bit and tasting?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on July 13, 2011, 01:10:25 PM
http://youtu.be/E552XSAXEdk

Here is a YouTube vid I just posted to help with vacuum sealing jars for those of you who might be interested.

LC
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on July 14, 2011, 06:23:17 PM
http://youtu.be/E552XSAXEdk

Here is a YouTube vid I just posted to help with vacuum sealing jars for those of you who might be interested.

LC

Darling you rock!  +1 from me - nice job!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Sister Wolf on July 14, 2011, 06:51:34 PM
That was awesome. I had no idea you could reuse Classico lids. THANK YOU, LC!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on July 14, 2011, 08:31:09 PM
Thanks... it is funny, though. I used to always direct folks to another vid with a similar demonstration. After the person who had posted it removed it from YT, I tried (without success) to find a good replacement vid. Anyway, I don't have to worry about someone removing this one...

:)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on July 14, 2011, 11:50:40 PM
Nice Job +1!!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: WVMan73 on August 12, 2011, 03:57:25 PM
I just finished reading this whole thread and all I can say is WOW! You all rock! I knew dehydrators were versatile, but really hadn't thought of all the possibilities. I've got so many new ideas just from this one thread that I don't know where to start. lol Not to mention all the links to other threads and other sites with TONS of info... (picture me with my eyes spinning as my brain tries to figure out just what to try first. lol)

+1 Morning Sunshine for starting what has just become my favorite threads on the whole site! I'll keep watching this thread for more ideas, and hopefully posting some of my results too!

Mods, I'm new to the forum so not real sure on how some things work, but I think this would be a great thread to "pin" to the top of the list. It seems like a subject that many are interested in. It definitely has "best of" thread potential too.

WVMan73
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on August 14, 2011, 04:51:09 PM
WVMan73

Thanks for the nice comments. You are right! We should make this topic sticky (I'll make it so). I hope this is useful to you in your prepping.

LvsChant
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on August 14, 2011, 05:02:01 PM
Dehydrated Rocky Ford cantaloupe (from Rocky Ford Colorado - the best grown anywhere). Got a deal at the Farmer's Market so I peeled and seeded 8 of them and then sliced them into 1/2 slices and dried about 20 hours (they were really ripe) and OH YUM!  Great snack food.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cedar on August 14, 2011, 11:17:27 PM
Okra - not sure yet
Broccoli - will add to a cream of soup instant mix; ham and broc crepes w/ hollandaise ; chickem divine
Cauliflower - same as above
Onions - lots uses
Blueberries - for muffins and pancakes, waffles
Chopped mixed peppers and onions, lots of uses.  Trying to figure out a dried salsa recipe
Corn -whole, for casseroles, and corn chowder, adding to cornbread
Corn - Creamed to make a chowder base
Imitation Crabmeat - for making my crab chowder meals I have in my backpack
Lemon Peel - baking/ice cream
Orange Peel - baking/ice cream
Llama jerky - this is pretty much gone too quickly as I can't stay out of it.
Fruit leather - these also dont last a long time due to eating them
Peas - I actually have not used these yet, but I wanted them out of my freezer
Beans - casseroles
Carrots - I use them in my Quinoa one pot meals
Celery - I use it for everything
Mushrooms - Portabella - lots of things
Mushrooms - Golden Chanterelles - Sauces

Cedar



Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: WVMan73 on August 15, 2011, 09:58:16 AM
WVMan73

Thanks for the nice comments. You are right! We should make this topic sticky (I'll make it so). I hope this is useful to you in your prepping.

LvsChant

You're very welcome! This whole thread has really given me a lot of great ideas! And thank you for liking my suggestion to make this topic a sticky.  :) I think it could help a lot of people learn about dehydrating.

WVMan73
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on November 18, 2011, 05:10:30 PM
veggie powder.  this stuff is dead useful.  first - the ingredients:
Vegetable seasoning powder:
(all ingredients measured in grams)
6 celery
3 mushrooms
3 black pepper
2 green sweet peppers
16 tomatoes
1 dry lemon peel
1 rosemary
1 garlic powder
1 oregano
2 onion
1 spinach
1 bok choy

powder in a coffee grinder, and put in a glass jar.


now - for uses:
throw some in sour cream with a bit of salt and you have a veggie or chip dip (without MSGs)
a teaspoon in beef stroganoff, stew, or soup makes a tasty addition

honestly, I just use this whenever I need seasoning for something.

Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: WVMan73 on November 18, 2011, 07:09:51 PM
That is an awesome idea MS! I could see that stuff being really useful in a lot of different dishes that need just a bit more flavor. Thanks for the great idea!

WVMan73
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on November 19, 2011, 01:23:34 AM
honestly, I just throw in whatever dried veggies I have kicking around.  I like to write it down in case it is a particularly good or bad batch.  this recipe just happens to be what I have in my cupboard right now.

and I do it by weight cuz dried food in volume is a tricky thing.  take mushrooms.  those things are weightless!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: upnorth on January 10, 2012, 10:55:17 AM
Something I just tried is dehydrating ginger. I cut it up into thin slices and dehydrate it. I use it for making tea. It's really handy at work where I can't store fresh ginger, but I can keep a zip lock bag with some dried ginger and use that to make tea. It tastes great!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on January 11, 2012, 06:03:40 AM
Good suggestion, upnorth. I'd imagine it would work fine to grind into a powder for uses in recipes, too.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on January 11, 2012, 08:26:29 AM
Ginger is also pretty good at calming nausea.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on January 11, 2012, 08:29:21 AM
Ginger is also pretty good at calming nausea.

yeah... I tried that last pregnancy.  the only thing that happened from it was that ever since if I am cooking with ginger I have to hold my breath until it is in the dish.  The smell of straight raw ginger (powdered, sugared, or raw) triggers the gag reflex.  I haven't gone near it this time around.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cedar on January 11, 2012, 09:41:03 AM
yeah... I tried that last pregnancy.  the only thing that happened from it was that ever since if I am cooking with ginger I have to hold my breath until it is in the dish.  The smell of straight raw ginger (powdered, sugared, or raw) triggers the gag reflex.  I haven't gone near it this time around.

Might be brave and try it again. Every pregnancy is different. First one I had I CRAVED Mango. I hate mango. I dreamed of mango and I couldn't eat enough of it. I am now back to hating mango. During my 2nd pregnancy, I thought mango might be a good idea as I at so much of it during the first one. UGH! I seriously hated mango and it made me gag. During my second pregnancy (StayPuft) I ate eggplant (which I hate) and edamame (which I cannot eat to this day) like they were going out of style. I had three times the level of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) while I was pregnant both times due to twins and that hormone is also what makes you sick. If it had not been for ginger I would have been throwing up all day long for months my doctor said. I didn't throw up but once. Maybe you could even make real ginger ale.

1 cup sugar
1 cup water
peeled and chopped fresh ginger

Boil 10 minutes (or slightly less), remove and toss the ginger, pour into a warm pint jar. When ready to use, put 1 tsp=1 tbsp of syrup into a 8 oz glass of club soda. It is way better than anything you can buy in the store.

Cedar
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cool Blue on January 11, 2012, 02:11:12 PM
When my wife was pregnant I had not trouble eating anything lol
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: upnorth on January 12, 2012, 07:31:21 AM
Great idea LvsChant. I'm going to try that!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: chickchoc on January 25, 2012, 07:58:09 PM
When I dehydrated apples this fall, I also dried the peels then ground them up.  They make a really nice apple tea (no caffeine) and are good to add flavor to dessert stuff. 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on January 27, 2012, 10:24:02 PM
Great idea Chick - I never thought of this.  I usually give the peels to my chickens as they love apples. It's lucky for us that we have apple trees and they get the trashed apples and peels and cores from any canning or dehydrating process.  I don't feel wasteful in any way if I can supplement them with good stuff but I may have to keep some for me and try this and since it sounds delicious.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TxGal on March 12, 2012, 04:19:24 AM
I'm still learning what does and doesn't work in dehydrating; also learning how to prepare the dehydrated food. I've dehydrated all kinds of things:

apples--lots of them! apple pie, but I snack on them sometimes
beef jerky
blueberries, from fresh and also from frozen
bread crumbs
broccoli--tried it with frozen and also blanched fresh--but we didn't like this (tough and also very strong smell) yuk!
carrots, celery (soups/stews)
canned fruit (peaches and pineapple)--just an experiment--it's turns out like a fruit rollup, didn't make it to food storage--eaten immediately
cantaloupe--fun summer snack! sweet and chewy, but it's sticky (I rolled in wax paper) didn't make it to food storage--eaten immediately!! YUMMY!
cauliflower
citrus (lemon and orange) lemon for lemonade!
purchased dried fruit like raisins and craisins, then RE-dried them in dehydrator to make them not sticky and is supposed to extend the life
frozen veggies--corn, mixed veggies, carrots, lima beans, okra, green peas, green beans, shredded potatoes
garlic-the elephant variety is preferred
hash browns (frozen, then dehydrated)
herbs-parsley, basil, cilantro, bay leaves
kale--this is very light and crispy, can be eaten as kale chips or added to soups
ginger
greens--like collard (can be added to soups)
mushrooms-favorite!!!!
leeks, onions, green onions
peaches-peach cobbler
peppers-diced--all kinds
pineapple-fun snack, but didn't make it to food storage! roll in wax paper to separate
potatoes-cook them whole, chill, next day --peel and shred them before dehydrating
rice
spaghetti sauce rollups (without meat)! Also great for left over tomato paste
strawberries, prefer drying fresh ones over frozen--didn't like the quality of the frozen ones because they were not ripe and ended up very tart when dried
sweet potatoes
tomatoes, sliced
watermelon--same as cantaloupe above!
zucchini

On my to try list:
I plan to make some recipes from this site:
http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-food.html
Love the bark idea using beans! I also want to try ham, but plan to keep it in the freezer/fridge--just want to extend the life of it
On this site he says to add bread crumbs to ground beef and it will rehydrate more tender--plan to try that
He also says pressure cooked meat dehydrated will rehydrate more tender

I read in a VERY old book that cottage cheese could be dried; would like to try it.

   

Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cedar on March 12, 2012, 09:08:50 AM
Last night, I had quinoa with dried carrots, dried onion, dried Golden Chanterelle wild mushrooms in it with a dash of chicken boullion and it was delicious.

Cedar
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: idelphic on March 12, 2012, 10:36:40 AM
I'm still learning what does and doesn't work in dehydrating; also learning how to prepare the dehydrated food. I've dehydrated all kinds of things:

<...>

On my to try list:
I plan to make some recipes from this site:
http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-food.html
Love the bark idea using beans! I also want to try ham, but plan to keep it in the freezer/fridge--just want to extend the life of it
On this site he says to add bread crumbs to ground beef and it will rehydrate more tender--plan to try that
He also says pressure cooked meat dehydrated will rehydrate more tender

I read in a VERY old book that cottage cheese could be dried; would like to try it.

   

Very nice list,.. Will have to expand my goals a bit.

Curious about the book - is it a book on Dehydrating or another topic that just had a section on it.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TxGal on March 12, 2012, 11:18:28 AM
Very nice list,.. Will have to expand my goals a bit.

Curious about the book - is it a book on Dehydrating or another topic that just had a section on it.


the booklet promotes dehydrating as a simple, convenient, wholesome, flavor preserver, space saver. It says that "to dry food products is to save them for food. It is therefore patriotic as well as good business".

The booklet is called Home Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, compiled and edited by Edgar Cooley of the Agricultural Extension Department--pub 1918

"The process of home drying described in this bulletin was developed by H. S. Mobley of the Agricultural Extension Department, International Harvester Company of N. J. (Inc.), and has been used and demonstrated by him during the past 15 years."

To dry: Cottage cheese—Cover the bottom of the rack with cheese cloth; spread the cottage cheese on the cloth to the depth 1/4 inch; dry for about four hours, or until the cheese becomes yellowish and grainy.

To restore:
Cottage cheese—Cover flat pan 1/4 inch deep with product and barely cover with water. Let it stand two hours. Do not use milk to restore it as it is only the water that has been evaporated.

The standard method of storage for the dried items was a paraffin coated paper bag--except for dried eggs, cream, meat, and watermelon which they say should be stored in glass.



Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on March 12, 2012, 11:28:09 AM
+1 TxGal  That was an inspiring list. I've had similar results with my dehydrating experiences. (We also didn't like broccoli dehydrated -- although I was wondering if I could grind it up and use it as a cream of broccoli soup or something of the sort... future experiment).
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on March 12, 2012, 11:30:05 AM
+1 TxGal  That was an inspiring list. I've had similar results with my dehydrating experiences. (We also didn't like broccoli dehydrated -- although I was wondering if I could grind it up and use it as a cream of broccoli soup or something of the sort... future experiment).

yeah, our broccoli was yucky too.  and I thought about broccoli soup, but I was so disappointed with the dried broccoli that I jsut don't want to deal with it again.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on March 12, 2012, 11:49:54 AM
although I was wondering if I could grind it up and use it as a cream of broccoli soup or something of the sort... future experiment).

We tried the soup thing with the broccoli and we didn't like it. The broccoli had a VERY strong flavor that came through extremely bad in the soup. It was not the normal soft tones that we get with the same recipe and fresh broccoli. Hope yours turns out better than mine.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: zackandjen2004 on March 12, 2012, 11:59:36 AM
I dried eggplant thinking that I could use it as a substitute for no-boil lasagna noodles.  Wrong.   YUCK. VERY thinly sliced and seasoned eggplant turned out ok as a "chip."  Kale and spinach and SHREDDED zucchini are great.  I de-bitter my zucchini by shredding, salting, rinsing, and then squeezing/wringing.  Then dry.

  My favorite dehydrated veg is tomato slices: I take cull heirloom tomatoes, slice them very thinly and dry till crisp.  I get $2/oz for them at the farmer's market.  You can eat them like chips, crush them into salads or toss into something that needs a little red color.  I DO leave the skin on, and that is a factor in cooked foods sometimes.  They MUST be stored in glass with a very robust O2 absorber and perhaps some dessicant.  That would keep 'em crisp.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: idelphic on March 12, 2012, 05:37:53 PM

the booklet promotes dehydrating as a simple, convenient, wholesome, flavor preserver, space saver. It says that "to dry food products is to save them for food. It is therefore patriotic as well as good business".

The booklet is called Home Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, compiled and edited by Edgar Cooley of the Agricultural Extension Department--pub 1918

"The process of home drying described in this bulletin was developed by H. S. Mobley of the Agricultural Extension Department, International Harvester Company of N. J. (Inc.), and has been used and demonstrated by him during the past 15 years."

To dry: Cottage cheese—Cover the bottom of the rack with cheese cloth; spread the cottage cheese on the cloth to the depth 1/4 inch; dry for about four hours, or until the cheese becomes yellowish and grainy.

To restore:
Cottage cheese—Cover flat pan 1/4 inch deep with product and barely cover with water. Let it stand two hours. Do not use milk to restore it as it is only the water that has been evaporated.

The standard method of storage for the dried items was a paraffin coated paper bag--except for dried eggs, cream, meat, and watermelon which they say should be stored in glass.

Amazing what you can find on the InterzNet..

http://ia700209.us.archive.org/1/items/homedryingoffrui00cool/homedryingoffrui00cool.pdf (http://ia700209.us.archive.org/1/items/homedryingoffrui00cool/homedryingoffrui00cool.pdf)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: chickchoc on March 12, 2012, 05:43:08 PM
I'm gluten sensitive, so I've been very glad to dehydrate my own food and combine fugality with health.  Here are some recipes I found.  I especially liked the "hamburger rocks".  Enjoy!

Apple Pie
3 1/2 C. dried apples
2 C. water
3/4 C. sugar
1 t. cinnamon
Cook apples until tender. The apples will rehydrate during the cooking and baking process. Add sugar and cinnamon. Fill and top with pie crust and bake 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
Cherry Pie
3 C. dried cherries
3 C. boiling water
2 Tbs tapioca
1 C. sugar
Cover cherries with water and let soak for 30 minutes. Simmer and add sugar and tapioca. Pour into pie crust and add top crust. Bake at 400 degrees for about 35 minutes.
Peach Pie
3 C. dried peaches
3 C. boiling water
3 tbs tapioca
1 C. sugar
2 t. cinnamon
1/4 t. nutmeg

Cover fruit with water and let soak for 30 minutes. Simmer and add sugar, spices and tapioca to thicken. Pour into pie crust, dot with butter, and cover with pie top. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes.

Creamed Corn
1 C. dried corn
4 C. boiling water
2 t. sugar
1/2 C. milk
1 T. margarine
salt and pepper to taste
Add corn to water and let stand for 30 minutes. Simmer corn until tender. This may take as long as an hour or so. Drain and add remaining ingredients. Simmer for an additional 5 minutes, stirring frequently to avoid prevent scorching.

Cooked Fruit
3 C. dried fruit of your choice
2 C. boiling water
1 t. cinnamon
Sugar to taste
 
Let fruit soak in the boiled water for 20 minutes. Simmer for another 20 minutes and add cinnamon and sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved and serve.

Vegetable Soup
1 C. diced cooked meat
3 C. dried mixed vegetables
salt and pepper
Cover dried vegetables with boiling water and soak 1 hour, then simmer for 2 hours or until tender. Remember you can add fresh vegetables, in case you don't have a particular dried one, to the pot as well.
Instant Jam
3/4 dried fruit - use a single fruit or combination like bananas and strawberries
3/4 to 1 cup fruit juice or water, heated to boiling
1/4 cup honey or other sweetener, if needed
Cover the fruit with warmed juice and let sit overnight, if possible. Put this in a blender, and add your sweetener. Puree until spreadable. This is delicious.
Dried Fruit Stew
1 cup dried fruit (I like to use a combination of fruits like apples, pears, peaches, raisins, cherries
1 cup boiling water
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 to 1 teaspoon spices to taste. Try: cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, ginger.
Combine all and let set until it softens. For a dessert, sweeten with honey and serve with shortbread cookies. For breakfast, stir in a little yogurt and honey.
?
Dried Veggie Seasoning
Powder dried vegetables in the blender in any combination you like. Add to boiling water for instant vegetable broth, or put in a shaker and use at the table as a seasoning for vegetables, pasta, and rice.

Banana Bread made in a dehydrator
1/2 cup cashew or almond butter
3/4 cup agave nectar or date paste (dates blended up to form a paste)
1/2 cup raisins
1 tsp. fine celtic sea salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. vanilla extract or vanilla bean
1/2 cup walnuts (soaked for 7 hrs. and blended up in a blender to form a cream)
1 1/2 cup almond flour (just powdered almonds)
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Blend all the ingredients together (except the chopped nuts), and put into a loaf pan lined with wax or parchment paper. Top the batter with the chopped nuts and place in the dehydrator for 6-12 hrs. Enjoy warm right out of the dehydrator!
Banana Macadamia Nut Fudge Cookies (no cook)
1 cup raisins
1 cup walnuts
1 cup macadamia nuts (chopped into big pieces)
1 cup bananas (chopped up)
In food processor blend raisins and walnuts until smooth. Add in macadamia nuts and bananas. Dehydrate for 8 to 10 hours.
Classic Gorp
1/2 c. dried apples
1/2 c. dried apricots
1/4 c. dried peaches
1/2 c. dried pears
1/2 c. dried pineapple
1/4 c. coconut flakes
1/2 c. golden raisins
1/2 c. cashews or blanched almonds
Cut apples, apricots, peaches, pears and pineapple into 1/2" pieces. Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl. Package in airtight plastic bags and store in a cool dry place. Use within 3 to 4 weeks. Makes about 3-1/2 cups.
Tangy Sunflower Seeds
2 T. vegetable oil
1 T. soy sauce
1/4 tsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. celery salt
Dash cayenne pepper
2 cups dried shelled sunflower seeds, raw
Preheat oven to 300 F. In a medium bowl, mix oil, soy sauce, paprika, celery salt and cayenne pepper. Add sunflower seeds. Stir until seeds are evenly coated. Place mixture in a shallow baking pan. Bake in preheated oven 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Drain on paper towels. Makes 2 cups.
Peanut Butter Bites
2 cups coconut
2 cups dried apples, peeled, cored and chopped
2/3 cup peanut butter
1 1/2 tablespoons vanilla
In a large bowl, combine all ingredients; mix well.
Shape into 1/2-1" balls.
Dry at 135º for 4 to 5 hours, or until firm and crisp on the outside.
Hangdog Oatmeal
•   2 1/2 cups oatmeal
•   2 Tbsp brown sugar
•   1/2 cup dried bananas, powdered
•   3/4 cup chocolate chips
At home: Mix ingredients into zip lock bag.
On the trail: Boil 4 cups of water into separate pan. Stir in contents of zip lock bag and reboil. Remove from stove and set aside until cool.
Makes 1 serving Recipe courtesy of Backpacker Magazine; April 1996; Pg 45
Cranberry Orange Rice
•   1/4 cup instant rice
•   1 Tbsp dried cranberries
•   1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
•   1 packet True Orange
•   1 Tbsp powdered milk
•   1 tsp brown sugar
Note: True Orange is also available at www.truelemon.com or some grocery stores. You can also substitute 1 teaspoon citrus juice or zest per packet.
Cherry Almond Oatmeal
•   1 packet instant oatmeal
•   2 Tbsp dried cherries
•   1 Tbsp slivered almonds
•   1 Tbsp powdered milk
•   1 tsp brown sugar
At home: Combine everything in a freezer zip lock bag.
On the trail: Add 2/3 cup boiling water to oatmeal (or more if you like a thinner cereal).
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders
Chocolate Banana Oatmeal
•   1/3 cup instant oatmeal
•   1 tsp unsweetened cocoa powder
•   2 Tbsp powdered milk
•   2 tsp brown sugar
•   1/4 cup freeze-dried bananas  (finely crumbled dehydrated works, too)
•   Chocolate cookies, crumbled (optional)
At home: Combine everything except the cookies into a zip lock bag. If you are bringing the cookies, package them separately.
On the trail: Bring 1 cup of water to a boil, add the oatmeal mix and stir. Simmer until the oatmeal is cooked through. Serve topped with the cookies.
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders
Bacon Polenta
•   1/2 cup instant polenta
•   2 Tbsp shelf-stable bacon
•   1/2 Tbsp dried onions or dried onion flakes
•   2 tsp butter powder
•   1 tsp chicken or vegetable broth powder
•   1/4 tsp paprika
•   2 packets Parmesan cheese
At home: Combine everything, except the Parmesan, into a quart size freezer zip lock bag.
On the trail: Bring 1 1/2 cups of water to a boil. Add the polenta and simmer until cooked and creamy. Top with the Parmesan cheese.
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders

Emergency Essentials Recipes using dehydrated /freezedried products http://beprepared.com/recipes.asp_Q_ai_E_1_A_c2r_E_tn_A_name_E_Recipes

 
Jars of canned butter & hamburger rocks.
"Hamburger Rocks" are small chunks of cooked, dehydrated, fresh beef. They will store effectively for two or more years. Once rehydrated by soaking one cup of rocks in two cups of boiled water, the pre-cooked meat can be used in any recipe. It is delicious for tacos, spaghetti sauce, hamburger helper, tamale pie, lasagna, or your favorite recipe. It is very difficult to distinguish from fresh hamburger in a meal!
RECIPE FOR HAMBURGER ROCKS
1. Using a large skillet (cast iron is great), brown and fry 5 pounds of ground beef. When thoroughly cooked, transfer the meat to a colander. Rinse under hot running water to remove the fat. Then clean the skillet with paper towels to remove excess fat from the first cooking.
2. Place the washed meat back into the wiped skillet and fry it again over medium/low heat, stirring often until you see no more steam. Keep the heat/flame low once the rocks are browning up nicely.
3. Place the "twice cooked" rocks into an oven roasting pan. Turn the oven to 200 degrees F, stirring and turning occasionally as the meat continues to dry. One to two hours should finish the job. Remove from the oven and check for dryness. When cool, pack into zip lock bags or mason jars. Pack tightly, expelling as much air as possible. Store in pantry drawers or shelves.
4. To "can" the hamburger rocks for long term storage, preheat canning jars in the over at 250 F, simmer the lids as usual, put the "rocks" into the jars while still hot, then seal the jars. After 15 minutes or so the jars will cool and you will hear the jar lids "pop" as they seal in place.
 
Carrot Pecan Burgers
•   4 Carrots
•   1.5 C Pecans (or another nut or mix in some seeds also)
•   1/2 C shredded zucchini (dried off a bit in paper towel or a towel)
•   2 Tbsp cilantro (fresh)
•   2 green onions (more if you like)
•   1.5 Tbsp olive oil
•   1/2 tsp curry powder
•   1/2 tsp salt
•   1/4 tsp pepper
Blend carrots first.
Add rest of ingredients and blend.
Form into burger patties. Note that the larger you make them, the longer they take to dehydrate. Place the patties on dehydrator trays.  If necessary, use parchment paper on trays to keep mix from dropping through.
Dehydrate about 7-8 hours, take them off trays, turn them over and put on mesh sheet. Dehydrate them until you like the consistency.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TxGal on March 12, 2012, 07:18:03 PM
Amazing what you can find on the InterzNet..

http://ia700209.us.archive.org/1/items/homedryingoffrui00cool/homedryingoffrui00cool.pdf (http://ia700209.us.archive.org/1/items/homedryingoffrui00cool/homedryingoffrui00cool.pdf)

Yes! That's it! I knew it was archive.org, but didn't have the link handy.
There are lots of interesting finds there!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on March 13, 2012, 06:18:29 AM
great post chickchoc. Thanks for sharing! +1
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: PorcupineKate on August 26, 2012, 04:51:32 PM
This is my first year dehydrating.

I have done blueberries.  I just washed them and put them in the dehydrator.  I didn't blanch or cut them.
Apple slices with cinnamon are becoming one of my favorites.
Cherries.  Washed and pitted.  We like them better than fresh cherries.  These are my husband's favorite.
Strawberries.  I used a mushroom slicer to cut them. 

My husband mixes these fruits with various nuts and eats it for breakfast.

I am drying a batch of mushrooms right now.  They are so easy to use dried.
I also did a batch of bell peppers. 
Celery is next on the list to make along with more apple slices.

 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on August 26, 2012, 05:10:28 PM
I tried watermelon.  it was nasty.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Shadowrider on September 03, 2012, 06:09:06 PM
If this has been covered in a topic, I can't find it. What is everyone using to powder their dehydrated product? DH uses his Ultimate Chopper and it works, but powder is all over the machine and the counter when he's done. My old Oster food processor chopper is larger, but there's powder everywhere again. Mom uses her Magic Bullet and says she also has powder all over the counter. We have an old Oster blender, but I don't think it is powerful enough to powder, although we haven't tried it yet. Tammy at dehydrate2store.com uses a blender that I think is a Vita Mix, but wow, they are expensive.

In spite of it all, we have powdered blueberries to add to ice cream, powdered butternut squash for pumpkin pie and pumpkin pancakes. Powdered ginger and garlic in the spice cabinet. In the dehydrator now is peach puree that I'm hoping will get crisp enough to powder. Yum!!!

At 1/2 cup of powdered butternut squash/pumpkin for a pumpkin pie, you can get a lot of pies stored in one quart jar. Pretty amazing.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Cedar on September 03, 2012, 07:22:41 PM
If this has been covered in a topic, I can't find it. What is everyone using to powder their dehydrated product?

My Cuisinart food processor.

Cedar
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Frugal Upstate on September 04, 2012, 05:34:13 AM
DH uses his Ultimate Chopper and it works, but powder is all over the machine and the counter when he's done. My old Oster food processor chopper is larger, but there's powder everywhere again. Mom uses her Magic Bullet and says she also has powder all over the counter. We have an old Oster blender, but I don't think it is powerful enough to powder, although we haven't tried it yet. Tammy at dehydrate2store.com uses a blender that I think is a Vita Mix, but wow, they are expensive.

I have not yet started powdering my dehydrated food, although it is on the list!  But I had a similar problem withaking my powdered laundry soap in my food processor-the very fine powder seemed to leak out no matter what. So I started taking a kitchen towel, wetting it down and then wringing it out well and then drappimg it over the machine before I started it.  The combo of cloth and slight damp ess seem to catch the really fine particles.  Then I just give it a bit before I remove the cloth & open the food processor for everything inside to settle back down.  Maybe this technique would work for your powders?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on September 04, 2012, 07:08:08 AM
for big amounts, I use my vitamix.  for small amounts, my coffee grinder; I have 2 actually.  One for sweet foods (fruits, berries, etc) and one for savory (veggies, spices).
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on September 04, 2012, 08:13:50 AM
I powdered tomatoes with my blender and didn't have much problem with mess and powder everywhere... (you did put the lid on, right? hehe)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Shadowrider on September 04, 2012, 09:21:05 AM
Thanks to the TSP Brain Trust, problem solved!

I have not yet started powdering my dehydrated food, although it is on the list!  But I had a similar problem withaking my powdered laundry soap in my food processor-the very fine powder seemed to leak out no matter what. So I started taking a kitchen towel, wetting it down and then wringing it out well and then drappimg it over the machine before I started it.  The combo of cloth and slight damp ess seem to catch the really fine particles.  Then I just give it a bit before I remove the cloth & open the food processor for everything inside to settle back down.  Maybe this technique would work for your powders?


My Cuisinart food processor.

Cedar

I dug out my Oster food processor and wrapped a damp towel around it. That worked great! The powder was the same consistency as the Ultimate Chopper and the dust was more contained. The damp towel idea is genius! I'll let Mom know so she can wrap her Magic Bullet.

I powdered tomatoes with my blender and didn't have much problem with mess and powder everywhere... (you did put the lid on, right? hehe)

Even though I was POSITIVE my blender wouldn't do the job, I dug it out next and tried it. When I put the lid on :D all the dust was contained and the powder is extra fine. The winner, hands down!

for big amounts, I use my vitamix.  for small amounts, my coffee grinder; I have 2 actually.  One for sweet foods (fruits, berries, etc) and one for savory (veggies, spices).

We thought about using the coffee grinder, but wanted to do larger amounts. I can see getting an extra one to do herbs though, so I like that idea.

+1 and thanks to Cedar, FrugalUpstate, Morning Sunshine & LvsChant who all replied with the great ideas I knew you would have.

Shadowrider

Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Frugal Upstate on September 04, 2012, 10:05:01 AM
So glad to have helped!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Shadowrider on November 13, 2012, 12:05:00 PM
Since I learned to powder my dehydrated foods (thanks again, everyone) I've been drying more and more. I chopped fresh ginger root and powdered it after dehydrating. It is far superior (of course) to what is in the little bottles at the grocery store. I've powdered chives, the tops of green onions. And I have small garlic that comes up every year but is too small to fuss with peeling, so decided I'll pull them up as young garlic (like scallions) and dehydrate them for powder. We've also started making our own spice mixes for different uses, using home made powders and adding store bought when necessary.

My husband loves persimmon cookies and in past years I've bought all I can find in the fall and made several batches of cookies for the freezer. This year I have 1 cup of persimmon pulp in the dehydrator. I'll measure it when it is powdered and know how much I need for a batch of cookies. Hopefully it won't be too sticky to powder. I have other persimmons ripening on the windowsill for dehydrating soon.

The stickier fruits are difficult to powder and tend to clump. Peaches were the stickiest. But I was able to use peach powder in homemade ice cream. WOW! Was that ever a hit! I probably won't try to powder peaches again though.

My mother discovered tomato powder and has decided it is a perfect fast food. She boils some water, adds tomato powder and has a lovely hot bowl of tomato soup in minutes. Along the same line, she has been powdering greens and using them to add to soups and as a seasoning on baked chicken. I haven't tried that myself yet, but she loves it. Powdered celery is another one I want to use for seasoning.

My dehydrator is going now with butternut squash (pumpkin pie!), persimmon and dog biscuits. Not all on one tray of course. ;)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Frugal Upstate on November 17, 2012, 09:40:43 AM
Ok, dehydrated baked pumpkin that I pureed--now I'm trying to powder it in my food processor.  I'm getting powder on the bottom and small flakes (about the size fish food maybe? but a tad bit thicker)--and the flakes don't seem to be powdering with more time.  What am I doing wrong? Should I just say heck with it and use the powder/flakes together? 

I know on Dehydrate2Store she said 1/2 C powder to 2 cup Water made 2 C puree--I'm wondering if I keep it as flakes if that will change the proportion as a 1/2 C flakes wouldn't be as dense as 1/2 C  powder...
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Bennington1776 on November 17, 2012, 10:57:14 AM
I am a dehydrating NOOB.

So far I have made Beef Jerky, Pinapple Chunks and Pineapple Slices.  None have made it into my short or long term storage.  Most have made their way into my belly.  ;) Happy Belly.

Just started anoth batch of pineappple slices.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Shadowrider on November 17, 2012, 03:12:30 PM
Ok, dehydrated baked pumpkin that I pureed--now I'm trying to powder it in my food processor.  I'm getting powder on the bottom and small flakes (about the size fish food maybe? but a tad bit thicker)--and the flakes don't seem to be powdering with more time.  What am I doing wrong? Should I just say heck with it and use the powder/flakes together? 

I know on Dehydrate2Store she said 1/2 C powder to 2 cup Water made 2 C puree--I'm wondering if I keep it as flakes if that will change the proportion as a 1/2 C flakes wouldn't be as dense as 1/2 C  powder...

Frugal Upstate, I don't see a problem with the small flakes. I've had that happen too. Since you started with a puree, the flakes will dissolve when you add the water to rehydrate. At least that's been my experience. And I've just measured out to the 1/2 cup line and haven't felt like I needed more to make up for the flakes.

Also, if for some reason you do find they are staying as flakes, you can always run your pumpkin pie mix through the blender like Tammy does on Dehydrate2Store. I found that made the pie too creamy for our taste, but still definitely yummy.

Hope that helps!  :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Frugal Upstate on November 17, 2012, 08:23:48 PM
Thanks Shadowrider!  I experimented with rehydrating 1 TBS of the powder/flakes to 4 TBS of hot water and it seemed to come out the right consistency :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on November 18, 2012, 06:00:57 AM
when I try to rehydrate pumpkin, it is mostly smooth with those larger bits never really coming smooth.  maybe I am dehydrating it too long, and it is too hard to grind up?  cuz my larger bits are NOT flakes, but hard balls about the size of mustard seeds, and when they rehydrate, they get soft, but not smooth.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Shadowrider on November 18, 2012, 06:59:40 AM
Thanks Shadowrider!  I experimented with rehydrating 1 TBS of the powder/flakes to 4 TBS of hot water and it seemed to come out the right consistency :)

Hooray for your success! Now you can make pumpkin pancakes (YUM!) as well as pumpkin pie!

when I try to rehydrate pumpkin, it is mostly smooth with those larger bits never really coming smooth.  maybe I am dehydrating it too long, and it is too hard to grind up?  cuz my larger bits are NOT flakes, but hard balls about the size of mustard seeds, and when they rehydrate, they get soft, but not smooth.

Morning Sunshine, I don't know what the larger bits are. I dry my pumpkin until it is crispy. I have also forgotten about it and let it go longer in the dehydrator, but even though it is to the harder stage, it still powders up, with just a few flakes.

Is it possible that the bits were uncooked? I know the last butternut squash I cooked in my pressure canner did not cook through the center (my mistake, I put the 15 pound weight on so figured to cook it less time -- NO!) I did take the uncooked portions and put them in my steamer for a few minutes before spreading the puree on the Paraflexx sheets in the dehydrator.

Did you try pureeing the rehydrated pumpkin before putting it in your crust?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: nelson96 on November 23, 2012, 10:16:01 PM
when you did hashbrowns, how did you do them?  (I ask because different parts of the country seem to call hashbrowns different things.)  I boil my whole russet potatoes, peel them while hot, cool in the fridge, shred with a hand cheese grater, and dry.  I did about 100 pounds last year.
I put about 2 cups of dry shredded pots in a 6-c bowl, pour on some water, about 4 cups, maybe, not hot, not cold, just whatever comes out of my faucet right then.  I let it sit about 20-30 minutes.  When ready to cook, I melt 2 T bacon grease and 2 T butter and add salt (I like salt, so I add lots of it) and fry the potatoes until tasty brown.  works every time.  And I need to do about 200 pounds this year!! :o  (we ran out about May)

This is something I am very interested in.  I've bought them before (they come in a waxed carton).  They are so convenient to cook with, especially camping.  Just rehydrate with hot tap water like you explained, drain off the excess water, and fry.

I don't see the point in dehydrating cubed or sliced potatoes because they are so easy to prepare fresh, but making fresh hashbrowns (grated potatoes) has always been an issue for me.  They never seem to come out nice and dry after you cook them.  Mine always are fried crispy on each side and mushy in the middle.  I want to make them like you get in a restaurant.  I'm figuring dehydrated could be the answer.

Could you do me the favor of detailing exactly how you do it and explaining how they look when your done (pic's would be great). 

Some of the questions I have:
Did they stay nice and white?  How thin do you spread them out on the tray?  Do any of them stick together when they're done?  How long does it take?  Is there a temperature I need to try and maintain?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: cheryl1 on November 24, 2012, 07:44:06 AM
Dried morel mushrooms-crumble them up and cook into soup. MMmmmmmmm :)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: enl126rtg on November 25, 2012, 11:03:22 AM
Hello, I am new here and have been trying my hand at dehydrating foods. I have looked thru but have not seen anything on dehydrating eggs! Can anyone help me out on that one? I have plenty and would like to be able to dry them, powder them and vacuum seal them! Any one have experience in that one?

Thanks so much!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on November 27, 2012, 11:48:18 AM
enl126rtg:

Check out this thread on dehydrating eggs: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=6046.msg163055#msg163055

Here's another: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=87.msg223084#msg223084

Dehydrating eggs isn't something I've done, but I have read about others' results in the above threads...

Good luck.

LC
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: rikkrack on November 27, 2012, 12:53:25 PM
Recently steamed and diced shrimp, then dehydrated. Put into freezer and took up way less space. Used in gumbo. 

Also most of our medicinal herbs.

Put dehydrator outside in garage and dehydrated fish heads and parts after harvesting fillets. Then ground up in blender from goodwill. (wife said I can't use good kitchen stuff for experimenting). Fed it to fish and chickens.

Stevia, was nice to make up stevia sweetener in winter when all fresh plants have died due to winter.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Frugal Upstate on December 01, 2012, 04:17:23 PM
If anyone is interested in seeing the photos, I did a tutorial on my blog for dehydrating the pumpkin:

DIY: How to Dehydrate Pumpkin (http://www.frugalupstate.com/crafts-diy/diy-how-to-dehydrate-pumpkin/)

I showed what my "powder" came out looking like and I took a picture of some rehydrated.

Right this very minute I'm experimenting with dehydrating store bought canned peaches.  I've been posting pictures and having some interesting conversation with folks about it over on Facebook. 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: rikkrack on December 01, 2012, 06:00:33 PM
Dehydrated sweetpotatoes left over from Thanksgiving  we never used. Making sweetpotato chips
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TexasGirl on December 01, 2012, 07:28:36 PM
If anyone is interested in seeing the photos, I did a tutorial on my blog for dehydrating the pumpkin:

DIY: How to Dehydrate Pumpkin (http://www.frugalupstate.com/crafts-diy/diy-how-to-dehydrate-pumpkin/)

I showed what my "powder" came out looking like and I took a picture of some rehydrated.

Right this very minute I'm experimenting with dehydrating store bought canned peaches.  I've been posting pictures and having some interesting conversation with folks about it over on Facebook.

Awesome!  Thanks for sharing this Jenn.

~TG
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on February 07, 2013, 05:16:30 PM
I just dried some purple savoy cabbage.  I will probably just use it in my veggie powder, but it is such a pretty color.  It is mixed purple and green, it looks kind of like a lavender plant.

dried produce is so pretty.  Call me a girl, but I like pretty.  I choose functional over pretty, but when functional is also pretty, I get happy.  One of my favorite is to mix dried red, orange and yellow sweet peppers in a glass jar.  it looks like flames.  pretty.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Shadowrider on February 07, 2013, 05:20:59 PM
One of my favorite is to mix dried red, orange and yellow sweet peppers in a glass jar.  it looks like flames.  pretty.

We like to mix red and green jalapeno slices when we pickle them in a jar. My husband will even layers them. Perfect beauty for Christmas gifts! This isn't dehydrated, but it is pretty.  ;)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on February 07, 2013, 10:04:21 PM
Dehydrated some celery and tossed it into some chicken soup I made. It didn't rehydrate at all. Still very hard and chewy. No idea why, as it was in the simmering liquid for over an hour.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Hootie on February 07, 2013, 10:56:10 PM
Dehydrated some celery and tossed it into some chicken soup I made. It didn't rehydrate at all. Still very hard and chewy. No idea why, as it was in the simmering liquid for over an hour.

celery usually works very time when I put it in for a soup, but i usually do a crock pot thing for 5 hours or longer.
maybe you just need to let it rehydrate longer. Let us know if you find a source to confirm why.
http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=17544.msg209861#msg209861 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=17544.msg209861#msg209861)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: rikkrack on February 08, 2013, 06:09:10 AM
I have found it takes almost 1/2 the time to rehydrate. So if it originally took 8 hrs to dehydrate I usually let it set for 4 hrs.

So if making say veggie soup let set in the tomato juice or broth in the morning, then all you do is heat up when get home. All the veggies will soak up not only water but flavoring as well.

I do this with beans as well. I usually soak dry beans over night and crock pot next day. So I will add garlic, salt, pepper, and seasonings to the soaking water. Makes the beans have more flavor.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Downeastwaves on February 28, 2013, 07:52:22 PM
Awesome!  Thanks for sharing this Jenn.

~TG

TG, How long should that pumpkin last? I'm mean if you do not eat it first <G> I have 2 pumpkins in the freezer that I made into pulp by baking and pealing and then cooking down a bit. Hubby keeps asking me what they are, they are always in the way of the ice cream <G> Just wondering if I was to dehydrate them how long would they be good for? DEW
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Frugal Upstate on March 01, 2013, 07:13:03 AM
TG, How long should that pumpkin last? I'm mean if you do not eat it first <G> I have 2 pumpkins in the freezer that I made into pulp by baking and pealing and then cooking down a bit. Hubby keeps asking me what they are, they are always in the way of the ice cream <G> Just wondering if I was to dehydrate them how long would they be good for? DEW

How long the pumpkin should last would depend in part on how you packaged it.  Typical sources say that dehydrated foods last a year (that would probably be in a jar in your cupboard, maybe with a desiccant thrown in), however if you keep it free of air, light and moisture--say toss a desiccant in, an 02 absorber and then seal it in Mylar I'd be pretty confident in it for at least, oh, 3 or 4 years.  USA Emergency Supply (https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/storage_life_of_foods.htm#link9) has info on how long dehydrated foods store.  I believe they are referring to commercially prepared, but they state that correctly sealed & stored veggies can last 8-10 years and fruit 5 yrs. 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Downeastwaves on March 01, 2013, 09:24:41 AM
How long the pumpkin should last would depend in part on how you packaged it.  Typical sources say that dehydrated foods last a year (that would probably be in a jar in your cupboard, maybe with a desiccant thrown in), however if you keep it free of air, light and moisture--say toss a desiccant in, an 02 absorber and then seal it in Mylar I'd be pretty confident in it for at least, oh, 3 or 4 years.  USA Emergency Supply (https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/storage_life_of_foods.htm#link9) has info on how long dehydrated foods store.  I believe they are referring to commercially prepared, but they state that correctly sealed & stored veggies can last 8-10 years and fruit 5 yrs.

TG, Thanks! I appreciate the answer and the link.
DEW
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Panhead Bill on March 03, 2013, 08:35:54 PM
I'm new to dehydrating - the wife got me a dehydrator for Valentines day, but have t had a chance to use it yet. I've got a bunch of lemons ripe on the trees on our new property, so I figured I'd dehydrate a bunch before they go bad on me. I haven't been able to find any instructions for lemons though (only peels). Is there any reason I couldn't dehydrate lemons?  How would I prep them - slices, wedges?  Do I leave the peel on?

Also, the thought came to mind - though I've never heard of it or seen it anywhere - bacon jerky!  Anybody ever try making bacon jerky?  I would think you'd do it the same way you'd do any other jerky. Hmmm

Thanks,

Bill
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: PorcupineKate on March 04, 2013, 07:26:16 AM
Here is a video on making dehydrated lemons and lemonade.  This web site has a lot of great info on dehydrating.


http://www.dehydrate2store.com/videos/?id=29
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on March 04, 2013, 08:53:50 AM
I'm new to dehydrating - the wife got me a dehydrator for Valentines day, but have t had a chance to use it yet. I've got a bunch of lemons ripe on the trees on our new property, so I figured I'd dehydrate a bunch before they go bad on me. I haven't been able to find any instructions for lemons though (only peels). Is there any reason I couldn't dehydrate lemons?  How would I prep them - slices, wedges?  Do I leave the peel on?

Also, the thought came to mind - though I've never heard of it or seen it anywhere - bacon jerky!  Anybody ever try making bacon jerky?  I would think you'd do it the same way you'd do any other jerky. Hmmm

first, I would be very wary of attempting bacon jerky from raw bacon.  Pork really does need to be cooked thoroughly.

second, about those lemons.  by all means, dehydrate some.  have you been to www.dehydrate2store.com yet - she does lemons.  but I would, instead, recommend another method of lemon preservation.  Moroccan lemons.  I posted a tutorial here: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=22990.msg252815#msg252815
check it out, do a quart jar of them this year, just to try it, and then be prepared to do twice that next year.

if you have extra lemons after all that, try making your own lemon pepper.  that is the best lemon pepper I have ever had.

I love lemons, and wish I lived in a place where a lemon tree can grow outside.  I have a potted one, but it still has not produced any lemons :(
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Panhead Bill on March 05, 2013, 02:06:58 AM
Thanks for the advice and links - looks like I'll get rolling tomorrow with some lemons and some bananas that are starting to get a little over-ripe (on a break from painting! 

Antihero thought - and you can tell me how far off base I am -

Had the kids make spaghetti for dinner - used jarred Ragu with 2 lbs of browned ground beef mixed in. I know I've read that the ground beef doesn't dehydrate we'll. is there any way to dehydrate and save the leftovers from this meal?

Thanks,

Bill
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on March 05, 2013, 10:43:09 PM
Thanks for the advice and links - looks like I'll get rolling tomorrow with some lemons and some bananas that are starting to get a little over-ripe (on a break from painting! 

Antihero thought - and you can tell me how far off base I am -

Had the kids make spaghetti for dinner - used jarred Ragu with 2 lbs of browned ground beef mixed in. I know I've read that the ground beef doesn't dehydrate we'll. is there any way to dehydrate and save the leftovers from this meal?

Thanks,

Bill

haha... you really love dehydrating! I would say dehydrating your meat sauce might not be a good idea... I have seen articles on dehydrating cooked hamburger meat (hamburger rocks), but I tried it and the results were less than stellar. I've moved more toward dehydrating veges and fruits and canning of meat products... ymmv.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Hootie on March 05, 2013, 10:54:27 PM
I love lemons, and wish I lived in a place where a lemon tree can grow outside.  I have a potted one, but it still has not produced any lemons :(

I feel your pain. I have a potted lemon tree too (in Wisconsin). Still trying to squeeze a single lemon out of that tree.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: theadob on March 16, 2013, 05:06:03 PM
i dehydrate hamburger all the time and it comes out fine for soups and stews.  I also dehydrate ragu sauce so I see no reason why dehydrating your spaghetti wouldnt dehydrate. Its important that you clean your cooked beef though to get the fat off of it or it will go rancid fast.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LizardGurl on May 07, 2013, 08:07:55 AM
Yesterday I did an experiment with Kale.  Recently flavored Kale Chips have become very popular as a snack food.  We had a bag in the office so I scoped out the ingredients.  Basically the coating was made from nuts, vinegar and spices. 

I harvested a large bowl of kale.  Then I mixed some almond butter, apple cider vinegar and a couple of tablespoons of this Taco seasoning I mix from time to time to have on hand.  The mixture wasn't quite thin enough, but tasted as vinegary as I wanted, so I mixed in a bit of water.  I tossed the kale in the mixture until it was evenly coated and then dehydrated it.  It came out great.  The store bought Kale chips are currently my 15 month old grandson's favorite snack.  I need to do a grandma drop by and give him some of mine.

LG
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on May 09, 2013, 08:22:24 PM
Yesterday I did an experiment with Kale.  Recently flavored Kale Chips have become very popular as a snack food.  We had a bag in the office so I scoped out the ingredients.  Basically the coating was made from nuts, vinegar and spices. 

I harvested a large bowl of kale.  Then I mixed some almond butter, apple cider vinegar and a couple of tablespoons of this Taco seasoning I mix from time to time to have on hand.  The mixture wasn't quite thin enough, but tasted as vinegary as I wanted, so I mixed in a bit of water.  I tossed the kale in the mixture until it was evenly coated and then dehydrated it.  It came out great.  The store bought Kale chips are currently my 15 month old grandson's favorite snack.  I need to do a grandma drop by and give him some of mine.

LG

That sounds delicious! I need to plant some kale this summer and try this! Thanks LG.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on May 11, 2013, 08:05:22 AM
Thanks for the reminder LizardGurl about the kale chips and the "recipe" idea.  You can also bake kale leaves in a 350 degree oven for about 10 minutes if you want a quick snack or don't have a dehydrator.  I reminded my DH yesterday that we wanted to plant a bunch so to leave space for it.  I dehydrate a lot of it and keep a jar of crushed leaves by the stove and toss some into stews, soups and sauces to give us a little extra nutrition.  I also drink a mixture of dried veggies (with a lot of kale in it) every morning in a glass of orange juice. 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on May 08, 2014, 09:43:26 AM
thought i would give an update of my veggie powder, it has changed a lot since the last time I posted it.  So, the last batch I had I used the following amounts.  Every time I make a new batch, I open my word folder and follow the recipe that I last made.  If I have to change something - I ran out of dried bok choy, I now have dehydrated eggplant - I note that.  And then I type the new date and what I put in this time.  I do this in case it suddenly tastes really nasty cuz I put in something new that I shouldn't do again.

Vegetable seasoning powder
All ingredients in grams.  Use blender to break up big things and then move to coffee grinder.  Use in sour cream for veggie dip; on steak for seasoning, in soups, stroganoff, omelets, and other tasties.  I use/substitute whatever dried veggies I have at hand.  Sometimes I have something and sometimes I don't.  I try not to add a lot of anything really strong flavored, and would love to add some hot peppers to it (but my family would stop eating it!)

3-20-14: made a 2-c batch, packed
96 tomatoes
36 celery
24 mushrooms
20 carrot
12 green sweet peppers
15 red onion
6 rosemary
6 garlic
6 oregano
6 spinach
4 savoy cabbage (purple)
6 yellow squash
6 beet
6 zucchini
6 kale
6 collard
6 chard
6 spring greens
6 eggplant
6 winter squash
6 mystery unlabeled leafy green
6 parsley
4 jalapeño
4 black pepper
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LvsChant on May 08, 2014, 01:40:38 PM
Thanks, MS... sounds yummy... Can I just come over to your house and try it out?

I found a great deal on Mangos about a week ago... they were hard as flint when I bought them, but after sitting on my kitchen counter for a little over a week, they were fragrant and perfect.

I sliced around the pit, peeled the two sides and the pit part, then sliced in strips about 1/8"-1/4" thick... then dried overnight at 110 degrees. They are completely yummy. No need to add lemon juice... they are fine without adding anything.

Dried mangoes... a very good thing.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: d3nni5 on June 24, 2014, 06:06:15 PM


I picked a bunch of basil.   Clipped, rinsed and towel dried.

Added to my dehydrator on the lowest setting (95) and started drying.   All eight trays are full.  Once dry, I'll put the leaves in a plastic bag, crush and put in a sealed jar with my spices.  Curious just how much this will be dried.  I doubt it will be more than a typical .5 to 1 oz jar you get in the store.

(http://i1374.photobucket.com/albums/ag432/mountainstateprepper1/garden/20140624_190120_zpsvjnvtoqb.jpg)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: nelson96 on June 24, 2014, 06:27:39 PM
I doubt it will be more than a typical .5 to 1 oz jar you get in the store.

But much better quality and much less expensive.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: annmedford on June 25, 2014, 07:39:19 AM
Dehydrated some kale and sage from the garden. Haven't used them yet.
recently ordered the prepper excalibur on special, can't wait for it to arrive. I have a dying old round dehydrator on it's last legs, and a lame solar dehydrator-- maybe lame because I'm in humid Maine?
I samples some spiced dehydrated onion rings, gluten free vegan things that were called rimgs of fire-- spicy but not really that hot, loved everything about them except the $$$ spendyness of them. Am working on reverse engineering the rec. Will post on my success or lack thereof.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: annmedford on June 25, 2014, 07:47:59 AM
Yesterday I did an experiment with Kale.  Recently flavored Kale Chips have become very popular as a snack food.  We had a bag in the office so I scoped out the ingredients.  Basically the coating was made from nuts, vinegar and spices. 

I harvested a large bowl of kale.  Then I mixed some almond butter, apple cider vinegar and a couple of tablespoons of this Taco seasoning I mix from time to time to have on hand.  The mixture wasn't quite thin enough, but tasted as vinegary as I wanted, so I mixed in a bit of water.  I tossed the kale in the mixture until it was evenly coated and then dehydrated it.  It came out great.  The store bought Kale chips are currently my 15 month old grandson's favorite snack.  I need to do a grandma drop by and give him some of mine.

LG
that sounds like an awesome use for my kale abundance!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: annmedford on June 25, 2014, 07:49:42 AM
Yesterday I did an experiment with Kale.  Recently flavored Kale Chips have become very popular as a snack food.  We had a bag in the office so I scoped out the ingredients.  Basically the coating was made from nuts, vinegar and spices. 

I harvested a large bowl of kale.  Then I mixed some almond butter, apple cider vinegar and a couple of tablespoons of this Taco seasoning I mix from time to time to have on hand.  The mixture wasn't quite thin enough, but tasted as vinegary as I wanted, so I mixed in a bit of water.  I tossed the kale in the mixture until it was evenly coated and then dehydrated it.  It came out great.  The store bought Kale chips are currently my 15 month old grandson's favorite snack.  I need to do a grandma drop by and give him some of mine.

LG
I really like the paleo passage blog! thanks for blogging
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: annmedford on June 25, 2014, 07:53:01 AM
s
first, I would be very wary of attempting bacon jerky from raw bacon.  Pork really does need to be cooked thoroughly.

second, about those lemons.  by all means, dehydrate some.  have you been to www.dehydrate2store.com yet - she does lemons.  but I would, instead, recommend another method of lemon preservation.  Moroccan lemons.  I posted a tutorial here: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=22990.msg252815#msg252815
check it out, do a quart jar of them this year, just to try it, and then be prepared to do twice that next year.

if you have extra lemons after all that, try making your own lemon pepper.  that is the best lemon pepper I have ever had.

I love lemons, and wish I lived in a place where a lemon tree can grow outside.  I have a potted one, but it still has not produced any lemons :(
share a lemon pepper recipe please....
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: annmedford on June 25, 2014, 08:02:30 AM
I'm gluten sensitive, so I've been very glad to dehydrate my own food and combine fugality with health.  Here are some recipes I found.  I especially liked the "hamburger rocks".  Enjoy!

Apple Pie
3 1/2 C. dried apples
2 C. water
3/4 C. sugar
1 t. cinnamon
Cook apples until tender. The apples will rehydrate during the cooking and baking process. Add sugar and cinnamon. Fill and top with pie crust and bake 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
Cherry Pie
3 C. dried cherries
3 C. boiling water
2 Tbs tapioca
1 C. sugar
Cover cherries with water and let soak for 30 minutes. Simmer and add sugar and tapioca. Pour into pie crust and add top crust. Bake at 400 degrees for about 35 minutes.
Peach Pie
3 C. dried peaches
3 C. boiling water
3 tbs tapioca
1 C. sugar
2 t. cinnamon
1/4 t. nutmeg

Cover fruit with water and let soak for 30 minutes. Simmer and add sugar, spices and tapioca to thicken. Pour into pie crust, dot with butter, and cover with pie top. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes.

Creamed Corn
1 C. dried corn
4 C. boiling water
2 t. sugar
1/2 C. milk
1 T. margarine
salt and pepper to taste
Add corn to water and let stand for 30 minutes. Simmer corn until tender. This may take as long as an hour or so. Drain and add remaining ingredients. Simmer for an additional 5 minutes, stirring frequently to avoid prevent scorching.

Cooked Fruit
3 C. dried fruit of your choice
2 C. boiling water
1 t. cinnamon
Sugar to taste
 
Let fruit soak in the boiled water for 20 minutes. Simmer for another 20 minutes and add cinnamon and sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved and serve.

Vegetable Soup
1 C. diced cooked meat
3 C. dried mixed vegetables
salt and pepper
Cover dried vegetables with boiling water and soak 1 hour, then simmer for 2 hours or until tender. Remember you can add fresh vegetables, in case you don't have a particular dried one, to the pot as well.
Instant Jam
3/4 dried fruit - use a single fruit or combination like bananas and strawberries
3/4 to 1 cup fruit juice or water, heated to boiling
1/4 cup honey or other sweetener, if needed
Cover the fruit with warmed juice and let sit overnight, if possible. Put this in a blender, and add your sweetener. Puree until spreadable. This is delicious.
Dried Fruit Stew
1 cup dried fruit (I like to use a combination of fruits like apples, pears, peaches, raisins, cherries
1 cup boiling water
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 to 1 teaspoon spices to taste. Try: cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, ginger.
Combine all and let set until it softens. For a dessert, sweeten with honey and serve with shortbread cookies. For breakfast, stir in a little yogurt and honey.
?
Dried Veggie Seasoning
Powder dried vegetables in the blender in any combination you like. Add to boiling water for instant vegetable broth, or put in a shaker and use at the table as a seasoning for vegetables, pasta, and rice.

Banana Bread made in a dehydrator
1/2 cup cashew or almond butter
3/4 cup agave nectar or date paste (dates blended up to form a paste)
1/2 cup raisins
1 tsp. fine celtic sea salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. vanilla extract or vanilla bean
1/2 cup walnuts (soaked for 7 hrs. and blended up in a blender to form a cream)
1 1/2 cup almond flour (just powdered almonds)
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Blend all the ingredients together (except the chopped nuts), and put into a loaf pan lined with wax or parchment paper. Top the batter with the chopped nuts and place in the dehydrator for 6-12 hrs. Enjoy warm right out of the dehydrator!
Banana Macadamia Nut Fudge Cookies (no cook)
1 cup raisins
1 cup walnuts
1 cup macadamia nuts (chopped into big pieces)
1 cup bananas (chopped up)
In food processor blend raisins and walnuts until smooth. Add in macadamia nuts and bananas. Dehydrate for 8 to 10 hours.
Classic Gorp
1/2 c. dried apples
1/2 c. dried apricots
1/4 c. dried peaches
1/2 c. dried pears
1/2 c. dried pineapple
1/4 c. coconut flakes
1/2 c. golden raisins
1/2 c. cashews or blanched almonds
Cut apples, apricots, peaches, pears and pineapple into 1/2" pieces. Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl. Package in airtight plastic bags and store in a cool dry place. Use within 3 to 4 weeks. Makes about 3-1/2 cups.
Tangy Sunflower Seeds
2 T. vegetable oil
1 T. soy sauce
1/4 tsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. celery salt
Dash cayenne pepper
2 cups dried shelled sunflower seeds, raw
Preheat oven to 300 F. In a medium bowl, mix oil, soy sauce, paprika, celery salt and cayenne pepper. Add sunflower seeds. Stir until seeds are evenly coated. Place mixture in a shallow baking pan. Bake in preheated oven 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Drain on paper towels. Makes 2 cups.
Peanut Butter Bites
2 cups coconut
2 cups dried apples, peeled, cored and chopped
2/3 cup peanut butter
1 1/2 tablespoons vanilla
In a large bowl, combine all ingredients; mix well.
Shape into 1/2-1" balls.
Dry at 135º for 4 to 5 hours, or until firm and crisp on the outside.
Hangdog Oatmeal
•   2 1/2 cups oatmeal
•   2 Tbsp brown sugar
•   1/2 cup dried bananas, powdered
•   3/4 cup chocolate chips
At home: Mix ingredients into zip lock bag.
On the trail: Boil 4 cups of water into separate pan. Stir in contents of zip lock bag and reboil. Remove from stove and set aside until cool.
Makes 1 serving Recipe courtesy of Backpacker Magazine; April 1996; Pg 45
Cranberry Orange Rice
•   1/4 cup instant rice
•   1 Tbsp dried cranberries
•   1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
•   1 packet True Orange
•   1 Tbsp powdered milk
•   1 tsp brown sugar
Note: True Orange is also available at www.truelemon.com or some grocery stores. You can also substitute 1 teaspoon citrus juice or zest per packet.
Cherry Almond Oatmeal
•   1 packet instant oatmeal
•   2 Tbsp dried cherries
•   1 Tbsp slivered almonds
•   1 Tbsp powdered milk
•   1 tsp brown sugar
At home: Combine everything in a freezer zip lock bag.
On the trail: Add 2/3 cup boiling water to oatmeal (or more if you like a thinner cereal).
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders
Chocolate Banana Oatmeal
•   1/3 cup instant oatmeal
•   1 tsp unsweetened cocoa powder
•   2 Tbsp powdered milk
•   2 tsp brown sugar
•   1/4 cup freeze-dried bananas  (finely crumbled dehydrated works, too)
•   Chocolate cookies, crumbled (optional)
At home: Combine everything except the cookies into a zip lock bag. If you are bringing the cookies, package them separately.
On the trail: Bring 1 cup of water to a boil, add the oatmeal mix and stir. Simmer until the oatmeal is cooked through. Serve topped with the cookies.
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders
Bacon Polenta
•   1/2 cup instant polenta
•   2 Tbsp shelf-stable bacon
•   1/2 Tbsp dried onions or dried onion flakes
•   2 tsp butter powder
•   1 tsp chicken or vegetable broth powder
•   1/4 tsp paprika
•   2 packets Parmesan cheese
At home: Combine everything, except the Parmesan, into a quart size freezer zip lock bag.
On the trail: Bring 1 1/2 cups of water to a boil. Add the polenta and simmer until cooked and creamy. Top with the Parmesan cheese.
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders

Emergency Essentials Recipes using dehydrated /freezedried products http://beprepared.com/recipes.asp_Q_ai_E_1_A_c2r_E_tn_A_name_E_Recipes

 
Jars of canned butter & hamburger rocks.
"Hamburger Rocks" are small chunks of cooked, dehydrated, fresh beef. They will store effectively for two or more years. Once rehydrated by soaking one cup of rocks in two cups of boiled water, the pre-cooked meat can be used in any recipe. It is delicious for tacos, spaghetti sauce, hamburger helper, tamale pie, lasagna, or your favorite recipe. It is very difficult to distinguish from fresh hamburger in a meal!
RECIPE FOR HAMBURGER ROCKS
1. Using a large skillet (cast iron is great), brown and fry 5 pounds of ground beef. When thoroughly cooked, transfer the meat to a colander. Rinse under hot running water to remove the fat. Then clean the skillet with paper towels to remove excess fat from the first cooking.
2. Place the washed meat back into the wiped skillet and fry it again over medium/low heat, stirring often until you see no more steam. Keep the heat/flame low once the rocks are browning up nicely.
3. Place the "twice cooked" rocks into an oven roasting pan. Turn the oven to 200 degrees F, stirring and turning occasionally as the meat continues to dry. One to two hours should finish the job. Remove from the oven and check for dryness. When cool, pack into zip lock bags or mason jars. Pack tightly, expelling as much air as possible. Store in pantry drawers or shelves.
4. To "can" the hamburger rocks for long term storage, preheat canning jars in the over at 250 F, simmer the lids as usual, put the "rocks" into the jars while still hot, then seal the jars. After 15 minutes or so the jars will cool and you will hear the jar lids "pop" as they seal in place.
 
Carrot Pecan Burgers
•   4 Carrots
•   1.5 C Pecans (or another nut or mix in some seeds also)
•   1/2 C shredded zucchini (dried off a bit in paper towel or a towel)
•   2 Tbsp cilantro (fresh)
•   2 green onions (more if you like)
•   1.5 Tbsp olive oil
•   1/2 tsp curry powder
•   1/2 tsp salt
•   1/4 tsp pepper
Blend carrots first.
Add rest of ingredients and blend.
Form into burger patties. Note that the larger you make them, the longer they take to dehydrate. Place the patties on dehydrator trays.  If necessary, use parchment paper on trays to keep mix from dropping through.
Dehydrate about 7-8 hours, take them off trays, turn them over and put on mesh sheet. Dehydrate them until you like the consistency.


I realize this post is a little old, but there is tons of great info here. Thanks for posting!!!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: LittleOwl on June 25, 2014, 08:28:28 AM
We do chopped carrots, onions, leeks, plantain (the wild green), celery, cabbage and peppers all mixed together in about even amounts. We label it soup flakes, but use it in meatloaf, stirfry, Bannock, omelets, and anything else we can. We also powder it as a seasoning.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: annmedford on June 26, 2014, 07:23:46 AM
We do chopped carrots, onions, leeks, plantain (the wild green), celery, cabbage and peppers all mixed together in about even amounts. We label it soup flakes, but use it in meatloaf, stirfry, Bannock, omelets, and anything else we can. We also powder it as a seasoning.
Great idea of using plantain, I'll be adding that for sure! Thanks!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: d3nni5 on June 26, 2014, 08:21:40 PM
My 8 tray dehydrator was full of basil leaves when I started.   I finished them up tonight, and ended up with this much.   This was a jar of mushrooms, so what..about and ounce maybe two?


(http://i1374.photobucket.com/albums/ag432/mountainstateprepper1/garden/20140626_180049_zpsftygqg5g.jpg)

(http://i1374.photobucket.com/albums/ag432/mountainstateprepper1/garden/20140626_181122_zps0jpdqq41.jpg)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: oktheniknow on July 26, 2014, 12:56:27 PM
Ever make plantain chips? Those suckers are delicious. Can't eat just one...
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Erica/NW Edible on September 02, 2015, 10:36:41 AM
Most recent dehydrator experiment: fruit leather.

This year was insane for apples, but many of them weren't the highest quality for storage. So I ran massive batches through the steam juicer, kept the juice for cidering, and then food milled the pulp. It was very thick so it was good for the fruit leathering. I did sweeten and add acid and spices to compensate for the juice I removed. Dried the leather and it turned out GREAT - kids basically are trying to eat nothing but this stuff and I have to lay down the law WRT how much they can have. But, man, fruit leather is labor intensive. Between the juicing, food milling, spreading, cutting, and wrapping it was a process. Plain dried fruit is way easier.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Frugal Upstate on September 03, 2015, 06:28:23 AM
Sounds good!  I've dried some tomatoes & herbs, but that's it.  Pretty much out of the food preservation game due to injury this year.  Now that I'm better it's too hectic.  I'll have to make some apple leather though...kids do love it!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on May 10, 2016, 03:07:04 PM
new one: POPCORN

pop your popcorn in your favorite way.

sweet option: powder your dried berries (we have used both strawberry and blackberry.  cannot wait to do raspberry and blueberry.  or a mix.  YUM!).  about 1/4 c powder + 1-2 T powdered sugar (optional, but I think it cuts the tang of the berries) + 1/4 t salt.
pour melted butter and mix into popcorn and THEN slowly pour berry powder as you mix.  It helps to have 2 people.

savory option: add 2 T melted butter to 1 T lime juice.  incorporate into your popcorn.  Then add 2 T crushed dried cilantro and 1 t dried lime zest.  mix well.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: TwoBluesMama on May 12, 2016, 11:17:26 AM
Although I am a popcorn purist - a little butter & a little salt only thank you - this sounds like something my grandkids would love. And if I open a can of dried fruit from Thrive or somewhere it seems like there is always "fruit powder" in the bottom of the can which is good on oatmeal and ice cream) but here is another use.  Thanks MS!!
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Ms. Albatross on August 01, 2016, 09:31:05 AM
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017KSBYHC/ref=gbps_img_s-3_5402_30598d67?smid=A2LM6ZPY06LT1N&pf_rd_p=2558495402&pf_rd_s=slot-3&pf_rd_t=701&pf_rd_i=gb_main&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=R1PR1BNCCP0RD7GQ61ZE

This is one of Amazon's Deals of the Day today.  I haven't used this product and know nothing about it.  (61 Amazon reviews Most are 4 & 5 stars)  But I thought some in this forum might be interested.  $79.99 today only.  It says the normal price $120.

(http://mealvitality.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Ivation-Electric-Countertop-Food-Dehydrator.jpg)
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Stwood on May 31, 2018, 08:01:17 PM
Finished up some sweet taters and pineapples the other day in our new Excalibur
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Redman on June 03, 2018, 08:12:54 AM
I got some Poblano peppers this morning and strung them to hang until they turn red, hopefully, and then I plan on drying them. If it works out I'll use them in Pozole.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Carl on June 03, 2018, 08:21:09 AM
  Great pepper KARMA
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Stwood on June 03, 2018, 09:50:54 AM
I got some Poblano peppers this morning and strung them to hang until they turn red, hopefully, and then I plan on drying them. If it works out I'll use them in Pozole.

50#???  ;D

I've got a dozen Ancho's planted
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Redman on June 03, 2018, 10:20:13 AM
Just go 6 green poblano peppers. $0.99/lb. That's as cheap as they get. Ripe and dried the bloody things run around $5/$6 for 1/2 to 3/4 lb.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Night Walker on April 25, 2019, 11:17:30 AM
Always have some "Mixed Veggies" dried and ready to add in soups, stews, meatloaf, etc. I get frozen bags of mixed corn, carrots, peas, and green beans. Put 'em in my Excalibur and let it run overnight.

We've also got some jars of each of those individually, along with smaller amounts of dried celery, bell pepper, parsley, and other herbs.

Tried dehydrating potatoes in various forms. The Mrs. is still deciding if she likes home canned or reconstituted dried potatoes best. Until then I call it a "tie" and we keep some of each!

Apple rings and dices handy for snacks, trips, baking, desserts, etc.

Not a dehydrated food, but I also use our Excalibur regularly for making yogurt.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Fixit on April 25, 2019, 12:13:24 PM
I think the most interesting think that I dehydrated lately was buttermilk but what else would you do with 40 gallons of buttermilk?
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Stwood on April 25, 2019, 02:10:59 PM
Make cheese  ;D
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Redman on June 19, 2019, 06:16:04 AM
Outstanding Spaghetto. Copied the link to my favorites. I do a similar dish of linguine used home canned salsa, dried bell pepper, commercial pasta sauce, ground beef and brown sugar.

Just finished the last bit of a large pot of it for breakfast this morning.
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: PorcupineKate on September 27, 2019, 11:21:29 AM
I made my first raisins. 
My seedless concord grape vine produced grapes for the first time and we had way more than we could eat fresh so I made raisins.  I have a quart and a half of them in the pantry. 

 
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Morning Sunshine on September 27, 2019, 12:54:15 PM
I made my first raisins. 
My seedless concord grape vine produced grapes for the first time and we had way more than we could eat fresh so I made raisins.  I have a quart and a half of them in the pantry.


ni-ice!


I am making pear wedges again today.  We ended up getting a good deal on SEVEN bushels.  I filled my 2 9-tray and my small 4-tray Excalibers.  Then sent my son on a journey to gather friend's dehydrators.  We currently have 7 running in my kitchen - I hope I don't trip the breakers!
I still have 3 bushels....
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Stwood on September 27, 2019, 01:18:26 PM
I made my first raisins. 
My seedless concord grape vine produced grapes for the first time and we had way more than we could eat fresh so I made raisins.  I have a quart and a half of them in the pantry.

 8)

If we could assassinate all the jap beetles around here so ours could produce grapes.... :(
Title: Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
Post by: Stwood on September 27, 2019, 01:20:01 PM

ni-ice!


I am making pear wedges again today.  We ended up getting a good deal on SEVEN bushels.  I filled my 2 9-tray and my small 4-tray Excalibers.  Then sent my son on a journey to gather friend's dehydrators.  We currently have 7 running in my kitchen - I hope I don't trip the breakers!
I still have 3 bushels....

Awesome