The Survival Podcast Forum

Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Transportation => BOV Emergency Kits => Topic started by: Serellan on October 05, 2008, 10:20:57 PM

Title: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Serellan on October 05, 2008, 10:20:57 PM
So, after listening to the show, I actually was prompted to shift some of my kit supplies around to set my cars up better.

I have been putting my emergency kit together for a while, but I really hadn’t thought about what would happen if a disaster struck while we were at work.

So I bought some new items, took some items out of my at-home kit (since, like Jack mentioned, it’s a pretty rare case when we are at home when no cars are there), and set up two car kits.  These supplement my car supplies (jumper cables, road flares, etc) that were already in my cars.

They aren’t quite 72-hour BOB’s, but we only work 10 miles from home, so the goal of getting home or dealing with a roadside emergency should be met. In our primary car I have 2x of some items (like gloves, hats, etc), and in our secondary car just one set.

So, here is the kit:

(http://serellan.3dretreat.com/pictures/car_kit_1.jpg)

Included:

First Aid Kit - see link: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php/topic,285.msg2394.html#msg2394
2 day supply of medication (including EpiPen for wife who has allergies)
Female Hygiene Pad
Roll of Duct Tape
Long Johns
Warm Hats
Swedish Cold Weather Gloves & Liners
Blanket (Stadium type)
Flashlight
Folding Knife
Light stick
500ft twine
Emergency Blanket
Swiss Poncho
2 MRE’s (TOTM version)
4 Bottles Water
3 Larger Heater packs

With this amount, it all fits nicely into a bag that can be carried easily if we need to abandon the car and walk home.

(http://serellan.3dretreat.com/pictures/car_kit_2.jpg)

One thing I want to add for both cars is a pair of cold weather boots, even if they are just cheap snow boots to get home and get real boots (although I'd rather get some air force surplus green boots).  One of my rules of emergency kits is to not put things in it that I will be tempted to raid in normal cases.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: DeltaEchoVictor on October 05, 2008, 11:39:38 PM
Good stuff, it reminds that I need to update my Jeep kit.  The weather is cooling off & I need to add the winter supplies.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: dreadstalker on October 06, 2008, 04:52:54 AM
For your purposes that kit should work.

A word on the boots. I cary an old pair of the 5 buckle overshoes. They come in handy during inclement weather and help keep your feet warm as well.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: dreadstalker on October 06, 2008, 11:13:58 AM
I would however change one thing.

Switch over to a backpack to carry it in. No sense in having your hands full and it will be much more comfortable if you have to hoof it.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Serellan on October 06, 2008, 12:10:45 PM
I would however change one thing.

Switch over to a backpack to carry it in. No sense in having your hands full and it will be much more comfortable if you have to hoof it.

That is a good suggestion.  I used bags that I have extra in the house, and my spare backpacks are all small.  I'll keep an eye out for the next round of cheap surplus packs (I wish I had snapped up a few sets of that Swedish pack set when they were $5 each a few years ago), if I can find one for $10 each I'll transfer it.

Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Beetle on October 11, 2008, 12:02:10 AM
Cool kit, good job!!
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: susan1957 on October 12, 2008, 05:16:28 PM
One other suggestion I learned this weekend is if you put a rolling suitcase as your emergency kit, then if you had to leave the car it's much easier for us ladies to roll with it than to carry it along.  I've also found extra ones in yard sales cheap to use to make up bug out bags for the kids with. 
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: wingrider on October 14, 2008, 09:45:36 PM
I keep a 12 volt combination jump starter, air compressor, LED light, with a 12 volt "cigarette" lighter power outlet unit in all my vehicles. It has come in handy many times. Mine has the ability to charge the car battery from the vehicles cigarette lighter.
The ability to bring it into the house for use as a 12 volt power supply to charge cell phones, MP3 players, PDA's and even run a laptop or radio using a small inverter.

The peace of mind that these devices offer makes them a must have for me.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Serellan on October 15, 2008, 12:01:30 AM
Good point, in my wife's car I keep an inverter.  She is asthmatic and sometimes needs a nebulizer, so I've actually had the inverter for years and years so that if the power goes out she can take her medication.  The nice thing is, it will also charge a cell phone, run a laptop, radio, etc.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Lucretius on October 18, 2008, 11:52:30 AM
If space is an issue, keeping a roll of duct tape is kind of wasteful. Wrap it around a small piece of card board, and  you've got a few meters in the form of a credit card (and a lot more useful than a credit card...).  Got one in my back pocket, and combined with pocket knife easily the most appreciated prep gear for my wife (everyday uses plentiful!)

Depending on where you live: a shovel and sand/salt for snow.

Great kit, btw!
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Serellan on October 18, 2008, 08:45:01 PM
If space is an issue, keeping a roll of duct tape is kind of wasteful. Wrap it around a small piece of card board, and  you've got a few meters in the form of a credit card (and a lot more useful than a credit card...).  Got one in my back pocket, and combined with pocket knife easily the most appreciated prep gear for my wife (everyday uses plentiful!)

Depending on where you live: a shovel and sand/salt for snow.

Great kit, btw!

Great feedback.  I have a shovel/pick in my home kit, I will buy an extra one and move them both to my car kits.

On the duct tape, I don't have a space issue, but if I did your advice is great.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Serellan on October 25, 2008, 02:00:40 AM
Hey all, based on feedback here and further thinking, I've made some changes.

First off, I purchased backpacks to hold the contents.

Next, I added the following:

Folding Shovel (E-tool)
Compass
Firestarter Stick & Trioxane Tabs (3)
Ball Twine

Next, at least for right now, I have removed the MRE's and water, as it is starting to get cold, I worry that repeated freezing/thawing in the trunk of the car will stress or break the pouches. I also worry the water bottles will burst if frozen. 

I plan on getting some coast guard rations for the cars, not sure how to solve the water problem except maybe to get some heavy bottles and fill them 3/4 full.

Here is what the kit looks like now:

(http://serellan.3dretreat.com/pictures/backpack_4.jpg)
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Lucretius on October 25, 2008, 06:50:00 AM
I have removed the MRE's and water, as it is starting to get cold, I worry that repeated freezing/thawing in the trunk of the car will stress or break the pouches.

Great! You even have some space left over in your trunk! (I stuff a paranoid amount of stuff in mine so I have to use the backseat for shopping bags and such...  :-[). Photos are always nice, too- +1!

Aren't MRE bag "thermostabilized" so you don't have to worry about such? That's how my local importers justify the ridiculous prizes the charge for them.... Around here, a car is a green house/sauna during summer, and a freezer in winter, so there's not a lot of food you could keep in the car for a full year. Importers claim MRE bags can stand exactly that type of repeated freeze/thaw cycles. But until I've heard someone unpartisan tell me this actually works, I by default suspect b*lllsh*t....

I bet someone around this forum has some hands on experience about this...   
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: 18C Troll on March 03, 2014, 09:05:24 AM
you dont have to worry about the MREs puch bursting. But the alternating freezing/heating might cause a probelm.  The older MRE or winter rations are made with Dehydrated meals and are better for the temps that fluctuate more.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Josh the Aspie on March 27, 2014, 01:23:52 PM
You might also consider a temperature stabilized ration:
http://www.safecastle.com/3600-calorie-food-bars.aspx
http://www.amazon.com/ER-Emergency-Ration-Survival-Preparedness/dp/B008DEYAZ6/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1395948156&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=temperature+stabilized+emergency+ration

Also, there might be some water pouches designed to be able to freeze and thaw safely, so long as they aren't crammed into a confined space.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: GrizzlyAdams on April 07, 2014, 06:46:48 PM
You may want to consider coffee for your car preps.

I think the most likely event for me is getting stuck on the highway because it is closed due to an accident, snow, or ice.  In those cases if I am stranded for many hours I have put together a small "coffee backpack".  No greater feeling than being stuck somewhere, especially in a cold environment, and being able to drink a hot cup of coffee!

GA
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: jhull87 on November 15, 2014, 04:30:06 PM
Realize I'm way late to the ball game here and new to this but just thought I'd throw it out there. If you carry water in just regular bottles if it freezes will they burst or do you need to pour a little out for the expansion? I know the military style can we used to haul water in will burst or at least rupture the cap. Didn't even have to be freezing out, the wind chill factor of driving down the road made them rupture at temps around 45 degrees since you were driving around 40-60 MPH. This wouldn't be a problem with the bottles in the trunk but I could still see them freezing.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Cedar on November 15, 2014, 04:51:44 PM
I don't fill them up all the way.

Cedar
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: endurance on November 16, 2014, 09:44:47 AM
I've never had a costco bottle burst. I just toss them in the trunk and replace annually. They do freeze solid, but I haven't had a failure yet.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Carl on November 16, 2014, 12:04:01 PM
Duct tape is great...but Hi Viz ability orange duct tape has more uses...also ...if you leave the auto a couple cliff bars will add fast energy and weight less than carrying a shovel or jack...or maybe they aren't in the backpack. I have found a Leatherman type multi tool and tweezers a good addition,also a reflective vest and good head cover .
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: bcksknr on November 16, 2014, 04:50:17 PM
     Road flares, the red ones sometimes called "fusee's" are good to have. they have their own igniter, can be had in different burn times and have many uses. Along with some emergency reflectors (the red triangular kind truckers use) they can help keep you from getting hit by a plow or traffic if you go into the ditch in snow. You can start just about anything on fire with a road flare, including a spare tire for daytime smoke signalling.
     Where I'm at, freezing temps are the norm. There are small emergency water pouches, in mylar that are Coast Guard approved and are partially filled so they won't explode when frozen. You have to have something to thaw frozen water out (or snow) for drinking. If you use a tin can burner or any open flame in a stranded vehicle, you must leave a window cracked open to get fresh air or you will die from carbon monoxide poisoning. If you get even a whiff of gasoline, don't light anything and immediately check for a fuel leak. This also goes for using the vehicle heater (if the engine still works). The tailpipe must be clear of obstructions and a window must be opened for ventilation. Run the engine only for short periods to save fuel. Someone should remain awake while the engine is running.
     I keep a -50 degree sleeping bad system in my truck. If I have to overnight in the ditch, at least I'll be warm. A shovel and some coffee cans of sand and salt are also a good idea, along with a pair of "pak" type boots and spare wool socks. I use lithium batteries in my flashlights because they will work much longer in the cold than alkalines. I'd add a jar of peanut butter and a spoon to your munchies. It is calorie dense and will give your "inner fireplace" something to burn.
     On the physiological side, don't drink alcohol or smoke; they both will lower your body temp. As weird as this sounds, if you have to pee, do it (outside of course). Holding in urine uses body heat. Put on a good hat or hood. You lose lots of body heat from an uncovered head.
     This is getting a little long, but one last thing. Unless you've gone off a remote mountain logging road and nobody knows you're there (with no hope of rescue), stay with your vehicle, maybe even then. It can provide you with much of what you need to survive. Make your vehicle as visible as possible, perhaps with a large piece of blaze orange plastic on an antenna or a stick, or your flares and reflectors.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Beetle on November 16, 2014, 06:35:06 PM
I love popping smoke at accidents I always have a case of flares in my truck. I would add some radios, I like having a ham radio and a SAR radio. keep up the preps.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Carl on November 16, 2014, 07:49:34 PM
In my younger,more foolish days,I had a rubber (fake)  human arm in the trunk and just laying that in the road had a way of slowing traffic to a crawl. ;)   better than a  flare..
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: jhull87 on November 16, 2014, 09:27:31 PM
What about spare belts and hoses? Just asking your mechanic to save the old ones when you have them replaced for regular maintenance could save a several hours on the side of the road.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: bcksknr on November 18, 2014, 05:56:50 AM
     When I had my Land Cruiser, I kept spare hoses, belts, and a change out of ignition parts ( this was back in the days of distributor caps,rotors and ignition coils). They will do you no good unless you have a tool kit to actually change them out. On a nice sunny day, you might want to try exchanging belts and hoses and ignition parts on your driveway with only the tools you have put in your vehicle kit. Then imagine that your stuck with a broken vehicle in a blizzard and you're attempting the same repairs with a flashlight held in your teeth and it's 20 below. Good food for thought.
     By the way, a high quality "headlamp", the type with an elastic band that you wear to keep your hands free is a great addition to your kit. You may also want an extra large (to fit over winter clothing) reflective "highway worker" type vest. All to often someone gets creamed by another motorist because they weren't seen whilst digging out.
     A charged cell phone may be your new best friend in these situations, as might a CB radio. I hesitate to do an advertisement, but an AAA membership isn't a bad idea. The only two times I wound up in the ditch, in winter, a AAA dispatched tow truck had me back on the road in 30 minutes. My membership saved me hundreds of dollars and inconvenience.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Carl on November 18, 2014, 06:07:47 AM
A shovel, come-along and scissor jack are also very handy , along with gloves and the above mentioned Headlight.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: IKN on November 18, 2014, 07:18:34 AM
For those in a northern climate like me, adding a bag of kitty litter will aid in getting out of those pesky snow drifts sometimes by adding that little extra traction.
Just make sure the bag is sealed good, placing inside anothersealed bag even better.
Remember, kitty litter + oil + time = FIRE !
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Carl on November 18, 2014, 08:04:01 AM
For those in a northern climate like me, adding a bag of kitty litter will aid in getting out of those pesky snow drifts sometimes by adding that little extra traction.
Just make sure the bag is sealed good, placing inside anothersealed bag even better.
Remember, kitty litter + oil + time = FIRE !

Spontaneous Kitty Combustion ??  OH  MY
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Caveat on November 18, 2014, 10:34:20 AM
For those in a northern climate like me, adding a bag of kitty litter will aid in getting out of those pesky snow drifts sometimes by adding that little extra traction.
Just make sure the bag is sealed good, placing inside anothersealed bag even better.
Remember, kitty litter + oil + time = FIRE !
+1
Thanks for the fire info and the reminder. 
I keep mine in a clean dry laundry detergent bottle(s) that are hand labeled as litter.
Makes for an easy and clean dispenser.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: TNSurvivor on November 22, 2014, 09:47:33 PM
Nice reminder.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Carl on November 23, 2014, 05:15:40 AM
You will do better with "FRESH" unused kitty litter    ;D
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: alan123 on November 23, 2014, 07:18:53 PM
Kitty litter is clay and does not burn. When they are talking about oily rags, they are talking about drying oils like used in paint, tung and boiled linseed oil. The drying oil oxidizes, produces heat and the wadded up cotton rag is the fuel. Not motor oil, it doesn't dry and is sprayed on the bottom of pistons in an engine without bursting into flame. I had oily  kitty liter under my cars for years to catch the oil drips.
How long have you had that oil rag to wipe down your guns? Me---decades.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Cedar on November 23, 2014, 07:31:47 PM
I would also add:

WD-40 - gets those lugnuts off WAY easier if you have a flat
Small bottle of Window Cleaner - I hate it when it is rainy/glary out and the inside of your windshield is yucky
Lady's pantyhose - Might tell your wife why you have them in there, but they work as a great temporary fan/etc belt.

Cedar
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: jhull87 on December 04, 2014, 07:04:50 PM
Kitty litter is clay and does not burn. When they are talking about oily rags, they are talking about drying oils like used in paint, tung and boiled linseed oil. The drying oil oxidizes, produces heat and the wadded up cotton rag is the fuel. Not motor oil, it doesn't dry and is sprayed on the bottom of pistons in an engine without bursting into flame. I had oily  kitty liter under my cars for years to catch the oil drips.
How long have you had that oil rag to wipe down your guns? Me---decades.

I always put oily rags into a baggie of some sort I can seal. It may just be extra "safe" but as a mechanic all oily rags end up in a sealed "bin" every night. We were always told this was because they can combust much like a wet hay bale (so I'm told I've never seen either occur). I've worked at multiple shops and they always had the same red bins to toss used rags in. I don't know if this was something the fire marshall mandated or if it was an actual cause for concern.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Alan Georges on February 02, 2018, 05:13:23 AM
Some more items for your consideration:
http://thesurvivalmom.com/items-glove-box-trunk/ (http://thesurvivalmom.com/items-glove-box-trunk/)

TLDR version:
1. Road Atlas / Printed Maps
2. Wrist Compass
3. Headlamp
4. Water Purification Straw
5. Folding Knife & Fire-Starter
6. Alcohol Swabs
7. Pepper Spray
8. Face Mask
9. Ziploc Bag

Can't say that I'm 100% in with this list, but it's a nice break from politics for the moment.  Also it leaves out things like a Maglight (a handy club that may even be legal in DC and Chicago) and a seatbelt cutter/window breaker.  Like I said, items for your consideration.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: bcksknr on February 02, 2018, 08:42:56 AM
     There is a series of paperbacks called "Armchair Reader". They are about two inches thick, about 500 pages. There are a wide varieties of titles; the one I keep in the truck is "The Amazing Book of History". If you're stuck for any amount of time, being able to occupy your mind will help pass the time (or going crazy). I can sit in a deer stand for hours, but after naming all of the trees and becoming on a first name basis with the squirrels, my mind starts to shut down.
     A book, short one or two page anecdotes (as in Armchair Readers) or a novel, or maybe a puzzle book, will give you something to do. All of my kits have photos of family and beloved pets, to motivate me to "hang in there". Physical survival is important and it also depends on mental and emotional survival.[size=78%] [/size]
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: alexlindsay on February 02, 2018, 11:27:20 PM
I use my vehicle for work in remote areas and its a truck so i can dedicate some space. Couple tarps 8x10, complete socket set, pliers, screwdrivers' first aid kit, tire plug kit, air pump, jack and one jack stand, 30' tow strap, spare fuses, water, bit of food, contractors bags, gorilla tape, jb weld, 5l of oil, cell phone booster, soap, water purifier tablets, lighters, extension cord, 50l gas, and a can of bear spray. All i can think of right now.
Title: Re: Car Emergency Kit
Post by: Carl on February 03, 2018, 05:51:14 AM
  Don't forget the silicon self fusing SUPER TAPE, it can mend many problems to get you home.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HWROLIG/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1