The Survival Podcast Forum

Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Emergency Preparations => Topic started by: MikeMartin on September 17, 2008, 10:22:56 PM

Title: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: MikeMartin on September 17, 2008, 10:22:56 PM
This has always been a great topic on other forums so let's do it here.  Post your BOB inventories and let's all learn from each other.

Here is my list,

shelter
8'x10'Siltarp
Footprint for my 2-man tent
(The tent is in the truck.  If I have to hoof it, I may leave the tent behind)
Grommet kit
Tent repair kit
 
tools
Folding shovel (on a belt)
Folding bow saw
Gerber folding saw (like a pruning saw)
Leatherman with pliers, screwdrivers, etc
Leatherman with needlenose, knives, etc
Little Stanley kit with ratchet that uses screwdriver tips
SAK (Swiss Army Knife)
 
fire starting/cooking
I know Rick has stuff, but here's what I pack:
Matches in waterproof carriers (3 different ones)
Flint & steel - couple different ones
Magnesium fire starter
Bic lighter
Refillable butane lighter
Cotton balls soaked with vaseline
Tommy stove and about 20 fuel tabs
 
food gathering
snare wire
backpack fishing rod/reel
small fishing kit packed in a .410 shell
Breakdown .308 rifle with 16.25" barrel
20 rounds of ammo for .308
1911 with 3 8 round mags +1 in the spout
.22 conversion kit for 1911
100 rounds .22 ammo

So what do you guys keep or as Jack would say  ;), what do ya'll keep in your BOB?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: minrlwtr on September 18, 2008, 12:01:53 PM
Good list but the best thing to pack is what is between your ears.  We have all talked about whats in a bag and how to use it but if you lack one of these "100 Skills Every Man Should Know" get some info and knowledge on it now before you need it. Its your own personal BOB that's always with you and always useful because its hard to lose and extremely difficult to replace.
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_journal/how_to/4281414.html
 ::)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: ModernSurvival on September 18, 2008, 12:06:34 PM
Holly Crap!  minrlwtr, I love that list, so fricken awesome.  I feel a show or may be two or three coming out of that list.  Great post, thanks, some "karma boost" is coming your way.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: minrlwtr on September 18, 2008, 12:32:54 PM
Lets add this old classic for consideration
Rudyard Kipling
If

If

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or, being hated, don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream - and not make dreams your master;
If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with triumph and disaster
And treat those two imposters just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to broken,
And stoop and build 'em up with wornout tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breath a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on";

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings - nor lose the common touch;
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you;
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run -
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And - which is more - you'll be a Man my son!

 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Patriot:Ex Machina on September 18, 2008, 01:16:04 PM
That is a really good list! I've got quite a bit of the same stuff in mine, with a few additions.
Something some folks might not think of is:
spare pair of socks (regular during most seasons, thick socks during winter)
Who knows how far you're going to be hoofin' it to where you're going.
Foot care is essential. Infections and sores will slow you down, and if you're are traveling with a group (be it  family or a mutual defense group)
you could be slowing them down and in turn putting your life and other's in danger.
Flashlights with extra batteries. Primarily, a head lamp style light that frees up your hands for use.

Emergency blankets (the ones that look like aluminum foil). They store small and will warm you up in no time. I've used one before when I fell in my uncle's pond in the middle of Feb. and I actually started sweating after about 20 minutes.

#550 Parachute cord. I keep a small roll of that in my bag as well.
That stuff is STRONG. You never know when something will tear, break, or need to be tied. And I can guarantee you it's useful for that.

A pair of latex exam gloves. In a total collapse situation, you don't know what you may come into phsyical contact with, and you certainly would want to minimize your contact with anything infectious. Gloves aren't a magical shield against a virus but a pair of gloves and maybe some of the little white masks won't hurt. (although the white masks are a bit much even for me. Just a thought though.)

That's all I have right now. I may think of something else.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: minrlwtr on September 18, 2008, 02:11:25 PM
Change up on the socks as a suggestion and worth the price, majorsurplusnsurvival.com had some Marine issue socks cheap at one time that contain silver to kill the foot odor and rot we get from longterm wear,there are other commercial brands plus underwear etc available. remember the old pioneers used to through a silver dollar in a gallon of milk to make it last longer and not spoil etc.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: creuzerm on September 18, 2008, 11:34:51 PM
I guess I don't really have a BOB as a lot of people would think of one. Mine is probably closer to a GHB (Get Home Bag). The thing is, I always have this bag around with me. I am a programmer, and it's the large backpack for my laptop. I think there is about 1 hour a day when this bag isn't in the same room as me - that's when I am at home for lunch, a block away from work.

You can't take it with you if you don't have it with you and you need it RIGHT NOW, right?

I would agree with the post above, that the most valuable thing you can carry with you is your head. But, hey, that's why are are listening to the podcast, reading the websites, and talking on the boards, to improve what's in our heads.

Most of the stuff I carry I try to have as 'stealth' gear. It is multi-purpose, or otherwise made to look inauspicious.

The scope of this bag is to primarly be useful for everyday living - all the little crap that happens, sprained ankle at the park, button fell off your pants, you know the stuff that makes life interesting. Worse case scenario it will allow me overnight just about anywhere outside or indside. I can also walk a few days with it if needed.

So, here is what I carry around with me everywhere, I noted what I actually used today.

Lets see, Front Left pants pocket.
Keyring - this has several items on it
A little pill bottle with some pain killers and Pepcid AC
The little small Swiss army knife - great for a nail clippers (I used this today)
A 1gig USB drive with encrypted files of my important documents
A small rod shaped whistle that I picked up at a tradeshow
Keys (used today -duh)
Separate from the keyring, a large Swiss Army Knife Cybertool - great for working on computers


Right pocket
3 inch folding lockback knife (yes, that's number 3 on my person) (I used the knife today)
Pen (I used the pen today)
Sharpie marker - you can't believe how handy these are to have around
small pen flashlight with some duct tape wrapped around it - this makes it easier to find by feel (I used the light today)
Lighter - I don't smoke, when people ask why I carry it, I tell 'em my last girlfriend smokes
Small diamond knife sharpener - it has some floral wire wrapped around it - I am not sure how this ended up in my pocket, but I have yet to find a reason to find another home for it and I use it at least once a week either on my knives or a friends knife.

Wallet
Cash
Debit Cards
card with contacts next to insurance cards
2 bobby pins, one in each 'fold' (I used one today to try to pick a lock to a cabinet we needed into at work)
25 lb braided fishing line wrapped around an old insurace card - it was the thinest card I could find - I use this often for stuff, never fishing
half a dozen 'patches' of duct tape on the back of a bookstore membership card - anybody have any idea how to keep the tape from sliding off the card and making a sticky mess?
a few fishing hooks wired together and put into that spare house key slot in the wallet.

Cell phone (used it today)

Now for the computer backpack. I take this thing EVERYWHERE I go. When people ask, I have it in case one of my servers goes down (which is true, but that's just an excuse to have the rest of the stuff with me)

Front pocket
Assorted company branded  pens pencils and markers
some branded post it notes
some nylon zip ties shoved int one of the pen slots in the bag - I am wondering how these would work for snares...
A company branded swiss army knife
A branded tradeshow giveaway screwdriver set
A magnesium firestarter
a plastic sewing kit set
a handfull of crystal light 'on the go' pouches
a magic trick quarter (happens to be an old silver one)

Middle pocket - this is where most of my 'supplies' are
A box of granola bars
A camping first aid kit stuff to bursting with extras like rubber gloves, athletic tape (sticks as good as duct tape, and the roll is much smaller), newskin, Ace bandages, etc. - I think the Biggest thing in there as far as BOB is the ace bandages - what if you sprain an ankle?
A plastic hooded poncho big enough for me and the bag
Assorted allergy medicine, cold medicine, etc. (I think I have taken one of the cold medicine, everyone else uses it)
A spare t-shirt wrapped as a 'brick' I got from a tradeshow - shirt or very large bandage
Altoid tin in a plastic bag with BagBalm in it - works like Vaseline and is antibacterial as well
35mm film canister of cotton balls
water purification tablets (the crystal light is to kill the taste if needed)
A ziplock bag with a 10x10  foot .7 mil painters drop cloth and some plastic garbabe bags
Also a few rayon cloths compressed into a small pill form
2 small pouches of tuna fish
1 Kitchens of India Rice meal in one of those boil pouches with a large pouch of tuna fish shoved in the box and glued back shut (DIY MRE)
Space blanket
Strike anywhere matches in a waterproof case with a dry cotton balls and the striker from the match box
Some light cord
hand sanitizer

The main pouch
The laptop
Power Adapter for the laptop
zippered leather notebook with calculator
small company branded notepad of graph paper
Folding maps of my state and the state north of me (where my folks are if I ever need to bug out)

Side pockets
Assorted computer cables and dohickys
spare cell phone charger
digital camera & charger and cables
bottle of water & one of those belts clips on the bag's shoulder strap to keep the water with me as it loves to fall out of the worthless water bottle pouch on this bag

The little cell phone pouch on the strap keps a compass/thermometer/whistle/magnifing lens all in one tchockys

I carry this around with me every day.
I had upgraded my first aid kit when my cat and I had a disagreement and he got hold of my arm.
The only other thing that I seem to use often is the food for days when I am too busy or forget to take lunch.
Everybody else is asking about the meds.
 
As much of this stuff is from tradeshows or otherwise branded with company names in the industries that I work for that it can pass for just a collection of assorted odds and ends that I have collected in my bag over the years. This has so far prevented me form being branded as one of those 'crazy survivalists'.

Now I just gotta find somebody with some bobby pins so I can replace the one I made into the lockpick today... Don't let me forget.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: archer on September 19, 2008, 09:30:30 AM

#550 Parachute cord. I keep a small roll of that in my bag as well.
That stuff is STRONG. You never know when something will tear, break, or need to be tied. And I can guarantee you it's useful for that.


Just a good tip to know, within 550 paracord, there are 7 (actually 14, but they are twisted into 7) separate strands that you can pull out to use when you need smaller rope.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: ColdHaven on September 19, 2008, 11:45:38 AM
I hope that linking to another site is not stepping on anyone's toes, but in the essence of not having to retype everything I did in another forum, here is my Get-home-gear that will be upgraded soon. My GHG is in my car, and I have added a few things since then. Once I have updated it on ZombieHunters I will update it here as well.

Plus you get to see my stupid mug on here.  :P

http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=34323)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: BigDanInTX on September 19, 2008, 12:07:12 PM
Cold, cross-posting is most definitely allowed.  Jack knows this is a hub with listeners from other venues.  It also exposes people who may not know about ZS (or any other prep site) and may give them another source of information.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: minrlwtr on September 20, 2008, 07:01:19 PM
Nobody reponded to my "IF" poem yet, but from all my years of boy to man and answeing questions from the teenagers what is a man or how to be one that has always been my favored answer,if you think about it ,or are somewhat tongue tied when questioned, it is a great referal to what we as an old grizzled one can say a thing or two about if questioned about the meaning.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: ColdHaven on November 18, 2008, 10:08:28 PM
I tried posting this in Region 3 to see, but have not had alot of responses. I thought that this would be a good topic so I am bumping this one back up with my posting of my BOB (of what I have thus far)

Here is my BOB:

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a235/ColdHavenV/Survivalism/PICT0504.jpg)

Sleeping Bag - 20 degrees
Tent - Sleeps 2
Lensatic Compass
Pedometer
E-tool
4 Canned Heat
Canned Heat stove
2 packs fire starter sticks
1 Mess kit
2 glow sticks
50 feet of 300 lb test nylon rope with hook on end
All purpose gun cleaning kit
Multi-tool
Sun-Block/ Insect repellant
Bottle of hand sanitizer
1 bottle tylenol
1 bottle antihistamine
1 bottle ibuprofen
1 bottle Multi-vitamin
2 cigar tubes of iodine salt
1 small jar of instant coffee
4 energy bars
4 packs of instant miso soup
1 pack ramen noodles
1 Jar beef stock
1 towel
2 sets of shirts (water wicking)
2 sets of pants
3 sets of socks
3 sets of underwear
2 emergency blankets
2 rain ponchos
1 knife sharpener
1 roll fishing line
1 roll gorilla glue duct tape
1 carbiner
Package of 50 disposable wipes
2 Packs of Hot Hands
2 Lrg. packs of Hot Hands
1 sleeping mat
1 waterproof container of matches + striker
1 pipe
2 cans of tobacco
1 tent hammer
unscented deodarant
Hatchet

Some may think that this BOB is lacking however I have developed my own system where my GHB (Get Home Bag) fits onto my ruck via ALICE clips. Here is a link to another forum where posted my GHB. The idea is that if I am away from home then I will have access to my car which has my GHB equipment. Once getting home and I have to bug out then my GHB attaches to my ruck with minimal effort and away I can go.

http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Earth Monk on November 23, 2008, 05:32:10 AM
Nice Desert Dust Goggles Coldhaven!

Really like the concept of the BOB, but the mil gear will be a draw for those with nothing, IMO. Maybe an oversized windbreaker type of jacket, Grey preferably, or a black/OD green poncho for rain weather would be a good addition to conceal the LBE, put the backpack on over top.

BTW, where is the 18" 12ga shotgun in a campchair bag for concealment? jk...

One addition to the extra socks would be Moleskin. It is a thick sticky pad one puts on a place (foot/hand/ shoulder where the backpack straps are) to reduce friction hence reducing blisters. Its cheap, light, and super to have when you need it. I'm willing to bet your feet may be conditioned if you do hiking (start now if your only a prepper in the mind, not in reality). Your dependants (kids/wife) may not have conditioned feet, and their blisters WILL reduce your pace, possibly increasing the risk of danger due to overexposure in an environment or lack of mobility.

-Ras
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: kernal_panic on November 23, 2008, 09:22:08 AM
I tried posting this in Region 3 to see, but have not had alot of responses. I thought that this would be a good topic so I am bumping this one back up with my posting of my BOB (of what I have thus far)

Here is my BOB:

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a235/ColdHavenV/Survivalism/PICT0504.jpg)

Sleeping Bag - 20 degrees
Tent - Sleeps 2
Lensatic Compass
Pedometer
E-tool
4 Canned Heat
Canned Heat stove
2 packs fire starter sticks
1 Mess kit
2 glow sticks
50 feet of 300 lb test nylon rope with hook on end
All purpose gun cleaning kit
Multi-tool
Sun-Block/ Insect repellant
Bottle of hand sanitizer
1 bottle tylenol
1 bottle antihistamine
1 bottle ibuprofen
1 bottle Multi-vitamin
2 cigar tubes of iodine salt
1 small jar of instant coffee
4 energy bars
4 packs of instant miso soup
1 pack ramen noodles
1 Jar beef stock
1 towel
2 sets of shirts (water wicking)
2 sets of pants
3 sets of socks
3 sets of underwear
2 emergency blankets
2 rain ponchos
1 knife sharpener
1 roll fishing line
1 roll gorilla glue duct tape
1 carbiner
Package of 50 disposable wipes
2 Packs of Hot Hands
2 Lrg. packs of Hot Hands
1 sleeping mat
1 waterproof container of matches + striker
1 pipe
2 cans of tobacco
1 tent hammer
unscented deodarant
Hatchet

Some may think that this BOB is lacking however I have developed my own system where my GHB (Get Home Bag) fits onto my ruck via ALICE clips. Here is a link to another forum where posted my GHB. The idea is that if I am away from home then I will have access to my car which has my GHB equipment. Once getting home and I have to bug out then my GHB attaches to my ruck with minimal effort and away I can go.

http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323)

Ok i realize this is my very 1st post here and you are a mod and this isn't a critique  of you or a personal attack but your BOB is screwed up. let me go through it an explain.

1st off thats thing is really bulky and i'll bet really heavy.

2nd you are missing some really important items.

I'm going to go through your list make some deletions and some additions.

Sleeping Bag - 20 degrees - great if gets that cold BUT the bag you have is super bulky- shop around for a smaller one. I use a 40 degree bag thats about 1/4 the size and weighs 3 pounds.


Tent - Sleeps 2 - thats a pretty bulky and I'll bet heavy tent. there are several good and not expensive 2 man back packing tents in the 4-6 lbs range that are alot smaller than that. as a matter of fact colemans family site (login: family) is having a steep sale for black friday
Lensatic Compass -EXCELLENT!  where are your maps?
Pedometer- what? why? loose it.
E-tool a big what and why but if its something like a s tough sog etool then keep it
4 Canned Heat- bulky and heavy loose it. replace with alcohol or esbit
Canned Heat stove- see above
2 packs fire starter sticks- ok
1 Mess kit- whats in the mess kit? a canteen cup and a spork is all you need.
2 glow sticks- why? you can use them once each. where is your flash light?- replace with an LED headlamp
50 feet of 300 lb test nylon rope with hook on end- ok I like parracord better but to each his own
All purpose gun cleaning kit- how many guns are you bringing? tailor your kit to the firearm being carried
Multi-tool- GOOD!
Sun-Block/ Insect repellant- EXCELLENT!
Bottle of hand sanitizer- why? replace with small bottle of soap. hand sanitizer is just hand sanitizer. soap cleans you, clothes, mess kit, etc
1 bottle tylenol
1 bottle antihistamine
1 bottle ibuprofen
1 bottle Multi-vitamin- loose it you don't need it
2 cigar tubes of iodine salt- what? loose it! replace with a few salt packets from a fast food joint
1 small jar of instant coffee- ok
4 energy bars- ok
4 packs of instant miso soup- ok
1 pack ramen noodles- ok
1 Jar beef stock - ugh ok
1 towel - make it small towl. I carry one of those little terry cloth jobs for car detailing.
2 sets of shirts (water wicking) -ok
2 sets of pants- ok
3 sets of socks- ok
3 sets of underwea -okr
2 emergency blankets- are these the little silver $1 ones or a real one? I carry a heavy duty thick one. the cheapies are just noise producers
2 rain ponchos- you just need 1
1 knife sharpener - a smiths or gerber diamond rod
1 roll fishing line- you don't need a whole roll
1 roll gorilla glue duct tape- you can get a camper sized roll of duct tape at dicks or gander mountian
1 carbiner- what? are you going mountian climbing without a rope? loose it
Package of 50 disposable wipes- loose em see the bottle of soap above

2 Packs of Hot Hands - loose em buy wool mitts
2 Lrg. packs of Hot Hands- same as above buy wool hat
1 sleeping mat
1 waterproof container of matches + striker- get a magnesium fire starter and 2 bic lighters. 1 bic will outlast a box of matches
1 pipe
2 cans of tobacco
1 tent hammer- loose it its what a rock is for
unscented deodarant
Hatchet - loose it. an etool with a sharpened edge works

things you are lacking that are critical:

water purification: get a good filter- tablets don't kill crypto
get some water bladders- you have no water carriers list at all! you can't go more than 3 days without water at best and contaminated water will kill you.
a 1st aid kit. you have no bandages, no antiseptics, nothing but a few pills

you are light on food might want to add some more energy bars and some mountain house meals.


your bob as it is now has got to be heavy I'm guessing 60 lbs?

my 1st interation of a BOB was also ALICE pack based and it weighed 50 LBS!

i'm down to about 25 right now.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: robt871 on November 23, 2008, 09:57:46 AM
tylenol and ibuprofen, dont they serve the same purpose
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Taylor3006 on November 23, 2008, 10:34:03 AM
First off I just wanna say how against bugging out I am. History shows us that refugees are preyed upon and entirely too vulnerable. I do believe in evacuation from hurricanes and the like, but hunkering down at home to me has always been the sane thing to do. I agree with an earlier poster that technically my bag is not a BOB but a "Get Back Home Bag" that I carry in my car. Now with that said, just a couple of comments about bag contents. As a hiker/camper I would ditch all the different hygiene products including deodorant and toothpaste in favor of Dr Bonner's Soap (I prefer peppermint). You can brush your teeth with it, wash your body (including hair), wash clothes or dishes with it. Diluted you can use it as mouthwash. Great multipurpose soap and is much nicer than carrying around a ditty bag full of hygiene products. A small bottle costs around $3 at the health food store and you may wanna buy it first and try it out. If you are not accustomed to essential plant oils, ya may wanna try out the plain soap first as the peppermint or tea tree oil extracts may cause some "warming" of yer private areas. The other thing I always carry into the field is body powder, usually the medicated. When you can not shower, powdering can give you that clean feeling and it is good for the feet. It is cheap and light. I buy the Equate brand at Wally World or the medicated powder at the Dollar Stores. At $1 a bottle it costs so much less than the standard Gold Bond brand (close to $7) that it is truly unbelievable. I have tried the Gold Bond and like it but not enough where it justifies the extra cost.

About using an Alice bag, I love them especially with a frame. The medium sized bag is huge and with a frame I can tote quite a bit of weight comfortably. If you are worried about attracting attention, make or buy a pack cover made of whatever you want. There are some commercial pack covers available at Campmor and the like that will keep the military look to a minimum. Personally I do not worry about this, surplus packs are probably more common than commercial packs and anyone carrying a REALLY nice commercial pack would cause me to look at them a bit.

What's in your bag is secondary to what your are wearing. I keep good sturdy boots with my bag, I prefer Canadian issued combat boots. Feet stay dry and warm when it is cold and comfortable when it is over 100 degrees as well. Stuff a couple pair of good socks in each boot in case you are wearing flip flops or the like when ya need to get out of Dodge. A bag of good hiking clothes that you can change into prior to leaving your vehicle is probably a good idea as well. I keep a pair of cammie pants with a pair of wind pants (the kind that has zippered legs where you can make shorts outta them) in the car as well. If you are worried about the military look, just slip the windpants on over your cammies until you get to the woods. I also keep a pair of Swiss Army gaiters in with my boots, if you never used them, get them. I love my gaiters and think most hikers who have used them do as well.

Never discount the lowly walking stick. You can buy the aluminum ones if you like, personally I love my hickory stick. It was a gift and I tote it every time I hike or just take a walk. There are too many uses for it and have used it for protection more times than my firearms/knives combined. If you don't have a stick, make sure you have a means of obtaining one when yer on the run (ie a good knife).

For those who plan on bugging out, all I can say is good luck. If you have nowhere to go and just kinda plan on living off the land in a national forest during hard times you may wanna read about a fella named "Wild" Bill Moreland. His story may change your mind about heading into the wilderness.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: ColdHaven on November 23, 2008, 11:38:13 AM

Some may think that this BOB is lacking however I have developed my own system where my GHB (Get Home Bag) fits onto my ruck via ALICE clips. Here is a link to another forum where posted my GHB. The idea is that if I am away from home then I will have access to my car which has my GHB equipment. Once getting home and I have to bug out then my GHB attaches to my ruck with minimal effort and away I can go.

http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323)

Ok i realize this is my very 1st post here and you are a mod and this isn't a critique  of you or a personal attack but your BOB is screwed up. let me go through it an explain.

1st off thats thing is really bulky and i'll bet really heavy.

2nd you are missing some really important items.

I'm going to go through your list make some deletions and some additions.
Sleeping Bag - 20 degrees - great if gets that cold BUT the bag you have is super bulky- shop around for a smaller one. I use a 40 degree bag thats about 1/4 the size and weighs 3 pounds.
Tent - Sleeps 2 - thats a pretty bulky and I'll bet heavy tent. there are several good and not expensive 2 man back packing tents in the 4-6 lbs range that are alot smaller than that. as a matter of fact colemans family site (login: family) is having a steep sale for black friday
Lensatic Compass -EXCELLENT!  where are your maps?
Pedometer- what? why? loose it.
E-tool a big what and why but if its something like a s tough sog etool then keep it
4 Canned Heat- bulky and heavy loose it. replace with alcohol or esbit
Canned Heat stove- see above
1 Mess kit- whats in the mess kit? a canteen cup and a spork is all you need.
2 glow sticks- why? you can use them once each. where is your flash light?- replace with an LED headlamp
50 feet of 300 lb test nylon rope with hook on end- ok I like parracord better but to each his own
All purpose gun cleaning kit- how many guns are you bringing? tailor your kit to the firearm being carried
Bottle of hand sanitizer- why? replace with small bottle of soap. hand sanitizer is just hand sanitizer. soap cleans you, clothes, mess kit, etc
1 bottle tylenol
1 bottle antihistamine
1 bottle ibuprofen
1 bottle Multi-vitamin- loose it you don't need it
2 cigar tubes of iodine salt- what? loose it! replace with a few salt packets from a fast food joint
2 emergency blankets- are these the little silver $1 ones or a real one? I carry a heavy duty thick one. the cheapies are just noise producers
2 rain ponchos- you just need 1
1 knife sharpener - a smiths or gerber diamond rod
1 roll fishing line- you don't need a whole roll
1 roll gorilla glue duct tape- you can get a camper sized roll of duct tape at dicks or gander mountian
1 carbiner- what? are you going mountian climbing without a rope? loose it
Package of 50 disposable wipes- loose em see the bottle of soap above
2 Packs of Hot Hands - loose em buy wool mitts
2 Lrg. packs of Hot Hands- same as above buy wool hat
1 waterproof container of matches + striker- get a magnesium fire starter and 2 bic lighters. 1 bic will outlast a box of matches
1 tent hammer- loose it its what a rock is for
Hatchet - loose it. an etool with a sharpened edge works

things you are lacking that are critical:

water purification: get a good filter- tablets don't kill crypto
get some water bladders- you have no water carriers list at all! you can't go more than 3 days without water at best and contaminated water will kill you.
a 1st aid kit. you have no bandages, no antiseptics, nothing but a few pills

you are light on food might want to add some more energy bars and some mountain house meals.

your bob as it is now has got to be heavy I'm guessing 60 lbs?

my 1st interation of a BOB was also ALICE pack based and it weighed 50 LBS!

i'm down to about 25 right now.


Alright! Finally a critique! First of all let me say that I do not take this as an attack. Constructive criticism is always welcome so long as it obvious that someone is not being condescending about it or mean. I do not think you are being this way, but let me start out by saying that you must not have read my entire post. There is a link to where I have my GHG. I even stated that in my post. It seems you jumped right to the list without reading anything I wrote in the post. There is a link at the bottom of the post. It goes to here: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323) I had mentioned at the bottom of my post that there were things that seemed like they were missing from my BOB and that you should go to the link to see the gear that suppliments what I have listed here. Since I had posted it somewhere else I didn't see a need to write all that stuff up again.

For Brevity sake I am only going to respond about those things you critiqued on. Again, thanks!

Bulky means it can carry more, and heavy only depends on what you put in it.

Sleeping bag - its not heavy. In fact, for the size, price, and quality it is the best one for me to purchase. You want bulky and heavy try the sleeping bags the Army issues you.

Tent - I am not sure why you think these items are heavy. The tent weighs less that 5 lbs, and the sleeping bag may weigh 3 lbs. Shelter and keeping warm is very imporant in survival. They are items you need to bring with you if it is going to be a trek to your BOL. Besides, this is a two man tent, but it fits my family pretty good. Maybe not in a few more years, but we will see.

Lensatic compass - Please see http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323) I am looking for topigraphical maps, but haven't found any yet for my area. These maps I am used to using when I was in the Army. I would have to make due with what I have right now.

Pedometer - Small and weighs about the same as a feather. Simple. If you know how many feet you have traveled and know the conversion to miles then you can estimate how far you have traveled. In fact I am thinking about putting this in my GHB. With a map, Lensatic Compass, and a pedometer you can better track where you are and how far you have traveled.

Standard issue E-tool - My Drill Sergeant taught me too many ways to use this to not bring it with me. You can use this to clear an area to camp pretty quickly. You can chop medium sized branches. You can use it to hammer various things like tent pegs. You can use it to control fire. If for some reason you are caught in a forest fire you can use it to dig a trench around your area. Hell, you can even use it for defense. In my opinion you should have one of these in your BOB, BOV, and BOL.

Canned Heat - I have a budget. It travels good, and is not that heavy. I have thought long and hard about different types of fuel. Canned heat will not spill, and I do not have to worry about it exploding. It can get things just as hot as a stove, and it can even be used to start tender if needed. Each lasts about 2 1/2 hours. After that the empty cans can be used for other purposes (non-food or water related) and can also hold other kinds of fuel such as Kiwi wax, alcohol, or kerosene.

Canned Heat Stove - If you carry canned heat its kinda crazy not to bring something to cook on.

Mess Kit - If you think you will only need a canteen cup then go ahead. I am not going to stop you, but I would like to be able to cook on something. There is also matches in the kit. Included with this is a handy tool that has a spoon, knife, fork, and other utensils. The mess kit also has a cup for drinking soup, it has a frying pan, and eating plate. Its put together and collapes to make the thing about half the size of a regular plate. I also have a P38 can opener in this kit. I am not sure what you are planning to eat on your way to your BOL, but I will be able to eat the full range of canned food, dried food items, and anything I want to cook. I would call this personal preference if it were just me, but since it is my family I need a quicker way to cook things in bulk.

Glow sticks - Yes they can only be used once, but they are to hang outside of my ruck so that those following behind me can see me. Sometimes it is better to not have a flashlight on while traveling at night if that is what you need to do. I learned this idea from the Army. Most of our Kevlar helmets had two glow in the dark patches on the back of a band we wrapped around our helmet. This is so if we were traveling at night that the person behind us would not lose track of the guy in front of him, and so on. I would love to get ahold of one of those on a larger scale so that it could recharge during the day like most glow-in-the-dark stuff. I will have to look into it further.

Rope - Parachord is good. Remember, I am on a budget. If you find any sales on this let me know!

Gun Cleaning kit - I plan to bring one gun of each type. Handgun, Carbine, and shotgun. I know...how am I going to carry all of that? Simple. The handgun fits on my webbing belt for the LCE. I can either hand carry/sling/or put the shotgun across my ALICE pack top. So what about the carbine? My fiancee, soon to be wife. I am teaching her how to use a handgun, and hopefully how to use a .22 and eventually the carbine. So yeah, I need to bring something to clean the stuff I am bringing.

Hand Sanitizer - Soap you need water to clean with. Personally I do not want to waste any more water than need be. Hand sanitizer kills 99.99% of germs. This is the idea in using anything to clean. It can be used to clean my hands quickly before cooking or eating. Its quick, dries easy, uses no water, and in my opinion it does not get your hands cold (which if it is winter you are not going to want to get your hands colder than they already are).

I am going to assume that since you did not list an 'ok' beside the meds or comment on them you are including them in the multi-vitamin statement. Never assume everything is going to go 100% according to plan. Hell, don't even assume 50% of your plan is going to work. Tylenol is acetaminophen. Used in conjunction with caffeine its effects improve. Not astronomically, but better than by itself. Here is a link: http://www.drugs.com/mtm/acetaminophen-and-caffeine.html (http://www.drugs.com/mtm/acetaminophen-and-caffeine.html) The same thing with Ibuprofen. You might need pain relief whether it is from fatigue, headaches, or cramps. Antihistamine is for allergies, bites, stings, and they can be broken open and applied directly to the skin. Last is the multi-vitamin. If you think you are going to get all your nutrients and minerals through the food you eat on your way then you might want to think again. Even once you get there you are not going to have all the nutrients you need, and one of those is iodine. I don't know about you but I don't want a goiter the shape of a football.

Tubes of iodine salt - I am not sure how far your BOL is. It could be down the road, mine is many miles, and I like assurances. Salt is good, in small quantaties, to help replenish electrolytes in your body. This is no different an idea than the salt tablets the Army gives to recruits during the hot months of the year. I like to err on the side of caution and have this just in case. Salt packs from restaraunts are too small, and can get wet too easily.

Beef stock - Scratching  your head about this one? One it has salt in it too, but it also has nutrients. We give beef stock to those people in the hospital when they can not keep down solids. Do you think that during the trip someone might not get sick or be in a position where they can not eat solids without vomiting? Its a small bottle if that worries you. I would rather have it and be able to feed someone than not have it and need it.

Emergency blankets - Of course they are the 1 dollar kind. They are there for more than one reason too. They might be noise makers, but if you need to be rescued then they might be handy. They are shiny, warm, and reflective. Sometimes you might want to be found. Need to take that into account. Besides, I have my sleeping bag. If I needed something for warmth I would use that, right?

Rain ponchos - Need only one? I have a family of three. My fiancee, daughter, and myself. Hopefully your planning involves family members also. Mine does.  ;D I  have a army issue poncho that is a part of my GHB. Its not in the picture because there is a link to it.

Knife sharpener - I have one of the easy to use kind. My BOL already has a good knife sharpening kit. This will be light and sufficient to get me to my BOL. (Not to mention cheaper)

Fishing line - Again, multi-purpose. Not only can this be used to fish with, but to tie things, sew things, be used for sutures, and be used to trap animals. The roll fits nicely in the bottom of one of the outer pockets and so does not use that much room. Personal choice, I guess, but I would rather have it than not.

Gorilla Glue Duct Tape - You can also get this kind of duct tape at Wal-Mart. It is super strong, and you won't have to worry about it coming loose. Besides, I also have a smaller amount of this wrapped around a pencil in my GHB in case I need some there. Compact and easy to use. This also fits in the bottom of one of my outside pouches rather nicely. This stuff is too useful not to bring some with you.

Carbiner - First of all I do have a rope. You commented on it a minute ago. Second, this is not a carbiner to climb with. It is used to carry items. What if I need quick access to something? What if for some reason my pack fell and I need to lift it up to me? It has this handy little carbiner attached so all I have to do is lower a hook and pull it up to me. Carbiners are very useful and I want to buy some more soon.

Disposable wipes - Man you are going to be really stinky out there if you do not have a way to bathe yourself, or wipe your behind. You think you are going to go very long without the need to deficate? Hope you brought plenty of corn cobs!

Hot hands - yes, but the thing is that neither gloves nor hats actually generate heat. These do. There is a reason hunters are fond of them. Don't get me wrong. Bring a set of gloves and hat, and they can be used in conjunction for better effect. They stay warm for many hours. These are small enough to place in jackets and gloves. Chalk it up to personal preference if you want.  ;)

Matches and striker - I have a magnesium striker in mh GHB. See: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323) The matches are there for more than one reason. Try getting a BIC to light easily when it is cold. Its not easy. I know, I am a smoker. The reason for the matches are that in case of the BICs not working from my GHB then I will use these.

Tent hammer - It is also what a E-Tool is for. However, if I need to be vertical and hammering a rock and an E-tool is not going to be as useful. I suppose I could do without it. For now I am keeping it, and probably in my BOV.

Hatchet - Just a minute ago you said an E-Tool wasn't needed. Yes, you can use it to chop. Do I want to? No. I don't want to try and spend hours chopping a thick limb with it. I already did that with my survival knife, and decided I want to have a hatchet. Again you could mark this up to personal preference I suppose. Besides, if your E-Tool becomes stuck in a large limb or tree how do you suppose to get it out and use it again? I never underestimate the probability for any legitimate plan to have setbacks. Why risk losing the E-Tool? I could use the E-Tool and Survival knife to chop. I have done it before. However, I prefer not to have too many blisters. Its convienience mixed with risk management.

Water Filter - I am looking into this. Most filters are pretty expensive. This may be a purchase futher down the line. I do have water tabs in my GHB. It listed here: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323)

No water carriers -  ;) Okay...listed here: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323) There is a 2 quart container of water in my BOV with water tabs. In my trunk is a 7 gallon container of water. On my LCE there are two 1 quart canteens of water. I have in the house 24 gallons of water. Inside the house I have chlorine for contaminated water in addition to the water tabs in the BOV. I have a 2 1 quart water bottles inside the house also. In all about 32 gallons of water. 8 of those gallons being a part of my bug out gear.

1st aid kit - I have a FAK with tons of useful items, but to your credit I didn't mention it. However, listed here: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323) there is the GHB load-out with the 1st aid type equipment. Also, there is a complete 1st aid kit under my seat in my BOV. I work at a hospital, which you did not know, and one of the first things I started gathering was medical supplies. Legally of course.

Food, yes I know there is more I should add. I have 9 gallon container with pento beans in them (very useful  to cook with the canned heat), but I am looking into some other things as well. Energy bars only go so far. I have more food in my GHB, but I need to put more in my BOB too. To see the food I have in my GHB go to http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 (http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323) Trail mix does well and that is what I have in my GHB. I have been thinking about purchasing some rations (not MRE's or mountain house) which I have seen online. They supply you with all the nutrients you need per meal. I am still deciding on this.

Gear weight? Probably around that when I add on the GHB. Might be more than that later. 50 lbs was standard carrying weight when we went on road marches. I have read that a good standard to go by is to not pack more than 1/3rd your weight. I weigh 250 and so 1/3rd of that is 83. This has to do with carrying so that it does not make you lose your center of gravity. Your other arguement for this would be could I carry it? I am a pretty hefty guy, but even I would say I need more practice carrying it longer distances than I have. That is why I am thinking of trying to get people from my region together to do Bug out drills and tests. I still would like to see more people in our region in our forum area before I do this though. Everyone could use more exercise including me. So I will give you that, but I still can carry it a good distance without fatigue.

I could see about getting my BOB lighter, or I could also exercise a bit more than I do and carry what I need.

Thanks again for your critique! I like hearing what others think. Also, I have developed a system that works for me and my family, and I like to hear how I can improve. My system of using my GHB as an attachment to my ALICE pack I think is a good one. You have alot of essential gear when you are out, and if you need to get home, but if you need to bug out from there you can attach it to the ALICE pack and go. Also, it would have helped if you would have read that link I wrote in my original post. You would have seen that I am not as under prepared as you thought. I am not a pro, but I am not a newbie either.

I would love to see your pack! If you have been able to work it down to 25 lbs that is great! I would love to learn how to make better use of the space I have. Like I said I am not a pro. Help the thread along and post your BOB. Thanks again for your comments and suggestions!  :D
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: ColdHaven on November 23, 2008, 12:05:07 PM
tylenol and ibuprofen, dont they serve the same purpose

Tylenol is better for fevers. Ibuprofen is better for muscle aches and sprains. Both used in conjunction with caffeine are better.

First off I just wanna say how against bugging out I am. History shows us that refugees are preyed upon and entirely too vulnerable. I do believe in evacuation from hurricanes and the like, but hunkering down at home to me has always been the sane thing to do. I agree with an earlier poster that technically my bag is not a BOB but a "Get Back Home Bag" that I carry in my car. Now with that said, just a couple of comments about bag contents. As a hiker/camper I would ditch all the different hygiene products including deodorant and toothpaste in favor of Dr Bonner's Soap (I prefer peppermint). You can brush your teeth with it, wash your body (including hair), wash clothes or dishes with it. Diluted you can use it as mouthwash. Great multipurpose soap and is much nicer than carrying around a ditty bag full of hygiene products. A small bottle costs around $3 at the health food store and you may wanna buy it first and try it out. If you are not accustomed to essential plant oils, ya may wanna try out the plain soap first as the peppermint or tea tree oil extracts may cause some "warming" of yer private areas. The other thing I always carry into the field is body powder, usually the medicated. When you can not shower, powdering can give you that clean feeling and it is good for the feet. It is cheap and light. I buy the Equate brand at Wally World or the medicated powder at the Dollar Stores. At $1 a bottle it costs so much less than the standard Gold Bond brand (close to $7) that it is truly unbelievable. I have tried the Gold Bond and like it but not enough where it justifies the extra cost.

About using an Alice bag, I love them especially with a frame. The medium sized bag is huge and with a frame I can tote quite a bit of weight comfortably. If you are worried about attracting attention, make or buy a pack cover made of whatever you want. There are some commercial pack covers available at Campmor and the like that will keep the military look to a minimum. Personally I do not worry about this, surplus packs are probably more common than commercial packs and anyone carrying a REALLY nice commercial pack would cause me to look at them a bit.

What's in your bag is secondary to what your are wearing. I keep good sturdy boots with my bag, I prefer Canadian issued combat boots. Feet stay dry and warm when it is cold and comfortable when it is over 100 degrees as well. Stuff a couple pair of good socks in each boot in case you are wearing flip flops or the like when ya need to get out of Dodge. A bag of good hiking clothes that you can change into prior to leaving your vehicle is probably a good idea as well. I keep a pair of cammie pants with a pair of wind pants (the kind that has zippered legs where you can make shorts outta them) in the car as well. If you are worried about the military look, just slip the windpants on over your cammies until you get to the woods. I also keep a pair of Swiss Army gaiters in with my boots, if you never used them, get them. I love my gaiters and think most hikers who have used them do as well.

Never discount the lowly walking stick. You can buy the aluminum ones if you like, personally I love my hickory stick. It was a gift and I tote it every time I hike or just take a walk. There are too many uses for it and have used it for protection more times than my firearms/knives combined. If you don't have a stick, make sure you have a means of obtaining one when yer on the run (ie a good knife).

For those who plan on bugging out, all I can say is good luck. If you have nowhere to go and just kinda plan on living off the land in a national forest during hard times you may wanna read about a fella named "Wild" Bill Moreland. His story may change your mind about heading into the wilderness.

Cool I am going to have to look for that stuff! (Dr Bonner's Soap). That would be a pretty handy thing to have, and you're right that would reduce the amount of items in your pack. Where do they usually sell it?

I don't think I have foot powder yet, and it is a great suggestion. We were encouraged to use it alot in the Army. I need to get some for both my FAK, BOB, and BOL. I also need to buy more Moleskin, and thicker socks.

I do have a cover for the pack, but I think it makes it stand out more. I have it because it came with the pack when I bought it. It is supposed to help keep rain and dust out of your pack. You could use the same kind of principle with other material. The cover I have is desert camo. I wonder if I turned it inside out if it would be less noticeable. I think attacting attention is more possible if you have a ton of tactical gear. A BOB by itself is not going to attact attention. Besides, the way I have it set up it looks more normal, at least I think so.

A good pair of shoes is probably one of the more essential parts of your gear. I have a pair of boots in my BOV. I thought about putting them in my BOB but they take up a lot of room. I also have some clothing in my car, but I need to get more cold weather clothing. I have another pair of boots in my house. I can't get away with having boots at work, but thats why there are some extra clothing and boots in my car. I have never tried gaiters, but I hear they are very useful. I never thought about a walking stick either. I might try to get one. Most can attach to your BOB easy.

As a side note, not everyone bugging out is heading to live in the forest. Some of us live in a place where it would not be good to be if some SHTF. I live in a trailer and in most disasters staying there would not be a good idea. I would love it if I could bug in my house, but in most scenarios I have thought about it is not a good idea. Though, if I thought the situation warranted it, I would stay here. I have a BOL and I would head there. If I was away at work or anywere else I would rely on my GHB and BOV to get home to gather equipment, and head to my BOL. If you live at a place that is better to stay than to go then you are blessed and I wished I lived in the same circumstances.

Thanks for the posts! Very good information so far. +1 Taylor on the Dr. Bonner Soap! That is going to save me alot of space.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Taylor3006 on November 23, 2008, 01:24:43 PM
"Cool I am going to have to look for that stuff! (Dr Bonner's Soap). That would be a pretty handy thing to have, and you're right that would reduce the amount of items in your pack. Where do they usually sell it?"

Any health food store should have it, Whole Earth Foods carries it and you could probably find it online. I really love this stuff hell you can eat it as well if you had to. BTW it is nice too for those who have to read something while taking a crap. The label is just covered in writing, lots of it. Some weird stuff, some fun, but everytime I have to "go" in the woods, I always bring my bottle along for reading material. When you get a bottle you will see what I mean. They sell the stuff in small bottles (approx 8 oz sized) all the way up to gallons. You might experiment a bit with the smaller bottles to see which one you prefer. I buy the peppermint and the plain to which I usually add my own essential oils (you can get them at the health food store as well).

As a corpsman I always wanna say powder yer feet however foot powder is designed only for feet (trust me on this, burns yer private areas) and is why I always go for the body powder as you can use it anywhere including feet. Course I always heard from the old timer corpsmen (usually Nam vets) that they used foot powder in the field to kill lice or crabs. Personally I think I would live with the bugs but hey, whatever works.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: archer on November 23, 2008, 03:42:19 PM
What is 'body powder'? I've never heard of it....
I'll have to get some Dr Bonners Soap and try it out.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Taylor3006 on November 23, 2008, 03:58:16 PM
"What is 'body powder'? I've never heard of it...."

Just like baby powder only not all smelly. Usually over by the foot powder section of a grocery store. Gold Bond Powder is a name brand, I think there is one called Shower to Shower as well, been a while since I have seen it. I was introduced to body powder in high school by my track coach. They called it jock itch powder and ya powdered your privates and butt crack with it so you didn't get a heat rash during the summer when training. Have used it ever since. Barbers used to use talc powder after they shaved the hairs off your neck as well, very refreshing.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: archer on November 23, 2008, 04:21:01 PM
Thanks for the info Taylor3006! I'll have to get some and try it out.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Taylor3006 on November 23, 2008, 04:53:17 PM
"As a side note, not everyone bugging out is heading to live in the forest. Some of us live in a place where it would not be good to be if some SHTF. I live in a trailer and in most disasters staying there would not be a good idea. I would love it if I could bug in my house, but in most scenarios I have thought about it is not a good idea. Though, if I thought the situation warranted it, I would stay here. I have a BOL and I would head there. If I was away at work or anywere else I would rely on my GHB and BOV to get home to gather equipment, and head to my BOL. If you live at a place that is better to stay than to go then you are blessed and I wished I lived in the same circumstance."

I apologize for not making myself clear on this point. If you have a BOL by all means use it. What I so poorly was trying to say is that many "survivalists" have an idea of just heading out with their gear and living off the land or what not. IMHO I believe that these "survivalists" will become nothing more than well armed looters preying off of country folk like myself and it probably would not take long for them to become a target to be taken out before they become a problem instead of waiting until they killed livestock or break into outbuildings. Even in good times a property owner could probably get away with shooting an armed man especially if they were all dolled out in military garb. For those headed to national forests or the like, all I can say is good luck. Living that way is tough and I can not imagine that park rangers would take too kindly to people killing off wildlife or misusing the lands they are sworn to protect. If you make yourself too much of a pest, they will find you. Most park rangers know their area much better than someone who has visited many times, these guys (and gals) work there every day and many live on the park year round. Anywho I apologize for not making myself more clear. If you plan on bugging out, just make sure that where you are headed is friendly to your arrival.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: kernal_panic on November 23, 2008, 06:41:38 PM
Bulky means it can carry more, and heavy only depends on what you put in it.
I mean the stuff you have in it an attached to it is bulky why carry 60 lbs when stuff that weighs 30 lbs will do?

Sleeping bag - its not heavy. In fact, for the size, price, and quality it is the best one for me to purchase. You want bulky and heavy try the sleeping bags the Army issues you.

so its smaller and lighter than an army issue bag. so what. everything the army issues is stupidly heavy. a slumber jack telluride 30 degree bag is the size of a foot ball. have you weighed that bag of yours? I bet its a solid 5 lbs or more. a tellurides 3 lbs

Tent - I am not sure why you think these items are heavy. The tent weighs less that 5 lbs, and the sleeping bag may weigh 3 lbs. Shelter and keeping warm is very imporant in survival. They are items you need to bring with you if it is going to be a trek to your BOL. Besides, this is a two man tent, but it fits my family pretty good. Maybe not in a few more years, but we will see.

have you weighed this stuff? what tent is that? i've never seen a 5 lb tent that was that big!

Lensatic compass - Please see http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323 I am looking for topigraphical maps, but haven't found any yet for my area. These maps I am used to using when I was in the Army. I would have to make due with what I have right now.

Pedometer - Small and weighs about the same as a feather. Simple. If you know how many feet you have traveled and know the conversion to miles then you can estimate how far you have traveled. In fact I am thinking about putting this in my GHB. With a map, Lensatic Compass, and a pedometer you can better track where you are and how far you have traveled.

Standard issue E-tool - My Drill Sergeant taught me too many ways to use this to not bring it with me. You can use this to clear an area to camp pretty quickly. You can chop medium sized branches. You can use it to hammer various things like tent pegs. You can use it to control fire. If for some reason you are caught in a forest fire you can use it to dig a trench around your area. Hell, you can even use it for defense. In my opinion you should have one of these in your BOB, BOV, and BOL.

ok so you can do all of that. the question is do you NEED to? you state you'd rather use a hatchet for chopping wood.
A rock or chunk of wood works as a hammer, you can dig with a stick if you HAVE to, you have a gun and knife for defense, its your spine carry what you want but I think you are wasting space and weight for something you MIGHT use rather than what you will use


Canned Heat - I have a budget. It travels good, and is not that heavy. I have thought long and hard about different types of fuel. Canned heat will not spill, and I do not have to worry about it exploding. It can get things just as hot as a stove, and it can even be used to start tender if needed. Each lasts about 2 1/2 hours. After that the empty cans can be used for other purposes (non-food or water related) and can also hold other kinds of fuel such as Kiwi wax, alcohol, or kerosene.

Canned Heat Stove - If you carry canned heat its kinda crazy not to bring something to cook on.

you should try alcohol stoves I have a nifty kit I put together that consists of 2 zip lock bowls, a hennieken beer can and an alcohol burner. Hit me with a mail address I'll send you one to try out. total weight with 4 onces of fuel is just 398 grams

Mess Kit - If you think you will only need a canteen cup then go ahead. I am not going to stop you, but I would like to be able to cook on something. There is also matches in the kit. Included with this is a handy tool that has a spoon, knife, fork, and other utensils. The mess kit also has a cup for drinking soup, it has a frying pan, and eating plate. Its put together and collapes to make the thing about half the size of a regular plate. I also have a P38 can opener in this kit. I am not sure what you are planning to eat on your way to your BOL, but I will be able to eat the full range of canned food, dried food items, and anything I want to cook. I would call this personal preference if it were just me, but since it is my family I need a quicker way to cook things in bulk.

why do have a frying pan and a plate when none of the food in your bob is fryable? its more unnecessary stuff

Glow sticks - Yes they can only be used once, but they are to hang outside of my ruck so that those following behind me can see me. Sometimes it is better to not have a flashlight on while traveling at night if that is what you need to do. I learned this idea from the Army. Most of our Kevlar helmets had two glow in the dark patches on the back of a band we wrapped around our helmet. This is so if we were traveling at night that the person behind us would not lose track of the guy in front of him, and so on. I would love to get ahold of one of those on a larger scale so that it could recharge during the day like most glow-in-the-dark stuff. I will have to look into it further.

they make electric ones these days. you might want to look into them
Rope - Parachord is good. Remember, I am on a budget. If you find any sales on this let me know!

Gun Cleaning kit - I plan to bring one gun of each type. Handgun, Carbine, and shotgun. I know...how am I going to carry all of that? Simple. The handgun fits on my webbing belt for the LCE. I can either hand carry/sling/or put the shotgun across my ALICE pack top. So what about the carbine? My fiancee, soon to be wife. I am teaching her how to use a handgun, and hopefully how to use a .22 and eventually the carbine. So yeah, I need to bring something to clean the stuff I am bringing.

you are going to lug a 4 or 5 lbs shotgun, a 4 or 5 lb carbine a pistol, and ammo for all 3 around? thats 15 lbs of guns and ammo or more. loose the shotgun or the carbine or give the carbine to the woman.

Hand Sanitizer - Soap you need water to clean with. Personally I do not want to waste any more water than need be. Hand sanitizer kills 99.99% of germs. This is the idea in using anything to clean. It can be used to clean my hands quickly before cooking or eating. Its quick, dries easy, uses no water, and in my opinion it does not get your hands cold (which if it is winter you are not going to want to get your hands colder than they already are).

again which can be done with soap which has more uses than hand sanitizer. why carry both when 1 will do.

I am going to assume that since you did not list an 'ok' beside the meds or comment on them you are including them in the multi-vitamin statement. Never assume everything is going to go 100% according to plan. Hell, don't even assume 50% of your plan is going to work. Tylenol is acetaminophen. Used in conjunction with caffeine its effects improve. Not astronomically, but better than by itself. Here is a link: http://www.drugs.com/mtm/acetaminophen-and-caffeine.html The same thing with Ibuprofen. You might need pain relief whether it is from fatigue, headaches, or cramps. Antihistamine is for allergies, bites, stings, and they can be broken open and applied directly to the skin. Last is the multi-vitamin. If you think you are going to get all your nutrients and minerals through the food you eat on your way then you might want to think again. Even once you get there you are not going to have all the nutrients you need, and one of those is iodine. I don't know about you but I don't want a goiter the shape of a football.

how am I going to get goiter with in a week or 2? I don't take vitamens NOW, infact most people DON'T take vitamens. as for the final destination thats an item you stock THERE. why lug it around if you if you don't have to??

Tubes of iodine salt - I am not sure how far your BOL is. It could be down the road, mine is many miles, and I like assurances. Salt is good, in small quantaties, to help replenish electrolytes in your body. This is no different an idea than the salt tablets the Army gives to recruits during the hot months of the year. I like to err on the side of caution and have this just in case. Salt packs from restaraunts are too small, and can get wet too easily.

I have gatoraide packets. as for salt getting wet 1 so what its can dry out, 2 thats what a plastic baggy is for.

Beef stock - Scratching  your head about this one? One it has salt in it too, but it also has nutrients. We give beef stock to those people in the hospital when they can not keep down solids. Do you think that during the trip someone might not get sick or be in a position where they can not eat solids without vomiting? Its a small bottle if that worries you. I would rather have it and be able to feed someone than not have it and need it.

never eaten the stuff in my life, why waste the money and space on something I won't use?
Emergency blankets - Of course they are the 1 dollar kind. They are there for more than one reason too. They might be noise makers, but if you need to be rescued then they might be handy. They are shiny, warm, and reflective. Sometimes you might want to be found. Need to take that into account. Besides, I have my sleeping bag. If I needed something for warmth I would use that, right?

the 1 dollar kind in my experiance are useless garbage. I have a heavy duty one that has groments on it and is red on one side reflective on the other. I got it at bass pro. "might be handy"  been there tried em and they aren't have used the good one to boost the effectiveness of my sleeping bag more than once when the temps dipped below its rating. I can't say enough about the quality reflective blankets. the cheapies suck. try one then try a good one. the good ones are heavier and bulkier but they are worth it

Rain ponchos - Need only one? I have a family of three. My fiancee, daughter, and myself. Hopefully your planning involves family members also. Mine does.  Grin I  have a army issue poncho that is a part of my GHB. Its not in the picture because there is a link to it.

nope just me. but why are you carrying the kids gear and the womans?

Knife sharpener - I have one of the easy to use kind. My BOL already has a good knife sharpening kit. This will be light and sufficient to get me to my BOL. (Not to mention cheaper)

Fishing line - Again, multi-purpose. Not only can this be used to fish with, but to tie things, sew things, be used for sutures, and be used to trap animals. The roll fits nicely in the bottom of one of the outer pockets and so does not use that much room. Personal choice, I guess, but I would rather have it than not.

where are your hooks?

Gorilla Glue Duct Tape - You can also get this kind of duct tape at Wal-Mart. It is super strong, and you won't have to worry about it coming loose. Besides, I also have a smaller amount of this wrapped around a pencil in my GHB in case I need some there. Compact and easy to use. This also fits in the bottom of one of my outside pouches rather nicely. This stuff is too useful not to bring some with you.

Carbiner - First of all I do have a rope. You commented on it a minute ago. Second, this is not a carbiner to climb with. It is used to carry items. What if I need quick access to something? What if for some reason my pack fell and I need to lift it up to me? It has this handy little carbiner attached so all I have to do is lower a hook and pull it up to me. Carbiners are very useful and I want to buy some more soon.

how are you going to retrieve the bag when the rope and caribiner are in the bag?

Disposable wipes - Man you are going to be really stinky out there if you do not have a way to bathe yourself, or wipe your behind. You think you are going to go very long without the need to deficate? Hope you brought plenty of corn cobs!

soap and a small towel

Hot hands - yes, but the thing is that neither gloves nor hats actually generate heat. These do. There is a reason hunters are fond of them. Don't get me wrong. Bring a set of gloves and hat, and they can be used in conjunction for better effect. They stay warm for many hours. These are small enough to place in jackets and gloves. Chalk it up to personal preference if you want.  Wink

you get to use them once. a warmer set of gloves or mitts you use multiple times. why waste valuable space and weight on something that disposable when you could use that space for something that 1. can be used again and again and 2. has more than one use?


Tent hammer - It is also what a E-Tool is for. However, if I need to be vertical and hammering a rock and an E-tool is not going to be as useful. I suppose I could do without it. For now I am keeping it, and probably in my BOV.

why would you be vertical hammering a rock? you don't have any climbing gear! besides you are carrying a hatchet no? the back end works as a hammer!



i have one but don't carry it but you really might want to try a hand chain saw. not one of  those crappy wire saws but a hand chain saw. they run 20-30. I've used one. it will zip through a 2-3 inch limb in seconds.
Water Filter - I am looking into this. Most filters are pretty expensive. This may be a purchase futher down the line. I do have water tabs in my GHB. It listed here: http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=34323

I use the katadyn hiker. its good for 200 gallons or so. its fast and doesn't clog up like the msr ceramics do. freind of mine is a through hiker and uses one. 1st cartdige lasted 3 hiking seasons for him. also Berkey has a sport bottle with a ceramic filter in it. I have one of those 2. the Hiker runs $60 and the berkey was $25.



get a 2 liter bladder. they sell em at walmart for $10. I have one in my pack and i use a 1 quart GI canteen too.

1st aid kit - I have a FAK with tons of useful items, but to your credit I didn't mention it. However, listed here:

excellent the importance of a 1st aid can never be stressed enough. other than my tent, bag, clothes, flash light and food, my 1st aid kit gets used everytime I go out.



trail mix is great. don't get the stuff which the chocolate chips though. the stuff melts! life boat rations taste like a racoons ass.

Gear weight? Probably around that when I add on the GHB. Might be more than that later. 50 lbs was standard carrying weight when we went on road marches. I have read that a good standard to go by is to not pack more than 1/3rd your weight. I weigh 250 and so 1/3rd of that is 83. This has to do with carrying so that it does not make you lose your center of gravity. Your other arguement for this would be could I carry it? I am a pretty hefty guy, but even I would say I need more practice carrying it longer distances than I have. That is why I am thinking of trying to get people from my region together to do Bug out drills and tests. I still would like to see more people in our region in our forum area before I do this though. Everyone could use more exercise including me. So I will give you that, but I still can carry it a good distance without fatigue.

I could see about getting my BOB lighter, or I could also exercise a bit more than I do and carry what I need.

this is where you have a slight problem. You aren't in the army anymore. I've never been in. thank you for your service!
this is probably why you and I have a different view point. I was in boyscouts I hated lugging to much crap about
My point here is go through the pack and take a new look at everything. Do i NEED this? or is this something I think I MIGHT need?
250 lbs and in good shape? GREAT! go through the pack, reduce the current bulk and weight and that will let you add more of the stuff you need like food and water carriers



I would love to see your pack! If you have been able to work it down to 25 lbs that is great! I would love to learn how to make better use of the space I have. Like I said I am not a pro. Help the thread along and post your BOB. Thanks again for your comments and suggestions!  Cheesy

Ok I have no pic because my BOB is discomBOBulated as I was using it last weekend to camp but here is what I carry:

Outdoor products internal frame pack , wal mart, 2 lbs
2 liter water bladder, wal mart
Hennieken keg cook kit, home made, 16 ounces with fuel, 2 bic lighters, and soap, and snow peak spork
usgi canteen and canteen cup, $15 from army navy store
slumber jack diablo, got it from campmor, $40
alpine design 2 man hiker tent, 4.5 lbs, $30 at sports authority- to be replaced soon with eureka solitare which weighs 2.5 lbs
ozark trail camp pad, made in the us, wal mart, $10 about 1 lbs
1 coleman emergency poncho
becker bk-7  , free from freind, on my hip not part of pack
gerber sportsmans multiplyr too
1 extra pair of caro pants that convert to cargo shorts
1 extra shirt
2 pair whitie tighties
3 pair wool socks
wool watch cap
35 or 40 foot hunk of paracord
couglins heavy duty thermal blanket
katadyn kiker filter
tooth brush tooth paste deodorant
rayovac kids adventure light head lamp, light weight, bright
rayovac sportsman 3 watt 2AA  tac light
2 mres
2 mre entrees
2 mountian house meals
3 cliff bars
gatoraid packets
1st aid kit  with pain killers, alieve, bandages, anti biotic cream, hydro cortizone cream, tecnu and duct tape

thats about it. I know no compass or maps. I'm working on it!


that packs about 25 lbs right now with no water.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: kernal_panic on November 23, 2008, 06:46:59 PM
my point is go through and look for ways to reduce bulk. like I said my 1st attempt at this came out at 50 lbs!

so I started looking at it 1st was :

1. what do I really use?
2. can I get this in something smaller and lighter?
3. what do i have here that can pull double or triple duty?

my stove the 1st time around was a colemen 442 and a gsi pot. holy crap it weighed like 2 or 3 lbs! PLUS THE FUEL!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: ColdHaven on November 28, 2008, 11:36:49 AM
I agree that I could find ways to reduce bulk. One of these is stashing some items at my BOL. However, there are some reasons I include what I do. Most of them I said could be chalked up to personal preference. I do what I can with what I got on what income I have. Simpley stated. what I have and think I need is going to differ from what you think would be best for you. Obviously weight is a concern, but I think you are trying to overstate its importance. Simply saying what you did in your last post would have been sufficient.

I am not sure how much my ruck weighs, but I can carry it and walk around with it rather well. I do need to test walking with it for several miles though to get a better gauge of its weight and my endurance. You seem to have a pretty negative view about much of my equipment. Either not seeing a need for it or thinking it is worthless. It might be to you, but I have never heard many survivalists saying a E-Tool should not be a part of your gear.

This will be my last post in response to you on my BOB. We have a difference of opinion. I will take the suggestion to lighten my gear and add more food because I agree with that. But leaving out what I consider vital gear to depend on any sticks and rocks I may or may not find I think is foolish.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Beetle on November 30, 2008, 09:19:01 PM
I got my wifes BOB done today. My background is in SAR so it is probably oreinted that way. Please feel free to critique or make suggestions.

The Backpack is a hiker design, old SAR pack I had:

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3074/3072559685_efaaf60da4_b.jpg)

Stuff laid out:

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3223/3072554999_4aa491a9a3_b.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3181/3073389704_290fcba82b_b.jpg)

Close up of contents:

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3287/3073390636_55f907e553_b.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3060/3073394186_b5a42347cf_b.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3021/3072554093_2a2781de5d_b.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3227/3072555983_d9551fc4eb_b.jpg)

I put the lighters, matches and battery's in a little plastic bottle to protect them:

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3072/3073395078_327f7d6655_b.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3277/3072558759_261853281c_b.jpg)

I packed everything in a heavy orange bag, like the state uses for garbage to keep everything dry:

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3214/3072560575_a1ee375b87_b.jpg)

Picture of the pack packed:

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3198/3072561607_15627087a7_b.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3233/3073399584_ca924e8b43_b.jpg)

On the wife:

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3205/3073400622_ce81a61a6d_b.jpg)


I asked my wife if she thought I was crazy for making her a BOB, she replied "kinda". I said "Do you think there are other husbands who would do this for their wife?" Without missing a beat she replied" Well maybe the guys on your survival website."...I chuckled...  Prepper's take that as a compliment!!!!

Contents of pack:

FAK
Knife-folder
Knife- K bar type
2 flex cuffs
1 pack Wet wipes
TP
Whistle/ Match holder/ Compass w strike anywhere matches
Cheap rescue blanket
triangular bandage
Oregon road map
Esbitt stove w/ extra Tabs.
2 "D" Maglite
1 "AA" mini maglite
2 extra "D" Batt.
Crystal light for bottled water
Surgical gloves 2 pair
2 N95 masks
50'cord
1 heavy duty Rescue blanket
2 BIC Lighters
2 boxes windproof matches
6 "AA" Batts.
10 Yrds.duct tape wrapped around bottle
Tarp 6'x8'
Rubber Rain jacket w/ hood
1 pair Wool socks
5 Mountain house meals
1cardboard windscreen  See link  http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=1120.msg10605#msg10605 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=1120.msg10605#msg10605)
1 Fleece blanket
Heavy winter Gloves
Wool hat
Leather work gloves
1 Yasaeu 2 meter VX 170 ham handheld radio w/ weather channel
1 FRS radio
Leatherman
GPS
Metal cup
Hi visibilty safety vest
6 bottles water
Heavy coat w/ hood
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Derek on December 14, 2008, 09:09:16 PM
I ran across these and I felt thisw was a great place to post the link. Don't waste space in your BOB wear it. or two of them.

 http://www.survivalstraps.com/survivalbracelets.html
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Roswell on January 25, 2009, 01:39:23 AM
Bailey:  good pack I would just 1) pack the cardboard on the inside because you want to keep it dry.  Take the flashlight out to make room and put it on the side so it is close at hand.  2) don't forget insect repellent. it is a nuisance us men often forget about.    ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Beetle on January 25, 2009, 11:44:46 AM
Bailey:  good pack I would just 1) pack the cardboard on the inside because you want to keep it dry.  Take the flashlight out to make room and put it on the side so it is close at hand.  2) don't forget insect repellent. it is a nuisance us men often forget about.    ;)

Great suggestions I will do it, Thanks
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: flagtag on January 25, 2009, 12:29:38 PM
I just glanced through the list, but I didn't see any extra zip lock bags (to use when items are opened - like the wet ones) to keep things dry or to keep wet things from drying out. Just roll up, they won't take up much room. Also can be used to put wet/dirty clothing in.  (Lg & sm sizes)
Did I miss them? 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Beetle on January 25, 2009, 02:11:44 PM
   Sorry, I actually packed items in ziplock bags before I put them in the pack and didn't take a picture of it. I was actually going to repack it and use the seal a meal on stuff like the matches. The wet ones reseal on their own to stay moist. Soon I will pack my own Bug out bag, but I have been in the process of gathering some items.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: flagtag on January 25, 2009, 02:46:54 PM
The reason I mentioned the Wet Ones was that I used to keep some in my truck and they either leaked or dried out until I put them in the zip lock.  I'm sure the temps had something to do with it.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Da Fat Kid on February 14, 2009, 08:35:09 PM
Bailey Well I know this post is a little old but hey being new here I am trying to catch up! Good lookin pack  (forgive me here folks)  BUT keep in mind that since you are packin fer yer bride, THE LADIES have some different needs than us fellers do if ya know what I mean ;) :-[ Maybe ya got it covered but just not mentioned.  Guys please keep this in mind if packing for others.
Also you might want to check out the Leatherman Monarch 500 light. Trust me you will never go back to a mini mag!  DFK
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: The Professor on February 15, 2009, 03:07:02 AM
Okay, I'm bored tonight and figured I'd respond.

However, before I go into an extremely lengthy response, I do want to make a few caveats and explanations.

I never have liked the term "Bug-Out Bag."  It presupposes that such an assortment of equipment and supplies will only be used during an evacuation.

A long time ago, I coined the term "Personal Emergency Resource Kit (or PERK)."  Why?  Because I wholeheartedly believe that this small kit is the FIRST and MOST IMPORTANT assembly of stuff anyone interested in preparedness should put together.

The motivation behind a PERK is not as a collection of stuff to run away, but to survive under any situation.   It is arranged in such a matter as to be able to move it from where you are to where you want to go, if that move results in a greater chance of survival.  You do not have to be a subscriber to the "run away" mindset to take advantage of a PERK.  It is the most basic assembly of survival items you should ever have.  Each and every member of a family should have one of these kits.  From the youngest to the oldest, a PERK should be assembled and ready to go. . .or stay.  All of the items contained in a PERK can be used if you stay at home, are forced to leave by car, or can be carried on foot.

Now, a PERK has certain requirements:

A PERK must provide you with total support of all your needs for 24 hours, while giving you the tools and equipment to provide for yourself almost indefinitely (this is not a WELFARE kit, you are expected to contribute time and effort to your own support).

Personally, my own requirements are as such :

First, a PERK must provide you with 24 hours' supply of water, while providing you with AT LEAST 2 weeks' worth of the ability to procure and filter potable water.

Second,  a PERK must provide you with a MINIMUM of 1 week's worth of food and provide you with the ability to obtain and prepare food indefinitely.

Third, a PERK must provide you with minimal shelter, suitable for your average foreseeable weather conditions and provide you with the tools to make more durable, or even semi-permanent/permanent shelter.

Finally, the entire package must be man- (or woman-) portable under the worst conditions.  If I can take my truck, you can bet your bottom dollar that I will. But, if I am forced to leave my home, then my PERK will be taken with me.

Now, on to the contents:

Water :

1-gallon water in containers seperate from PERK for easy rotation
2 or 3 durable water containers (canteens, water bladders) for use in rough conditions
6 bottles Polar Pur Iodine tablets
1 Mechanical water filter w/ spare filter

Food:

6 MRE's, removed from their packaging and put into Slide-Lock bags. This should cover me for 3 days.
1- 1qt Nalgene container with Minute Rice
1 - 1qt Nalgene container with Acine di Pepe Pasta
1 - 1qt Nalgene container with Idaho REAL Mashed Potatoes (this exact brand name)
1 - bag or bottle with various flavorings (Beef, vegetable, pork or chicken bouillion.  various dried soups, etc.).

Cooking Utensils :
1 - Stainless steel cup or military canteen cup (camper's pot will suffice)
1 - Stainless spoon
1 - Stainless fork
1 - Small cleaning kit (Brillo pad, small sponge, tiny bottle of dishsoap)
1 - Esbit Stove or "Tommy Cooker" with spare solid fuel tabs/blocks

Shelter :
1 - Heavy Duty Space Blanket (not the flimsy one)
1 - Ecotat Survival Shelter
4 - Tent pegs appropriate for your environment (spikes if good, or rocky soil, stakes or "flats" if sandy)
4 - 18-24" Bungee cords
1 - Hammock
1 - Sleeping Bag appropriate for climate

Clothing :
(Note : 1 set should be inside PERK, 2nd should be in small bag outside PERK)
2 - Complete sets of DURABLE clothing appropriate for climate.
    * Each set consists of :
      1- Pair Pants
      1- Long Sleeve Shirt
      1- T-shirt
      1- Pr. Sliding shorts
      4- Pr. Socks
      1- Pr good quality boots.
      1- Pr. Quality Leather Gloves
      1- Hat
      1- Pr. Inexpensive, UV-tinted Safety Glasses

Hygiene :
1 - Hand-sized towel
1 - Washcloth
2 - Bars, Unscented soap (Do NOT use scented)
1 - Bar, shaving soap
1 - Razor with additional heads
1 - "Unbreakable" mirror
1 - Toothbrush
1 - Tube, Toothpaste
1 - Microfiber towel (buy a Sham-Wow and make Finch happy)
1 - Roll, Floss
1 - Pr. Tweezers

For those of you with Cold Weather concerns, add in :
1 - Cold Weather Jacket
1 - Cold Weather Pants
2 - Pr. Cold Weather Gloves
1 - Pr. Cold Weather Boots
1 - Cold Weather Hat (Wool cap, or equivalent)
2 - Sets Thermal underwear (1 set goes in small duffel bag. . .explained later).

Tools :

1 - Cold Steel "Spetsnaz" shovel
1 - Busse Steelheart sheath knife with Sheath & Sharpening Stone
1 - Leatherman Wave Tool
1 - Gransfors Bruks Small forest axe (19" hickory handle, 3 1/4" face and 1 1/2 lb head)

First Aid Kit
2 - Triangular Bandages
1 - Box Assorted Bandaids (Preferably waterproof and flexible)
8 - 4" x 4" Gauze Pads
1 - Magnifying Glass (A plastic Fresnel Lens is perfect)
10 - Safety Pins
1 - Roll of Moleskin
1 - Bottle Tylenol (50 count)
1 - Bottle Multi-Vitamins (50 Count)
1 - Thermometer
2 - 2" x 6' Ace Bandages
2 - Rolls, Surgical Tape
8 -  Sutures, General Purpose
1 - Tube, Triple Antibiotic cream
1 - Bottle, Pepto-Bismol Tablets
1 - SAM Splint
1 - Lip Balm
3 - Pr, Latex Gloves
1 - Pr. EMT Shears
10 - Butterfly Closures
5 - Ammonia Inhalants
10 - Sudafed (or equivalent)
10 - Cough Suppressant
10 - Tablets, Anti-Diarrheal
10 - Tablets, Laxative

Misc.
1 - MiniMag Flashlight (If you can find a red lens cover, get it)
100' - 550 cord
1 - Gerber StrikeForce fire starter
100 - Waterproof matches
1 - 8-hour candle
1 - Set of maps of your area (Go to camping store and buy MapSaf to waterproof them (or use Thompsons Water Seal))
1 - Luminous dial Military Compass
1 - Sewing Kit, (spare buttons, heavy duty needles and thread, patching material)
1 - Fishing Kit in 35mm film cannister (monofilament line, hooks, small sinkers, flies, spoons/spinners)
1 - Tube Sunblock
2 - Bottles Bug repellent (use only manual pump-type, not pressurized)
1 - Wallet with extra Identification
5 - Large Trash bags, Industrial-grade (the heaviest-duty you can find).
2 - Rolls, Quarters
$100 in cash, small bills preferred.

All of this goes into an appropriately-sized internal frame backpack.  The internal frame pack allows you to rest the kit comfortably on your back, keeping both hands free.  It pulls the equipment close to your back and reduces the possibility of the load shifting while you are moving around . . .perhaps while attempting to negotiate dangerous rubble.

Finally, you should sit down and make up a small notebook with all the names, addresses and telephone numbers (home, work, cellphone, fax, etc.) of everyone you know both in, and out of, your area.  You should include EVERYONE, including your bank manager, insurance agent, the toll-free number for your water, electricity, phone, and all other services.  One thing you can do is enter this into your favorite Word Processing program and print it out on that Waterproof outdoor paper, punch holes in it and put it in a small binder. Remember to get them notarized, especially important papers and identity documentation and put in a rugged, waterproof pouch.

I do have two arrangements for a PERK.  Each is dedicated to a particular season.  I only use all this gear when I refit for Cold Weather and I put this into an original Lowe-Alpine CFP-90 pack.  During the warmer months, I remove the C/W gear and put it into one of the larger "3-day"  packs.

Additionally, I have one full set of clothing (underwear, T-shirt, socks, pants, shirt, hat, gloves and boots) in a small duffel bag which sits next to the PERK.

This is because I may not be in an "acceptable" set of clothes when disaster strikes, and may not have the time to immediately change clothes.  For all I know, I might be in the shower when the train carrying toxic chemicals goes off the tracks and I may have to evacuate my soapy self while trying to outrun the deadly chemical cloud wafting down my street.  I can attach the small duffel bag to the pack and throw the ruck on my back and run down the street (or get in my truck) stark nekkid.

(And for those of you interested in such things, no, I have never conducted a bug-out drill exercising this particular skillset).

However, this gives me a kit that I can use anywhere, under practically any circumstance and covers the basics of what it takes to survive.

Just some thoughts, hope they help.

Prof.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Da Fat Kid on February 15, 2009, 08:13:50 AM
Professor  Is there a reason you would remove the MRE's from original package? Also I am not familiar with Nalgene containers could you please fill me in on those. Also on the first aid supplies. I got a "ready made" kit at Wal-Mart. This is one of the best kits I have seen. It is in a zipper bag with grab handle and shoulder strap. The bag is designed so when you open it it has a coat hook to hang up and everything is in view in clear pockets and easy to access. There are individual packets (which I really like) of things like aspirin, non-aspirin, antacid, burn cream, sting away, iodine, cleansing pads, alcohol pads and many wound dressing and bandaging items. There is also room to add in other things of your own. I just think it to be much easier to get a ready made and add to. Wal-Mart was selling this kit for about $20.
Also you said you have not done a drill . I would highly recommend that you do a drill. Put your pack on and take off down the street/road. Then head out in the bush and set up camp using only what you have in your pack.. It is far better to find out on a drill what works and what doesn't. Practice now and it will come automatic when the time comes you need it.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: archer on February 15, 2009, 09:46:26 AM
Professor  Is there a reason you would remove the MRE's from original package?
Lots of people remove the MRE contents from the original packaging to remove items they do not like/need and reduce the space used.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: rustyknife on February 15, 2009, 12:51:48 PM
Looks like everyone is well equipped but just in case here is my setup..I split my system into three components.

First, I carry on my belt every day a multi-tool, round diamond knife sharpener and a mag fire starter.

Second level is a duty belt with lb suspenders. On this belt I carry..
   2 one quart canteens w/cups
   small butt pack with extra socks, t-shirt, under shorts, wool gloves and 100 ft of paracord
   2 pouches, one on each side that contain three bars of 2400 calorie emergency rations , the kind the Coast
            Guard endorse, above the rations are small individual packets of instant coffee (about 30 units ea side)
   On the back of one pouch is my survival knife/sheath (no brand name/made myself)
   On the back of the other pouch is a smaller pouch that contains fishing kit, dryer lint, insect repellent, two
            kinds of fire starting systems and a small first aide box that also has some small harness needles and
            dental floss
   2 M16 mag pouches, one each side that hold 180 rounds total of 7.62x39
   This whole second level fits into a medium sized gym bag. On the bottom of the gym bag is a wool blanket.
            There is a pair of well worn hiking boots on the blanket then this web gear between the boots. My
            favorite outdoor jacket is attached at the gym bag handles.

Third level is an Alice pack, med size. It contains..
   A sleeping bag, mummy style rated at 0 deg
   Tube tent, one person, camo
   Military poncho
   Series of maps of my local area, plastic scales for the different maps, topo maps and USGS quad maps ( I like
             maps)
   A much more complete First Aid kit takes up the entire middle outside pouch
   200 ft para cord
   Spool of trip wire, three colors
   Face paint
   Black mechanic gloves
   Can of "Monkey butt Powder" sim to baby powder
   Handy refer to edible wild plants
   Another set of cloths, socks, t-shirt, undercloths, pants...For pants I like using "carpenter pants" they have
             cargo pockets on them, also a nice shade of brown
   Folding saw
   Couple rolls of TP smashed down flat in Ziploc bags
   Personal hygiene kit with scentless shop, hand towel and wash rag
   Compass and compass pouch on left shoulder strap
   Small binoculars in a pouch on right shoulder strap

Last but not least my Bible in a Ziploc bag

I recall this all from memory so there might be some smaller items I missed.

   

   
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: The Professor on February 15, 2009, 03:10:24 PM
Professor  Is there a reason you would remove the MRE's from original package? Also I am not familiar with Nalgene containers could you please fill me in on those. Also on the first aid supplies. I got a "ready made" kit at Wal-Mart. This is one of the best kits I have seen. It is in a zipper bag with grab handle and shoulder strap. The bag is designed so when you open it it has a coat hook to hang up and everything is in view in clear pockets and easy to access. There are individual packets (which I really like) of things like aspirin, non-aspirin, antacid, burn cream, sting away, iodine, cleansing pads, alcohol pads and many wound dressing and bandaging items. There is also room to add in other things of your own. I just think it to be much easier to get a ready made and add to. Wal-Mart was selling this kit for about $20.
Also you said you have not done a drill . I would highly recommend that you do a drill. Put your pack on and take off down the street/road. Then head out in the bush and set up camp using only what you have in your pack.. It is far better to find out on a drill what works and what doesn't. Practice now and it will come automatic when the time comes you need it.
 

Three things:

As someone else pointed out, I strip my MRE's to reduce bulk and weight.  The outer plastic bag is weight and bulk as are the cardboard "boxes" in which the retort pouches are packaged in also are extra weight.  You can save quite a bit of space by stripping them down and putting the contents in a slidelock bag.

And Nalgene bottles are the same type of bottles you find at REI or any similar sports store.  Mine are simply wide-mouthed and square as opposed to having a sippy-straw, pop top, or bitevalve and round.

And, for clarification, I said I had not done a drill wherein I ran down the street buck naked carrying my gear. to quote :

". . .I can attach the small duffel bag to the pack and throw the ruck on my back and run down the street (or get in my truck) stark nekkid.

(And for those of you interested in such things, no, I have never conducted a bug-out drill exercising this particular skillset). . ."

I hope you'll forgive me when I say that I have absolutely no plans, whatsoever, to let my dingle dangle in the snow just for the sake of saying I ran around naked with my PERK.  Not only am I worried about both Frostbite on the tip and building up a callus from the dragging, but I would really rather not spend 72 hours in psychiatric observation trying to explain to the nice Doctors that it's all a misunderstanding, I'm NOT a lunatic nudist survivalist and that I was real sorry Mr. Smith's 5 year old girl caught a glimpse of the Professor's whatsit.

We, as a family, often do "drills," but in the form of camping trips and backcountry roams here in the Colorado Rockies several times a year.  As a general rule, these are the same items we carry on such trips with the addition of some serious photography gear (my wife is a shutterbug) and a little different tenting arrangements.

Prof.


Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Da Fat Kid on February 15, 2009, 04:15:08 PM
Prof.  TY for taking the time to answer my questions. Sorry I totally misunderstood about the drill. But keep in mind that in that kind of cold everybody looks like sisters anyway so nothing to worry about.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Roswell on February 18, 2009, 11:31:23 AM
Cold,  why not use the hatchet as a tent hammer.  I like all of your explanations on your gear, but in this one case it just seems like useless weight.  You have the hatchet, the e-tool and yes there is always a rock.  just trying to save you some back ache.   ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: creuzerm on February 18, 2009, 09:52:32 PM
A thought just occurred to me.

BOB - gonna spend a lot of time in your shoes, hygiene is less then stellar, etc.

Toss in a tube of anti-fungal cream for athletes foot.

Nobody packed their flip-flops in their BOB, so everybody is gonna get it.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Roswell on February 18, 2009, 11:21:10 PM

And, for clarification, I said I had not done a drill wherein I ran down the street buck naked carrying my gear. to quote :

". . .I can attach the small duffel bag to the pack and throw the ruck on my back and run down the street (or get in my truck) stark nekkid.

(And for those of you interested in such things, no, I have never conducted a bug-out drill exercising this particular skillset). . ."

I hope you'll forgive me when I say that I have absolutely no plans, whatsoever, to let my dingle dangle in the snow just for the sake of saying I ran around naked with my PERK.  Not only am I worried about both Frostbite on the tip and building up a callus from the dragging, but I would really rather not spend 72 hours in psychiatric observation trying to explain to the nice Doctors that it's all a misunderstanding, I'm NOT a lunatic nudist survivalist and that I was real sorry Mr. Smith's 5 year old girl caught a glimpse of the Professor's whatsit.


+1  that was an awesome answer
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: The Professor on February 20, 2009, 12:50:32 PM
A thought just occurred to me.

BOB - gonna spend a lot of time in your shoes, hygiene is less then stellar, etc.

Toss in a tube of anti-fungal cream for athletes foot.

Nobody packed their flip-flops in their BOB, so everybody is gonna get it.

Y'know, I actually do carry a tiny bottle of Tinactin and a small powder bottle of Gold Bond in my gear. It's one of the things I've always done since I was a grunt.  That's why I also have so many socks.

 I honestly don't know why I forget about posting it.   

 There are a couple other things I don't include.  When I posted this, I just cut and pasted my standard checklist.

<sigh>

Guess this means I gotta do an inventory.

Oh, the wife is gonna be SO pissed.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Heavy G on March 15, 2009, 09:11:06 PM
(This thread has been selected as a “best of” thread by Heavy G.  You can search for “best of” threads by using that term in the search mode.  Everyone on the forum is encouraged to reply to a post they think is “best of” worthy so we can all search for them.  For more information on the “best of” thing, see  http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3423.0  (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3423.0))
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: ldmaster on March 27, 2009, 12:20:48 AM
HI folks,

New to the forum, but here's my BOB contents...

Spare body armor, six loaded mags of softpoint for carbine (folding stock AK) and pistol (glock)
longsleeve silk underwear, knit hat, rainproof pants
milsurp poncho
2 1 liter bottles of water
heavy knife, Becker rescue tool.
3 contractor grade cleanup bags (like lawn and leaf bags but 3 mils thick and VERY large)
folding metal shovel
12 nasty tasting protein bars repackaged inside of a doubled mylar bag
Tylenol, Excedrin migraine formula (has caffeine and aspirin, keeps you awake), extra strength Gold bond powder, Zinc oxide,  Imodium, Sudafed, benadryl, antibiotics (two), vicodin, powdered charcoal, sting swabs, iodine, vetwrap, tampax, superglue, bandaids, tincture of benzoin and moleskin.
alcohol stove, milsurp sierra cup/kit (tactical spork)
premade coffee packs (instant coffee, cocoa powder, sweetener and cremora)
6oz of 95 percent rubbing alcohol
200 bucks in small bills
2 pair heavy socks
sunglasses with old pair of my regular prescription glasses.
1 pair boots OLD (already broken in, just not worn out - rotated to this use) I treated the boots with copious amounts of lanoline (the pure stuff) that I got from Walgreens (special order at the pharmacy counter) - hey, it keeps sheep dry!
Firemaking kit (ferrocerium, magnesium(already shredded - bought from fireworks reseller), wad of cotton, hexamine, 2 bic lighters.
Deep-sea fishing leader (125lb test)
6 steel spikes (think really big nails)
Paracord wrapped around anything that I can, cans, bottles, knife.
suture kits.
Duct tape, biohazard grade (look it up, sticks about the best out there), about 25 ft of it  - rolled onto a steel spike.
syringes, for injecting benzoin into blisters.
2 small LED flashlights, each takes 1 CR123 battery.
rugged metal compass and pedometer.


It all fits into a small/medium size backpack I have from my teeanger years.  I put this together a couple of weeks ago when I realized I had the stuff in different cars and places already assembled - but not together because some stuff (like the shovel) I only had one of.   It's still a work in progress, the prescription meds you CAN get your doc to prescribe if you explain why you want them (backcountry treks outside of human contact). 

I didn't want to put any weapons in it simply because I'm always armed anyway.  Figuring the idea was to get safe, not hunt or allow myself to get engaged with bad guys.  The BOB is a work in progress, I think I have too much ammo - but any scenario where I'll NEED ammo I believe I should have enough of it - I might switch to FN P90 and the pistol to save weight, but the lightweight bullets bother me.  I've also considered switching to one of the glock plastic shovels, but a metal shovel can cut sod without risking breakage. 

Might use one of those ultra-lightweight sleeping bags and bivy shelter, but the GOOD bivy shelters are a bit bulky.

Suggestions?

Title: I considered a field guide
Post by: ldmaster on March 27, 2009, 12:33:44 AM
Looks like everyone is well equipped but just in case here is my setup..I split my system into three components.

.........
   
   Handy refer to edible wild plants
 
..........

I recall this all from memory so there might be some smaller items I missed.

   

   

I considered the field guide to edible plants, but then I remembered that edible wild plants have almost NO calories in them and with something on the order of 80 percent of wild plants in the USA being inedible AND/OR toxic, I figured I'd just poison myself.  I've eaten bugs, and furry things a few times on camping trips, and it's my understanding there's almost nothing that has fur, or crawls that will poison you - and the creature has already done all the work of concentrating the calories from plant life for me.  I also figured that since I was bugging out, most of my time was better spent constructing a shelter and setting snares, instead of gathering enough edible plant life to make a difference in my survival - no such thing as a shelter that's TOO well made.

thoughts?

Bueller?  Anybody?
Title: Re: I considered a field guide
Post by: shadowalker_returns on March 27, 2009, 01:30:36 AM
I considered the field guide to edible plants, but then I remembered that edible wild plants have almost NO calories in them and with something on the order of 80 percent of wild plants in the USA being inedible AND/OR toxic, I figured I'd just poison myself.  I've eaten bugs, and furry things a few times on camping trips, and it's my understanding there's almost nothing that has fur, or crawls that will poison you - and the creature has already done all the work of concentrating the calories from plant life for me.  I also figured that since I was bugging out, most of my time was better spent constructing a shelter and setting snares, instead of gathering enough edible plant life to make a difference in my survival - no such thing as a shelter that's TOO well made.

thoughts?

Bueller?  Anybody?

these are my solution to emergency calories in a small compact size:
http://www.majorsurplus.com/Emergency-Survival-Food-Tabs-P14370.aspx (http://www.majorsurplus.com/Emergency-Survival-Food-Tabs-P14370.aspx)
they have a taste like Whoppers but much harder to bite on. They are also glucose based so if your diabetic they are probably a no-no. Used them for a three day hike in the Sierras up by lake tamarind. I was glad to eat something else after three days. I like to keep a small variety of food stuffs but these tabs will do in a pinch. I keep a case on hand.

http://www.majorsurplus.com/Emergency-High-Energy-3600-CalorieCarbo-Fiber-Bars-2-Pack-P14373.aspx (http://www.majorsurplus.com/Emergency-High-Energy-3600-CalorieCarbo-Fiber-Bars-2-Pack-P14373.aspx)
These taste like a cocanut vanilla wafer but are thicker and crunchier. My kids like them (also used as road snacks). I keep three cases on hand.

And finally I include Solgar brand Vitamins in my pack for nutrition so I only have to provide calories with my food sources.

Adding some noodles and beef jerky really can make a difference in the long term palatability of the above emergency food items.

Regards,
Shadowalker
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Torpedo on June 03, 2009, 12:03:35 AM
Hey guys

 I got this list from a website f=by Neil Strauss, he just wrote a book I recommend called "Emergency: this book just may save your life", his prior stuff is kinda different but this book is really good, I think his story is very similar to people who awaken to how important being prepared is.

Let me know what you guys think of this list, any suggestions are welcome

Thx

ALICE PACK

[or, better still, as one reader suggests, "if you really want to go incognito, get a hiking BOB in a non-military color; sew on a a patch or two (Greenpeace, PETA, Canadian Flag) and you are now transformed from a wolf to a sheep."]

Food Bag
Mess Kit
3 self-packed bricks of food, approximately 4-5 days for one person, each with two MRE's, and assorted jerky's, candy bars, additional foil-packed tuna/spam, energy bars, soonest rotation is late 2011.
Dead space is filed with assortment of cold brew ice teas, sugar packets, splenda, fast food condiments (ketchup, mustard, honey, taco sauce, salt, pepper, hot sauce), bouillon cubes (chicken and vegetable), about five feet of aluminum foil folded.

Misc bag
Trash bags
Votive Candles
Deck of cards
Ziplock bags
space blanket
Solar/crank-powered radio/flashlight
Hygiene bag
Feminine bag
-Contents: lipstick, nail care kit, lotion, pumice stone Bag of water flavoring, juice, punch, coffee, and some onion soup mixes to spice up gamey wild-caught animals
Can of athlete foot spray
60 multi-vitamins
100 vitamin c
Insect repellant
Sun block
Camp suds
Gold bond powder
Package anti-bacterial wipes
Tooth brush
Tooth paste
Travel-size bar of dial soap
Travel-size purell
Travel-size q-tips
Travel-size deodorant
4 disposable razors
Condensed beach towel
2 Condensed hand towels
Camping utensil set
Six-pack of tube socks

Tool bag
Folding saw
Multi-head screwdriver
Pliers
Electrical tape
Nails
Needle-nosed pliers
Crescent wrench
Book: combat skills of the fighting soldier
Field shovel/pick
Hammer/hatchet/pry bar

Utility pouch
Sewing kit
Vegetable seeds
Emergency whistle
Waterproof matches
Fire paste
50 feet rope
Cable ties
Extra batteries (AA and AAA)
Magnesium block/flint
Trip/snare wire

Top storage pocket
2-man tent strapped to top
Emergency Bivvy bag
Book: survival, with updates
Book: Counter mobility
Book: booby traps
Book: field sanitation
Signal mirror
Signal fireworks/flares
Compass
Whet stone

Barter pocket
Coffee
80 Tampons (OB for increased carry)
Lighters
Rolling tobacco
Toilet paper
2 bottles water purification tabs
Anti-diarrhea tabs
Gold/Silver coins
$200 in small bills

Misc. pocket II
2 rain ponchos
Toilet paper
250 ml Clorox bleach (purifies btwn 40-60 gallons depending on cloudiness)
6 Power bar snacks
Dog treats
Notepad
Pens
Intruder detection kit (eye screws, tops of party poppers-freaking loud w/o the body)
Copies of passport, drivers license, and other personal documents

Shoulder Strap Pouches
Gun cleaning kit
Survival knife
Binoculars
12 ga shot shell holder (12 rounds)

Emergency first-response belt
Dust masks
Eye goggles
Marking chalk
Gas shut-off tool
Head lamp
2 canteens, each with water purification tablet bottle
First aid kit (dressings/band-aids, field surgical kit, latex gloves, waterproof tape, snakebite kit, dental tools, analgesics, first aid army field manual, sunscreen, anti-diarrhea, trauma pads, space blanket, medical scissors, etc.)
Work gloves
Power bars
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Beetle on June 03, 2009, 12:08:41 AM
Wow great list... I love the patch idea.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Roswell on June 03, 2009, 09:57:45 AM
I don't think that lipstick is going to be of much use and it may melt.

It is a great list, however it is very long. I would look at making a seperate bag for your BOV with some of those bulky items or even storing them at your BOL.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Torpedo on June 03, 2009, 05:57:56 PM
This BOB , I plan to keep in the vehicle, but thx for the input
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: flashcard on July 16, 2009, 10:25:46 AM
I couldn't find a better thread to post my question in, but I'd appreciate some advice if anyone's got some to spare :) If this should be a new topic, or if it's been covered - please point me in the right direction.  I couldn't find anything similar with the search function, or the "best of" search.

I've been working on a bob/bib/emergency prep kit, etc. at home (city, no BOL) for the event that we get stuck in or need to evacuate to...? but I'm much more concerned about what to carry on me during the day, in the event that I can't get home first.  I don't have a vehicle (my spouse does), which is mostly fine because it is practical and healthy for me to get around on foot.  BUT - there's no way I can carry a huge, complete BOB with me on my hour long walk to work, and then back again home (I usually take transit home).  It would be impractical and I'd look homeless.  I do carry a small-ish backpack/book bag with me though, and I think it would be awesome for my strength and endurance to slowly start adding more things to it for my everyday kit. 

In order from absolute most important items, what should I keep on me?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Buffy on July 16, 2009, 05:01:05 PM
My bag is small, weighs about 12 pounds. Its what I carry when I'm hiking.
It has food, water, a bivvy sack, a poncho, first aid kit, paracord, headlamp, Swiss Army knife, pepper spray, matches.
I keep other stuff in my car; change of clothing, hiking boots and trekking poles, blanket, extra water, light sticks, small charcoal grill, maps.
Much as I would like to have other stuff, I don't think I would get very far carrying a heavier load.
However, I think I will put together over-the-saddle packs for the horses to carry if needed. These packs could also go into the vehicle if I had to leave from home.
Probably a good idea to find out how far you can travel with your BOB. I hike regularly.
Trekking poles make a huge difference for me.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on July 16, 2009, 06:32:28 PM
I couldn't find a better thread to post my question in, but I'd appreciate some advice if anyone's got some to spare :) If this should be a new topic, or if it's been covered - please point me in the right direction.  I couldn't find anything similar with the search function, or the "best of" search.

I've been working on a bob/bib/emergency prep kit, etc. at home (city, no BOL) for the event that we get stuck in or need to evacuate to...? but I'm much more concerned about what to carry on me during the day, in the event that I can't get home first.  I don't have a vehicle (my spouse does), which is mostly fine because it is practical and healthy for me to get around on foot.  BUT - there's no way I can carry a huge, complete BOB with me on my hour long walk to work, and then back again home (I usually take transit home).  It would be impractical and I'd look homeless.  I do carry a small-ish backpack/book bag with me though, and I think it would be awesome for my strength and endurance to slowly start adding more things to it for my everyday kit. 

In order from absolute most important items, what should I keep on me?

flashcard
Do you routinely go through any kind of security check on a daily basis, like a metal detector or anything like that?
Also, what is your comfort level with things like self protection. Do you feel confident you can handle most situations if something turns physical or is that something you would want to prepare for?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: flashcard on July 16, 2009, 08:13:27 PM
flashcard
Do you routinely go through any kind of security check on a daily basis, like a metal detector or anything like that?
Also, what is your comfort level with things like self protection. Do you feel confident you can handle most situations if something turns physical or is that something you would want to prepare for?

You're making me paranoid, Hare! Of all the things you could've mentioned, you probably picked my biggest vulnerability.  Nope.  I could probably handle mediation/negotiation better than your average Jane, but I have almost no confidence in my ability to physically defend myself.  I don't even look tough and intimidating - at least I'm not waifish (I never thought I'd say that).  No security checks or metal detectors of any kind except at airports.  My best defence: I look pretty broke :)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on July 16, 2009, 08:41:46 PM
You're making me paranoid, Hare! Of all the things you could've mentioned, you probably picked my biggest vulnerability.  Nope.  I could probably handle mediation/negotiation better than your average Jane, but I have almost no confidence in my ability to physically defend myself.  I don't even look tough and intimidating - at least I'm not waifish (I never thought I'd say that).  No security checks or metal detectors of any kind except at airports.  My best defence: I look pretty broke :)

No problem there.
The reason I chose the lowly hare as my avatar is that I believe there is an advantage to looking harmless.
The key is to look harmless but hold a deadly secret.
It can be something as simple as a can of pepper spray to taking defense classes and learning how to take down the bad guys.
Unfortunately a lot of that requires money and for most of us, money is tight.
And there are a lot of "defense" courses that are just a waste of money.
I'm impressed by something called Systema which is a Russian martial art.
Jack did a thread about it here:
http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=967.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=967.0)
But for short term, I have to recommend pepper spray. You should have at least two small cans of it in your bag or in a pocket or anywhere that you can get to it fast, but don't put them together.
Also, a couple power bars for some quick carbs for energy, and at least a quart of water, considering your distance from you home. Maybe some basic first aid stuff like some butterfly bandages, a couple maxi-pads and some medical tape.
Keep in mind, your best tool is the one between your ears.
Focus you mind and keep a clear head. Think about possible situations before they happen and you will be better able to handle them if they happen.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Freshman Preppy on January 08, 2010, 08:32:43 PM
I have a GHB in my car.  I live in Northern Virginia so the most likely impact from a big emergency would be a complete traffic jam on I95 which would cause me to abandon my vehicle and walk home. 
I keep the Get Home Bag and a case of water in my car.  I also have a small, mesh back pack which my son used to use for school in the top of my bag.  If I end up hoofing it, I'll probably end up with an unprepared coworker.  They don't know this yet but they will be carrying a small back pack full of water bottles.  :-)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: JGreene on January 15, 2010, 01:16:35 PM
Mine is still (and probably should) evolving.  I had an ALICE pack with the regular stuff in it, but it took about 25% of my trunk.  Since 99% of my travels don't take me away from civilization, I decided to break it down.

I have a GHB (Get Home Bag) that I keep in the car.  This has the necessary things to get me home or a days travel on foot, safetly.  The balance is at home ready to go and now includes a few more 'camping' kind of items.  If we needed to bug out from home, I'd have it there.

Everyone is going to be different. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: joeinwv on January 20, 2010, 09:17:49 AM
I have not seen a lot of mention of coins - I always stash a few bucks in quarters. Never know when you may stumble across a vending machine or pay phone in your travels.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: JGreene on January 20, 2010, 11:03:33 AM
I have not seen a lot of mention of coins - I always stash a few bucks in quarters. Never know when you may stumble across a vending machine or pay phone in your travels.

Good point.  As well as small currency bills for similar reasons. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: JGreene on January 20, 2010, 11:19:38 AM
Dog leash - For helping out strays, or maybe one of my own if needed.  This is in my GHB, not my BOB.  I've seen strays on my way home from work and didn't have any line.  Certainly any piece of line would work, but I picked up a few cheap ones from the dollar store.

I don't see much in regards to tools.  Crescent, sockets etc.  Other than bushcraft type tools.  A few multi-tools may be handy while in the process of scavanging as needed.  I know its a bit of weight.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on January 20, 2010, 12:51:09 PM
Extensible ratchet, 1/4" drive, as well as metric and SAE sockets, and an extra deep spark plug socket. And a stanley FuBar. The smaller steel one, not the monster huge one... eeps! Also some hack saw blades, and a few carbide grit reciprocating saw blades. Cuts steel and wood equally well, but won't cut hands - like a stick of really ungodly coarse sandpaper. The smaller ones are good for keychains since they've got a hole in 'em for a jigsaw chuck.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Ian Adams on January 24, 2010, 12:23:47 PM
I have not seen a lot of mention of coins - I always stash a few bucks in quarters. Never know when you may stumble across a vending machine or pay phone in your travels.

I keep a single roll of quarters in each of our bags.  If nothing else, I can grab a candy bar from the vending machines.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: JerseyVince on January 24, 2010, 03:06:50 PM
I'd like to add 1 tool that should be in all our pack or something similar  A CountyComm Breacher Bar!! It Takes up almost no room and can be used to pound/pry/chisel and slice (if sharpened) through almost any SHTF situation. Its also makes a good spare key if you find yourself without a key (LOL)
Title: oops
Post by: Greenneck on January 28, 2010, 01:17:41 PM
Tried to post a photo and couldn't get it to work...any thoughts on that?
Title: Re: oops
Post by: JGreene on January 28, 2010, 07:57:23 PM
Tried to post a photo and couldn't get it to work...any thoughts on that?
Check out the help section, there should be something there on that. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: amanadoo on February 04, 2010, 07:30:55 AM
Y'all have given me lots to think about, great thread! I love the pedometer idea for groups who may need to temporarily split up.

And lanolin...I can't even believe I'd never thought of that. FYI, you don't have to get it special from a pharmacy, if u don't want to. They sell it all over the place (and online) for breastfeeding Mommas. There are a few different brands, most of which are pure lanolin.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: tetonsky on February 06, 2010, 05:04:03 PM
Picture of my Son, (motivation) 4 Cups dry rice, sunscreen, nature valley granola bar, 2 ckn buon cubes, 6 bottles of h2o, candy, blanket, shoes, with socks stuffed in them, soap, extra long sleeve shirt, 8oz vodka, needles, glucose tablets, bayer for babies (works for heart attacks), led flash light, multi-tool, local maps, survival instruction printout, swiss army knife, loads of pills for almost anything some including;anti diarrhea pills, aspirin, tylenol for preggers wife, allergy pills, cold relief. In a different bag I have Skin treatments such as; hydrogen peroxide, bandages, chaps-stick, sterile bandages, neosporin, anti fungal cream, burn treatment.  Latex gloves.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on February 07, 2010, 11:06:30 AM
Nice loadout.

It took me five minutes to figure out how you keep 4 cups of dry ice from sublimating...

*facepalm*
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Koldsteel on February 07, 2010, 06:48:10 PM
I have not seen a lot of mention of coins - I always stash a few bucks in quarters. Never know when you may stumble across a vending machine or pay phone in your travels.

I dont have a BOB. I have a smaller E & E kit to get home with. I do keep a zip-lock in my truck console to collect all the coins I might amass from shopping, etc. Im a medical professional so I dont do coins and scrubs. Anyhow, I also have a roll of pre-64 junk silver dimes in my gear. BTW - nice thread - very good info.

Kold
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: CyborgX on February 08, 2010, 07:34:18 AM
I'm certainly not prepared for everything, but I do have lots of wilderness gear since I like to camp a lot.

I have a backpack that's got:
4 man tent
2 tarps
Sleeping bag (rated for -40F)
Roll pads
Emergency blanket
Edible plants book
Iodine drops
First aid kit
Maps (Metro Detroit, Michigan, USA, a few others for camp sites around MI)
Compass
Notebook/Pencil (pens are no good in the winter)
Water bottles
Hatchet
Machete
Swiss army knife
Buck knife
Tent/boot/backpack repair kit
Duct tape
Flint
Lighter
Matches
Dry bag of kindling
Toilet paper
collapsible shovel
Compression sacks
(All food remains circulated in the pantry)
Portable white gas stove + two extra tanks of white gas.
Portable pots
Money
Backpack cover
I probably forgot to list a few things, but it's all there.

Right now it's also got all my winter gear folded up next to it. Planning on taking a trip out if we ever get some snow here.

Beyond that, I always carry a knife, a compass, a map of the area, some cash, my cell phone, keys, and some trail mix. Don't really have a dedicated BOB yet, but it's in line to being worked on this month.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on February 10, 2010, 04:12:01 PM
nitrox/butane torch - nice for slicing locks off gates when you forget your key, or for cutting someone out of a car. might run out of nitrous before you get all the way through the door sill, but she'll burn steel like nobody's business.

"archer micro torch" or "micronox torch"
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Atom on February 16, 2010, 09:11:03 PM
I ordered ten catalogs from different places seeds, ammo, and some other places. I love free catalogs.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on February 16, 2010, 09:37:34 PM
Is that what you keep in your bugout bag, or what you did today to prep?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Atom on February 16, 2010, 10:48:49 PM
Sorry bud wrong thread.  Im up to speed now. Thanks.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on February 17, 2010, 12:34:15 AM
*nudge*

No prob man. I use tabs, so sometimes I get 'em mixed up too. Too bad the edit button disappears after 20 seconds or so.

while you're here, what DO you keep in your bugout bag? ;-)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on February 25, 2010, 09:32:57 PM
I am not going to post a comprehensive list of everything in my bag.  I carry things that most of us do.  Instead I will post a couple things that I do maybe a little differently that most.

Fire.  I noticed that a lot of folks depend on butane lighters and matches to get the furnace lit.  IMHO this is a mistake for several reasons.  Butane lighters are filled with liquid butane that expands to a gas when used.  But when it is really cold they may not light.  Obviously if they are wet they won't work.  Same thing with matches...even storm proof matches are susceptible to getting damp and dying of old age.  A bad thing for an item stored in a pack for a long time.  And both items will get used up.  A lot of fire starters require both hands to use.  Magnesium bars also need you to be able to scrape a pile of material off into a little pile which can suck in the rain and wind and cold.  Especially if you cannot use both hands. With most of these if you have a wounded hand you very well may be screwed.  I use a Blast match  http://www.ultimatesurvival.com/camping-hiking/BlastMatchFireStarter.php (http://www.ultimatesurvival.com/camping-hiking/BlastMatchFireStarter.php)  I can use it one handed with either hand and it can be wet.  I also keep an old peanut butter jar full of assorted tinder so I am ready to go.  I have recently purchased some of this company's wet tinder cubes and they are great.
I am not saying not to carry matches and a lighter...I do...just don't have them as your only method of ignition.

While I carry an axe (an Estwing long handle camper axe) my main wood gathering tool is a Bow saw.  Nice and quiet to use, it is also easier to gather smaller branches from blowdowns.  I carry a PVC tube full of spare blades.

I also see a lot of trowels, folding entrenching tools and similar devices.  While great for lighter duty (admittedly some entrenching tools are ok I just have a distrust of hinges on tools I may have to depend on for survival) like digging crap holes and such I prefer something a little more heavy duty.  I have a Razorback mini shovel  strapped to my pack.  http://www.gemplers.com/product/151384/Razorback-Shovel (http://www.gemplers.com/product/151384/Razorback-Shovel)  I got mine a little cheaper and gave it a nice flat OD green paint job.  I have used these at work and have never broken one but not through lack of trying.

Those are a few off the top of my head.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on February 26, 2010, 08:59:48 AM
In my particular pack, I found a bow saw (Standard lawn and garden style) to be a wee bit on the bulky side, so I zip tied some saw blades together and got a hacksaw handle. With a little tweaking, reciprocating saw blades work on it as well, and that's what I have for cutting branches. Do you have a more compact version?

Thanks for the blast match link. Definitely on my short list of things to get.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on February 26, 2010, 09:54:02 AM
No I use a regular ol 10 dollar bow saw.  I gave it a nice new paint job and store it in a nylon sack.  I also don't keep it in my pack.  I strap it, along with my axe and shovel, on the outside of my pack. 

I have purchased one of these... http://www.vtarmynavy.com/trailblazer-buck-saw.htm (http://www.vtarmynavy.com/trailblazer-buck-saw.htm) but have not had the chance to give it a proper test run as yet.  I figured the longer blade and more room in the handle would allow the harvesting of larger diameter wood than is possible with my bow saw.

I also notice that they have several different saws and the Sawvivor (found down the page a bit) does look like it may be a decent tool but I like my bow saw and until I use up my blade stash, am unlikely to replace it.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: volwest on February 26, 2010, 11:07:46 AM
This one (laplander) is great.
Thiner and lighter than your regular bow saw...and cuts 100% better.

http://www.amazon.com/Bahco-BAH396LAP-Laplander-Folding-Saw/dp/B0001IX7OW (http://www.amazon.com/Bahco-BAH396LAP-Laplander-Folding-Saw/dp/B0001IX7OW)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Duke66 on February 26, 2010, 01:11:44 PM
I carry a Wyoming Saw in my BOB.  I love that thing!  It's not as light as the Laplander but it has multiple types of blades and it comes apart and stores away pretty well.

http://www.cabelas.com/p-0006390.shtml (http://www.cabelas.com/p-0006390.shtml)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on February 26, 2010, 01:53:38 PM
volwest...I looked at that and other folding saws before but I do not trust hinges.  Things like that have a tenancy to break at the most opportune times.  I also purchased two of my saws for less than 20 bucks and stripped one for parts just in case.   Not saying your saw isn't great...just not for me.  As far as 100% better sawing ability...I would have to loose that race to believe it.

Duke66...I also looked at the Wyoming Saw but at the time I was looking at saws I was in a cheap mood.  LOL...So I got two bow saws and spare blades for less than 25 bucks.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: volwest on February 26, 2010, 06:15:51 PM
Hey as long as it works for you...it works for me.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on February 27, 2010, 09:45:47 PM
*ponders*

I think I might have to rig up a battery power supply mod for an electric carving knife. Upgrade the gears to metal, and toss a sawzall blade on it, and see how she does. Solar panels are a must, though...

THAT just might be the ultimate bugout saw.

Thanks for the links and such - I think I will be getting one of the lighter saws. I forgot to mention I also have one of the folding utility saws. Folds like a giant pocket knife, pretty light weight, and the grip comes off to store a couple of blades. I like the SiC grit blades, since they can cut steel (albeit a bit slowly) that poses too much girth for my bolt cutters.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cartpusher on February 28, 2010, 05:20:20 AM
I just listed a ton of Bug Out Bag gear for sale at the following thread in the Great Deals Forum:

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=14383.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=14383.0)

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: monkeybird on February 28, 2010, 07:33:44 AM
I have a 'car' bob that goes everywhere with me.  (I'd hate to have to walk home in high heels)  Anyway, I recently purchased a back pack combination rolling luggage at Costco.  Thanks goodness for the wheels.  No way, at my age, would I be able to carry that thing on my back. (I tried) I tried to decide what to take out to make it lighter, but according to the above lists, I'm traveling light. With the wheels, I can however, roll it along.  I know, it might not roll in the woods, but, in order to carry all the stuff you guys carry, it simply has to roll!

Someone needs to come up with a way for older and or disabled folks to GOOD.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Duke66 on February 28, 2010, 08:39:50 AM
I have a 'car' bob that goes everywhere with me.  (I'd hate to have to walk home in high heels)  Anyway, I recently purchased a back pack combination rolling luggage at Costco.  Thanks goodness for the wheels.  No way, at my age, would I be able to carry that thing on my back. (I tried) I tried to decide what to take out to make it lighter, but according to the above lists, I'm traveling light. With the wheels, I can however, roll it along.  I know, it might not roll in the woods, but, in order to carry all the stuff you guys carry, it simply has to roll!

Someone needs to come up with a way for older and or disabled folks to GOOD.

Here ya go!   :)
http://image.4wheeloffroad.com/f/bigdogself/8279733+w450+h338+cr0+re1+ar1/2004-jeep-tj-tj-w-m416-trailer.jpg (http://image.4wheeloffroad.com/f/bigdogself/8279733+w450+h338+cr0+re1+ar1/2004-jeep-tj-tj-w-m416-trailer.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: monkeybird on February 28, 2010, 03:30:41 PM
What do you do if your walking?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on February 28, 2010, 05:20:28 PM
I believe he's making silent commentary on the reliability of the jeep platform.

*sigh*

 :P
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: flagtag on February 28, 2010, 09:26:07 PM
How about a game cart?  ;D
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on March 01, 2010, 12:25:52 AM
I have a 'car' bob that goes everywhere with me.  (I'd hate to have to walk home in high heels)  Anyway, I recently purchased a back pack combination rolling luggage at Costco.  Thanks goodness for the wheels.  No way, at my age, would I be able to carry that thing on my back. (I tried) I tried to decide what to take out to make it lighter, but according to the above lists, I'm traveling light. With the wheels, I can however, roll it along.  I know, it might not roll in the woods, but, in order to carry all the stuff you guys carry, it simply has to roll!

Someone needs to come up with a way for older and or disabled folks to GOOD.

Monkeybird...one of the worst things you can do is to over pack a bag you intend on carrying.  If you struggle to carry it or even get it on your back it will most likely hurt you more that anything in it will help you.   Let me ask you a few questions and we will see if your bag can be made more manageable.  Keep in mind that just because you keep items in your car does not necessarily mean you have to carry them away from your vehicle.   I see you live in Florida.

What do you envision using your bag for?  Just getting home or losing yourself in the everglades until the crisis passes?

How far do you typically travel from home? 

How far could you walk in good shoes?

How much weight do you feel you could comfortably carry on your back?

Lets start there and work at building a bag that will best fit your circumstances.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: monkeybird on March 01, 2010, 08:12:38 AM
Originally, after reading "One Second After" it was to get home when my car didn't work.  I have sneakers, heavy socks, water pouches, 2 mountain house entree, energy bars.  Everything was ok.  Well, I kept reading about other peoples bags and began to worry that I need more stuff.  So, I added a wind up radio and flashlight, sterno, instant coffee, mess cup, leatherman, first aid kit, fire starting stuff, one of those little saws, tube tent, space blanket, hand and foot warmers,  Ala. and Fl. Deloran maps and probably other stuff I can't remember unless I unpack the bag.  I don't work, and I use the car for club meetings, shopping, that kind of thing.  

To add to the problem, I will no longer drive the newer car, a small convertible.  I insist on keeping the older explorer in case I have to leave in a hurry and need to pack my food stores.  I keep spare gas for that purpose as I go back and forth between Alabama and Florida.  I live in both places.

I know that things are getting worse in our world.  If I need to get from my home in Alabama to my home in the Florida panhandle I want to be able to do so.  My husband humors me but is not involved in anyway.  He tells me to stock up.  He gives me no grief on the stuff I buy, even the solar oven.  He also has heart disease and get extremely short of breath with activity.  So I'm really on my own.  My adult son lives near our Florida home and would be able to do anything I needed done, once I get there.

So, when I read about all the things others are doing, I get a little worried.  I know that my husband could not survive long without his cardiac medications, and fear being totally alone here in Alabama.  I'm a baby boomer, so I'm not that old, I have no health issues.  

Sorry I wrote a book!  What to other women do?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: pchambers on March 01, 2010, 08:27:31 AM
Monkeybird,

I'm on my own, too.  My husband rolls his eyes and is completely uninterested.  I can't even get him to think about possible places to bug out, except the obvious family member's mountain house.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Duke66 on March 01, 2010, 02:39:05 PM
Monkeybird,

I'm on my own, too.  My husband rolls his eyes and is completely uninterested.  I can't even get him to think about possible places to bug out, except the obvious family member's mountain house.

Guess he'll be staying behind... :o
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on March 01, 2010, 03:11:35 PM
Are you KIDDING me?

*dies*

Has he never SEEN the cool junk he could convince you to buy for him?!

*dies a fiery death*
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: keepitlow on March 01, 2010, 03:56:10 PM
I don't put too much effort into bug out gear. I got a small 2 person camper in the driveway. And even without the camper, surviving for a few days is not a big deal unless you are stuck out in freezing cold or NYC. (generally speaking)

I put most of my effort into long term survival preparedness, but I still have some bug out gear on hand.

I keep a cooking bug out pack in an orange ammo box. Got 2 propane cookers with a cylinder in it. One is a stripped down pocket size unit, one is full size.

Also 3 SS cooking cups / drinking mugs, eating utensils, hot bev powders, lighters, sugar, etc., I use it a lot in the winter when I want to cook some soup or hot drinks when skiboarding or snowshoeing.

Keep most of my bug out clothes in my car year round packed away in mesh dividers, nooks and crannies. Gore-TeX, cold survival in gear the winter, some tools, Leatherman Core, compass, pen, paper, L.E.D lights, pepper spray, trekking poles, etc...oh have 3 inflatable Thermarest pillows and pack sink as well. Car had a weather band in it. If I am not in the car have a weather scanner to take. Also have SW world band mini radio.

Bug out food is an easy grab. I keep about a dozen home made low fat high protein muffins in the freezer...grab the bag and have enough things to munch on for a coupe or three days. Also have other ready access foods and lots of bottled water to grab in the house.

Also pack a water filter:

Have many backpacks for different uses. One thing in common with them all is a titanium divers knife mounted on the strap for super easy access...just pull down and it is there.

Also many odds and ends such as pack sink, bivay bag, ENO hammock, bug net for head, roll pile blanket, Thermarest inflatable butt pad, pocket TV (...it will be useless after '09 when digital comes around), Rad D-Tec, face masks, mace and various weapons, bug spray, T.P., 25% alcohol spray and shower adapter with mini hose, faucet keys to fit various hydrants. Wife has her own pack list includes a lady J.

Speaking of backpacks, got a Stihl 192t chainsaw for one pack if needed.

http://www.stihlusa.com/chainsaws/MS192T.html (http://www.stihlusa.com/chainsaws/MS192T.html)

Sigg fuel bottles carry the gas.

It is a stripped down model and weighs about 7 pounds. It fits in my backpack so I can hike or bike with it.

I took off the anti kickback safety on it to make it fit better and be lighter (not recommended unless you are experienced tree feller...so don't complain if you get hurt by this mod)

Also have a mid size Thermarest pad that is ready in a stuff sack in my house.

Pretty comfy, but if you need more cush go for the Luxury model for more $$

First aid kits? Got many of em from large laptop size for big trips to a mid size in my car to mini packs in my backpacks. All custom made and individualized.

Was on vacation in the USVI and BVI a few years ago. While walking on the beach to photograph a cove with some sailboats I banged my toe into a large rock in the sand. (The Buddhists saying for this..."when one eye is kept on the destination it only leaves one eye left for the journey.")

I hurt my toe pretty bad and had to keep it bandaged throughout the trip as well as when I returned home. It was a real pain in the ass since the dressing was continually getting wet while diving or snorkeling and had to be changed up to 5 times a day. This experience also reminded me of the importance of a good first aid kit (which I luckily had two of with me.)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mental Avenger on March 01, 2010, 05:22:30 PM
I have a 'car' bob that goes everywhere with me.  (I'd hate to have to walk home in high heels)  Anyway, I recently purchased a back pack combination rolling luggage at Costco.  Thanks goodness for the wheels.  No way, at my age, would I be able to carry that thing on my back. (I tried) I tried to decide what to take out to make it lighter, but according to the above lists, I'm traveling light. With the wheels, I can however, roll it along.  I know, it might not roll in the woods, but, in order to carry all the stuff you guys carry, it simply has to roll!

Someone needs to come up with a way for older and or disabled folks to GOOD.
I am 62 and have had 6 knee surgeries, including one total knee replacement.  I had a 42 lb pack for over 20 years, and decided there was no way I could carry that. So I decided to downsize.  I put a lot of thought and research into my new kit and got it down to an 8 ½ lb waist pack including the 2 ½ liter bottles of water.

This is a very serious survival kit, with items probably not found in most other kits, and some items not found in any other kit anywhere.  It is compact, yet complete.

Here is a photo of it.

(http://i819.photobucket.com/albums/zz113/yehuudi/BugOutPack.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mental Avenger on March 01, 2010, 05:46:18 PM
Ultimate Survival Pack Complete 8 ½ bs

Survival With Style Book
(2) Razor Arrowheads
(2) Trash Bag 13 Gal
(2) Trash Bag 30 Gal
Space Blanket
Survival-First Aid Book
Ready.Gov Brochure
Cable Lacing 25ft
Camp Pan
Dental Floss 55yds
Duct Tape 2ft
Paper Water Filters
First Aid Kit
Fishing Gear
Flashlight LED
Gatorade (4oz)
9” Throwing Knife
Sawblade Mini Knife
Butane Lighter
Magnifying Lens (95mm x135mm)
Mirror & Morse Code
MultiTool
Notepad & Pencil
Reading Glasses
(4) Lg Paper Clips
Para Cord 20ft
Poncho
Respirator Mask
Salt
Emergency Wire Saw
Sewing Kit
Storm Shelter
Slingshot slings
Aluminum Alcohol Stove
8 Tea Bags
Water Filter & Tube
Water Purification Tabs
Whistle-Compass-Matches

First Aid Kit
(2) 3x3 Gauze pads      
Steri-Strips   
(2)Sutures   
(2)Lg Bandage   
(2)Antibiotic foil pks
3-pk Betadine swabs      
Moleskin
2 2x3 Non-Adherent pads
36 Asst Bandaids
3 Alcohol Prep Pads

Items included which are updated every six months.
(2) .5 Liter bottles fresh water   
(1) Tuna 6 oz can
(6) Bullion Cubes
(6) Instant Oatmeal Pkgs
(6) Instant Coffee pkgs
(4) Fresh Batteries
(4) Energy Bars
(1) Alcohol, 95% 10 fl oz
(1) Personal Knife
(1 pair) Elk Skin Leather Gloves   
(1) Toothbrush
(1) Disposable Razor   
Most items are packed in various sizes of ZipLock bags.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on March 01, 2010, 07:42:00 PM
Monkeybird...correct me at any time but from what you say your primary goal if something happened would be to get to your home in Florida.   What is your husbands view on this?  Would he be willing to go with you?  Also it seems that a supply of his heart meds are in order.  If he said I'm staying in Alabama what would you do?

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Coyote Kid on March 01, 2010, 09:02:50 PM
Here is the list of my current BOB. Right now it's the only one I have and is the main GOOD bag. I'm going to be working on some smaller ones to keep in the car and take to work with me later, but I wanted some advice on the contents of this one to see if anyone thought I should add or drop some of the equipment on the list.

Top Pouch
Mess Kit
3-piece cook kit with pan, pot and plastic cup
Collapsible fork/spoon/knife set
Waterproof matches
Magnesium firestarter
First Aid Kit
29 Waterproof bandages of various size
10 Butterfly sutures
Two pair of latex gloves
Two triangle bandages with safety pins
1 gauze wrap
Non-sterile cotton balls
Water purification tablets
Q-tips
Waterproof Tape
Trauma Sheers
Tweezers
Thermometer
Medications
Nyquil
Dayquil
Imodium
Benadryl
Acetaminophen
Aspirin
Ibuprofen
Iodine

Main Compartment
Hatchet
E-tool
Tool Bag
Work gloves
3-Piece Sharpening Stone Set
Tool Pouch
6 mini screwdrivers
4 pc ratchet set w/ driver tool and extension
Needle nose pliers
Wire Cutters
Tweezers
9 pc driver bits
Pliers
Hammer
Multi tool
Folding saw
Materials
50’ Paracord
Roll of twine
Zip ties
Nails
Super glue
Electrical tape
Hygiene Kit
Toothbrush
Toothpaste
Athlete’s foot spray
Gold Bond powder
Camp soap
Purell
Toilet paper
Food Kit
3 MREs, broken down to save space
Slim Jims
Hard candy
Multivitamins
Waterproof Utility Box
Compass
Emergency Blanket
Pen/Notepad
Signal Whistle
Chapstck

Middle Compartment
Road maps for Houston and Texas
Knife
Binoculars
2 Glow sticks
LED Flashlight

Right Compartment
Hand crank flashlight/radio
A pair of two way radios
Extra batteries

Left Compartment
Roll of trash bags
Deck of playing cards

Most of the things I chose were based on the idea that I wouldn't be traveling alone. Currently I've been unable to convince any of my friends or family of the wisdom of building a BOB, so I try to prepare as best I can for the idea of traveling with them. Some of the items not currently added to the bag are my sleeping bag and my tent, which I'm still trying to find a way to properly attach to the bag (and one of the reasons I've already ordered a new bag with better attachment points).
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: monkeybird on March 02, 2010, 05:57:24 AM
Who me . . .He would definitely go with me.  We haven't been married for 35 years for nothing.  If he should get stupid and decide to dig his heels in - I would prepare to leave anyway.  At that point he would probably change his mind.  However if he didn't, it would be stupid of me to stay and watch the ship sink. Loving someone doesn't mean dying because they choose to be stupid.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on March 02, 2010, 12:39:38 PM
Which is pretty much what I figured the situation to be.   So you should prepare two bags, one for each of you that you would be able to carry.  A third kit that would stay in the vehicle that would be primarily gravy to make your trip more comfortable, that you would pack on your mule if you had to abandon your vehicle.

As your home in Florida would be your Bug Out Location, most of your long term survival supplies should be staged there so you would not have to try and move them.  Keeping in mind that the most likely situation that would call for a Bug Out would be economic in nature, you would most likely be able to drive the whole way. 

One thing you should think about is which property would be your best bet for SHTF...in other words would you be better off staying in Alabama and having your son come there.

Another item would be your husband's meds...if he cannot survive without them you should lay as much of a supply as possible. 

The house where you intend on ending up at in a SHTF situation should have most of your long term supplies stored there.  Having your son close is a bonus as he can keep an eye on the place.  Also OPSEC should be a primary concern as you don't want anyone to know the neighbors house is full of food.

Ok as to packs...your new costco pack concerns me.   First if you think "ok i will be able to pull it behind me"  you are more likely to stuff it full of stuff.  Having a bunch of stuff is not in itself a bad thing. BUT...those things are not designed for long duration cross country treks.  The first thing that would happen is you would end up with pulled muscles in your shoulder and back as pulling a case behind you is not how your body is set up.  The second is the little plastic wheels would fall off. 

A far more efficient way to move that "extra" gear is to find yourself a yard sale mountain bike and fix it up.  Set it up with new tires and extra tubes, make sure it is well greased...then get panniers and bags designed for a bike.  Now, if you have to abandon your vehicle you can pack your bike with extra food, water and gear and just walk beside it.  That will be a lot less stressful on your body as well as allowing you to not only move a larger volume of gear easily, you can go "off road" if you need to.  Something your rolling suitcase would not survive for very long.

As far as a BOB you need a pack that you can actually carry.  Doesn't have to be huge or have a lot of stuff in it.  Clothing, water, food, shelter, fire.   It's only purpose is to get you to your BOL.  Not to allow you to survive in the wild for and extended period of time.  Quite frankly the majority of people would not last very long in the wild.  It is a skill set that most just do not possess.  Gear that you don't really know how to use is of no benefit to you.   

I know as you look at lists of stuff everyone post you feel that you have to pack all that gear yourself but you don't.  You need food, water and shelter to survive.  Make sure you have a good water filter and several containers.  Freeze dried food is light and doesn't take up much space, a light stove is all you need to prepare food. (I use one of these  http://www.bushbuddy.ca/indexs.html (http://www.bushbuddy.ca/indexs.html)  a hand full of sticks will cook dinner) A titanium pot will cook your food and weighs a couple ounces. You don't need to build a big fire.  Light sleeping bag will get you through the night. A 2 person tent is all you need for shelter.

Everything else is gravy, nice to have but you can survive without it.  Keep your carry pack very light and if you need more pack it on your bike mule.

Above all make sure you know how to use everything.  Practice using your stuff in the back yard where failure is just inconvenient.  Be able to put up your tent in the dark, light your stove in the rain, be able to filter water without the directions.

One item that you did not mention and up to now neither did I.   How do you plan to protect yourself and you gear if SHTF and you are walking to Florida?  I don't know if you own any firearms but I highly recomend at least a handgun and training on it's proper use.  The fact of the matter is there are boogy men that haunt those woods.  Some people are just evil and others only have a civil face because others are watching and they fear the consequences, but would not hesitate to turn into Zombies if things went bad.  Don't get caught alone in the middle of nowhere without some way to defend yourself.  For that matter don't get caught at home with no way to defend yourself.















Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: monkeybird on March 02, 2010, 03:40:18 PM
Thank you, Who Me, for the information and advise.  I appreciate it.  I do have a handgun and do go practice with it. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: goatboy66 on March 04, 2010, 04:25:05 AM
Hi, newbie here-

Looking for thread on bug-out vest.
Did a search; nada.
Searched BOV and got to the bug out vehicles.

Are there any threads on vests?

Thanks.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on March 05, 2010, 03:19:06 PM
Go to cabela's or bass pro shops and look for hunting vests, then take a look at photographer's vests.

Those'll probbably be your vest bet.  :P

I have a canvas photog vest that I've been toying with - plenty of pouches and the like.

Also, you might look at plate carriers or chest rigs from places like sawtac. I've seen some really neat molle-compatible things while poking around at surplus places.

if you search youtube for nutnfancy, he's got some neat loadouts that he goes through in his videos for hiking and SHTF.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: goatboy66 on March 05, 2010, 05:40:35 PM
if you search youtube for nutnfancy, he's got some neat loadouts that he goes through in his videos for hiking and SHTF.

Hey- great lead; thanks.
Dave.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RodPowley on April 02, 2010, 04:44:54 PM
I have a M12 100Ltr capacity tactical bag I use for a BOB. In it I keep:
a tent, mummy style sleeping bag and small air matress.
I have water bottles with 44 steel mug
telescopic baton
sling shot
sharpening stone
larger and small folding saws, one to keep in the bag and one in my pocket
Bivvy bag
foil survival blanket
small guide books for info and to kill bordom
walkies
Tuna
first aid kit
soap bag
sewing kit
crank powered radio/torch
hunting/gutting knife and woodcraft knife
magnesium block
flint striker
whistle
headlamp
binoculars
waterproofs (behind gas mask)
550 paracord
compass
leatherman
personal alarm
zippo
A mouse trap
fold away cutlery and a small cooking pot
In a small possibles pouch I have matches in a waterproof pot made out of an old shot gun cartridge, carabina clips, water purification tablets (also have them in the first aid kit and my water bottle pouch) and other odds and ends that might be usefull. Most of this fits in the outer pockets of the bag.
Also depending on the situation I have a S10 Gas mask and Omega 4997 multi-band radio.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RodPowley on April 02, 2010, 05:30:56 PM
(http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h73/rodster6/Camping/bugoutbag.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ursus on April 06, 2010, 11:38:16 PM
Hey guys,

Here is the list for my "Bug Out Bag" which is a small EDC survival kit that I take with me in my vehicle and on my person every day.  I also take my Bug Out Bag camping or on road trips.  Small and light, not all-inclusive by any means.

I plan to add a handful of surgical suture kits to my Bug Out Bag.  (Any medical personal here that have suggestions for sutures and a place to buy them?)  And I'm shopping for a small camping/backpacking stove (suggestions?), as well as a good quality canteen and cup and/or backpacking pot and a light weight shelter option (suggestions?).  I'd also like a good book on edibles in my area (California) as well as some snare wire.  I'm considering throwing my Pocket Ref (by Thomas J. Glover) in the BOB as well.  I also carry a 4 gallon water canister in my car.

Here's the list of what I carry, so far.

-ursus-


BUG OUT BAG
My personal Bug Out Bag all fits in a small bag that has a shoulder strap and a hip belt (Maxpedition Sabercat).  The entire kit weighs about 9 pounds.

Survival/Tools:
1 Leatherman Wave multitool
1 LED flashlight with 3 AAA batteries (white and red light)
1 Bic lighter
1 compass
1 space pen
1 magnesium flint fire starter
1 P38 can opener
1 small canister of dryer lint (tinder)
1 box storm proof matches
1 Trees of North America guidebook
1 knife (5 in. fixed blade, Fallkniven NL4) with custom leather sheath and sharpening stone
1 Wool cap (100% wool)
50 ft. of 550 cord
1 Buff wrap (headwear)
1 3600 calorie food brick/bar
1 XL bandana
1 emergency poncho
1 survival blanket
1 pouch toilet paper
1 signaling mirror
1 small roll guerrilla tape/duct tape wrapped around a phone card
1 Small sewing kit with safety pins
1 Whistle
3 trioxane pouches (fire starter)
1 small metal camping coffee cup
1 pepper spray
1 small calculator
1 small travel towel

Medical:
1 pack Tissues
12” X 12” aluminum foil
3 Emergen-C pouches
2 packets instant coffee single serve
1 Cliff Bar
1 roll gauze tape
1 Purell hand sanitizer
1 temporary filling, tooth repair kit
1 2” wide roll of gauze
1 vicodin pain killers
1 vial of eye drops
1 jar of water purifying tablets
1 roll of Tums antacid
1 Chapstick with SPF 15
5 pouches of Advil (2 pills ea.)
2 single serving Neosporin packs
4 alcohol antiseptic wipes
4 regular size bandaids
1 medium-large bandaid
1 XL bandaid
1 2X2 sterile gauze dressing
1 4X4 sterile gauze dressing
6 chewable Pepto Bismol pills
4 Benadryl Antihistamine pills
4 Pepsid indigestion pills
2 Imodium pills
2 sinus/cold daytime pills
1 QuikClot Silver hemostatic agent
1 Watergel burn dressing
2 Watergel burn ointment pouches
1 Celox-A hemostatic with applicator for puncture wounds
5 packs of Stay Alert caffeine gum
Title: Vests
Post by: ICBM on April 07, 2010, 08:43:20 AM
My wife and I both have vests as our last resort BOB's-- they cost about $30 and have 2.5 liter hydration pouches. There are a number of places you can purchase them--just type in tactical vest with hydration pouch. We have several layer to our plan--the first level being survive in place--but if we have to leave, we have several packs--each prioritized as to which to take leave as the situation demands. Since we're both in our late 50's--heavy "back" packing isn't in the cards any more :-) So if we had to leave our survival in place--all of our stuff would go in the car--if we had to ditch the car, I have two deer carts that we would carry our packs, sleeping gear, etc. if we had to ditch more, I have a plastic deer sled, and if we had to ditch even more--the vests as our last resorts.

My vest:
2.5 l. water bladder 
Hydration cleaning kit
Knife--USAF, survival
Knife--fillet
Knife sharpener
Saw--folding
Spear tip, three prong
Flashlight--crank
Fishing reel--automatic
Fishing kit--hooks, sinkers, etc.
Straw--emergency water filter
Compass
Bic lighters
Fire starters
.223--60 rounds
Magazine--AR15--30 rds
Insect repellent
Coffee filters
Tube triple antibiotic
Tape--waterproof
Gauze
Hand sanitizer
Aspirin
Toothpaste
Toothbrush
Razor
Floss
Paracord-- 50ft.
Survival Tabs--180 count
Gloves
Socks--1 pr.
T-shirt
Briefs--mens--1 pair
Blanket--emergency
Eating kit--knife, spoon, fork

In addition, I would wear a Web belt & thigh pouch--on the Web belt
Hatchet
Canteen
Water purification tabs
Poncho
In the thigh pouch
AR15 magazine 30 rds
.223 80 rds
AR15 cleaning kit
Field dressing kit
Fire starter
Powder drink mixes
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on April 07, 2010, 11:49:24 AM
ICBM,

Depending upon your location, I might suggest you consider re-evaluating your use of a vest for a BOB. Vests are one of those things that sounds logical, but in practice turn out not to be as great as when you're brain-storming.

For example, vests are hot.  In hot weather, they add an additional layer of insulation over your entire torso.  In cold weather, you may find them difficult to put on over your cold weather gear. . .or  you may not be able to put your cold weather gear over your vests and close them.

A small backpack is a better choice.  You can easily find one that can hold the same amount of gear and can be put on over any clothes. 

Just some thoughts, hope they help.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ICBM on April 07, 2010, 02:21:44 PM
Professor--thanks for your feedback. Thought about the issues you brought-up and did my Web surfing/field testing. I'm retired military and did some tramping around with packs, etc. in the good old days :-) The vests I'm using are mesh and I've practiced using them in the heat and cold. These are actually, for me at least, a little cooler than a pack--and definitely, because of the ability to distribute the weight better than the packs--more comfortable. In cold weather, because these expand quite a lot, fit well over our parkas. They also give me a little more freedom of movement in that I'm more balanced. And, things are easy to get to if you don't/can't take the time to go through the pack.

Again though--good thoughts--the reason why I went for the mesh, and a vest that had great expandability. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RXO on April 07, 2010, 02:35:51 PM
My BOB has evolved over the last couple of years. When I learn about new and better products or better ways to use old ones, the pack gets re-evaluated. The one thing I have learned personally is make your BOB look less tactical. I started with an OD pack with MOLLE straps and anytime someone saw it they asked too many questions. I don't mind educating people about being prepared, but in a SHTF scenario, I want to be invisible. Now I have a used blue backpack from Goodwill and no more questions.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on April 07, 2010, 05:54:23 PM
Bailey:

You've got a good set up. .. I'm feeling cantankerous today so I'm going to nitpick a bit, so don't take it personally, just what *I'd* swap out.

The big flashlight (2-D Maglite).  This is very heavy for the service it provides you.  Depending upon what you want it for, I might suggest either doing away with it or getting one of the smaller lights, maybe a  second Mini-Mag if you don't want to go with one of the CR123-batteried LED's.  As Roswell pointed out, put it on the outside, that way you won't have to go searching for your light. . .in the dark.

The Cardboard Windscreen: Swap it out for one of the super-heavy aluminum-foil style.  This way, you won't have to worry about it getting wet or crushed.  They're also better if you have to jam them into the ground a bit to keep them up in wind.

You have three cutting implements, but I don't see a sharpening stone (perhaps on the pouch on the belt knife?).

Is that map waterproofed?  You don't have to spend $$ on StormSaf, you can use Thompson's WaterSeal if you have any or can borrow some.  I'd also suggest getting a smaller map in addition to the state map.  Perhaps a smaller topo map of your immediate area.

Speaking of maps, I see a GPS, but no compass.  Even a cheap one is beneficial.  Your GPS will eat batteries quickly, especially if the scenery around your home is damaged and you have to use it a lot.  A compass needs no additional power and unless you're worried about the poles shifting, you can use it under any circumstances.

Speaking of Batteries, either pack a lot more, or. . .my preference, upgrade as soon as you can to a minimum of 12 Lithium batteries.

Radios: You have an FRS and an amateur radio?  While I applaud redundancy, I'm going to suggest losing one or the other (preferably losing the FRS radio).  If your wife isn't a HAM, then bug her until she becomes one.  Were it me, I'd take that Yaesu and mod it to all freqs.  Keep it set on low power and you have just lost not only quite a few ounces, but another battery-drainer.  Now, you can use it as a scanner and as a communications device.  I'd also suggest getting the vehicle and AC adapter and keeping the original battery as long as you can.  This way, you can plug in anywhere.  Consider also joining your local HAM group.  Chances are, they'll be out in a disaster and either helping or just surviving, as well.  They might be able to help out with more info.

Hygiene Kit:  Put together a small one.  A bar of un-scented soap, a washrag, comb and a small towel.  Put it in a ziploc bag.

Ziploc Bags: MORE.  Especially for that roll of toilet paper.  Double-bag that bad boy.

Food: Get a 1-qt Nalgene bottle and fill it with Instant Rice, you've more than tripled your food supply.  Also, I'd add in a couple Millenium bars or something that's already made.  Yes, you can eat the Mountain House foods dry, but that's no fun.  And if you're truly in a situation where you need to move quickly and can't take time to set up a cooking spot, you can grab one of your bars and eat on the run, so to speak.

A personal preference would be to swap that poly cord out for some 550.  You can pack more 550 in the same space and it's easier to keep from unravelling if you can't melt the ends

Other than that, overall, it's a pretty good set up!  Just some thoughts, hope they help.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on April 08, 2010, 01:20:17 PM
Nice idea with the thompson's waterseal.

I've used scotchguard in the past to great effect, though it takes several spray-and-let-dry cycles.

as far as a windscreen, you might want to look at your local home depot or lowes for some aluminum flashing coils. they sell them as short as 25 feet, and you'll always find a use for the extra material.  I made a hard drive enclosure for a friend one time with a few feet of it - Just had to bend a bunch of reinforcement channels in it for rigidity. Worked great, and went together really fast with a 1/8" drill bit and some pop rivets.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Beetle on April 08, 2010, 03:42:50 PM
Bailey:

You've got a good set up. .. I'm feeling cantankerous today so I'm going to nitpick a bit, so don't take it personally, just what *I'd* swap out.

The big flashlight (2-D Maglite).  This is very heavy for the service it provides you.  Depending upon what you want it for, I might suggest either doing away with it or getting one of the smaller lights, maybe a  second Mini-Mag if you don't want to go with one of the CR123-batteried LED's.  As Roswell pointed out, put it on the outside, that way you won't have to go searching for your light. . .in the dark.

The Cardboard Windscreen: Swap it out for one of the super-heavy aluminum-foil style.  This way, you won't have to worry about it getting wet or crushed.  They're also better if you have to jam them into the ground a bit to keep them up in wind.

You have three cutting implements, but I don't see a sharpening stone (perhaps on the pouch on the belt knife?).

Is that map waterproofed?  You don't have to spend $$ on StormSaf, you can use Thompson's WaterSeal if you have any or can borrow some.  I'd also suggest getting a smaller map in addition to the state map.  Perhaps a smaller topo map of your immediate area.

Speaking of maps, I see a GPS, but no compass.  Even a cheap one is beneficial.  Your GPS will eat batteries quickly, especially if the scenery around your home is damaged and you have to use it a lot.  A compass needs no additional power and unless you're worried about the poles shifting, you can use it under any circumstances.

Speaking of Batteries, either pack a lot more, or. . .my preference, upgrade as soon as you can to a minimum of 12 Lithium batteries.

Radios: You have an FRS and an amateur radio?  While I applaud redundancy, I'm going to suggest losing one or the other (preferably losing the FRS radio).  If your wife isn't a HAM, then bug her until she becomes one.  Were it me, I'd take that Yaesu and mod it to all freqs.  Keep it set on low power and you have just lost not only quite a few ounces, but another battery-drainer.  Now, you can use it as a scanner and as a communications device.  I'd also suggest getting the vehicle and AC adapter and keeping the original battery as long as you can.  This way, you can plug in anywhere.  Consider also joining your local HAM group.  Chances are, they'll be out in a disaster and either helping or just surviving, as well.  They might be able to help out with more info.

Hygiene Kit:  Put together a small one.  A bar of un-scented soap, a washrag, comb and a small towel.  Put it in a ziploc bag.

Ziploc Bags: MORE.  Especially for that roll of toilet paper.  Double-bag that bad boy.

Food: Get a 1-qt Nalgene bottle and fill it with Instant Rice, you've more than tripled your food supply.  Also, I'd add in a couple Millenium bars or something that's already made.  Yes, you can eat the Mountain House foods dry, but that's no fun.  And if you're truly in a situation where you need to move quickly and can't take time to set up a cooking spot, you can grab one of your bars and eat on the run, so to speak.

A personal preference would be to swap that poly cord out for some 550.  You can pack more 550 in the same space and it's easier to keep from unravelling if you can't melt the ends

Other than that, overall, it's a pretty good set up!  Just some thoughts, hope they help.

The Professor
   Great ideas Thanks... Love all your ideas. I do have 550 cord and will swap it for her. She is a ham so good to go on the Yaseu. I figured we could use the FRS to eavesdrop on others since they are popular( what do you think? Bad/good). I figured the D maglite also can be used as protection, nice to have some "weight" in your hands if suprised by someone. Not sure why I didn't add a compass to her BOB as I do have extras...Will add for sure.
   Kinda figured the cardboard screen could do double duty as firestarter material since it is that waxy cardboard from a lettuce box. Plus if it got lost or ruined no real big deal since it was free. TP is in ziploc bags just took it out for picture, Great idea on Hygiene kit will add for sure. Also rice and Millenium bars more great ideas... Thanks and will add
   I do have a 3 cell C maglight that is perfect, not to heavy but enough light and great for defense. Could swap it for the D maglight. What are your thoughts on it?
Thanks Professor for the great ideas keep 'em coming.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on April 08, 2010, 05:41:51 PM
Bailey,

I can't find your post, it didn't come up in my list, for some reason.  So, I can't remember what model Yaesu you had.

My inclination due to the nature of most emergencies, is to not worry about FRS.  Most of them will be families and businesses trying to get their people safe or such.  You're better off with a small AA-powered am/fm radio so you can listen to the news.  I want to say you had one of the 100-series radios.  If you can mod it out, you may be able to listen to the AM band radio broadcasts.  But I doubt that you'd get much usable info from FRS.  Again, it's just my opinion.  That's also why  I suggested hooking up, now, with your local amateur network. They'll be called out if the emergency is bad to provide comm support. You may be able to get more info from them.

Just a thought.

Also, if she's going to use the D-Cell Maglite as a weapon, just make sure she knows HOW.

Now, I gotta figure out what happened to your post.

The Professor.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Beetle on April 08, 2010, 07:21:25 PM
   It's on page 1 reply 26 I switched my screen name to Beetle...lol I'm in pretty tight with the ham community in the Pacific Northwest, I use ARES and RACES on a lot of SAR missions. Since we live up in the mountains I volunteered my property for a repeater, I agree with you they are a great resource and a good group of people.
  Lol My wife is a log truck driver and that entails throwing wrappers over the load. A wrapper is a 20' steel cable with chains attached to the ends, so I don't think I would mess with her. She is a real farm girl and I am amazed at how awesome she is at surviving. Although she is reminding me that she is not some big buff tobacco chewer...But she is tough.
    I was thinking...What if you ended up hooking up with others in a SHTF scenario and since the popularity of FRS you would have comm.'s with them? Can you mod a dual band ham radio to work in the FRS band? I know it's somewhere in the 450mhz.
  Right now I have Yaseu vx 170's, Bendix king Ht's and some stuff that will work on the LEO channels. Big plus one on the AM radio by the way...
Title: Bug Out Bag Videos.
Post by: ursus on April 09, 2010, 03:52:48 PM
Hey all,

I just wanted to share this great YouTube channel from a user that calls himself AnalyticalSurvival.  He covers survival gear, B.O.B., web gear, medical supplies, organization, food, some weaponry, and survival concepts.  Some of the best that I've seen on the web, this guy should have his own tv show.  Great quality video's and great info.  I got a lot out of these videos.

AnalyticalSurvival YouTube Link:
http://www.youtube.com/user/AnalyticalSurvival#p/u/3/TREim9mHs7k (http://www.youtube.com/user/AnalyticalSurvival#p/u/3/TREim9mHs7k)

Enjoy,

-ursus-
Title: Re: Bug Out Bag Videos.
Post by: pchambers on April 12, 2010, 10:43:23 AM

....
AnalyticalSurvival YouTube Link:
http://www.youtube.com/user/AnalyticalSurvival#p/u/3/TREim9mHs7k (http://www.youtube.com/user/AnalyticalSurvival#p/u/3/TREim9mHs7k)

Enjoy,

-ursus-


Enjoyed these youtube "videos".  The caching is new to me. thx for posting. +1
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: TrashCanMan on April 12, 2010, 03:36:26 PM
I've just added a tyvek boiler suit to my bug out bag.  It folds up really small so hardly takes up any room.

The reason?  I got a blow out on a tyre today and although I had nitrile gloves to stop my hands getting dirty when changing it, I got tyre rubber on my work trousers (pants) and shirt.  Not a good look!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RodPowley on April 15, 2010, 12:01:08 PM
I have a video on youtube explaining most of the contents of my BOB though I have made a few improvements since making the video.


Bug Out Bag Survival kit (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RF5femVwIo#lq-lq2-hq-vhq-hd)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on April 15, 2010, 12:22:21 PM
Got a new inverter for @ home. Tossed my 400 watt unit in the BOB.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Oregun89 on April 28, 2010, 07:52:13 PM
Bag


First Aid Kit

In addition:

Everyday Items

Pics:
(http://i585.photobucket.com/albums/ss299/geokeoki/DSCN0597.jpg)

(http://i585.photobucket.com/albums/ss299/geokeoki/DSCN0599.jpg)

Additional Notes:
This pack is designed to fit my needs, it is NOT built to go to battle, it is NOT built to take me to Mexico. It is built to be used in the MOST likely of scenarios.

It is designed to take me as far as I can get on foot in about 36-48hrs, or to a point of shelter and resupply. It is designed to compliment all of the gear I currently keep in my Jeep. It is also built with the intention of being properly dressed for the current/upcoming weather conditions of it's intended use.

I keep the bag clean, and in working order, along with all of its contents. I use a silicone water guard spray on the bag, as well as the first aid kit. I keep my knives sharp and my gun oiled. Maintenance is key, keeping up on all of your perishable contents is also essential. I keep tabs on them by recording them in my iCal which is synced with my macbook and my iphone, when things expire, I always know.

This bag is light, fast, and quiet. It does it's job, and it does it well. Hopefully someone will find this inspiring in some way. Use it to learn from, as I have used others ideas to learn for myself. I welcome criticism, but don't be surprised if I shoot it down.

Currently, I plan to add a small detachable hygiene kit to the webbing stitched on the underside of the pack. It will include tiny toothpaste, flossers, a collapsible toothbrush, and the anti-bacterial wipes which are currently in the bag. Also, (non-hygiene but in the same little bag nonetheless) gun oil and cleaning patches.[/list][/list]
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Ironhead on April 28, 2010, 10:18:07 PM
^^^^^^ Wow. you rule. great post and awesome BOB. very inspiring. welcome to the forum.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Heavy G on April 30, 2010, 08:18:41 PM
Ya, great post.  We hope you find a home here at TSP.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on April 30, 2010, 09:24:53 PM
Next there is no replacement for being dry, and consequently warm, or safe from the sun in the warmer months.

I agree with 99.9% of what you have going on, but what about shelter? I imagine that you have some equip that works in the Jeep, but what happens if you have to hoof it for that 36-48 hours and post up overnight in the rain? Throw a heavy duty trashbag in that bad boy.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Oregun89 on April 30, 2010, 09:39:31 PM
I agree with 99.9% of what you have going on, but what about shelter? I imagine that you have some equip that works in the Jeep, but what happens if you have to hoof it for that 36-48 hours and post up overnight in the rain? Throw a heavy duty trashbag in that bad boy.

On top of being appropriately dressed, there's a space blanket and a poncho in my pack.

Poncho > Hefty Bag  ;D
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on May 01, 2010, 07:47:56 AM
On top of being appropriately dressed, there's a space blanket and a poncho in my pack.

Poncho > Hefty Bag  ;D

Fair enough. You gonna stuff that poncho with leaves and sleep on it to insulate you from the ground? Or take it off to catch the rainwater? Bring both. Hefty bag weighs nothing, and remember 2 is 1 and 1 is none.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Docwatmo on May 01, 2010, 09:10:18 AM
I have 4 of the SUPER heavy duty Contractor style 55 gallon bags in each of our bags.  They weigh mere ounces and take up about as much space as a fist. (Or as in my day pack they are spread out in the map pocket and really don't take up any space at all).  Very versatile.  (I do have a good rain suit and 3 of the cheap $1 poncho's from wal-mart in each bag as well (Mostly to give to others who didn't come as prepared ;D)  I hadn't considered stuffing one with leaves to keep off the ground.  Thanks for that.

I also use my bag as an every day bag and use it constantly, I don't follow the "Bug out Bag" philosophy so much as the having what you need when you need it philosophy.  Great job on the pack.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Oregun89 on May 01, 2010, 10:50:29 AM
Fair enough. You gonna stuff that poncho with leaves and sleep on it to insulate you from the ground? Or take it off to catch the rainwater? Bring both. Hefty bag weighs nothing, and remember 2 is 1 and 1 is none.

I have 4 of the SUPER heavy duty Contractor style 55 gallon bags in each of our bags.  They weigh mere ounces and take up about as much space as a fist. (Or as in my day pack they are spread out in the map pocket and really don't take up any space at all).  Very versatile.  (I do have a good rain suit and 3 of the cheap $1 poncho's from wal-mart in each bag as well (Mostly to give to others who didn't come as prepared ;D)  I hadn't considered stuffing one with leaves to keep off the ground.  Thanks for that.

I also use my bag as an every day bag and use it constantly, I don't follow the "Bug out Bag" philosophy so much as the having what you need when you need it philosophy.  Great job on the pack.

No... I was thinking more along the lines of curling up into the fetal position, layering the space blanket beneath the poncho. But, I'm sure a Hefty Bag could come in handy, I'll throw one in.

Come to think of it, I meant to throw one in last Fall but never got around to it. I was out for a casual hunt with a friend, I shot a coyote with a beautiful coat, so we decided to bring him back to the cabin to skin him. Fortunately my friend had a Hefty bag to haul him. Thanks for the reminder guys, and yes they are very versatile.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RightArmOfWyoming on May 07, 2010, 09:37:31 PM
Bugs (back-up guns)  ;D

(http://www.rightarmofwyoming.com/glock/BUGs%20003.jpg)


(http://www.rightarmofwyoming.com/glock/BUGs%20004.jpg)


(http://www.rightarmofwyoming.com/glock/BUGs%20006.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on May 09, 2010, 12:07:28 AM
Or even BUCKS. Back Up Carry Kitty
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RightArmOfWyoming on May 09, 2010, 11:55:59 AM
Or even BUCKS. Back Up Carry Kitty

LOL!

Basically, I ain't buggin' out. That's probably antithetical to much of this site, but I'm stockin' up my house, and we'll sit on the roof with rifles and pick off zombies if need be.


MWD
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roknrandy on May 13, 2010, 01:45:34 PM
My bob rant

bob1_0001.wmv (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9dwRp_avgY#lq-lq2-hq-vhq)

bob2_0001.wmv (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZemLvXT6jFs#lq-lq2-hq-vhq)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on May 13, 2010, 07:21:35 PM
My bob rant

bob1_0001.wmv (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9dwRp_avgY#lq-lq2-hq-vhq)

bob2_0001.wmv (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZemLvXT6jFs#lq-lq2-hq-vhq)

Thanks Randy!

I would add,

Ditch the titanium spork. Plastic forks/spoons etc are free from food joints, throwaway, lightweight, and even float in water (God forbid  :))

Heineken keg cans are often used as a poor mans cook pot

A $4-8 tarp can be used for more things than a tent

the hardware store has torch sparkers for $2 and they are idiotproof

coffee filters will filter gunk out of water then add iodine tabs, or tincture of iodine

trash bags, trash bags, trash bags,

etc...

These aren't ideal, but better than bitching about cost and having nothing.
Thinking outside the expensive box.

 







 



Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: idelphic on May 14, 2010, 04:01:34 PM
Yolp!..  Don't forget that the Hobo's make stoves from cans,..  You can make a pot, cup, etc from soup cans..  I have a alcohol stove that is a pop can, and will soon make one from a (metal) beer bottle.

Don't forget Yard Sales too,,.. Craigslist and Freecycle.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roswell on May 14, 2010, 05:21:34 PM
Awesome video Randy. Thanks for posting.  I think often times people can get paralyzed into in activity because they think they have to spend all this money. They don't have money for those crazy expensive items they want so, they buy nothing and end up unprepared.

Smith, good idea about the hienken keg turned hobo crock pot. I am going to have to try that. I like those little kegs. I would caution you on the iodine. Many people are allergic to it and believe it or not bleach may actually be a better alternative.
(http://users.resist.ca/~kirstena/photoeqwaterchart.jpg)
Archer, has a cool chart in his signature.

good call idelphic, love me some Freecycle and craigslist (check the free section). also, army surplus stores and gun shows for cheap military surplus gear. I love that stuff, but I like it inside my backpack rather than the big army pack that says, "I'm a prepper" unless I am hunting or something.

I'd also add those little keychain led lights are great for cheap and burn forever. And DON'T forget a med kit. You can save by picecing one together yourself. Make sure to put it in a waterproof container too. If nothing else double bag it with ziplocks.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on May 15, 2010, 10:46:40 AM
Put together a little over 3 days of food into a stainless steel three-bowl stacking lunch box. One buddy called it a turkish lunch box, another called it an indian lunch box. Either way, I have sweetener and various condiments, no msg boullion, tea, two packs of ramen, powdered milk, rice, and lentils, and three packs of carnation instant breakfast all tucked away in the back of my truck. I also tossed in something a buddy of mine went nuts over - a welding rod carrier! I threw three cans of sterno in it with a magnesium fire starter and a lighter for now, but it's got enough head space (and a belt clip) to handle a few other odds and ends. Gives me another layer of protection in case something tries to puncture one of the sterno cans, and the belt clip and lanyard loops are pretty handy, just need to thread some paracord through them.

I also got together with a couple of guys and built my first rain barrel last night. Fought off an instant hangover from half of what I presume was a bad beer, and managed not to cut a 2" hole in my hand with my buddy's cordless drill. Twice. Barrels turned out pretty sweet, and I'm going to actually put them in place sometime over the next week so I can start work on my rainwater flush system.

One last prep is really a finish - I took my Exit Exam of Writing today, and I'm pretty sure I aced the hell out of it. Just two more classes and I can walk away with a really expensive piece of paper under my arm, but no college debt!


That was a hell of a lot of work now that I write it all down, but I felt like I didn't get anything done at all over the past two days. Jeez, I'm hard on myself!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roknrandy on May 17, 2010, 05:58:26 PM
ok, 5th post attempt  >:(

Heres a little something I ran across in target a couple of weeks ago. I'm using it to important info in our home and car bags. It has 10 plastic sleeves (business card size) with card stock in each so you can write info on the cards and keep it protected. It was six dollars.

(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f372/Roknrandy/DSC03669Medium.jpg)
(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f372/Roknrandy/DSC03680Medium.jpg)
(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f372/Roknrandy/DSC03670Medium.jpg)
(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f372/Roknrandy/DSC03671Medium.jpg)
(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f372/Roknrandy/DSC03676Medium.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on May 17, 2010, 09:33:31 PM
You might think about spraying those cards with a few coats of scotchguard or something like that map waterproofer stuff - I've had the open edged card protectors wick moisture in, and if you have to remove the card to read it (if you put two cards back to back, or have a folded piece of paper with four panels of info for example) then you might wind up tearing it up a bit if it gets wet. My buddy made hydrophobic sand using scotchguard once, it's pretty handy stuff.

*reminder to stock up on a few more cans of scotch guard!*
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roswell on May 18, 2010, 08:27:05 AM
I have also heard you can use Thompsons water seal if you have some of that laying around. I love the idea of your own little survival flip book. I like that is small enough for EDC.  Much lighter and easier to carry than a big trapper keeper.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roknrandy on May 19, 2010, 02:21:06 PM
My bob video because I'm too tired to list everything  :P

Bug Out Bag (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snZmRJm6VRQ#lq-lq2)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on May 29, 2010, 09:05:59 AM
OK, Randy et. all.... I took this cheap idea and ran with it. Took me a week to put together the,

The Poor Man's Bug Out Bag

This kit was put together for an urban/sub-urban environment, with the intention of building the cheapest possible functional BOB. Ideally this kit would get someone safely out of dodge and to their local FEMA shelter for emergency assistance and forced vaccination. =)
The whole thing comes in at  around 12lbs. If I we're to grab it and run I would probably add a hammer from my tools. Please note: this kit could be made a lot better with a little $$$, but that defeats the purpose...

(http://i798.photobucket.com/albums/yy263/RoboSmith/pmbob/May2510005.jpg)

(http://i798.photobucket.com/albums/yy263/RoboSmith/pmbob/May2510004.jpg)

(http://i798.photobucket.com/albums/yy263/RoboSmith/pmbob/May2510009.jpg)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Bag (shown is a used messenger bag); Cost = $0, from home

Contents

1 Hand Towel; Cost = $2.50, from discount retail store
4 1Q Ziplock Freezer Bags; Allocated Cost = $0.66, from grocery store
1 bigger (?) Ziplock Bag; Cost = $0, from home
1 Bar of Soap; Cost = $1.99, from Walgreens
1 Toothbrush (most of handle hacked off for size/weight); Cost = $1.25, from Walgreens
1 Travel Toothpaste; Cost = $1.25, from Walgreens
1 Roll of TP (flattened & put in Ziplock); Allocated Cost = $0.41, from grocery store
Other incidental Hygiene products; Cost = $0, from home
2 Lighters with TSP ant logo; Cost = $0, from TSP Region 4 M&G
1 Book of Matches; Cost = $0, from local restaurant

1 First Aid Kit (basic small cheap white plastic kit, stuck in Ziplock); Cost = $1.99, from Walgreens
has lots of extra space in it for many additions raided from home, such as,
extra bandages all sizes
extra medicine
needle/thread/safety pins
razor blade
medical tape
cotton swabs, etc

1 American Flag Bandana; Cost = $2.00, from Army/Navy Surplus
1 Stainless Steel Kitchen Knife (lanyard hole drilled in handle); Allocated Cost = $0.89, from Walgreens
1 1L Stainless Steel Water Bottle; Cost = $4.00, from Walgreens
1 50' "Fox Outdoor" 350 cord; Cost = $3.50, from Army/Navy Surplus
2 Contractor Size Trash Bags; Allocated Cost = $0.66, from grocery store
1 Blue Poly-Tarp 6x8; Cost = $4.00, from hardware store
1 Plastic Poncho; Cost = $1.99, from Walgreens
1 LED Flashlight (keyring "impulse buy" kind); Cost = $1.99, from hardware store
1 Red Plastic Whistle; Cost = $0, from home/work
1 bunch of Duct Tape; Cost = $2, from hardware store

1 Heineken Keg Can Cookset (instructions found on youtube from "Tinny" at minibulldesign, can be substituted with small pot from thrift store); includes,
1 24 oz Heineken Keg Can; Cost = $0, leftover
1 4 cp plastic Ziplock container; Allocated Cost = $2.00, from grocery store
1 1 cp plastic Ziplock container; Allocated Cost = $0.66, from grocery store
2 tealight candles; Cost = $0, from home
1 wire pot stand; Cost = $0, from home
Plastic Fork & Spoon; Cost = $0, from fast food place (Chipolte has some nice heavy duty ones)
2 2oz Plastic Containers of 90% Rubbing Alcohol; Allocated Cost = $2.00, from home
salt packets & assorted condiments; Cost = $0, from fast food place

Coffee Filters; Cost = $0, from home
Potable Aqua H2O Tablets; Cost  $5.75, from sporting goods store
Plastic Funnel; Cost = $1, from hardware store

1 Pen, 2 Pencils, 1 Red Sharpie; Cost = $0, from home/work
1 Notebook; Cost = $0, from home/work
1 Map of Metro Area; Cost = $0, from local transit authority
1 Deck Playing Cards; Cost = $0, from home
1 Paperback Book; Cost = $0, from home
1 Copy of the US Constitution; Cost = $0, from minuteconstitution.com

1 Pair of Socks; Cost = $0, from home
1 Pair of Underwear; Cost = $0, from home

3 Packages Beef Ramen; Cost = $0.75, from grocery store
3 Snickers Bars; Cost = $2.67, from grocery store
3 Granola Bars; Allocated Cost = $1.50, from grocery store
1 Cliff Bar; Cost = $1, from grocery
2 Packages Instant Oatmeal; Allocated Cost = $0.50, from grocery
1 Package Beef Jerky; Cost = $4.99, from 7-11
2 1/2 liter bottles of water; Allocated Cost =  $0.50, from grocery
Handful of Jolly Ranchers; Allocated Cost = $0.30, from grocery

Total Cost = $54.65


Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cartpusher on May 29, 2010, 02:50:35 PM


The Poor Man's Bug Out Bag

Smith - this is an awesome $54 kit

2 Lighters with TSP ant logo; Cost = $0, from TSP Region 4 M&G

You guys are handing our premiums at your Meet and Greet's???  Now that is great. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roknrandy on May 29, 2010, 03:28:31 PM
Now thats what I'm talking about!! Great job Smith. I like that kit, it's simple and covers the basic needs. It's not very big or heavy. At least you have one now so down the road you can start replacing items (if you so choose) with something better  ;D

the little first aid kit you have(the white box) I grab bunches of those when they go on sale for .99 and double them up and use the empty containers for other things
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on May 29, 2010, 09:59:07 PM
Now thats what I'm talking about!! Great job Smith. I like that kit, it's simple and covers the basic needs. It's not very big or heavy. At least you have one now so down the road you can start replacing items (if you so choose) with something better  ;D

the little first aid kit you have(the white box) I grab bunches of those when they go on sale for .99 and double them up and use the empty containers for other things

Thanks Randy! I've got better bags for me and the loved ones, just figured I'd put this one together as a project, and maybe give/get some ideas on how to simplify things.

The hope was to bring it in so cheap that no one could say "I can't afford a bug out bag".
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: KatieH on June 03, 2010, 05:09:37 AM
I am student studying and living in Palmerston North (i'm actually studying Defence and Geography so I can get involved in civil defence), money is pretty tight but I'm doing the best I can with what I have. If something were to happen, I'm planning on staying put but If I was to evacuate this is what I've got.

Currently in my car (Get home bag/emergency vehicle kit as I do a lot of travelling)
Hiking Boots
Woollen Socks x 2
Cargo Pants
Polar Fleece Jumper
Wick T-Shirt
Rain Jacket
Beanie, Sunhat, Gloves and Scarf
Thermal Underwear
Radio
Spare Radio Batteries
Torch
Spare Torch Batteries
Car Cellphone Charger
Spare Cellphone Battery
Tube Tent
Rope
Sleeping Bag
Lighter
Waterproof Matches
Water Purifying Pills
Emergency Stove w/Fuel
Foldable Shovel
Brush (for snow)
Whistle
Spare Petrol
First Aid Kit
Water (10L)
Soup
Tuna
Hot Chocolate + powdered Milk
Heat Packs
List of Important numbers
Emergency Blankets
Chapstick
Tea light candles
Folding knife
Leather gloves
Dust mask
Bungee Cords
Salt
Maps  (all around the North Island)
Compass
Cards
Backpack (to put it all in)
Prescription Glasses
Baby Wipes
Deodorant
Coins
Cash
Tampons
Toilet Paper
Spare keys
First aid Manual
Bright cloth (if stranded in snow storm)
Rubbish bags
Water bladder

Plus a supplement bag for evacuation:
Any extra water
Emergency Rations
Back country meals x 6
Heavy duty tarpaulin
Camp cutlery
Rain pants
Bug Repellent
Sunscreen
Underwear x 3
Soap
Caffeine Pills
Camping Stove
Stove Fuel
Camping Pot
Any canned food etc I can grab

Any critiques or suggestions? If I had to evacuate and depending on the size of the problem I would either go 3 hours away to my best friends farm or head all the way home to Auckland which is 7 hours away.



Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on June 03, 2010, 09:26:58 AM
...
Any critiques or suggestions? If I had to evacuate and depending on the size of the problem I would either go 3 hours away to my best friends farm or head all the way home to Auckland which is 7 hours away.
...

I would say add some Emergency Flares to your car kit. I would also substitute some of the canned food for powerbars or granola bars. Something that doesn't require cooking. Of course, that might be what you mean by "Emergency Rations". Canned goods are really really geat, easy to heat up, keep for along time, etc... but they are heavy.

Also, some way to filter water & a multitool may be good additions.

Sounds like a pretty comprehensive list of supplies, I would also "stage" them so that if your car breaks down and you have to hump it, you can grab the "walking bag" and leave some of the heavy stuff behind. It would sure beat having to make decisions about what to keep and what to leave when you may not be thinking clearly and theres a blizzard outside.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: SteveandTracyinKY on June 11, 2010, 07:19:09 AM
I really liked the idea of a miniature shovel over a E-tool.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Oregun89 on June 11, 2010, 12:26:33 PM
I really liked the idea of a miniature shovel over a E-tool.

These little shovels kick ass.

http://www.rei.com/product/407009 (http://www.rei.com/product/407009)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: steeltownknight on June 11, 2010, 12:39:44 PM
No matter how water proof a case or  pouch claims to be I always place them in a GQ garbage bag or two.

I always have bungee or paracord already attached to at least the corners of my tarp. (for quick setup in a sudden rain)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: templar223 on July 07, 2010, 09:59:32 PM
I've seen some folks here with BOBs that must weigh forty to fifty pounds (as mine used to be when I started many years ago).

I came to realize there's no way I'm going to carry forty plus pounds on my back, plus body armor, plus a long gun, handgun and ammo, plus misc other gear, and be good for more than about 100 yards between breaks / naps / pain killers.

Multiple big knives?  Multiple multi-tools?  Sharpening stones?  Kitchen sinks?  A library of big, fat, heavy books?  Big, heavy flashlights (MagLights)?  What are some folks thinking?  It's a recipe for failure.

Lightweight is the name of the game.  Spartan.  Keep things simple.

This is a great thread and I've picked up a couple of ideas on improving my gear.

Here's what I had in my pack, with photos, from the Meet and Greet thread I did on an event that I hosted in Urbana, IL about a month ago http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=18673.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=18673.0).  There's still room for improvement, but what I've got is pretty refined and certainly lightweight - at just over 20 pounds (which is about 10 more than I'd like).

(http://www.gsldefensetraining.com/photos/meet10.jpg)

The bag itself, a medium ALICE pack with a genuine USGI folding shovel and canteen, along with some 550 cord.

In the inside pocket are food products, including a single MRE, a couple of Mountain House entrees and some oatmeal and hot chocolate.  In the flap is some cash, USB drive with personal inventory and documents, etc., paper, pens, deck of cards, etc.


(http://www.gsldefensetraining.com/photos/meet9.jpg)

Inside:

Most all in freezer bags...  towel, TP/napkins, leather work gloves and synthetic cap, socks (including wool) and polypro underwear, feminine stuff (pads and tampons), First Need water filter, a set of BDUs (probably to be soon replaced by 5.11s, a tarp with reflective inside coating for shelter or blanket, personal hygiene items (soap, baby wipes, shampoo, bug juice, sunscreen,  etc.), some freezer bags, a wood saw and several "construction clean-up" ultra heavy duty black plastic bags.


(http://www.gsldefensetraining.com/photos/meet8.jpg)

In the pockets

550 cord, meds, contact solution, toothpaste & brush, mirror, hydrocortisone cream.

Miniature FRS radio, Fenix CREE 1-AA LED with multiple settings and spare batteries.  (There's supposed to be a tiny AM/FM earbud radio in there...)

Heavy twine, Gerber multipliers, fuel tabs, candles, waterproof matches, bic lighter, etc.

IBD bandage

Combat tourniquet.

Nitrile gloves.

First aid products - pads, gauze rolls, band-aids, tape, CPR microshield, etc.  2 emergency rain ponchos.


Surveyor tape, aluminum tent stakes, clips for tarp, compass, cup, Esbit stove and fuel blocks, space blankets (2) and a space blanket sleeping bag.


Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Docwatmo on July 08, 2010, 06:38:14 AM
Good post Templar. After using my Daypack bag for 7 days of real EDC in the woods (50 Plus miles of hiking) I made a few changes.  The bag started out at about 35 lbs.  I have since dropped it to about 25 lbs.  (Did drop several duplicate and backup items like knives and multitools,  ;D the E-tool, some books (Just kept the knot tieing book for downtime study).  Because this EDC bag is used whenever I leave the house for the woods and sometimes I'm with a bunch of young scouts, While i'm with them, I carry a few extras like extra granola bars for snacks, a few extra waters for the boys who forget them (after a short but firm lecture on being prepared) or leave them at the last station, a couple of extra poncho's and Lots of 3 foot sections of rope for the boys who "Get bored" so they can keep occupied practicing knots.  (Finally got that darned Taut-line mastered myself LOL). 

I try to keep my bags dynamic.  I have a box at home with "Extras" or about 50 lbs of extra gear that I cycle in and out of the bag depending on the use.  If I'm hiking by myself there are things I take that I don't take when hiking with a bunch of scouts (Larger first aid kit, E-tool, Hatchet, Large chopping knife, mess kit etc).  I am more apt to take lots of extra gear if i'm going somewhere by myself for a few days or I alter the contents with some duplicates and extra food when with the family (Cause me and the two older boys are the only ones to carry day packs so we carry extra for the younger boy and my wife).

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on July 20, 2010, 03:19:40 PM
One item that I've recently added was to eliminate one more thing to carry.  I found some reflective 550 cord (actually rated at 400 pounds, so it's not really 550 cord) and bought it in hot pink.  Not only do I eliminate the annoyance of tripping over my shelter's guy ropes both during the day and at night, it also serves as a very unique flagging that doesn't look like everybody else's standard pink or orange flagging.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: slingblade on July 28, 2010, 12:39:20 PM
A Visa card. Why?
1.  In an emergency I would rather keep the cash in my pocket/BOB rather than spend it and have to worry about getting more in the near term.  Why go hunting for an ATM in the middle of an emergency?
2.  If someone steals my cash.  I have a zero cost backup.  No I don't have cards with yearly fees.  If someone steals my $25K I'm SOL - if they steal my Visa then it is no loss to me.
3.  I have several (5) BOBs in play at once - each has a card with $2k - $25k limits.  It would be impossible to keep that cash in each bag.
4.  They take Visa almost everywhere.  If they don't then I don't need to be there.

Disclaimer.  My finances are in order.  I have more than enough money to pay off even if I maxed them out.  They are all higher end cards with big banks - not the high fee cards you have to "buy" if you have bad credit.  I NEVER carry a balance.  I CAN buy a beer on a Southwest flight!  YMMV.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: zeke on July 29, 2010, 03:44:54 PM
I'm putting a B.O.B. together which will be left in the car. I planed on storing some of the mountain house or M.R.E. pouches in there. Will they hold up to the heat?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on July 29, 2010, 04:06:52 PM
Both will hold up fine, but you lose some shelf life with the heat.  There's a formula to it, something like 60 months at 70F, which is halved for every 15F hotter and doubled for every 15F cooler.  If you replace the MREs every couple years, they'll be fine.  Freeze dried foods are a little more heat tolerant, but they also lose nutritional value like everything else (heat changes proteins, which is why eggs harden when you cook them, but it's not always such a good thing). 

Even though I have a good store of FD foods around the house, I prefer MREs in the car because they don't take significant water to reconstitute.  Water adds enough weight to a car if you want three days worth of drinking water in the car.  I don't want to add to that with food that needs water, too.

@slingblade:  Have you considered a pre-paid visa?  I've never used one, but the idea appeals to me for many of the same reasons (security, density of value, etc.).
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: slingblade on July 29, 2010, 04:24:17 PM
@slingblade:  Have you considered a pre-paid visa?  I've never used one, but the idea appeals to me for many of the same reasons (security, density of value, etc.).

Thought about but I just didn't want to hand them over cash that they can use to pay bonuses with.  I figure the regular VISA is zero out of pocket and I theoretically am carrying around $25k vs making it pre-paid and having to pay $XXX up front.  Not that I think a prepaid VISA is a bad thing - just not for this purpose.  If you have bad or no credit, or are not disciplined enough to have a card without using it/paying it off then pre-paids are the way to go if you need the service.  Just my $.02, YMMV....
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: TRguy on August 01, 2010, 01:25:08 PM
Bug Out Bag - BOB (Current Total Weight 15.4lbs excluding Glock and Ammo)

Tools
Fixed Blade Knife
Folding Knife
2 - Multipurpose Tool - Gerber and one cheap one for shaving magnesium
Gerber Folding Saw
Knife Sharpner
Binocular 10x25 compact

Water
MSR MiniWorks EX Water Filter (Filters 2000 liters)
2 - Aquamira Filtration Straws(Filters up to 20 gallons)
1 - Aluminum Water Bottles with Lanyard (Lanyards have 7’ of Paracord)
1 - Canteen with Steel Cooking Cup
Small container with two ounces of bleech

Fire Starting
I know Rick has stuff, but here's what I pack:
2 - Boxes Matches
1 - Magnesium fire starter
1- Windproof Lighter
Refillable Zippo  lighter

Hygiene
1 bar of Soap
2 Small bottles of hand sanitizer
1 Small bottle Shampoo
Toothpaste
3 - Toothbrushes
Dental Floss
2 Disposable Razors
Manicure set with clippers, scissors, and file

Medical
1 Bottle Ibuprophen
1 tube of anti bacterial Neosporin
8 Tablets of Benadryl
8 Tablets of Ibuprophen Cold and Sinus
Sun Screen 30 SPF
Rolaids Small Tube Pack
Irrigation Syringe
Bandages

Comfort
4 - Emergency Blankets
4 - Emergency Ponchos
2 - Bandanas
10 small individual packs of Grape Koolaid
Seal Skin Waterproof Socks

Directional
Motorola Droid GPS - works off of GPS Satellites
Compass

Light
Mini Mag Light
Headlamp various lighting options
Coleman Aluminum Light 85 Lumens LED

Power
12 - AA Batteries
12 - AAA Batteries
(See Misc for Midland ER102 Radio with charging crank USB port)

Miscellaneous Items
Midland ER102 Emergency Radio (with Charging Crank and USB Ports)
50’ Paracord
2 13 gallon trash bags
1 Notepad and Pencil
1 Whistle
2 washcloths
2 handtowels
1 Deck of Playing Cards

Firearm
Glock G19 with an additional 4 spare mags (75 rds) total

Note: I haven’t got my Calories, I have enough room for two MREs
Thought of adding a small  tarp (Thoughts?)

(http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj131/TRguy/02ebd5c4.jpg)

(http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj131/TRguy/7860f252.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roswell on August 03, 2010, 09:16:52 AM
Looks good TRguy.  Might I suggest that if you want to use MREs that you take them out of the packages. They put so much packaging and useless things in those that you can often cut the size of an MRE in half just by removing the packaging. Then you can carry twice as many MREs.  ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: templar223 on August 03, 2010, 02:44:03 PM
A Visa card. Why?

I too carry credit cards in my "BOB". 

My daily computer bag is my "BOB" as compared to a 72hr kit.  In it is everything I need to protect my wealth and ability to earn an income.  To protect my health is on my hip.

I've got my computer (communication, entertainment, research, etc.), scans of all important documents, degrees and transcripts, training certifications, a photographic inventory of 99% of the stuff I own, hardcopies of what's in my wallet and lots more.  I've also got checkbooks from each of my accounts (I bank at multiple banks to spread my eggs around), and a couple of credit cards and cash as well.

Frankly, in most scenarios I can envision, I plan on bugging in my car (my escape pod) to a friend's house or hotel room somewhere outside of the problem area and my VISA card will be as helpful as anything if I need a place to stay at a hotel.

Frankly, I also keep the cards in there because when they aren't in your wallet, there's less temptation to use them.

John
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: 03USMCRAR_WA on August 05, 2010, 11:01:58 PM
I have to say that I love the JOB pics and some of the videos that I've seen in here. I'd only like to add a few things that I think might be helpful. I've seen a lot of zip-lock bags, and they are good for the whole waterproofing bit but one of the fantastic things that I discover in the Corps was space bags. it's like a zip lock on steroids. they aren't the best thing for food stuff but for things like clothing that eat room they are amazing to reduce the amount of space lost. I see socks pop up here an there on peoples BOB lists but those and some clean skives really do come in handy out in the field.
Now before people start to think that I'm some crazy go live in the woods after the end o the world, I'm in a very complicated situation between my commute to work and my custody battle. I the worst of situation I could have to spend up to three days moving cross country with my daughter and three others in tow. As callous as it sounds my gear is just for my daughter and myself.
I'm not going to go into a great deal of detail but I'll say that my entire kit, 96 hour pack and deuce gear live in my trunk 365 days a year unless I'm out training with it. Unfortunately to date I've only done a dozen moments over 20 miles. With full water reserves my total kit weights in at 90lbs. This includes ammunition for a rifle and pistol. My rifle goes into my trunk along with my side arm every day and comes inside every night. I realize that most days this is a little much but events today can happen in a matter of hours and I am usually the last to know.
One item that I will mention directly that I think everyone need to consider if they live in a forested area like Washington state. Caulk boots, pronounced "cork" these are boot with small metal cleats on the bottom fo moving through thick underbrush and across fallen logs. After several years working in the timber of western Washington I have a great deal of respect for these boot. Don't get me wrong I love my combat boots but when it comes to having to move through the woodlands out here in the left coast I will not go anywhere with out a pair of Caulks in my trunk. They save energy and allow for shortcuts that no one would ever think of wearing regular boots.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on August 08, 2010, 12:12:36 PM
TRguy...here is my solicited opinion.

Looks like a good solid kit with just a few (IMHO) tweaks needed. 

I noticed that in your fire starting kit you have no tinder.  There are many recipes for home made tinder and quite a few natural ones you can find.  Take a small peanut butter jar a fill with the tinder of your choice, almost no wieght, water proof and makes life much easier.

Water...That one little aluminum bottle is not enough of a water supply.  I use several Platypus plus bottles.  http://cascadedesigns.com/Platypus (http://cascadedesigns.com/Platypus)  they only come in at 1.3 oz each and roll up to almost nothing when not being used.

Everyone should have at least one trauma bandage http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/MHR331-1.html (http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/MHR331-1.html)
and some form of CELOX bandage or granules.  http://www.celoxmedical.com/ (http://www.celoxmedical.com/)

Finally, even tho I have a tent in my gear I have a KIFARU Para Tarp for emergency shelter.  https://kifaru.net/paratarp2009.html (https://kifaru.net/paratarp2009.html)

All of those item together might increase your total pack weight by maybe 2 pounds (depending on what fire starter you chose to use)  but would make life of the road much safer and enjoyable.
 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Onug on August 08, 2010, 09:25:51 PM
I haven't read all of the posts here, but I'll list what is in my BOB. 

I probably have a different focus that most for my BOB.  My BOB stays in my truck and is basically made up of two parts.  One part is the BOB itself, the second part is what I keep in the truck.  I work about 20 miles from home and the wife stays home with the kids.  If something bad happens, my BOB is packed to get me home.  I guess that makes it a "BHB"...bug-home-bag...

The bag itself contains extra socks, comfortable walking shoes, food, water and rain gear.  It also has a basic camel-bak system so I can add water if I find it.  Extreme weather where I live is very rare, so I don't keep that kind of stuff on hand so I can travel "light and fast".

The second part is the truck part.  I have a first aid kit and a truck-box full of gear (shovels, rope, matches, knife, etc.).  If I head out on foot, I'll grab what I need and go from there.

Actually, there is a third part to my plan.  It is the "seasonally adjusted" portion.  If I'm expecting extreme weather, I'll add additional gear as needed.  I live in the Seattle area, so really that's just the one or two weeks a year that we could be getting snow.  If the family and I are taking a road trip, I'll add more gear as well.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: TRguy on August 10, 2010, 11:07:27 AM
TRguy...here is my solicited opinion.

Looks like a good solid kit with just a few (IMHO) tweaks needed. 

I noticed that in your fire starting kit you have no tinder.  There are many recipes for home made tinder and quite a few natural ones you can find.  Take a small peanut butter jar a fill with the tinder of your choice, almost no wieght, water proof and makes life much easier.

Water...That one little aluminum bottle is not enough of a water supply.  I use several Platypus plus bottles.  http://cascadedesigns.com/Platypus (http://cascadedesigns.com/Platypus)  they only come in at 1.3 oz each and roll up to almost nothing when not being used.

Everyone should have at least one trauma bandage http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/MHR331-1.html (http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/MHR331-1.html)
and some form of CELOX bandage or granules.  http://www.celoxmedical.com/ (http://www.celoxmedical.com/)

Finally, even tho I have a tent in my gear I have a KIFARU Para Tarp for emergency shelter.  https://kifaru.net/paratarp2009.html (https://kifaru.net/paratarp2009.html)

All of those item together might increase your total pack weight by maybe 2 pounds (depending on what fire starter you chose to use)  but would make life of the road much safer and enjoyable.
 

All solid suggestions: Tarp added, and so were two Platypus bottles (On Order), for tinder I went with two items; 1) Dryer lint in a double zip locked bag and 2) some shredded bicycle inner tube for a tire. (No liquid and minimal smell)......thinking about adding the trauma bandage
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on August 10, 2010, 01:08:14 PM
...thinking about adding the trauma bandage
Regarding a trauma dressing, my last firearms instructor, John Farnum, recommended the Israeli Battle Dressing.  I'm really impressed with it.  It's a large absorbant pad with an elastic wrap along with a compression bar that allows you to apply direct pressure on a wound without continuing to hold it.  Well designed, well packaged, small enough to keep with you in most circumstances, but big enough to deal with the bad stuff, and reasonably priced (just google for it and you'll find a dozen sellers from $6-9).

(http://www.redflarekits.com/mm5/graphics/00000002/UKE/4332.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mike Honcho on August 10, 2010, 05:18:01 PM
By no means is this complete but it's a start...I'm new to the game (and to the site) and have been "getting ready" for only about 7 months now; however I am committed to spending about $100 a month on gear so it's coming along...To be truthful I'm with the folks who are against "bugging out", I'm going to stay put until it becomes too detrimental to me and my family's safety (with 7-9 million sheeple in my immediate vicinity it may be awhile)... Also my fiance (wifey) is one of my designated pack mules in the event we would have to leave...Anyway here is what I have in my S.A.H.B (stay at home bag) / B.O.B... I have a spreadsheet that I filled out to keep me focused however, all suggestions from you good folks are more than welcome (I'm working on water and food storage now, talked wifey into getting a food dehydrator after reading a separate thread on here  ;D)...

Tools / Protection

12 ga Shotgun
200 rds (mixed flavors - bird, buck, slug)
Walther Nighthawk w/ red dot (.177 cal)
200 pellets
Brazilian Machete
5 1/4 Kabar fixed blade
4 in folding blade
Hatchet
Needle nose pliers (*Leatherman tool coming soon)

Shelter / Fire Building

Tarp
50 ft 124 lb rope (*100 ft 550 cord is on the list)
Magnesium fire starter
Matches (w/ waterproof box)
Bic Lighter
Lint trap zip-lock bag (fire tinder)
6 Charcoal briquettes

Medical

1 Platoon med kit (too much stuff to list but it has trauma bandages, burn cream, alcohol pads and such)
30 Amoxicillin tablets (simple cuts can kill in these situations)
50 800 mg Ibuprofen

Water (*this section needs work)

(1)Aquamarine filtered water straw (filters 20 gallons - 2 more will be ordered soon)
Stocked water storage w/ roughly 10 gallons of bottled water (*needs to be replenished though, down to 4 gallons)
(2) 5 gal water storage bags (*ordering on Thursday)

Misc

Bar soap (wifey uses Dr. Bonners at home and it broke me out in hives  :-\)
Department of the Army Survival guide (*highly recommended)
2 mini Maglites (w/ extra batteries)
Carbide knife sharpener
Remmy oil
Camo boonie cap (never under estimate the power of a good boonie cap)

Coming soon!

.22 LR (next month)
4 bricks of ammo (2,000 rds)
Duct Tape (Thursday)
(2) 5 gal. water storage bags (Thursday)
100 ft 550 cord (Thursday)
(2) Aquamarine filter water straws
Leatherman tool
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: 03USMCRAR_WA on August 10, 2010, 07:51:11 PM
Nice pack Beetle. I did to did SAR before i enlisted. It's a great background for stuff like this. I was just wondering how you secure the water proof bag in the pack. I've only ever had to use pack for flotation in the military and would not want to ford a river in a survival situation, but it's handy to have a pack that floats. Just wondering...
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: kr66p6r13 on September 01, 2010, 07:17:34 PM
my 13 year old daughter has a kit she has devised, from being freaked out about the whole swine flu pandemic last year, for her school back pack. consisting of:
several bandaids of misc. sizes
1 Sm bottle of purel
4 antiseptic towelettes
1 Sm roll of gauze/ 2 safety pins
2 pair of surgical gloves
2 surgical masks
back up cell phone charger
Bic lighter wrapped in some T.P. ;D
2 pink glowsticks
a piece of paper with emergency numbers
a whistle
all in a ziplock freezer bag. in addition there is always a bottle of water & various snacks (that's where she hides them from her sisters) with her school stuff. its not an actual B.O.B. but it would perceivable get her through to our designated meeting places. I'm very proud of my daughter "the prepper"
 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on September 02, 2010, 04:17:48 PM
At the risk of sounding very naive about BOB (which I am), would someone please kindly point me in the direction of the thread or podcast on WHY we should have a BOB?  ???

Thanks muchly.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on September 02, 2010, 04:25:18 PM
Back to add to my previous post:

I am NOT naive about being self-sufficient, raising/making our family's food, et al

I just don't want to thread drift and would like to add to a thread that talks about WHY to keep a BOB and about your BOL

Thank you for your understanding of this newbie on this forum.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on September 02, 2010, 04:29:39 PM
At the risk of sounding very naive about BOB (which I am), would someone please kindly point me in the direction of the thread or podcast on WHY we should have a BOB?  ???

Thanks muchly.
This episode is a good overview (http://www.thesurvivalpodcast.com/starting-the-journey-from-grasshopper-to-ant), but the basics are because you may not always be able to stay in your home in the case of an emergency.  Some emergencies are best weathered away from home, such as:  wildland fires, hurricanes, riots, chemical/hazmat spills, and radiation emergencies.

While I think most of us will agree, the best place to be in the event of an emergency is home-sweet-home, sometimes it's not an option or not the best option.

I also prefer a GHB (Get Home Bag) in my car that covers the essentials to get me home, whether on foot or stuck in a ditch during a severe winter storm it will give me what I need to stay warm, dry, fed and watered.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on September 02, 2010, 06:33:00 PM
Thanks muchly.  i will listen to it later tonight when there isn't so much activity going on. From the subjects listed I can see where it will help a 'grasshopper',.

I guess in my family's situation, I don't feel #6 or #10 would apply to us.  I think I will start a new thread so I don't distract from this one.

Thank you again
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: monkeyboyf on September 02, 2010, 06:37:36 PM
I'm very proud of my daughter "the prepper"
 
+1 to you for providing an atmosphere of information for your family to learn prepping.  She sounds like a very aware young lady.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on September 03, 2010, 09:37:47 PM
At the risk of sounding very naive about BOB (which I am), would someone please kindly point me in the direction of the thread or podcast on WHY we should have a BOB?  ???

Thanks muchly.

Hi MLF! There are many reasons to keep a BOB and you will find tons of info on the hows/whats/whys online if you search it out.
I would like to throw my 2 cents your way though...

BOBs are really for people who live in areas that may need a quick evac. If you live on a farm in a less populated area bugging out should probably be the last thing on your mind. If you live in the middle of New York City, however, it may be your only option.

1. Keep it Simple. Remember, K.I.S.S. There is no way that you are going to hump as much as you think you can so try to keep the complexity down and drop weight where ever possible. I can't think of a single instance where I would NEED a gas powered camping stove to survive. Its a luxury and as far as luxuries go I would rather spend the weight on canned peaches. To me this is so serious that I even hack the excess handle off of my BOB toothbrush.

2. Keep it realistic. When I built my first BOB it was waaaaay to tactical. Over time, however, I learned that blending in is better than standing out in a FEMA camp. Just think, do you really need 2 rifles and a handgun and all of the ammo to go with or would $600 federal reserve notes and a concealable handgun be equal to the task? Do you plan on running to the woods and living out of the bag for 20 years or just the 3-6 days that most evacs require? There will be no Red Dawn.

3. Keep it familiar. If you are not used to using something, don't bring it in your emergency kit. For instance, don't bring IDF tri-bandages because everyone says they are great if all of your first aid experience is with commercial bandages. If you like using a fork, bring the thing, instead of trying to make do with the monstrosity called a "spork". Familiarity reduces stress in survival situations which is a big plus.

4. Bring something to read/do. Imagine being sheltered down and fed with a camp meal after a disaster with nothing to do but think about the terrible thing that just happened. Get a trade paperback from an author that you like and throw it in the bag. You wont regret it and you can always use it for a journal or fire starting if necessary.  

5. Keep multiples of the absolute necessities. 2 knives of some kind, 2 ways to start fire, and 2 ways to purify/collect water.

That should help you learn from my mistakes. Other than that, watch out because survival has become an industry, which means that there are lots of people out there selling overpriced things that you don't really need.

Good Luck and God Bless!

  
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: mike77 on September 04, 2010, 12:57:45 AM
At the risk of sounding very naive about BOB (which I am), would someone please kindly point me in the direction of the thread or podcast on WHY we should have a BOB?  ???

Thanks muchly.

I'm working on putting my BOB together and I'm preferring to think of it in terms that I believe I read somewhere else on the forum. That's as a PERK, Personal Emergency Response Kit. It seems that the connotation of a BOB is that it is to grab and run for the hills until things get better, whether that's the reality or not. While I would hopefully be able to do that, I'm looking at it more as something to get my ass out of trouble in the short term and most likely problems. Examples Jack has mentioned are being out somewhere and mosquitoes are biting, grab the bug spray. At a kids game and it gets chilly, grab a hoodie or blanket. Or I get stranded at work for a day or two by weather or other problem. Or I have to immediately evacuate the house for a day or two because of a nearby chemical leak. That help?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on September 04, 2010, 02:01:52 AM
That's about my thinking as well... my pack is put together as a bug-around-bag. It adds flexibility to any operation when things don't go as planned. Whether a range day and you run out of cleaning supplies or forget the exact right hex key, or you get stuck in the mud and need to chop up a few limbs to stuff under that rear tire... etc. etc. etc.

that's why there are so many terms - Bugout Bag, Zombie Kit, Oh-Sh*t-Kit, PERK, Hurricane Kit, Trunk Bag/Kit, etc. are all different names/flavors of the same thing. I have a few bags packed now, and use them for different things, but my primary bugout bag goes with me all over the place, while the other kits are more generalized and slimmed down, or special-purpose kits for getting to and from a specific location no matter the need. One bag in particular is a standard, but very nice, civilian leather satchel that I keep packed with a small variety of items (power bars, space blanket, 20' of para cord, 2 bic lighters, ziploc first-aid kit, tiny sewing kit, cotton cord for tinder, leatherman-style tool, and a pocket 8x monocular) to get me through up to 72 hours independent of viable vehicular transport. Generally this stays in my car, but it includes a patch of treated kevlar in the outer zipper flap now that I've got a mix that can stop a .45ACP round without batting an eye. School shooting scenario? Throw it over my back and protect my vitals, and run! The remainder of the bag is still useful for my laptop, a notebook or two, my TI-83, and I've got a cell phone pouch clipped around the shoulder strap with two speed loaders in it. My CHP isn't valid on campus, but school regulations don't cover what you can keep locked in your vehicle (in my state at least) so when I'm not specifically ON campus, I'm carrying, and the speed loaders are a nice comfort factor, considering the fact that over the past two days I've had three emergency alert messages regarding robberies within a block of the chemistry building and the coffee shop across the street where I currently spend most of my time during class and evening study sessions.

the point is to put together a kit that adresses the threats or situations you're likely to find yourself in, while being flexible enough to at least be a help in virtually any situation.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Heavy G on September 04, 2010, 06:09:37 AM

BOBs are really for people who live in areas that may need a quick evac. If you live on a farm in a less populated area bugging out should probably be the last thing on your mind. If you live in the middle of New York City, however, it may be your only option.

1. Keep it Simple. Remember, K.I.S.S. There is no way that you are going to hump as much as you think you can so try to keep the complexity down and drop weight where ever possible. I can't think of a single instance where I would NEED a gas powered camping stove to survive. Its a luxury and as far as luxuries go I would rather spend the weight on canned peaches. To me this is so serious that I even hack the excess handle off of my BOB toothbrush.

2. Keep it realistic. When I built my first BOB it was waaaaay to tactical. Over time, however, I learned that blending in is better than standing out in a FEMA camp. Just think, do you really need 2 rifles and a handgun and all of the ammo to go with or would $600 federal reserve notes and a concealable handgun be equal to the task? Do you plan on running to the woods and living out of the bag for 20 years or just the 3-6 days that most evacs require? There will be no Red Dawn.

3. Keep it familiar. If you are not used to using something, don't bring it in your emergency kit. For instance, don't bring IDF tri-bandages because everyone says they are great if all of your first aid experience is with commercial bandages. If you like using a fork, bring the thing, instead of trying to make do with the monstrosity called a "spork". Familiarity reduces stress in survival situations which is a big plus.

4. Bring something to read/do. Imagine being sheltered down and fed with a camp meal after a disaster with nothing to do but think about the terrible thing that just happened. Get a trade paperback from an author that you like and throw it in the bag. You wont regret it and you can always use it for a journal or fire starting if necessary.  

5. Keep multiples of the absolute necessities. 2 knives of some kind, 2 ways to start fire, and 2 ways to purify/collect water.
  

+1 Smith.  Excellent.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: GrayMan on September 16, 2010, 02:17:12 AM
Have noticed several people mention credit cards in this thread. I hope this is in addition to (rather than instead of) cash. Keep in mind that during many localized disasters places that ordinarily accept cards won't be able to if electricity and/or phone lines (and increasingly Internet and leased digital lines) are down as a side effect of the emergency situation.

You should have enough cash to cover the basics no matter what. If you want to have a card in addition to that for redundancy and to increase funds then great.

I carry $200 in my BOB and another $100 in my EDC. Plus $100 in each car. I also have 5oz silver in my EDC, and 10 oz silver and  1 oz gold in my BOB. (if I'm at home, the stuff in my safe is packed in ziplock bags to be easy to grab and go... in which case I'd have substantially more with me. For the sake of discussion let's assume I'm not able to empty the safe.)

I still carry a credit card in the EDC, BOB, and each car. What if I needed a $1200 to repair (or even replace) my car while waiting out a disaster? Carrying that much cash can be problematic... But in most cases a credit card fills the bill nicely.

I use credit cards instead of debit cards for this purpose for several reasons:
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: PAGUY on September 16, 2010, 03:44:54 AM
I like the points that you are making about use of a credit card but, in a SHTF situation the system might be down and the card useless.  I see that that you have included cash as well and yes I understand that the situation might be local but, I just wanted to make this point.  Excellent idea Grayman.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: GrayMan on September 16, 2010, 05:23:46 AM
...in a SHTF situation the system might be down and the card useless. 

Yep, that was the entire point of my first paragraph.   :D

During a big storm in my area a couple years ago which left 200K without power, many for well over a week, the gas stations and stores who had any inventory left could only take cash.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: kr66p6r13 on September 18, 2010, 11:25:29 PM
  BOB/GHB is a 22lb back pack consisting of:
 2change of clothes, gloves, bandanna, poncho, phone charger, spare glasses
 zippo lighter, extra flints, Sm bottle of fluid
 1-frontier straw filter, 1-ltr smart water, pack purification tabs, stainless steel bottle
 550 cord, spool 100lb test fish line/3 hooks, 20 zip ties, extra pair boot laces
 7 pouches tuna, 7 pouches oatmeal, 2 bottles 5hr energy, 8 granola bars
 7oz beef jerky, 10 oz canyon mix, 7 emergen-C mixes. mini mess kit
 12x12 sheet thick plastic, solar blanket, trash bag, 2-1gal freezer bags
 custom med kit w/ surgical mask & gloves, SOG knife & multi tool combo, duct tape
 sling shot, sewing kit in mini altoids tin, 6 glow sticks, S&W 99 40 cal w/2 8R mags
 I keep extra box of 100 rounds in glove box. BOB/GHB stays in the trunk with 2.5 
 gallon water bottle.
 
 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: C.J. on September 21, 2010, 04:22:25 PM
I really appreciate this thread....as this is something i have not done yet. I have been picking up items here and there as I can afford them to build one, as I don't want to pull from the supplies I have put up for the house...the pics are very helpful. I am so glad I found the forum. :)



Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Ron on September 23, 2010, 01:44:30 PM
I have just started building my BOB which will be kept in my car. Does anyone insure there bug out bag ?  If you add my gun and $300-$400 cash you start to get a expensive BOB. Any thoughts?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: mxitman on September 23, 2010, 02:56:25 PM
Ya, I have one of these from pacsafe; http://www.pacsafe.com/www/index.php?_room=3&_action=detail&id=49 (http://www.pacsafe.com/www/index.php?_room=3&_action=detail&id=49)

It wraps around your bag to securely locking it from theft. I got a couple for our trip to Europe a couple of years ago, My wife and I were there backpacking for 5 weeks. I never had any problems, it was nice to lock it up in our room or on the train. You could still get into some of the pockets but like everything it buys you time and large items can't be removed easily. I now keep it wrapped around our BOB's in the trunk of my wife's car locked to the frame and in my truck I keep it locked to the frame of the back seat. The only issue I have with it is the key lock they give you... I picked up some combo locks instead... so no keys needed. Their spendy at around $75 for the 120L size.

Like everything in the bag, it all adds up. I think if I had to replace the bag and everything it would cost me around $400-$500 for each one, I don't keep any firearms in any bag.. always on me or locked in my safe.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on September 23, 2010, 04:05:54 PM
I have just started building my BOB which will be kept in my car. Does anyone insure there bug out bag ?  If you add my gun and $300-$400 cash you start to get a expensive BOB. Any thoughts?
Good question.  Personally, the gun is always in an in-car safe (used to sponsor Jack, can't recall the manufacturer) and my cash is in a concealed pocket on my belt (http://www.sockbroker.com/moneybelt.htm) that I wear every day.  They're cheap belts that only last about a year, but the price is unbeatable.  Don't expect the zipper to last if you do anything put put money in once and unzip it only when you're ready to replace it.  They just don't hold up well to zipping and unzipping, but for concealment, they rock.

Currently my GHB is in a day pack in the trunk, but I'd eventually like to mount locking medium-sized ammo can for the more expensive items (flashlights, headlamps, knives, etc.).  Better yet, take a look at the 505 project pictures for information on concealing goodies and building secret compartments.  Some beautiful work there!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on September 23, 2010, 05:01:41 PM
I have just started building my BOB which will be kept in my car. Does anyone insure there bug out bag ?  If you add my gun and $300-$400 cash you start to get a expensive BOB. Any thoughts?

FYI...your cars insurance does not cover the contents of the car.   Any of your "stuff" in your car is under your homeowners/renters insurance.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: OffTheGidReady on September 23, 2010, 09:33:35 PM
Part of my kit includes a CRKT folding knife, Ontario Knife SG1 fixed blade fighting knife and a KA BAR 1248 Machete. Plus I have some silver dimes and a few silver bars for TEOTWAWKI
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roswell on September 29, 2010, 08:02:01 AM
I have just started building my BOB which will be kept in my car. Does anyone insure there bug out bag ?  If you add my gun and $300-$400 cash you start to get a expensive BOB. Any thoughts?

Ron, check out Randy's video on setting up a BOB on the cheap.

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3.msg190436#msg190436 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3.msg190436#msg190436)

Also, when you get the chance, please stop over at the Intro Thread (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=89.0) and introduce yourself.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Kwitzats on September 29, 2010, 09:00:19 AM
Firetacks just because
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: captaind172 on September 29, 2010, 08:58:55 PM
I noticed many people use bags that look almost militaristic.  Is there a reason why people are choosing these styles over a hiking/backpacking bag like a Gregory or Osprey?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: MToons on September 29, 2010, 09:26:40 PM
I've noticed the same thing Captain D and welcome to the forum.  I think the military packs are popular for the modular aspect.  The ability to quickly add or subtract smaller packs for a specific purpose is a huge advantage.  But personally I like the hiking packs for the comfort, weight, and carrying load.  Check out backpacker.com for great videos and reviews. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Fishin Magician on September 29, 2010, 09:49:29 PM
  Is there a reason why people are choosing these styles over a hiking/backpacking bag like a Gregory or Osprey?

1.) Fashion
2.) Function

Fashion: Some folks are into the "Tacticool" look. I guess it can be appealing to the "mall ninja" in all of us, to a certain degree. ;D

Function: Military-styled packs tend to come in more muted, natural colors; they're usually pretty modular thanks to PALS/MOLLE webbing attachment points and accessories; they're also usually built tougher than standard hiking/backpacking packs, so they'll last through punsihing conditions and over the long haul.



Price can also come into play. Actual mil-surp stuff can be found and purchased very inexpensively.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on September 30, 2010, 07:51:46 AM
My car GHB is nothing more than a free pack I got as a safety award from the forest service 10+ years ago.  It's green, so it's muted, it has heavy duty zippers, it has several pockets to help me stay organized, and I've worn it for 12 hours of hunting, so it's comfortable enough, but not as good as my Osprey.  I'd rather not tie up my good gear that I use on a regular basis.  I like my system modular so I can open a pocket and, for instance, pull out my day pack wilderness survival kit (it's ultra-minimalist, has no food in it, but covers the basics of water purification, emergency shelter, first aid, signaling, pocket chainsaw, cordage, compact headlamp, and fire starting) if I'm going on an unplanned short hike.  Another pocket is road signaling stuff (flares, Cylume light stick, flashlight, headlamp), another is entertainment (playing cards, book, old i-pod w/ headphones and AA charger, notepad & pen, small light).  One pocket is convenience items (sunscreen, bug dope, toiletries and TP, etc.).  The main compartment is mostly food and warm clothing.  On the outside I have a small entrenching tool and hatchet.  I keep my water separate since it has a tendency to leak and occasionally burst during cold weather and I don't want to risk the rest of my gear getting wet.  Bulkier kit that varies by season (boots, sleeping bag, etc.) just stay loose in the trunk since they need to get moved around a lot.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: captaind172 on September 30, 2010, 09:37:39 PM
Thanks for the information on hiking bags vs. the military bags.  The modular makes a lot of sense, as well as the price.  I love the way my Gregory feels for long hikes, but a key difference is that not everything is accessible quickly.  My Gregory is mostly designed to be unloaded when I'm read to stop for the day. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Russet on October 08, 2010, 06:39:19 PM
Can buy a ALLICE or a MOLLE  pack for 30-35 dollars with frame...same thing commercially will set you back a few hundred =). Military guys and gals do ALOT of marching with lots of weight...they have to be tough, fit everything you need, and be comfortable.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Bradbn4 on October 08, 2010, 09:42:19 PM
There is a lot of nice used military gear out there at good prices.  I picked up a medium size Alice pack for 15 dollars - no frame - and a new frame + straps only cost me 25 dollars more.  I also picked up 2 large Alice packs for 60 dollars with frames that I plan on using  in the back on my SUV for bad weather gear.  I would post a link, but the guy that I have ordered from can be real slow shipping materials - so maybe looking at Amazon might not be a bad idea.

I have been working on a bunch of smaller "packs" / kits / add on's.  This way I can use one of my back packs and just toss in what sub-kits (medical, tools, etc) that I need.   I have a gun bag, etc with a fairly good size medical bag.  I use to carry a $100 dollar bill in my wallet, now I think that a few smaller denominations might be more useful so I don't have to worry about someone making change.  I also have a water kit + spare water bottle with filter + spare.    If I do the modular kit - I know I will have to keep all the items in one location with a check list to show whats in each sub kit. 

I need to pick up my 3rd portable radio so I can toss that in the kit.  I have  nice water proof state map that I bought when I use to take weekend trips on my motorcycle.  That style map is useful, and you don't have to worry about spilling on it.  It is real easy to over load the BOB, and depending on the style (day / weekend / 72 hour +) impacts the overall size.

The big hole in my bug bag is the lack of MRE's or other ready to eat foods.  If I am on a road trip I do stock up with dried snack food, etc - but it would be nice to have a bit more than water to drink in the car.

Brad - In Colorado




 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on October 09, 2010, 09:40:38 AM
DUDE!

I just found the most awesomest junk on earth. Crystallized lemon!!!

It comes in a box of little packets like you'd expect sugar to be in, but they're little foil packs of dehydrated, granulated lemon juice. Two packs make a normal sized bottle of water (half liter or so) taste like lemonade!

Pretty inexpensive compared to the price of actual lemons, I'd say about half the price, and they've got a shelf life that approaches the current age of the solar system.

Ok, more like a few years, but you get my drift.

So, I've now got about half a dozen packets in my BOB. Also, consider taking two cans of sardines and duct taping them rim-to-rim so that if you drop something on them they don't pop the lid open. I have sardines, herring/kipper snacks, as well as some vienna sausage and spam. The rest of my BOB/Vehicle preps include two small sterno cans in the car, my cooking pot + large sterno stuffed in a sock and a steel lunch pail with rice and beans, bullion cubes, dried milk, instant coffee, and random condiments like salt, pepper, and sauce packets. This allows me to keep my meals interesting witha  minimum of input from outside the kit.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on October 09, 2010, 03:17:54 PM
DUDE!!

They also have lime and orange...good stuff.

http://www.truelemon.com/ (http://www.truelemon.com/)

Seriously...try the orange.    ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on October 10, 2010, 10:06:27 PM
DUDE!

Thanks for posting the link ;-)

Orange! *nom nom nom*
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greenneck on November 19, 2010, 12:25:30 PM
I kinda consider my truck my BOB.  But I do keep a bag packed and in the truck too.

I do a lot of hiking, and even before I started prepping I always kept these things in my pack.

DaKine Heli Pro
3L platypus (Always full)
+/- 8 granola bars
Headlamp
Nylon Poncho
2 pair wool socks
Beanie
work gloves
First Aid Kit
Firesteel
Fishing tin
Buck folder
Leatherman
+/- 20 bucks in sacajewea dollar coins
National Forest Map
Compass
Matches/Lighter
Binos
Spare truck key

Inside the camper shell of my truck, I also keep:

Tire chains
recovery strap
jumper cables
Axe and shovel
Toolbox with all the basics
A few pieces of firewood (wheel chocks)
Mexican blanket (Warmth, stretcher, wheelbarrow)
Tarps (2)
Small cooler

No Guns at this point.  Also have a pretty respectable map collection in the cab...and hours of classic rock.



Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: daved on December 08, 2010, 12:58:09 PM
So I just put together a BOB for the first time. I was resisting doing this since I couldn't see too many things to make me want to bug out, and those that I could come up with were so local in scope that it wouldn't be a problem to stop at a Wal-Mart to buy a change of clothes or whatever else I needed after driving across town to my mom's or mother in law's house.
Once I realized that there were a few things that would make me want to leave, as well as the fact that I can use my bag as a get home bag as well, I figured I'd put one together. I am pretty excited about how it turned out.
First I went to Goodwill and picked up a nice bag for $2.99. It has a Sierra Club logo on it that I could have done without, but other than that it works great, and the price was definitely right.
Inside I have:
1 pair fleece lined wind pants in a gallon sized ziplock bag. They are warm, comfortable, and can be used as light snowpants if needed.
1 lined sweatshirt in a ziplock bag. Nice and warm, has a hood.
1 pair of socks in a ziplock bag.
1 pair of underwear in a ziplock bag.
1 t-shirt in a ziplock bag.
(The bags help save a little space, plus keep everything dry. I had considered using the foodsaver to pack that stuff to save even more space, but I like the utility of the ziplocks for carrying water, etc.)
1 winter hat
1 pair winter gloves that could double as light duty work gloves if they had to.
1 space blanket
1 lighter
1 magnesium fire starter
1 compass
5 big garbage bags (one for each member of the family as an emergency poncho)
2 bottles of water
1 extra pair prescription glasses
1 toothbrush (had to buy this $0.79 with a $0.75 coupon for a total of $0.04)
1 tube toothpaste (free from the dentist)
1 bar soap ($0.89)
1 travel size bottle of shampoo ($1.09)
1 travel sized deodorant ($0.99)
1 small pack of dental floss (free from dentist)
4 safety pins (kind of an afterthought - but figured it couldn't hurt)
1 small flashlight (fauxton)
1 pocket knife / fork (like a case hobo - but cheaper)

I still need to add some para cord, and a match safe. I also want to look into some emergency rations.

Basically everything I put in there was more for an unplanned stay at a hotel, not camping out in the woods. Some of it could serve that purpose if it had to, but that is more of a secondary concern for me. I also have a pretty solid list of EDC gear that is with me almost constantly so I didn't duplicate it in the BOB for the most part. (EDC - Leatherman Wave and bit kit, Fenix flashlight, cell phone, bandaids, space pen, cash, credit cards, etc) I also have more stuff in the car to supplement this kit. (water, tools, lights, etc)

I guess the next step is to get the wife and kids on board and make them some bags too. That will be a challenge.
 

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: James@sheila on December 12, 2010, 11:46:33 PM
Im new hi.
Iv read so much here. My wife and I both have hiked and lived not camped in wild. I have gone homeless also to learn urban survival. Ok haveing said that. I beleive your mind is the most important thing you carry. You must train it well. My pack is small.
Sleeping bag
Tarp
Tack knife
3 mres
Camal for water
First aid with sutures
Meds, high blood presure
Fishing gear
Poncho
Spare pants, military
Fless top
Heavy or light coat
Mess kit
Hobo tool
Hard candy
Walking stick I made it stainless steel and also is a blow gun. 20 darts. Took lots of practice yet to see it you would not know it was a blow gun
Gloves
Bogan, hat.
No maps or compass I know the 100mile area by heart
Iv lived and practeced my art.
Also was trained in anti terrorism very handy
22 rifle, yes ill walk with it
Mind you not being see is great
As I said you should also practice with only cloths on back and contents of pockets.
I do not plan to bug
Yet I have cashes in 6 states and can and will walk if I have to.
Tot less learn more
Great thread. I hope everyone makes it as they plan. But I know some wont. Sorry but this is true. I have spent 20yrs getting ready. Learn so much both to live and also of myself. I wish you all marry and safe christmas.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Have-Gun-Will-Travel on December 13, 2010, 06:07:59 AM
Few important things I keep in my GOOD bag (Get Out Of Dodge)
Glock 17 and 100 rds
$100 in $5 bills
$25 pre 64 coins all half dollars
U.S. Survival AR-7 and 500 rds  for small game if needed 
http://henryrepeating.com/rifle-survival-ar7.cfm?CFID=4494013&CFTOKEN=55479063 (http://henryrepeating.com/rifle-survival-ar7.cfm?CFID=4494013&CFTOKEN=55479063)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Old Scout on December 22, 2010, 10:06:28 AM
One thing I do not see in the lists on this thread are ways to stay clean while "on the road". The purpose of a B.O.B. is to keep you safe, and comfortable for 3-6 days while you transit from an unsafe condition to one of safety.  About day 3 you are going to be wanting a way to freshen up in a bad way and so will your family members.

I found a product called Klenz which is a heavy 2' x 4' size disposable "Shower in a Towel".
They are available online at http://www.ckbproducts.com/klenz-shower-in-towel-p-2796.html (http://www.ckbproducts.com/klenz-shower-in-towel-p-2796.html) and the cost is only $1.49 each.

The site states: KLENZ XXL Shower in a Towel is perfect for your active outdoor lifestyle! A KLENZ towel the most convenient way for you to get, and feel, clean when you don’t have access to fresh water facilities. One towel cleans the whole body! The towel’s size makes it very easy to use, and it is durable enough to get the job done.

The KLENZ XXL Shower in a Towel was conceived and designed by a US military serviceman who, while on a tour of duty, realized the need for a pre-moistened towel that was large enough, and durable enough, to provide a full-body cleaning. This shower in a towel quickly and effectively absorbs sweat and odor and removes dirt easily.  At nearly 2’ x 4’ (2 foot by 4 foot) in size, the KLENZ XXL Shower in a Towel is the perfect size for a myriad of uses.

KLENZ towels are made in the USA, are fragrance-free, alcohol-free, portable, and individually packaged, so they’re always conveniently fresh when you need it!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: joeinwv on December 22, 2010, 10:48:34 AM
I don't see many folks mention quarters. I know the pay phone is obsolete, but the vending machine is not. A kit kat in the hand beats standing in front of the vending machine with a silver coin worth $40.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: daved on December 22, 2010, 02:54:38 PM
I don't see many folks mention quarters. I know the pay phone is obsolete, but the vending machine is not. A kit kat in the hand beats standing in front of the vending machine with a silver coin worth $40.
I'm glad you brought this up. I've been meaning to add some change to mine for just this purpose.
Also, even though the pay phone is obsolete, there are still a few around here and there. It doesn't hurt to have the change to use one in case you happen to have your car break down in front of the one left in town when your cell phone won't get reception.
Another thing that I thought the change might be good for is toll booths. Sure you can blow through it, but if it isn't TEOTWAWKI then I'd just as soon pay the toll. I do have an I-Pass for the car so this isn't a huge deal, but it's just one more potential use for a few quarters.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Medicineball on December 23, 2010, 05:38:45 PM
I don't know if he/she is a member of this forum or not, but there's a great blog on bug out bags, called bugoutbagquest.blogspot.com

This guy has really thought things through. Good pics.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on December 25, 2010, 01:33:04 PM
One thing I do not see in the lists on this thread are ways to stay clean while "on the road". The purpose of a B.O.B. is to keep you safe, and comfortable for 3-6 days while you transit from an unsafe condition to one of safety.  About day 3 you are going to be wanting a way to freshen up in a bad way and so will your family members.

Well, not all of us are ignoring hygiene, though you may have to go back to the first few pages to see what some of the more comprehensive kits include.

My Personal Hygiene kit includes the following:

Hygiene :
1 - Medium Microfiber Towel
1 - Washcloth
2 - Bars, Unscented soap (Do NOT use scented)
1 - Bar, shaving soap
1 - Razor with additional heads
1 - "Unbreakable" mirror
1 - Toothbrush
1 - Tube, Toothpaste
1 - Microfiber towel (buy a Sham-Wow and make Finch happy)
1 - Roll, Floss
1 - Pr. Tweezers

Though, I do take a different perspective on the kit than most.  While the product you highlight is handy, the problem with it is that it's a one-shot deal.  Additionally, I have the requirement of my full BOB/PERK that it provide for me as long as possible.  I will not risk my life, or those of my family members, that the 3-6 day window will satisfactorily be met.  With some of the luck I've had, the disaster that forced me to move might also eventually threaten the destination.

Likewise, if the situation is truly dire, I may not have proper intel on the destination.  Therefore, I choose all my items to be durable as well as lightweight.  All the items I listed above fit in a small, waterproof zippered bag that's approximately 9" x 6".  The soaps and toothpaste will last a lot longer than a week and I only need about a quart of water to take a passable "bath."

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: mvrck on December 25, 2010, 04:30:03 PM
I started collecting all the items on my BOB list:

I broke it down as Energy, Food, Safety, Shelter, Water. After reading a couple of different books and all these BOB lists, there are a lot of things one could carry. So far, this bag weighs 30 pounds. I have been taking it with me as I work off-grid, making changes to what I carry and how it is packed.

I am also making light versions for everyone else in the family...

Category   Item   BOB.dad
Energy   Batteries AA 8ea   x
Energy   Batteries AAA 6ea   x
Energy   Candles 3ea   x
Energy   Flash Light 3ea   x
Energy   Fuel, Esbit 9ea   x
Energy   Lighter 2 ea   
Energy   Matches   x
Energy   Stove, Esbit   x
Food   Cup / Mug   x
Food   Energy/Snack Bars 6ea   x
Food   Fish Line Set   x
Food   Fork   x
Food   Meal, Freeze Dried, 3b, 3l, 3d   x
Food   Pot   x
Food   Snare   
Food   Spoon   x
Food   Traps   
Safety   Clothes - Hat   x
Safety   Clothes - Set   x
Safety   First Aid Kit   x
Safety   Hygiene - Bug Spray   x
Safety   Hygiene - Deodorant   x
Safety   Hygiene - Floss   x
Safety   Hygiene - Hand Towel   x
Safety   Hygiene - Razor   x
Safety   Hygiene - Soap   x
Safety   Hygiene - Sewing Kit   x
Safety   Hygiene - Tooth Brush   x
Safety   Hygiene - Tooth Paste   x
Safety   Hygiene - TP   x
Safety   Personal Protection Device Set   x
Safety   Tools - Axe   x
Safety   Tools - Binoculars   x
Safety   Tools - Compass   x
Safety   Tools - Knife   x
Safety   Tools - Saw   
Safety   Tools - Pen & Paper   x
Safety   Tools - Shovel   
Safety   Tools - Signals   
Safety   Tools - Multi-Tool   
Safety   Tools - Vest   x
Shelter   Blanket   x
Shelter   Blanket, Emergency   x
Shelter   Cordage   
Shelter   Pillow   x
Shelter   Sleeping Bag   
Shelter   Tarp   
Shelter   Tent   x
Water   Bottles, 0.5 liter, 4 ea   x
Water   Filter   
Water   Gallons   
Water   Purification Tablets   x
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ore2u on January 16, 2011, 08:27:46 PM
Professor, try getting a bottle of what I call hippy soap... Dr. Bronners The stuff comes in large and a small travel sized bottle. You can wash your hair, your body, and you can brush your teeth with it. Awsome stuff!!! and a real space saver!!!

Well, not all of us are ignoring hygiene, though you may have to go back to the first few pages to see what some of the more comprehensive kits include.

My Personal Hygiene kit includes the following:

Hygiene :
1 - Medium Microfiber Towel
1 - Washcloth
2 - Bars, Unscented soap (Do NOT use scented)
1 - Bar, shaving soap
1 - Razor with additional heads
1 - "Unbreakable" mirror
1 - Toothbrush
1 - Tube, Toothpaste
1 - Microfiber towel (buy a Sham-Wow and make Finch happy)
1 - Roll, Floss
1 - Pr. Tweezers

Though, I do take a different perspective on the kit than most.  While the product you highlight is handy, the problem with it is that it's a one-shot deal.  Additionally, I have the requirement of my full BOB/PERK that it provide for me as long as possible.  I will not risk my life, or those of my family members, that the 3-6 day window will satisfactorily be met.  With some of the luck I've had, the disaster that forced me to move might also eventually threaten the destination.

Likewise, if the situation is truly dire, I may not have proper intel on the destination.  Therefore, I choose all my items to be durable as well as lightweight.  All the items I listed above fit in a small, waterproof zippered bag that's approximately 9" x 6".  The soaps and toothpaste will last a lot longer than a week and I only need about a quart of water to take a passable "bath."

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on January 16, 2011, 08:54:20 PM
Professor, try getting a bottle of what I call hippy soap... Dr. Bronners The stuff comes in large and a small travel sized bottle. You can wash your hair, your body, and you can brush your teeth with it. Awsome stuff!!! and a real space saver!!!


Is it scented?

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bartsdad on January 16, 2011, 11:41:46 PM
Hippy Soap (http://www.drbronner.com/DBMS/LS.htm)  ;)

There does not appear to be a unscented option.

It is a unique product. I used it exclusively when guiding trips in the BWCAW. (http://www.bwca.com/)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cartpusher on January 17, 2011, 06:01:16 AM
Yeah, I think I have only seen Dr. Bronner's in a peppermint scent.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on January 17, 2011, 11:14:41 AM
We actually use our kits, exactly as they are listed, at least twice a year for practice.  One of the things I've learned, both from practices and hunting, is that you do not want any scented or perfumed products with you.  Those smells attract both rodents and insects.

I'm very adamant about unscented or "hunter's"-type soap and hygiene products.  Even our clothes are washed using unscented detergents.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: JohnAdams on January 22, 2011, 01:23:58 PM
As I've mentioned before, I don't have all my equipment in a single BOB. Instead, I have a tiered model. I always have my EDC, which augments my GHB, which augments by BOB, which augments my car. You can see my inventory here:

Equipment_List.xls (http://www.4shared.com/document/bisKjohB/Equipment_List.html)

Would love to have thoughts/feedback.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Sequanti on January 22, 2011, 04:00:58 PM
Professor,

Dr. Bronner's most popular is peppermint. That is what I have used and I have never had a problem with insects (or rodents for that matter). It might be enough to arouse the curiosity of larger and more dangerous animals such as bear if they are in your area. I remember putting tooth paste in bear bags for that reason.

Anyway, it is also available in Almond, Baby Mild, Citrus, Eucalyptus, Lavender, Rose, and Tea Tree. Baby mild is unscented so that might be your best bet. You can but it online in all sizes, but if you can get a travel size to try out first I would.

It would be nice (hint, hint) if someone tested the different scents to see what they might attract.

I have used it for body soap, shampoo, teeth, mouthwash, clothes and dishes. It concentrated so a little goes a long way. It does have a little bit of a soapy taste, so you may not want to get rid of your tooth paste yet. Not bad, but noticeable even with peppermint. I would imagine the unscented baby mild would be more soap-like.

I don't usually gravitate to things for their "eco-friendliness" but this is a great multi-tasking soap that happens to be "green".
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Dainty on January 25, 2011, 12:34:14 PM
Another possible option for an all-around soap is Tropical Traditions soap (http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/organic_natural_soaps.htm). It is soaponified organic coconut oil with no other ingredients, for the unscented version anyway. It comes both as a bar and as a liquid with a foam dispenser. I'm sure Dr. Bronner's is great, but I personally tend to lean towards the shorter ingredient lists.

It'd be interesting to experiment with the two and see if there's a difference with how many critters each attracts (or doesn't, as the case may be).
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: elcoyote on January 29, 2011, 07:46:51 PM
I don't know about rodent's and other mammals, but I do know that insects can't stand the smell of lavender. Dr Brommers has kept me free of ticks, skeets and other creepy crawlies for a few years on the road. It is kinda expensive though.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: duster22 on January 29, 2011, 08:15:53 PM
Shoe Goo has a place in my BOB.
Given the importance of reliable footwear in a SHTF scenario, a cheap tube of simple Shoe Goo to make an on-the-fly repair to your footwear can make a world of difference if your sole separates or you get a rip or hole or chunk torn out.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Scotty2Hotty on January 29, 2011, 09:13:08 PM
Shoe Goo has a place in my BOB.

I love that stuff!!!  Ever since I had a boot blow out 10 miles into a 25 mile ruck march I have always kept some in my ruck (BOB). Its also really handy in a emergency as a quick fire starter.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Matt.T on February 03, 2011, 10:21:01 AM
I keep my BOB as simple as my philosophy on prepping; rely on Skills, Knowledge and Abilities rather than on gear.

With that said, my immediate plan in a SHTF scenario is to Bug-In as long as possible, or at least until I gain a better understanding of what exactly it is I am responding to. When that time comes, I'll make the decision to stay or go. If I go, I plan to relocate to my BOL, at which I have stocked items intended for long-term habitation. Of course I'll have to get to my BOL and that will require using my BOB. I would prefer to drive, but if need be I can get to my BOL by foot in two days, which is why my BOB is supplied for three.

(http://www.emersonknives.com/pics/sas/SleekaForce1.jpg)

Backpack (Snugpack 35 Sleeka) - I like this one because it is size of a normal schoolbag backpack, it will handle rugged conditions, and doesn't look "tactical."
- Water bottle (wrapped with some duct tape) and purification tablets
- Rations (tuna packets, jerky, energy bars, nuts, dried fruit, herbal tea, Bisquick in small zip-locks)
- Metal cup (slides over bottom of water bottle)
- Plastic spoon
- Basic First-Aid Kit
- Leather gloves, fleece wind-proof gloves, microfleece tuque, smartwool socks
- Stormproof jacket (to be worn)
- Headlamp with extra batteries
- 550 cord
- Multitool
- Mylar blanket
- Recon 3 patrol sleeping bag (SUPER small when compressed)
- Knife with sharpener
- Lighters (2)
- TP and hand sanitizer
- Collapsible Nalgene water canteen (to be filled prior to bugging-out)
- Quart (2) and Gallon (1) size freezer zip-locks
- Pack towel
- Backpacker canister stove and 1 fuel canister
- Weapon repair and cleaning kit
- 2 extra ammunition magazines
- Small MOLLE pouch: (items used to negotiate my way to BOL if roads are blocked, monitored or dangerous)
  - Binoculars
  - Topo maps of local area
  - Lensatic compass
  - Rite-in-Rain notebook and pen
  - Extra lighter

And of course my weapon.

All packed, it weights about 20-25 pounds, and I still have 1/3 of the room available for add-ins.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: kenser321 on February 05, 2011, 11:26:58 PM
Ok be nice on the criticism I literally just grabbed the random items I had in my house and put together two BOB's one for my fiance and one for myself. The fish are basically screwed. And no idea what the cat is gonna do if we have to hoof it and ditch the BOV. I plan on putting a small pack on the dog and having him carry some food. Hes a small dog, but he can probably carry about 3 days worth of food. I am also putting together a tote for the BOV, but thats another thread. I also keep a few things in my pockets like a multitool, folding knife, various medicines, and a mini bic, but again thats another thread. Anyhow here is what I came up with.

My bag:

German Ruck from Cabelas
Two thin ratchet straps. To tie down sleeping bag.
Walmart sleeping bag
Box of bird load shotgun shells 20 gauge
Box of 50 Round Speer Gold dot ammo
BDU Pants
Thermal shirt
T-shirt
Underwear
Socks
Plastic garbage bag to keep clothes dry
 Shake flashlight
Lock and Lock tupperware for fire kit contents: Also good for water
Scrap paracord for kindling
Mini Bic
Flint and Steel
3 Boxes of matches
Small pocket knife
Fire sticks
4 tealights
Baggy for food procurement contents":
2 yo yo reels
Snare wire
Regional edible plant flash cards
Altoids tin with taste better kit (LOL) contents:
small bottle of tabasco sauce
two chicken bouillon cubes
2 packets Crystal Light
2 packets of tea
4 packs Stevia

Rain Poncho
20 Foot Nylon Rope
200 Feet Paracord 550
Nalgene Bottle
Camp Coffee pot. I can boil water, cook food, gather water, etc with this. A bit heavy, but totally multipurpose. And I can throw it right on the fire and not worry about it melting.
Water purifier tabs.
Survival Knife. The sheath wouldnt fit on my duty belt
Survival Stove with fuel tabs.
Mini SAS survival book
Roll of Duct Tape

Duty Belt
Raptor 2 holster for my Glock 17
Glock 17
dual mag pouch
2  17 round mags with the rest of my speer gold dot rounds.
Pepper spray pouch
Law Enforcement grade pepper spray
Key holder. Probably going to attach a few things to this.
Handcuff pouch
Handcuffs.. Extra weight I know, but  you dont always want to shoot first.
Glove Holder pouch
Plastic gloves...Blood Born Pathogens you get the point.

Carrying: 20 gauge shotgun.
Fiances bag:

Survival stove with fuel tabs
Small Survival guide more geared towards her: It pretty much says don't panic 5 times in every chapter.
Med Kit contents:
anti-fungal cream
Antibiotic cream
Ibuprofen
Antacid
Benadryl
Various bandages
Hand sanitizer
mini sewing kit
Rain Poncho
Spare Clothes
Headlamp with batteries
50 foot paracord 550
shake flashlight
Pepper Spray keychain
Survival in a bottle from Cabelas: Bandages, mini pocket knife, heat pads, matches, etc. Neat little setup.
Female items
Her Duty Belt: Adding more when I figure out what we need.
Handcuff Pouch
Handcuffs -She works Asset Protection so yes she already knows how to use them.
Multitool pouch with multitool

Things I still need:
Food
Emergency Blanket
Tarp
Dual Purpose pot
Anti-diarrheal tabs
Mini fishing kit
Hatchet
Whistle
Small assortment of seeds for a guerilla forest garden
another sleeping bag
camp mats
Chest Rig or vest with multiple pockets
foot powder
mess kits
Map and compass
Razors Soap Deodorant etc.
Toilet Paper
Handi Wipes
Bath in a bag

Want to upgrade:
2 Hennessee Hammocks
Those sleeping bags that are the size of a football
Underarmour  clothing
Shotgun or Rifle.

Things I had in my bag I already ditched: Due to weight. Swear I cut out 10 lbs.
Multi screwdriver
Binoculars
Extra box of bird shoutgun shells
Folding shovel
2 emergency flashlights.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Medicineball on February 06, 2011, 10:08:02 AM
This is a really nice list. One comment, one question: (1) I don't think handcuffs are worth it. The last thing you want in a bug out situation is prisoners. (2) what are the yo-yos for? Thanks!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on February 06, 2011, 10:28:18 AM
Ok be nice on the criticism I literally just grabbed the random items I had in my house and put together two BOB's one for my fiance and one for myself. The fish are basically screwed. And no idea what the cat is gonna do if we have to hoof it and ditch the BOV. I plan on putting a small pack on the dog and having him carry some food. Hes a small dog, but he can probably carry about 3 days worth of food. I am also putting together a tote for the BOV, but thats another thread. I also keep a few things in my pockets like a multitool, folding knife, various medicines, and a mini bic, but again thats another thread. Anyhow here is what I came up with.
Just a few questions:
What part of the country are you in?  (do you have seasonal weather concerns that need to be addressed?)
What is this kit to be used for?
Where will it be stored?

My car kit has more or less evolved over time into my BOB, but I have more than one now.  The purpose of my BOB is to get me home from where ever my car is.  4-5 days worth of food, warm clothes in the winter, rain gear, boots, repair kit, first aid, etc.  However, at work, my kit is designed to get me out of the building or to bug in for 3 days (smoke hood, flash lights, food, blanket, rappel rope, etc.).  My home is my BOL with two friends homes serving as short term shelters in the event of wildland fire, severe winter storm keeping me from getting home, local problems, etc. 

One thing I keep meaning to put together is a can work but can't go home kit.  Just 3 days worth of clean clothes for work in a bag stored in my office in case weather or some other factor keeps me in a hotel for a few days.  Is it essential for life?  No, but it could bring a lot of comfort in an otherwise unfortunate situation.  Sure beats trying to drive home in severe weather and winding up dead in a car accident.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: mvrck on February 06, 2011, 11:38:52 AM
BOB Field Report.

I put together a BOB last fall and I work a lot in off-grid situations. So, I have been using my BOB as practice, especially to make lunch out of the back of my work van.

I had a project come up that was 3 nights out of town installing solar on someone's BOL.  :)

Everything worked pretty well, except for two issues:

1. It was much colder than I had planned and if it were not for the customer leaving an extra sleeping bag, I would have froze my buns off. My cheapy 40 degree bag was not enough for the cold weather. Lesson learned to watch the weather a bit closer.

2. One of my bug out items is a waterproof match container and water resistant matches. After about a dozen lights, the striker on the bottom of the container became impregnated with wax from the match tips and would no longer light the matches. Luckily, I had extra boxes of matches in the van and could ignite the Esbit bricks ok. Those extra matches were moved back to the bob along with a bic and a magnesium block.

(http://www.mavericksolar.net/misc/perk/bob_690_1024.jpg)

Another side issue is the Esbit fuel blocks and that little stove. It works much better if you can block the wind on 2 or 3 sides...

Good Luck!

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: mike77 on February 06, 2011, 02:59:13 PM
2. One of my bug out items is a waterproof match container and water resistant matches. After about a dozen lights, the striker on the bottom of the container became impregnated with wax from the match tips and would no longer light the matches. Luckily, I had extra boxes of matches in the van and could ignite the Esbit bricks ok. Those extra matches were moved back to the bob along with a bic and a magnesium block.

(http://www.mavericksolar.net/misc/perk/bob_690_1024.jpg)


From the looks of it, I'm not sure that what is on the bottom of your match container is intended as a match striker. I bought a similar container and the package specifically listed it as a flint (or something like that) for sparks rather than a match striker. One thing that makes me think yours is the same is that it looks round rather than flat. If it was intended for matches, it would probably be flat.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: kenser321 on February 06, 2011, 03:14:44 PM
I live in zone 2. Yo to reels are a way of absentee fishing. Plenty of YouTube videos on them. Also my bob is general purpose. I plan on throwing it in my car when I'm not home and leaving it next to the door when I am. Also my choice of clothing would be underarmour. It's light weight wick sweat and I can be warm or cool in it regardless of the season. I also plan on keeping a tote full of goodies in my vehicle for bugging out. Check out road warriors 5 minute bug out challenge on YouTube. Also I may just get handcuff zip ties as a lightweight alternative. And besides I don't want to blast everyone. They might be useful to me.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Tactical Hippie on February 06, 2011, 09:41:47 PM
I live in zone 2. Yo to reels are a way of absentee fishing. Plenty of YouTube videos on them. Also my bob is general purpose. I plan on throwing it in my car when I'm not home and leaving it next to the door when I am. Also my choice of clothing would be underarmour. It's light weight wick sweat and I can be warm or cool in it regardless of the season. I also plan on keeping a tote full of goodies in my vehicle for bugging out. Check out road warriors 5 minute bug out challenge on YouTube. Also I may just get handcuff zip ties as a lightweight alternative. And besides I don't want to blast everyone. They might be useful to me.

I have large HVAC ductwork zip ties for that purpose in my BOB.  Not that I would take any prisoners....but if someone I run across it trying to do us harm ect.....I would rather incapicate than shoot them if possible.  I'd zip tie his ass to a tree or something and be on my merry way.  lol
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: kenser321 on February 07, 2011, 04:41:19 AM
Oh I totally plan on defending my family, but not everyone is going to be out to kill you. :o
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Dawgus on February 07, 2011, 05:14:20 AM
 I had the same problem with those waterproof match containers when I experimented with them on solo camping trips. I had empty boxes from the strike anywhere matches, and cut the striker from the side into small circles that fit inside the lid 3 or 4 layers thick. I though that possibly the matches could ignite from rubbing the heads against the material, so I just put the  top one in upside-down. This way, I have a backup striker when the one on the container gets coated with wax. (also saved my butt when I dropped the container in mud) I've considered using a separate match container with the entire box striker rolled up inside as another backup.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Docwatmo on February 07, 2011, 05:45:13 AM
We have a couple of those same match containers (in orange) and that is a mini ferrite striker on the bottom.  Hit it with a hacksaw blade or other sharp edged piece of metal and it should throw a few sparks.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: TANK on February 07, 2011, 07:37:50 AM
I have some of those match containers as well, but I like pill bottles I use them all of the time now, they are about the same size as the match containers. I cut out a small piece of sand paper glued it inside of  the lid of the pill bottle. I found a military first aid kit pouch at the military surplus store, just big enough for three pill bottles, one for matches, one for char cloth and another for greased up cotton balls. put on a piece of para cord and hangs on my neck with a neck knive pocket knife and small multi-tool.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Matt.T on February 07, 2011, 12:46:43 PM
This is what was in my first BOB. I've added some things and taken away others. This is based off of my professional training as a scout in the Army, and also my personal interest in bushcraft.

I try to keep my gear to the minimum, knowing that my BOB is intended to get me from my BIL to my BOL. I prefer to rely on my skills, knowledge and abilities in order to perform the tasks, and use my gear as tools to accomplish the tasks.
Each item I carry has a specific purpose that fulfills one of the five human survival needs. I’ve added hygiene to the list and combined food and water.

1)Shelter - protection from the elements
2)Food & Water - essentials to life
3)Fire - warmth, comfort, and a supplement to food and water
4)Hygiene - stay healthy to stay alive
5)Other - the rest of the "must haves"

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_uySoldsscQs/TVA-BdFk0YI/AAAAAAAAAzI/eons0-11tQ4/s640/BOB3%201-2011%20009.JPG)

A- Shelter
 1-Recon 3 -5C sleeping bag (very compact and warm)
 2-Snugpak gortex bivi/poncho (keeps the elements off of my body)
 3-100ft 550 cord (hang poncho or a hundred other uses)

B- Food & Water
 4-Rations (jerky, dried fruit, nuts, biscuit mix, hard candy, multivitamins - 2/3 days)
 5-1L Nalgene water bottle (wide-mouthed and wrapped with duct tape)
 6-Titanium cup (stores on bottom of water bottle; can boil water and cook in)
 7-1L collapsible canteen (platypus; stores small when not in use, provides extra carrying capacity of water)
 8-30 Katadyn Micropur water purification tablets (no after taste of iodine; purifies 1L of water per tablet; small)
 9-Crux ultralight canister stove (collapsible to fit under fuel canister; provides expedient method of boiling water)
 10-plastic spoon (high temperature resistant; almost unbreakable)
 11-2x 1 quart freezer zip-lock bags (strong storage containers for water, food, fire starting material, etc.)

C- Fire
 12-Gerber camp axe (ancient tool used for many purposes from camp chores to cutting up a large animal)
 13-Fire starters (always have 3 methods - Fresnal lens, firesteel and striker, 2x Bic lighters)
 14-Mil-grade pocket saw (high quality; can cut down large standing dead trees for firewood)

D- Hygiene
 15-Basic First Aid kit (contents posted in other forum thread - http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=24567.msg272532#msg272532 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=24567.msg272532#msg272532))
 16-Brommer's camp soap (can be used to wash dishes, body, hands, hair, etc.; biodegradable)
 17-bandana (useful for a hundred things; can be used as a sanitary wipe)
 18-toothbrush (keeps your mouth healthy; toothaches can be debilitating)

E- Other
 19-Mora stainless steel knife (man's oldest tool; will not rust)
 20-microfleece tuque (reduces heat lose)
 21-Carhartt leather work gloves (useful for collecting firewood, handling hot metal cup, protection from weather, etc.)
 22-topographical map (local area that can be accessed by foot)
 23-Brunton compass (simple and does not rely on batteries; a must have for navigation)

Not Shown-
 Snugpak 35 Sleeka backpack (very durable, non-tactical look, comfortable, still have 1/2 of pack available for add-ins)
 Weapon (OPSEC)
 Weapon cleaning and repair kit

Put all away, ready to load into backpack:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_uySoldsscQs/TVBLqx83W_I/AAAAAAAAAzQ/dbHutnmtNEI/s512/BOB%201-2011.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: mvrck on February 07, 2011, 01:39:23 PM
Matt.T,

Awesome selection. I will take notes...

I was thinking of making a BIC (Bug in Car Kit), moving a lot of stuff from my BOB to the BIC and thinning down a bit the BOB.

You have given me some good ideas.

Thanks

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Tactical Hippie on February 07, 2011, 02:52:43 PM
Those recon 3 bags are sweet.  I want to eventually have 3, one for each member of the family.  Nice setup!
                                                                                                                                Tac Hip
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Dainty on February 07, 2011, 03:34:21 PM
I have large HVAC ductwork zip ties for that purpose in my BOB.  Not that I would take any prisoners....but if someone I run across it trying to do us harm ect.....I would rather incapicate than shoot them if possible.  I'd zip tie his ass to a tree or something and be on my merry way.  lol

According to ITS Tactical even the biggest, baddest zip ties are fairly easy to escape from if you know how (http://www.itstactical.com/skillcom/lock-picking/how-to-escape-from-zip-ties/).
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Tactical Hippie on February 07, 2011, 05:33:57 PM
According to ITS Tactical even the biggest, baddest zip ties are fairly easy to escape from if you know how (http://www.itstactical.com/skillcom/lock-picking/how-to-escape-from-zip-ties/).

In the video the zip ties are put on with his hands in front of him....I really cant imagine in what scenario that I would want to tie someone with their hands in the front.  Also If I'm not mistaken, Law encorcement do not use a single zip tie.  There are 2 ties one for each had interlocked behind your back...maybe even ran through a belt if subject was wearing one.  If I'm going to tie someone up, I'm just trying to buy time to get away, not permantly restrain them.

With that being said...that was actually a cool post!  I learned something new.  Thanks for the feedback and the link!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Dainty on February 07, 2011, 08:25:30 PM
In the video the zip ties are put on with his hands in front of him....I really cant imagine in what scenario that I would want to tie someone with their hands in the front.  Also If I'm not mistaken, Law encorcement do not use a single zip tie.  There are 2 ties one for each had interlocked behind your back...maybe even ran through a belt if subject was wearing one.  If I'm going to tie someone up, I'm just trying to buy time to get away, not permantly restrain them.

There's more than one video....including one on breaking them with hands behind the back and also one on dual zip ties, same concept.

With that being said...that was actually a cool post!  I learned something new.  Thanks for the feedback and the link!
You're welcome, glad to help!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: TANK on February 08, 2011, 07:34:59 AM
My wife and I went to a garage sale this past summer I found two not to big meat cleavers. I bought both of them for $2.00 I was thinking about a post on here comparing a hatchet and a saw. Some are correct about the weight of the hatchet, I did some reserch and discovered the meat cleaver will do everything the hatchet will do. And is easier to sharpen and keep sharp. I made a sheath for both of the meat cleavers one for my wife's BOB and one for mine. They are sharp as a knife will do the slicing and diceing just as well as a knife and chop as well as a hatchet.

One other item we thought about in a SHTF SITUATION a BIBLE is always good to have with you. NOT JUST A NEW TESTMENT BUT A COMPLETE BIBLE, AGAIN A GARAGE SALE was the right place to find not one but two. My wife's BOB
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: TANK on February 08, 2011, 07:36:11 AM
OOPS I HIT THE WRONG BUTTON, as I was saying my wifes BOB
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Halyna on February 17, 2011, 11:50:48 AM
What great ideas...But I didnt see any of you have listed...
A notebook with all kinds of info (stored in a ziplock bag, of course) with everyone's phone numbers, neighbors, work phones, written instructions re KI dosages, maps and directions where I might most likely get stuck, and directions on how to get to my safe meet-up location from as many different routes as I could find,  churches, public places on routes.....pretty much ANYTHING I could think of. 
And the same for my children, 3 different meeting places from the 4 different directions.  What the kids should do if they have to abandon their car on route, and basic survival techniques (like tarp-tent, hobo can, etc).
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roadracer on February 22, 2011, 11:58:28 AM
Our family BOB is after many years of adding/subtracting is at it's lightest ever.
The first reason is weight. I did a 3 day hike with our bug out bag & S W O R E to lighten that thing up. It felt like a manchu-mile.

As a 72 hour bag it needs to make a person self-sufficient for that time. Things like chainsaws, bulldozers & backhoes are a killer to hump for that period of time. It gives us the basics rules of 3's: Shelter, water & food. Shelter is a 4 man tent, Water is a minimal 2 gallons with the ability to purify more & MRE's for 3 days. Instant oats, hard candy, gum & peanut butter are extras. Peanut butter has a great shelf-life & offers protiens & fats & great caloric density. A complete first aid kit is also on board for a JIC. A Gerber LMFII is my knife of choice along with a Leatherman Wave. Poopie-paper & waterless hand sanitizer is there for business purposes & a small tooth paste & brushes for all. My wife & I wear contacts so spare up-to-date glasses are also in there. A mini-kit (survival kit) is also in there. I'm sure I'm missing a few but that about covers it. We would be leaving with a location in mind. I fear for the "run to the hills" types. They will find themselves in a rather precarious situation.

That's about it. Firearms are not stored in the bag as it is in an unsecured location in the house. Due to children I won't risk that one. A big bright yellow tag is attached as a reminder to grab our Hard-drive (pictures) SS & birth certificates & such from our secured location on the premises. Pictures are the most important IMO. You can get another Birth certificate. You can't re-take pictures of your children when they were little 10-20 years ago or of deceased loved ones.

I too am very against bugging out unless the house is going to be destroyed.

RR
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: average_joe on February 22, 2011, 01:17:33 PM
I keep a small bundle of framing shims in the GHB. It is good dry wood and is easy to work with for getting a fire started in wet conditions.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Tiderian on February 25, 2011, 02:10:50 PM
"A big bright yellow tag is attached as a reminder to grab our Hard-drive (pictures) SS & birth certificates & such from our secured location on the premises. Pictures are the most important IMO. You can get another Birth certificate. You can't re-take pictures of your children when they were little 10-20 years ago or of deceased loved ones."

RR - not to tell you your business, but *please* fire up that hard drive long enough to make copies onto other media. I've learned from experience that unused drives have a habit of not working again after being in storage a while. I've lost some stuff I wish I hadn't because I assumed that an untouched hard drive was an excellent long-term storage. I'd hate to see that happen to anyone else.

Also - if you have a place that you can do so (an office, friend or relative's home, bank box, etc.) it's a good idea to store at least one copy of that stuff offsite.

I like the 3-2-1 rule; at least 3 copies, on 2 different types of media (hard drive & DVD, CD & flash drive, etc),  and at least one copy is stored offsite. Yes, I realize that sounds excessive, but if it's really important to you it's no burden at all.

T
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Xavier on February 25, 2011, 02:22:46 PM
Store it in "The Cloud."

www.box.net (http://www.box.net) is a great repository.  And, it costs you nothing.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on February 26, 2011, 06:44:19 AM
Going to start a thread dedicated to off site important stuff storage...maybe a mod could move these last couple posts there.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Heavy G on February 26, 2011, 10:23:52 AM
^^^ PM sent
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Who...me? on February 26, 2011, 10:51:18 AM
Here is a link to a new thread on storing your important documents and photos.

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=25259.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=25259.0)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: duster22 on March 09, 2011, 06:26:23 AM
I keep a small bundle of framing shims in the GHB. It is good dry wood and is easy to work with for getting a fire started in wet conditions.

Great idea!  I also have a little fatwood in there that goes up like no one's business.  I'll have to grab some shims and put them together in my fire pack.  Thanks for the tip!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: metatron on March 28, 2011, 11:28:12 AM
Books/Info/Comm's

Food For Free - I carry food but you can never have to much, plus supplementing it makes it last longer.
SAS Survival Handbook - Lots of great info
Nokia N810 - It does GPS, plus I have things like my CV and other important documents encrypted along with a few hundred ebooks.
4 extra batteries - for the N810
Modded Icom IC-E90 - My main radio for communication, its fitted with a Diamond SRH-940
Modded Yaesu vx-6r - This is fitted with a Comet SMA-701 (fits in my pocket) and is my back up radio, it is also always tuned to PMR channels
Uniden UBC3500XLT scanner - It has Close call to autotune into anyone broadcasting.

Tools

Folding saw - Building shelter and traps
Folding shovel - Digging a hole to poop in as well as other digging needs
Hand Axe - Building shelter and chopping wood
Lock Knife
2 Mora Knife
Gerber Gator Jr - Building shelter (makes it much faster to cut roof pools)
Small claw hammer - Making traps
Bag of small brass nails - Making traps
Brass wire - Making traps.
Double sided sharpening stone - Sharpening knifes and axe.
2 LED torches - I need to see at night
LED wide up head lamp - I need to see at night
Compass and local maps - Sometime GPS doesn't work
Fishing kit - Need to catch food
Solar battery charger - I like having radios
AA and AAA batteries - Power

Food/cooking

4 mountain house meals - There fast and light
2 Nalgene bottles of water - Got to have water
Hot chocolate - Sugar is a great boost
Instant coffee - You can just eat it to keep awake
Chocolate covered expresso beans - Keeps you away
Jerky - Extra energy
Small Kelly Kettle + Pot holder - I live in the UK, it rains a lot and this works in all conditions with minimal dry wood.  
Zebra cooking pot - Really nice pot for cooking things I catch.
Aluminum foil - Useful for cooking fish
2 disposable lighter - I need fire and they work great
Zipo Lighter + 4 cans of fluid and extra flints - Nice long life and well made fire making.
Magnesium firefighter - Works when nothing else will.
Bike inner tube - If everything else is wet including the inner tube, it still lights if you can't be bothered to make feather sticks.
Tinder - Never know when you might need one.
Spork - My hands might be dirty
Aluminum cup - Mostly for coffee
Duct tape - If you can't fix it with duct tape, you are not using enough duct tape

Shelter/Clothing

Poncho - Keeps you dry and can act as a shelter if needed
Balaclava - Keeps my face warm
Tarp - Keeps the rain away until, you can make something/ or if you are moving about saves you time.
Ground sheet - The UK is very muddy.
Self inflating mat - Keeps you warm.
Bivvy bag - Keeps you dry.
Sleeping bag with cotton liner - Keeps you warm.
Toilet paper - Beats leafs
Toothpaste - Got to keep clean
Toothbrush- Got to keep clean
Soap - Got to keep clean
Change of clothes - Got to keep clean
Tent pegs - Yes you can make them, but they save time.
550 Paracord - Helpful in lots of ways
Work gloves - Keeps you hands clean, safe and warm.
Waterproofs - It rains a lot.

First aid kit

Basic kit with plasters, bandages and such
Water purification tablets - For when you can't find the time to boil it.
Pain killers - You can never be sure
Wipes - Clean cuts
Antibiotics - You can never be sure
8 Glow sticks - Back up light

All this stuff is in a full-size 120 litre bergen. I'm 6 foot 7 inches with a rugby player build and I've had no issue carrying the load on a 8 mile mock bug out.
  
That's my main one.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RPZ on April 06, 2011, 10:02:03 AM
Flagtag mentioned extra ziplock bags. I would add, nitrile disposable gloves - the sterile kind and the mechanic'x type. Also the food safe thin disposables. There might be times when you really don't want to get your hands that dirty - or expose someone else un-neccessarily. Examples might be cleaning an infected wound, doing alittle emergency dentistry to your other half, cleaning guns with solvents and oils, filed dressing game etc.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mike Honcho on April 07, 2011, 10:41:17 AM
Here's a spreadsheet I created a year or so ago when I started prepping to keep myself on track... Cells in green are in the B.O.B / B.I.B. (or next to it)... Items in white are still needed... Enjoy - MH

(http://i1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee498/MrHoncho/Kit.png)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ag2 on April 07, 2011, 12:11:34 PM
I keep a small bundle of framing shims in the GHB. It is good dry wood and is easy to work with for getting a fire started in wet conditions.
There are lots of other cheap options.  I won't say that one is better than the other 'cuz YMMV.  But here are options which take less room 
Vaseline and cotton balls in a film canister
Wood shavings and parafin mixed together in a dixie cup
lint from the dryer, packed in a dixie cup, poor parafin and add more lint, etc
There are over-the-counter versions which are small, unsure of the price such as Fire Paste in a tube and pressed wood and wax that look like candy bars
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: metatron on April 07, 2011, 02:09:07 PM
There are lots of other cheap options.  I won't say that one is better than the other 'cuz YMMV.  But here are options which take less room 
Vaseline and cotton balls in a film canister
Wood shavings and parafin mixed together in a dixie cup
lint from the dryer, packed in a dixie cup, poor parafin and add more lint, etc
There are over-the-counter versions which are small, unsure of the price such as Fire Paste in a tube and pressed wood and wax that look like candy bars


Its extremely cheap to make charcloth from an old t-shirt, you can also make feather sticks even when things are wet.
Title: Essential Kit in the BOB (List your top four or five)
Post by: joejoe on April 16, 2011, 11:15:24 AM
I've watched several You Tube vids lately to see what everyone else is carrying. One vid I watched the guy was carrying six books and about ten pairs on scissors??
So whats the main items to carry.
For me:
Its shelter - light weight tent and bivi. (tarp in warmer clims)
Sleep - light weight sleeping bag
Food and water.
Lighter

So whats your top four must have items.


Title: Re: Essential Kit in the BOB (List your top four or five)
Post by: metatron on April 16, 2011, 11:52:42 AM
I've watched several You Tube vids lately to see what everyone else is carrying. One vid I watched the guy was carrying six books and about ten pairs on scissors??
So whats the main items to carry.
For me:
Its shelter - light weight tent and bivi. (tarp in warmer clims)
Sleep - light weight sleeping bag
Food and water.
Lighter

So whats your top four must have items.




Way to make a fire - Lighter/Swedish steel and a knife
Way to make a shelter - Folding saw
way to cook/clean water - A Pot

It rains a lot here so clean water is not an issue.
Title: Re: Essential Kit in the BOB (List your top four or five)
Post by: endurance on April 16, 2011, 12:50:14 PM
So whats your top four must have items.
Honestly?  A credit card for a hotel for the night and meals, a clean change of work clothes, my cell phone with its phonebook, and my i-pod. 

My most likely disasters are a severe winter storm keeping me from getting home or a wildland fire making me leave my home.  While I do keep a complete car kit with food, water, shelter, heat and light; when it comes to the need to bug out, I want to be able to comfortably go to work from a hotel, not start a fire in the snow.  I'm jus' sayin'...
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: average_joe on April 24, 2011, 08:21:26 AM
Great idea!  I also have a little fatwood in there that goes up like no one's business.  I'll have to grab some shims and put them together in my fire pack.  Thanks for the tip!


You're welcome duster22!

There are lots of other cheap options.  I won't say that one is better than the other 'cuz YMMV.  But here are options which take less room 
Vaseline and cotton balls in a film canister
Wood shavings and parafin mixed together in a dixie cup
lint from the dryer, packed in a dixie cup, poor parafin and add more lint, etc
There are over-the-counter versions which are small, unsure of the price such as Fire Paste in a tube and pressed wood and wax that look like candy bars



Those are all good options for fire starting ag2. I have a flint and steel, a lighter, matches and a small tube of Vaseline with a bag of cotton balls. I can also use the cotton balls as a simple water filtrate. I use the shims as kindling. I'm thinking i could also use them as a base and handhold for a bow drill, but i haven't tried it. I don't know if the wood is hard enough.   
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on April 25, 2011, 09:54:06 AM
I've watched several You Tube vids lately to see what everyone else is carrying. One vid I watched the guy was carrying six books and about ten pairs on scissors??

Dude, you can't tell us you found something like that without posting a link!

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greg1109 on April 26, 2011, 04:30:24 PM
What do I keep in my BOB?  Nothing.

Why??   Because it's coming in the mail tomorrow!!  *giddy*   

I've seen so many good suggestions and ideas on this thread, I can hardly wait to start stuffing it!!

Brilliant idea goes to the guy with the mousetrap in his.  (on my iPod at the moment, so it's hard to go back to look and see who it was)   I'm going to assume it's for catching small game and not some wacky booby-trap like the Asian kid in The Goonies would have.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on April 27, 2011, 12:43:21 PM
Brilliant idea goes to the guy with the mousetrap in his. 

I second that. Also could be used for a makeshift entry alarm.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: 3:16 on April 29, 2011, 10:41:21 PM
I list my bug out bag inventory once I get home in the morning but 1 thing I know that not a lot of people talk about is rehydration personally I keep enough of the powdered gatorade mix to make two gallons in a vacuum seal bag. in a really bad situations you can mix it triple or quadruple the recommended amount and have a super hydrating mixed drink that will replenish many of the lost nutrients and electrolytes that you will in a stressful situation you will be better physically and mentally properly hydrated as well make better decisions. take it from too many times to count of experience. ps I love this form well really the whole site :)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on April 30, 2011, 08:40:44 AM
I list my bug out bag inventory once I get home in the morning but 1 thing I know that not a lot of people talk about is rehydration personally I keep enough of the powdered gatorade mix to make two gallons in a vacuum seal bag. in a really bad situations you can mix it triple or quadruple the recommended amount and have a super hydrating mixed drink that will replenish many of the lost nutrients and electrolytes that you will in a stressful situation you will be better physically and mentally properly hydrated as well make better decisions. take it from too many times to count of experience. ps I love this form well really the whole site :)

Welcome to the forum, I see you've swung by the Front Porch and introduced yourself, that's a lot of living you've crammed, so far, into your 21 years!

Many of us do include rehydration regimens in our kits.  Some use Gatorade, as you suggested, others use any of a number of alternate brands of rehydration products.

However, I did wish to point out that your recommendation of "stacking" or concentrating rehydration solutions really is very unnecessary and some of the alleged benefits of doing so goes contrary to science.

First of all, Gatorade has very little in the way of nutrients.  It's quite simply a little sugar, a little salt, a lot of water and some flavoring.  You can mix a batch of rehydration solution at home for a lot less than what they're selling it to you.  A simple review of the label will show absolutely nothing other than a very small number of calories (for the weight), sodium, potassium and sugar.

In fact, even quadrupling the solution's mix (not really recommended, just using your recommendation as an example), barely meets the caloric level the liver can put back into the body in an hour.  The liver generally can put only about 220-250 calories back into the body if it's working properly and efficiently.  Unfortunately, what also happens is that the body cannot absorb most of those calories (and electrolytes) immediately. . .or even quickly, and you'll "flush" them out in your urine before they even have the opportunity to work.

So, in a nutshell, DON'T triple or quadruple the concentration of the mix.  In fact, it's actually better to halve the recommendation of the mix and drink a higher volume of fluid for rehydration.  If you want a quick boost, you're better off eating some candy with a much higher amount of simple sugars.

But nutrients and nutritional value?   Not with Gatorade.

Hope it helps.

The Professor

Secondly, the body can only replenish
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Bradbn4 on April 30, 2011, 09:21:52 AM
I list my bug out bag inventory once I get home in the morning but 1 thing I know that not a lot of people talk about is rehydration personally I keep enough of the powdered gatorade mix to make two gallons in a vacuum seal bag. in a really bad situations you can mix it triple or quadruple the recommended amount and have a super hydrating mixed drink that will replenish many of the lost nutrients and electrolytes that you will in a stressful situation you will be better physically and mentally properly hydrated as well make better decisions. take it from too many times to count of experience. ps I love this form well really the whole site :)

So should we call you "John"?

The Gatorade mixture well sealed is a worth while idea...I find that when I manage to give myself mild case of food poisoning - it helps quite the belly down a bit.   When Gatorade taste good, I know I have failed to keep myself hydrated correctly.   Right now I am trying out some true lemon mix + their orange to see how well the mixture will work for me. 

The true lemon is selection was based on adding a bit of flavor to plain water.  I find that lemon helps cut thru that cotton mouth feel when you don't hydrate correctly.

My office bag I have the standard first aide kit + 3 extra boxes of misc band aides, flashlight, spare batteries, gas-x, antacid, pocket knife, eight ( 8 ) bottles of water - 16 oz, 2 spare liter water bottles, aspirin, and a roll of duc tape.    I also keep a few other items at work that I don't consider part of the kit, food, instant tea, lemon aide mix, and cans of soup.

The car kit has similar items + change of clothes, filtered water bottle, razor knifes, spare flash lights, gloves, jacket...The distance from home to work is short (less than 2 miles) so that bag is intended to remain with the vehicle.

The home bag is nothing but a collection of smaller bags that contain specialized items like a more complete first aide kit, light source, camping food, poncho, compass, stove + fuel pellets, etc. These sub bags end up going into a small Alice back back which leaves room to add a sleeping bag if needed.  It was way too easy to over pack the full size Alice back pack, which will be used as an upgraded car survival bag in the future.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cartpusher on May 01, 2011, 11:07:47 AM
I started work on a new 24 hour, Get Home Bag today, and recruited my 4 year old daughter to help me with re-rolling some toilet paper and duct tape for the kit.   Before i know it she is starting work on her own Emergency Kit.  Her kit ended up being:

Bag - Pink Disney Princess back pack (Tactical version of course)
bag of pretzels
beef jerky
bag of cereal
flashlight
full roll of toilet paper
smaller re-rolled toilet paper
napkins
pencil
two erasers
blanky, folded and placed in ziplock
birthday cake decorating items - "in case you are stuck in your car, AND it is your birthday."


Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greg1109 on May 01, 2011, 11:48:55 AM
That's a-freakin-dorable.  :-)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Medicineball on May 01, 2011, 03:08:30 PM
Cartpusher, I did the same thing with my daughter and got a similar result! Good times!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cartpusher on May 01, 2011, 03:46:56 PM
Yeah she ended up talking about it most the day...  "What else do we need in our bag...OH!  Tools in case we need to fix something!"  I guess she has picked up something from all my rambling on about prepping.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cartpusher on May 07, 2011, 04:27:14 AM
Started work on a new kit for myself to take to work each day.  Need it to be at least a Get Home Bag, but I will stretch it as much as possible towards a Bug Out Bag.  Not complete yet but here is what I have so far...

Bag:
SO Tech Go Bag Extended

Components:
Ripstop poncho, with grommets in each corner.
survival blanket
3 chemical light sticks
gerber folding knife
flashlight
toothbrush/toothpaste
floss
toilet paper
baby wipes
20' of duct tape re-rolled

BCB International Ultimate Surival Kit (pre pack kit that comes in a water proof tin. This was a quick/cheap/compact way to get a lot of pieces into my kit. )
Tin contains:
Water bag
Nylon cord
Button compass
Candle
Flint & Striker
Hack saw blade
Tinder
Fishing kit
Mini multi-tool
Matches
Sewing kit
Purification tablets
Safety pins
Single edge razor
Salt sachets
Signal mirror
Whistle
Snare wire
Wire saw
Grip lock bag
Pencil
Survival instructions
Extra water bag
Vinyl tape
A4 waterproof paper
Micro light

BCB Crusader Cook System (This is my new favorite item!  Although it fits on the Go Bag, it takes away the narrow profile of the bag, and might not be something I leave on here in the long run.)
Contained in MOLLE Pouch:
Cooker
Cup Canteen
Water Bottle and Cup
12 "Green Heat" Ethanol Gel Fuel Packets
Fireball Flint Fire Starter
Cup Lid
Has a pocket for, but does not come with eating utensils, I will be adding these shortly.

2 MH Pouches
3 Cliff bars

ammo:
20 rounds of 7.62
20 rounds of 5.56
5 12ga slugs

Next item to tackle is First Aid......



Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greg1109 on May 09, 2011, 02:44:44 PM
Brilliant idea goes to the guy with the mousetrap in his.  (on my iPod at the moment, so it's hard to go back to look and see who it was)   I'm going to assume it's for catching small game and not some wacky booby-trap like the Asian kid in The Goonies would have.

Well, boys and girls, we're about to find out how well a rat trap will do at catching (hopefully killing) small game.  More specifically the freaking squirrel that dug up my garden sometime today!!

Before you all ask, I'm in NYC.  So no, I can't shoot the little bastard!

Using peanut butter as bait, which i've seen on a few ppl's BOB list, so it will be a practical experiment as well as a revenge-kill.

*cursing repeatedly under breath*
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Cedar on May 14, 2011, 03:28:40 PM
I plan on "Bugging In" unless there is some reason I have to leave my home or I am not at home. All my food is here, all my equipment for making more food is here. My current home is not as ideal of a BOL as I would have liked over my previous homes, but it is what I have.

My largest threat here is an earthquake and a dam failing. I figure I have 5 minutes at the minimum to get out of my house and up a huge hill that theoretically is taller than the wave of water which WILL come if the dam breaks. There is no option of taking a vehicle in this earthquake situation.. until the 'all clear' is called, I feel it is not safe to stay in my home if the dam is compromised at all. So I will leave if an earthquake happens and return when the "All Clear" has sounded.

My BOB, hiking boots (socks with) , Ergo pack (baby pack) and such are at my front door at all times other than when I am actually wearing them. At least once a week I climb my ‘escape’ hill with my gear and my baby. I leave the arm straps looser on my pack so I don’t have to fight to get into it and can tighten it up after I have it on. The baby pack has to go on first and for this instance it is easier to have her ride backwards, not forward facing. Without the BOB, she rides on my back forward facing. I would not have known this had I not been doing the hill with all the gear.

I take it in my truck with me when I leave the property, until I get my SAR pack re-packed and the SAR pack will stay in the truck where the tent/hatchet and some other things already are.

CONTENTS:
Food - 5 pounds 6 oz

2 pouches of tuna fish (MRE) 6 servings
1 pouch of salmon (MRE) 3 servings
2 pouches homedried dehydrated Jerky (MRE)
1 pouch homedried dehydrated apples (MRE)
1 pouch homedried dehydrated bananas (MRE)
1 pouch salted nuts homepacked (MRE)
67 servings of food (Dehydrated, water only needed)
     10 servings Apple-Cinnamon Oatmeal (carb)
       8 servings Creamy Wild Rice (higher fat & carb = 1/2 gallon)
       8 servings Cheddar Broccoli (higher fat & carb = 1/2 gallon
       8 servings Chicken Noodle Soup (higher fat & carb = 1/2 gallon)
       8 servings Gumbo (higher fat & carb = 1/2 gallon)
       25 cubes Chicken Boullion
Baby formula for 6 full meals (she is on solid foods too)
Stainless steel cooking pot (medium small size)
Cooking stand for pot

Water - 3 pounds
Water purification tablets (50)
1 quart water container with water - (Working on buying a filter)

Shelter - 4 1/2 pounds
6'x8' insulated tarp for shelter/groundcloth or signaling  (red one side/silver the other)
2 space blankets
2 Large black heavy duty garbage bags (emergency poncho or water collection)
Sleeping bag (mine is to 45F, in a garbage bag in a stuff sack)
Sleeping bag for baby (the baby's is to 32F, in a garbage bag in a stuff sack)

Clothing - 4 1/2
100% Wool hat
Bandana
100% Wool sweater
Wool Army Pants (I know they go to -45F)
Wool socks
T-shirt
Hoodie
1 sarrong (1,001 uses for it -from towel to sunscreen to privacy to ?)

Fire Starting/Cooking - 0.5 pounds
Matches in waterproof containers
Flint & steel
Bic lighter
Candle Stub
99% alcohol (HEET)
Stainless steel pot
Popcan stove (tried and proven – in case found fire materials are wet)

Baby Needs - 2 1/2 pounds
2 sets Baby clothes for my 18 month old (change out every 3 months)
Hat (that covers her ears)
Tights –warmer than just socks and dry faster
Snowsuit – keeps her super toasty and it kinda waterproof
10 diapers in her current size and 20 wet wipes (almost potty trained)

Communication/Navigation - 2 pounds
AM/FM/SW1/SW2 radio with flashlight (windup & battery)
ID
Sharpie Pen
Flagging – I used this a lot as a dog handler.
Notebook
Pencil
Mirror – multiple uses
Metal whistle taped on the edges
2 compasses (always have a backup)
Topo maps of my 2 BOLs, and the general area near home for 30 mile radius
(Working on replacing my 2-way radios- recently found out they corroded from the batteries)

First Aid - 2 1/2 pounds
First Aid Kit (from trach tubes to suture to vet wrap to band aides)
12 - Benedril due to bee sting allergies
Buzz Away insect repellent
Sun lotion (for baby)
Small bar of soap

Tools - 3 pounds
Leatherman with needlenose, pliers, screwdrivers, knives, etc
Finnish knife
My knife I can beat up a bit
Felco #2 - would rather have it than all of my knives
Leather Gloves
Insulated gloves
Magnetic flashlight
Headlamp
1 - 12 hour Glow Stick
Parachute cord
3 battery candles (these last a long time, longer than glow sticks)
Dental floss with needles in it
5 Carbiners (4 heavy duty)
Snare wire (giggli)
Small fishing kit
Bear mace (not just for 4-legged animals)
Carabiners (5)
1 - 4' nylon dog leash in case my guardian dog goes with us/also has other uses.

NOTE: Everything which is feasible to be, has been packed in quart and gallon sized Ziplock baggies to keep them dry and/or for water collection. They are then packed in black garbage bags inside the pack.

Total Weight: 28 pounds not including the pack that I forgot to weigh when it was empty. With baby in her pack + BOB = 52 pounds total weight I am carrying (guessing backpack is 2 pounds)

Cedar
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greg1109 on May 16, 2011, 08:58:40 AM
Well, boys and girls, we're about to find out how well a rat trap will do at catching (hopefully killing) small game.  More specifically the freaking squirrel that dug up my garden sometime today!!

Update:   Squirrels like peanut butter.  Trap sprung but did not catch the little sonofagun BUT it apparently scared the shit out of him...   literally!!    There was a bunch of little squirrel turds right where I set the trap that wasn't there before.   I'm going to look into a cage-type trap next.


Unrelated overlooked BOB item:  Shoelaces!!    I haven't read every BOB thread on here but I haven't seen shoelaces in any of the ones I have read.   
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: mike77 on May 16, 2011, 10:38:42 AM
Unrelated overlooked BOB item:  Shoelaces!!    I haven't read every BOB thread on here but I haven't seen shoelaces in any of the ones I have read.

For me, that's one of the 101 uses for para cord.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on May 16, 2011, 05:39:04 PM
For me, that's one of the 101 uses for para cord.

I replace all my bootlaces with paracord.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ncjeeper on May 16, 2011, 07:13:12 PM
For me, that's one of the 101 uses for para cord.
Yep me too.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greg1109 on May 19, 2011, 09:10:41 AM
With regards to BOB food:

I was planning on keeping a hard plastic, 6-egg holder on top of/and or in a highly visible 'reminder' location near my BOB to carry some hard boiled eggs in.  I usually have some on hand in the fridge, so it would only be a matter of a moment or two to get them into the bag.   

But after checking online, I see that the general consensus is that hardboiled eggs should not be eaten more than TWO HOURS after being removed from refrigeration??  That can't be right, can it??  I seem to remember hard boiled easter eggs being on my grandmothers's dining room table for what seemed like days and eating them with no I'll effects.   

So am I remembering this wrong, or is this another case of the powers-that-be covering themselves against the "duh, nobody told me not to eat the week-old eggs" type lawsuits??
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Cedar on May 19, 2011, 10:09:41 AM
But after checking online, I see that the general consensus is that hardboiled eggs should not be eaten more than TWO HOURS after being removed from refrigeration??  That can't be right, can it??  I seem to remember hard boiled easter eggs being on my grandmothers's dining room table for what seemed like days and eating them with no I'll effects.  So am I remembering this wrong, or is this another case of the powers-that-be covering themselves against the "duh, nobody told me not to eat the week-old eggs" type lawsuits??

You do not remember wrong necessarily. Salmonella is what the 'powers-that-be' are worried about. Back in grandma's day, chickens did not have the Salmonella issues that they do today. Sure chickens had Salmonella, but not to the extent they have now.

Eggs are naturally germ-free, due to bacteria-fighting proteins found within the egg white. BUT.. many years ago, starting about the 1970's, Salmonella infected birds who died.. were ground up and fed back to hot-house (commercial) chickens as a cheap protein source, much like the 'downer' sheep and cattle were being ground up and fed back to cattle as a cheap protein source. In the cattle, it became "Mad Cow" and in the chickens, the chickens often became carriers of Salmonella, but show no symptoms and are often immune. BUT.. the eggs contain Salmonella, as does the chicken meat, which is why cross contamination in the kitchen is spoken more about these days and why you need to cook chicken until it is fully done. To make it more confusing, there is more than one type of Salmonella.

It used to be that eggs got contaminated with salmonella on the outside, from contact with fecal bacteria. But in recent years (probably starting in the 1970's and compounding since), the Salmonella Enteritidis strain has been found inside intact, disinfected, grade A eggs. This type of germ contaminates eggs inside a hen's ovaries, before shells are even formed. The hens are in short... a "Typhoid Mary" (a healthy carrier of a disease pathogen).

So refrigeration slows Salmonella and rapidly multiplies in the egg (or meat) when it becomes room temperature or more.

Cedar
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Remman on July 13, 2011, 07:45:01 PM
Tag until I can get a list together.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: geoffreys7 on July 14, 2011, 09:27:20 AM
Here's my complete checklist, comments and suggestions welcome and apprecated;   :)

Basic Bug Out Bag - Backpack large enough for supplies Rev. 3-24-11
Shelter                   Water
______ Poncho                ______ Water Purifier/Paper Filter
______ Poncho Liner             ______ Purify Tablets/Clorox
______ Space Blanket-HD          ______ 2 Small Nalgene Water Bottles
______ 2 Space Blankets-Light          ______ 1 Liter Platypus Water Bag
______ Plastic Leaf Bags-HD          ______ Coffee Packets, Sugar, Salt
______ Plastic Tube Tent              ______ Gatorade, Cocoa, Iced Tea Mix
Clothing                   Heat/Cooking/Light
______ 4pr Socks (cotton/wool)         ______ Waterproof Matches, BIC Lighter
______ Leather Work Gloves         ______ Cotton Balls, Steel Wool
______ Warm Gloves(Winter)         ______ LED Head Light
______ Wool Sweater            ______ Small Birthday Candles
______ Windbreaker             ______ Stainless Steel Cup
______ Boots (Spare Laces)         ______ Trioxane Folding Stove
______ Wool Hat/Baseball Cap         ______ Trioxane Fuel Bars
______ Underwear (1 set)          ______ Eating/Cooking Utensils
______ Underwear- Thermal          ______ Wire-Saw
______ Coveralls (jumpsuit style)         ______ Aluminum Foil
______ T-Shirt & Shorts (Summer)         ______ Survival candle
______ Jeans & Shirt
Utility                   Communications
______ Swiss Army knife             ______ AM-FM-SW Radio
______ Sheath Knife             ______ Mini-Mag Flashlight w/Holster
______ Knife Sharpener Kit         ______ LED Flashlight
______ Leatherman Multi-Tool          ______ Bulbs & Batteries extra
______ Army Can Opener            ______ Post-it Pad of Paper
______ 50’ Parachute Cord          ______ Pen & Pencil
______ 20’ Nylon Rope             ______ Assorted Light Sticks
______ 100’ Yellow Mason Line         ______ Walkie-Talkies (Batteries)
______ German E-Shovel             ______ Mirror
______ Spyderline Fishing Line         ______ Whistle
______ Hammock             ______ Flares (aerial)
______ Cash (roll quarters)         ______ Electrical Tape
______ 6” Hacksaw Blade            ______ Emergency Contacts List
______ Plastic Zip-Ties            ______ Survival Cards
______ Sling-Shot            ______ Binoculars
Directions                   Hygiene
______ NY City, LI Maps             ______ Toothbrush, Paste
______ Compass             ______ Soap
______ Maps                    ______ Toilet Paper
______ First Aid Manual             ______ Zip-Lock Plastic Bags-Gal/Qt
______ Survival Skills Manual          ______ Disposable Razor
Food
______ 3 to 7 MRE Meals            ______ Small Can Peanuts
______ Slim Jim Sticks            ______ Power Bars
______ Instant Oatmeal            ______ Ramen Noodle Soup, Bullion
______ Fruit & Grain Snack Bars         ______ Hard Candy & Life Savers
Sewing Kit                First Aid Kit
______ Needles variety             ______ Triangular Bandage
______ Thread                ______ Band-Aids, Steri-Strips
______ Extra Buttons             ______ Towelettes, Alcohol Pads
______ Small Scissors             ______ Gauze Pads
______ Sewing Awl             ______ Sting-Ez
______ Nylon Thread             ______ Tweezers
______ Safety Pins             ______ Tylenol, Benedryl
______ Duct Tape            ______ Antacid Tabs      
______ Toilet Paper            ______ Pepto-Bismol, Immodium AD (diarrhea)
______ Soap               ______ Medical Tape
______ Insect Repellant-Deet         ______ Prescription Medicines
______ Tube Vaseline            ______ Ace Bandage
______                  ______ Antibiotic Cream
Ditty Bag
______ Magnifying Glass             ______ Sunglasses
______ Carrier/bag             ______ Multi-Vitamins
______ Bungee Cord, Surgical Tube      ______ Dental Floss      
______ Latex Gloves            ______ Push Pins, Nails   
______ Thermometer              ______ Spare Glasses   
______ Moleskin               ______ Small Towel, Washcloth       
______ Bandana               ______ Super Glue Gel
______ Mace Spray            ______ Toilet Paper       
______ Hand Warmers            ______ Dust Mask & Ear Plugs      
______ Carabineers            ______ B.O.B. Inventory Card
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Heavy G on July 14, 2011, 09:31:25 AM
geoffreys7: I love the checklist format with the little lines next to items.  Very handy.  Thanks.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: JerseyVince on July 14, 2011, 12:51:39 PM
OOhhhh- Slimjims :D the never starve food, a month later a burb out of the blue and it's like you just ate it :o
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: flagtag on July 14, 2011, 08:20:03 PM
OOhhhh- Slimjims :D the never starve food, a month later a burb out of the blue and it's like you just ate it :o

 :excited: :clap:
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: danbrown0331 on July 20, 2011, 05:04:34 AM
mine is more of a get home bag than a bug out bag and its mostly aimed at urban rather than wilderness, I have a wilderness bag packed with my tent and sleeping bag, cook stove and other camping equipment and MRE's that lives in my closet ready to go if needed. I also have a large foot locker packed and ready to go into the truck if need be that has a lot of my other gear, LBV, plate carrier and other things I acquired in the Corps
Here is whats in the bag that I carry with me daily

Humidor w/ cigars
cigar cutter
flask w/ bourbon
spare t shirt (from a local fire department)
550 cord 100'
more 550 cord
hygiene kit - toothbrush, tooth paste, deodorant, soap, razor
sewing kit
Springfield XD .45
spare mag
mag light
emergency radio
pry bar
spanner wrench
multi tool (2)
swiss army knife
dykes
crescent wrench
chem lights (2) wrapped w 550 cord
chem light
pen
note pad
can opener
zippo
flint and steel
bic lighter
tea light
water purification tabs
poncho (2)
space blanket (2)
FEMA incident response pocket guide
carabeners (2)
demo hammer
K-BAR
collapsible asp
bandanna
schmag
matches waterproof
lensatic compass
small compass on the match case
whistle
signal mirror
duct tape
electric tape
nylon webbing
hunting knife w bone saw and gut hook
condoms
hydration bladder w inline filter
First Aid kit
tactical light
stainless water bottle
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on July 21, 2011, 05:27:35 AM
Here is whats in the bag that I carry with me

Sounds heavy. My two cents is that you can trim down some.
I suggest,

Get rid of some knives, you have 5 listed if you count the multitools. Thats over kill. I day ditch the swiss army the kabar, if the hunting knife is fixed blade else ditch it, and one of the multitools, if they are good quality like leatherman else keep the swiss army and ditch one anyhow.
Add some powerbars and spare cash
Ditch the flint and steel, the lighters have enough to make a spark after they are out of juice
Add chem water tabs so you dont have to start a fire if necessary
Add binoculars
Lose a poncho and add contractor trashbags, a million uses.
Add a small first aid kit
Add a paperback or playing cards

Thats what comes to mind. Like I said just my two cents to take or leave. I still think youll be tool heavy, do you need a prybar a kabar and a demo hammer?, but its your carry.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: danbrown0331 on July 23, 2011, 11:22:24 PM
Sounds heavy. My two cents is that you can trim down some.
..... do you need a prybar a kabar and a demo hammer?, but its your carry.

I do need to trim it down, I am with you 100% on the knives, I inventoried it as I was posting. Mostly it has just been collecting small pieces here and there as time has gone by.  As for the K-BAR  and the demo hammer, as it is a bag that I carry and use daily, have gotten more use than most of the other stuff, either way there are a few things I can purge to save weight. The K-BAR is going to stay as it is the only fixed blade, the multi tools can probably go away as they are cheepos and I have a good gerber as part of my EDC. The pry bar can probably also go away as it hasnt ever seen use.
Thanks for the thought on ditching the poncho for some contractor bags, great idea. I do have a first aid kit that I carry as well. It was my original bag that I outgrew and I turned it into a trauma bag. I have a ton of different wound closure stuff (including tampons and quick clot) as well as airway management equipment (OPA's, NPA's, BVM) and OC meds
I also have iodine tabs for water purification in there, I may have missed them as I was posting. I do need the binos.
the original thought on the demo hammer was that I could dig it in as an anchor point and double up 550 cord to get down from something if I needed to, I really dont like heights.
thanks for the input,
Dan
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Matt.T on July 29, 2011, 12:02:39 PM
Everyone has different needs and different styles as to what they carry in their BOB, however, I would suggest to anyone that once their bag is packed and loaded, that they go out for a good length of time (a few hours at minimum) and see how it feels.

I tend to believe that our society (Western) conditions us to believe that we need a lot of stuff (call it commercial advertising), but in truth, we actually need a lot less. Yet we always seem to want to pack more than we ever can possibly use. I can think of two good examples of when this principle has applied to me:

1- Packing for an overseas trip. I packed the usual clothing, hygiene and necessary items (passpart, money, maps), but then I thought to myself, "I should take a book to read on the plane, and my iPod, and maybe my camera stand and GPSr." So, in went all of my gadgets, along with all of the required cords, but other than listening to some music on the plane, I never opened the book, I got directions by talking to people, and if I needed a picture of myself, I asked someone or set it on a table. I didn't even wear all of the clothing that I brought because the weather wasn't what I had anticipated and had to buy new clothes upon arrival.

2- Packing for camping trips and military field exercises. Again, I packed many items that I thought would be useful in a "what if" situation, but as it turned out, if I needed a specific item I was able to borrow it or make do without it.

In both of these scenarios, I could have and should have, packed much less than I did. As it turns out, it didn't matter much because I only had to carry my bags short distances, but if I had to carry them a long distance or for an extended period of time, I'm sure all those "extras" would have formed a nice breadcrumb trail behind me.

In short, what I believe is that "less is more." Carry the majority of your survival "tools" in your head - learn how to adapt, improvise and overcome (military training - I must have paid attention once during basic training). Carry what you NEED to survive - water, food, shelter, fire and security - and learn how to live without all the rest. Remember that a BOB is intended only to get you from Point A to Point B; keep it simple.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Matt.T on July 29, 2011, 07:38:05 PM
I've refined my BOB - based on taking it out on several trips and actually using the items within.  I found that for a 48-72 hour scenario (time frame needed to travel from my BIL to my BOL on foot), I was simply carrying too much stuff. So I ended-up taking several items out of my bag, to include extra collapsible water canteen, canister stove, pocket saw, toothbrush, and binoculars. I replaced the backpacking canister stove with a Sterno stove (lighter in weight and fail-proof), reduced my food by almost half (I just don't eat as much as I thought while moving), replaced my Mylar blanket with a military surplus poncho (less cumbersome), and replaced my binoculars with a monocular (for simplicity and space). With these improvements, I was able to remove 7-8 pounds of weight and now feel much more comfortable with what I have.

So here is my new layout for my BOB, listed by the primary needs they provide for:

Backpack

Water:
- 1L Water bottle and purification tablets
- Metal cup (slides over bottom of water bottle)

Food:
- Food (2 tuna packets, 6oz deer jerky, 4 energy bars, 1c mixed nuts, 2c dried fruits, 4 bags herbal tea, 1c Bisquick, handful of hard candy - all in small Ziploc bags)
- Heavy plastic "unbreakable" spoon
- Knife with sharpener
- (2) 1-Quart freezer Ziploc bags (to collect extra water, food or dry tinder)
- Sterno

Shelter:
- Military poncho
- 550 cord
- Camp axe
- Recon 3 patrol sleeping bag (SUPER small when compressed)
- Leather gloves, fleece glove liners, microfleece touque, smartwool socks
- Stormproof jacket (to be worn)

Fire:
- Lighters (2)
- Fire rod
- Fresnel lens

Security:
- Basic First-Aid Kit
- Headlamp with extra batteries
- TP and hand sanitizer
- Multipurpose biodegradable soap (Dr. Brommer's)
- Bandana
- Weapon repair and cleaning kit
- 2 extra loaded ammunition magazines
- Monocular
- Topo maps of local area
- Lensatic compass
- Rite-in-Rain notebook and pen

...And of course my weapon (pistol).

All packed, it weights about 18 pounds, and I still have 1/2 of the room available in my pack for add-ins.

This is my no-kidding, only-the-necessities, serious, hard working BOB. If I don't use one of the items every single day, it gets removed. This bag, its contents and my skills and knowledge will get me through any situation in which I have to leave the security of my BIL -- whether that is due to an earthquake, fire, severe weather, social collapse, war, or an alien/zombie attack -- at which point I will need to resort to my caches of supplies that I have placed in the area of my BOL.

I think I've finally reached the point where I am happy with my BOB (!) There isn't anything that I want to adjust or modify. I do, however, plan on continuing to "test" this set-up throughout the year, if for nothing else than to become more experienced with the items, and perhaps to ensure the items are not redudant or lacking.

This set-up has achieved the goals I had set for my BOB: it has proven successful, it is simple, and it allows me to travel from Point A to Point B as quickly as possible without compromising any of the primary human needs.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: grisrob on September 04, 2011, 09:06:51 AM
Road Flare the old kind  Good for fast fire start, also good for crowd control, keep people away from you that you don't want to come near you. Nobody want to run into that. One in each hand is good. good for signaling.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Shadow Survivor on September 12, 2011, 10:39:45 PM
Every kit I have and have made for others has a gallon size zip lock baggy on top labeled INK for Instant Needs Kit. I conceived these after watching footage of 9/11 several years ago - you know the images of the people running away in all of the ash and dust. The INK contains: Dust Mask, Dust/Chemical Goggles, Tissues, Water, Energy Bar, Ear Plugs, gloves, and a few Alcohol Wipes with Band Aids - just the Instant Needs that will get you out of the crap that is falling down around you in an earthquake, fire, etc. These cost very little to put together and are probably the most practical addition you can make to any of your kits.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: TANK on September 13, 2011, 07:52:29 AM
one thing I've found that works great, binder twine the kind farmers use for baling hay and straw, alot less expensive than 550 cord, although I do carry 550 cord as well, the binder twine is very sturdy I bought two big spools of binder twine and still have alot of it left after several years.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cartpusher on September 19, 2011, 06:44:33 PM
Used an extra medical pouch that had some internal pockets and filled it with two 20 round AR mags, four 10 round clips of 7.62, and 10 rounds for the 12 gauge.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: MToons on September 29, 2011, 06:24:17 AM
i like everyones kits and i have really seen a lot of ideas that would be really useful. but i want to cover the basics in my bug out bag

1. water purification
2. folding knife (part of my EDC) and bowie knife
3. firestarter and matches with vaseline soaked cotton balls
4. calories calories calories (trail mixes, protein bars, etc)
5. sig sauer with plenty of additional rounds

am i missing any of the basics?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Fishin Magician on September 29, 2011, 06:52:09 AM
i like everyones kits and i have really seen a lot of ideas that would be really useful. but i want to cover the basics in my bug out bag

1. water purification
2. folding knife (part of my EDC) and bowie knife
3. firestarter and matches with vaseline soaked cotton balls
4. calories calories calories (trail mixes, protein bars, etc)
5. sig sauer with plenty of additional rounds

am i missing any of the basics?


Here's the survival priorities in order of importance...it's good to include items from each category, so your bases are covered.

1.)Protect/Defend yourself (safety/security/self defense/situational awareness)
2.)Treat Injury or Illness (first aid, also includes hygeine for long-term health/illness prevention)
3.)Element Protection (includes seasonally-specific clothing and shelter)
4.)Firemaking
5.)Find, Treat and Carry Water
6.)Signalling/Communication
7.)Navigation
8.)Food
9.)Repair/Construct Items (tools/"force multipliers")


Obviously, proper training is the most important thing. "Stuff" won't do you a bit of good if you don't know how to use it properly.



So, here's your list in order of priority, so you can see what you lack...Just fill in the blanks.

1.)sig sauer with plenty of additional rounds
2.)
3.)
4.)firestarter and matches with vaseline soaked cotton balls
5.)water purification
6.)
7.)
8.)calories calories calories (trail mixes, protein bars, etc)
9.)folding knife (part of my EDC) and bowie knife

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Warlan on October 01, 2011, 08:19:29 AM
DISASTER LIST FOR VEHICLE

RECOVERY KIT( optional)/ONE
FLAT TIRE KIT /ONE
TIE DOWN KIT(optional)/ONE
SMALL TOOL KIT/ONE


FIRST AID KIT/ONE
(put in 1gal zip lock,then in small Cary bag)
(2 gauze rolls(1 1inch,1 3inch),1medi wrap,EMT shears,tweezers,one pack splint outs,4 pair of none latex glove
(in small zip lock bag,1 burn aid pack,25 triple antibiotic packets,4 Tylenol pills, 25 elastic strip,
10 knuckle,10 large patch,2 triangular bandage,2 emergency compress,4 eye patches,2lateral
shield,gauze pads(2 4x4,2 3x3,2 2x2)5 antiseptic wipes,2 emergency blankets,

DRIVER SIDE GO BAG
PASSENGER GO BAG/ONE

ALL CON TENSE FOR GO BAGS
PUT IN ZIPLOC BAGS,USE SMALL BAG PACK/OR WAIST BAG FOR ITEMS/ONE
(prescriptions,headlamp(extra batteries),rain
gear(or)poncho,socks,lighter,small knife,Benni,small first aid kit,Com's optional,
electrical tape,550 cord,pen paper,deck of cards,lights sticks(4),gloves,
two i gal zip lock back(extra),glasses case,list of contact phone numbers,
(out of state,red cross,Fema,cert,me(get laminated)ALL Contents ABOVE
PUT IN ZIPLOC BAGS,USE SMALL BAG PACK/OR WAIST BAG FOR ITEMS/

EVAC FOOD KIT/WATER/ONE
(use small waist bag to hold items)
(snack food,two disaster food bars,two bottles of water(16to24oz size)/ONE

ANIMAL KIT (IF HAVE ONE)

TOOLS

4 IN ONE TOOL RESCUE TOOL/ONE
DIVE KNIFE/ONE
GERBER MULTI TOOL/ONE
ET TOOL(SHOVEL)/ONE
GLASS BREAKER TOOL/TWO
HAMMER/ROCK PICK/ONE
ROAD MARKERS/FOUR

SIGNAL KIT

HIGH VIZ VEST(paper,pen,lighter, in a small Ziploc bag)/one
HIGH VIZ SIGNAL PANEL(vs-17)one( or i am working one my own)
SMALL FLASH LIGHT/LAZIER


BAIL OUT BAG/GO BAG
FIRST AID KIT/ONE

(Put in 1gal zip lock, then in small carry bag), 2 gauze rolls (1 1inch, 1 3inch), 1 medi wrap, EMT shears, tweezers, one pack splint outs, 4 pair of none latex glove (In small zip lock bag, 1 burn aid pack, 25 triple antibiotic packets, 4 Tylenol pills, 25 elastic strips, 10 knuckle, 10 large patch, 2 triangular bandage, 2 emergency compress, 4 eye patches, 2 lateral Shield, gauze pads (2 4x4, 2 3x3, 2 2x2) 5 antiseptic wipes, 2 emergency blankets, Medications/?
EVAC FOOD /WATER/
 (Snack food, two disaster food bars, two bottles of water (16to24oz size)
PPE KIT
 Pairs of none latex gloves/TWO
 N95 fold mask, /TWO
 Hand sanitizer/ ONE
 T p(folded roll)one
EVAC TOOLS
4 IN ONE TOOL RESCUE TOOL/ONE
BECKER KNIFE BK-2 OR SOG SEAL PUP /ONE
GERBER OR SOG MULTI TOOL/ONE
E TOOL (FOLDING SHOVEL)/ONE
GERBER PACK AX/ONE
18INCH US MIL MACHETE WITH HAND GUARD/ONE
FIRE STARTING KIT
STRIKE FORCE/ONE
BIC LIGHTER/ONE
COTTON BALLS DIPPED IN Vaseline (ZIPLOC)/TEN
WATER
MSR WATER FILTER/ONE
ZIP LOCKS/FOUR
MSR BLADDER 40OZ/ONE
COMS
I COM 4FS(IN ZIP LOCKS)/TWO
CHARGER/ONE
BATTER PACK/ONE
SIGNAL
VS-17 PANEL/ONE
WHISTLE/TWO
FLASH LIGHT/ONE
HEAD LAMP/ONE
SIGNAL MIRROR/ONE
CT (COUNTER TERRORISM
KEY TWO SAFE/?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RPZ on October 07, 2011, 04:40:20 PM
i like everyones kits and i have really seen a lot of ideas that would be really useful. but i want to cover the basics in my bug out bag

1. water purification
2. folding knife (part of my EDC) and bowie knife
3. firestarter and matches with vaseline soaked cotton balls
4. calories calories calories (trail mixes, protein bars, etc)
5. sig sauer with plenty of additional rounds

am i missing any of the basics?
1) Water
2) Food
3) Shelter
4) Security

Not necessarily in that order as one or more may be on hand in abundance depending on where and your circumstances. Only one I see you did not mention is shelter. If you are going to "make one" that is ok; otherwise you need some kind of bivi, tent or other portable shelter.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Bradbn4 on October 10, 2011, 04:31:29 PM
1) Water
2) Food
3) Shelter
4) Security

Not necessarily in that order as one or more may be on hand in abundance depending on where and your circumstances. Only one I see you did not mention is shelter. If you are going to "make one" that is ok; otherwise you need some kind of bivi, tent or other portable shelter.

5) Sanitation - missing some TP
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Fishin Magician on October 11, 2011, 09:31:29 AM
5) Sanitation - missing some TP

You're both missing First Aid, as well. See my post above.


The survival priorities are based on something known as the "Rule of Threes", which is a progressive "check list" of immediate life threats. It states:

A person can live approximately...

3 seconds without safety/security
3 minutes without air or first aid
3 hours without adequate environmental protection
3 days without proper hydration
3 weeks without proper nourishment

So...

Three seconds without safety/security: Security is top priority since its neglect can kill you the fastest. Even combat medics and emergency medical personel know this...they ensure the scene is safe before proceeding with medical care.

Three minutes without air and first aid: Obviously, a person can only survive roughly three minutes without air. What may not be immediately obvious is that a person can bleed to death or go into shock and die in about that same time, too. That's why air and first aid get the second-most top priority. Hygeine/sanitation is really a more long-term need rather than immediate need, but it is important for its role in first aid prevention of problems. Better to stop problems before they start, rather than having to deal with them when they come up...it's a prevention versus reaction approach.

Three hours without adequate environmental protection: This is the third-most important priority. Cold weather protection is what most folks think of, but hot weather protection is just as important. The key here is to use skills and equipment to keep the body temperature as close to the "normal" 98.6F degrees as possible. Inability to do this triggers problems that relate directly back to the first aid category (hot and cold weather injuries and illnesses). The catergory includes proper clothing and shelter choices and firemaking skills and supplies.

Three days without proper hydration: Staying properly hydrated is important to keep a person from lapsing back into the prior survival priorities. Water loss can be slowed or prevented by choosing the proper shelter site, and can prevent first aid emergencies. Skills for finding and treating water are just as important as gear needed to treat and carry water.

Three weeks without proper noursihment: This is technically a little more of a long-term need, than an immediate life threat. Most survival situations last less than 72 hours, so signalling or navigation skills and gear would be more important than food...unless the individual has diet-related medical issues...in that case, food is really more in-line with first aid in order of priority.


So here's the "checklist" again, that's a good rule to follow when packing a BOB/72 hour bag/GHB/etc...

1.)Protect/Defend yourself (safety/security/self defense/situational awareness)
2.)Treat Injury or Illness (first aid, also includes hygeine for long-term health/illness prevention)
3.)Element Protection (includes seasonally-specific clothing and shelter)
4.)Firemaking
5.)Find, Treat and Carry Water
6.)Signalling/Communication
7.)Navigation
8.)Food
9.)Repair/Construct Items (tools/"force multipliers")

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RPZ on October 11, 2011, 10:19:37 AM
Quote
Three seconds without safety/security: Security is top priority since its neglect can kill you the fastest. Even combat medics and emergency medical personel know this...they ensure the scene is safe before proceeding with medical care.
This, like sanitation is a practice and a matter of mindset, rather than something you pack in a survival kit.

Although some kind of cleaning and sterilizing agents should be part of a first aid kit (99.99% isopropyl alcohol, some hydrogen peroxide and perhaps some iodine soap) there is a practical limit to how far a few small bottles or packets of pre-moistened wipes will go if applied to general use. And I consider a first aid kit as a general piece of field gear that is carried on any outdoor foray in a cargo or coat pocket as opposed to something that sits in a bag in the closet waiting for a rainy day.

Under miscellaneous items I would recommend a dozen of three pairs of nitrile gloves and a pack of dollar store clear disposables (the type that come 100 to a bag). These will not weigh much and will go a long way to keeping your hands clean where water is scarce.

For a serious bug out on foot it is a good idea to be psychologically equipped to use other things in lieu of factory toilet paper as whatever you can carry in a pack or bag is not going to last very long at all.

Many people have survived for very long periods in the most appalling conditions by using their brains and being meticulously careful about food and water preparation and handling.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Fishin Magician on October 11, 2011, 10:46:18 AM
Quote
Three seconds without safety/security: Security is top priority since its neglect can kill you the fastest. Even combat medics and emergency medical personel know this...they ensure the scene is safe before proceeding with medical care.
This, like sanitation is a practice and a matter of mindset, rather than something you pack in a survival kit.

I agree, to a point. Skills will always be more important than gear...but gear is available for each category. Pepper spray, expandible batons, firearms, etc. are just examples of the tools used for the "safety/security category". It's implied that you have the skills and proper training in their use. The same thing goes with first aid. First aid supplies are practically useless without proper training.


The good thing is, no matter a person's skill level, there are items they can carry to cover them for each survival priority category. As skill level changes/improves, gear choices will more than likely change, as well.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RPZ on October 12, 2011, 12:31:46 PM
Again, firearms etc are not the kind of things you pack away in a bag for a rainy day. Not that I disagree with your points but the poster was asking about items and gear for the bag rather than skills and training.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cranston on October 30, 2011, 09:05:12 PM
Like most folks, my bag is a work in progress, depending on the time of year, my level of fitness, and what I've learned through field testing.  My goal is to have a bag I can hump for five to seven miles, arrive in good shape, and do it again the next day, and a third day.  For me, a 52 year old police sergeant in reasonably good shape, but living with dents and dings from a misspent youth in and out of uniform that amounts to 35 pounds or less.

If I can stay dry, fed, warm and injury free, plus be able to brew a decent cup of coffee, I can weather most hardship- so the things that allow me to do that and add as little as possible to my carry weight are what makes the cut. This week I'm weighing the nutritional benefits of MRE's with the amount of space they take up.  I'm also taking to care to make my daily off-duty wardrobe something where I don't need a total costume change to begin my "First day of the collapse" hike.  Good footwear (Merrill high tops in summer, Oakley combat boots in winter- a gift my son in law gave me on his return from Afghanistan, decent socks and clothing) leave room in my pack for dry smartwool socks and undies, and items for my other needs.

Two knives, one small and sharp (Mora blade) and one big and hefty (recon tanto), accompany the kershaw whirlwind that's always in my pocket.

I've also started thinking modular.  My EDC mini maxpedition cargo pocket pouch containing my blow out kit, extra 123 batteries, G2 light, space blanket and leatherman....

attaches to my shoulder bag, Maxpedition fatboy) containing extra magazines, meds, cash, and solar charger for my cell phone, energy bar and med kit. That goes on before I put on my....

three day bag- a no-name brand with a big fanny back that zips onto a ruck sack, containing food, water, army poncho, extra wound kit. a small .22 semi-auto with extra mags, pocket new testament, and some comfort items, including a airline sized bottle of bulliet kentucky bourbon for medicinal purposes of course.  I've recently added a swiss army volcano stove, which I can fill with small items, so it doesn't really add to weight or bulk.  Total weight (including some items I didn't list, a hair under 35#.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cranston on November 01, 2011, 07:20:46 AM
Again, firearms etc are not the kind of things you pack away in a bag for a rainy day. Not that I disagree with your points but the poster was asking about items and gear for the bag rather than skills and training.

A Firearm is exactly the thing I put in my bag for a rainy day.  A small .22, accurate, light, and legal is a good compromise for taking survival game and defense where a rifle is too much and a knife is too little.  Total weight with extra mags is just over a pound.  In my case it suppliments the CCW I always carry anyway..

Your mileage may vary.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: spooky-1 on November 10, 2011, 08:38:44 AM
I just added these tools to my BOB in my truck. I was talking to some demo guys in the USAF and they said having good tools to "break in, break out" (BIBO) are useful. the tools they use are firefighter grade and VERY expensive (halligans, axes, torches, etc) since I cannot afford these, I asked the guys what the Poor mans version would be, after a few discussions I came up with my own BIBO gear. I even stripped and painted them to make them look tacti-cool.
I imagine needing these tools as a very last resort, I need to be in desperate situations to use this kit.

(http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6098/6331421469_a8c0426990_b.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Medicineball on November 10, 2011, 08:26:38 PM
Dude, if I pulled you over and you had these things I your car, you'd have some 'splainin to do. :)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smith on November 11, 2011, 03:10:28 PM
Dude, if I pulled you over and you had these things I your car, you'd have some 'splainin to do. :)

Keep your government off of my toolbox!

Seriously though, what I think MB is getting at is that carting around what can be considered burglary tools can land you in hot water depending on the local laws. Mostly possession only comes into play if there is intent to commit a crime, and so its a charge tacked on to another charge such as tresspassing.

Imagine this scenario.

Its late at night and you're coming home from a job (a legit job  ;) ) . You notice that theres another car following you pretty close. This is odd because there are no other cars on the road this late and you are in a somewhat unfamiliar rural area. You get an uncomfortable feeling about it so you decide to pull off on one of the nearby dirt roads and let him pass. You turn onto the next gravel road that you see and the car turns right behind you lighting up his Sheriffs Dept strobes.

To him, you are an unfamilar car in his area at an odd hour of the night. Shining his light in your truck he sees a bunch of blackend burglary tools, and heck, he just doesn't like your "Don't Tread On Me Pigglet!" bumper sticker. Turns out your gravel road is actually some farmer's driveway and you are officially tresspassing. Not that you would necessarily be hauled in for these things, but it puts you in a precarious situation if say, he doesn't like you for some reason, he's a Grade A pr*ck, or you have any outstanding priors when he sends in your plates.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Medicineball on November 11, 2011, 06:10:38 PM
Smith is spot-on. I think those tools in your car are far more of a liability than an asset, since you're far more likely to be in a spot like Smith describes than a SHTF situation.

Imagine trying to explain those tools to a cop who is already suspicious of you.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RPZ on November 11, 2011, 07:17:52 PM
Quote
Dude, if I pulled you over and you had these things I your car, you'd have some 'splainin to do
Personally, I would not be explaining anything. If there is probable cause that so-and-so is a suspect in a specific crime that is one thing, but mere possession of any kind of tool is not grounds for a fishing expedition.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: flagtag on November 11, 2011, 07:31:45 PM
Just make sure they are in a place where they can't be seen.  "Plain sight" won't apply.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ncjeeper on November 11, 2011, 07:56:39 PM
Personally, I would not be explaining anything. If there is probable cause that so-and-so is a suspect in a specific crime that is one thing, but mere possession of any kind of tool is not grounds for a fishing expedition.
True. But if he gets stopped and arrested for whatever reason then the vehicle will be inventoried and towed. The tools will be found in the inventory search. So you could be skating on a fine line. Each states laws are different.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RPZ on November 11, 2011, 10:50:28 PM
Certainly some items might be illegal in some states - know the law. For example, an old law in Texas makes the possession of fence cutters illegal and as far as I know is still on the books. So if you have wire cutters or small bolt cutters keep them at home until the dirt actually starts flying.

As a general rule keep hardware in the trunk; heat will not affect them and they can stay in there indefinately. The superficial search incident to a traffic stop does not extend to the trunk; that was a U.S. Supreme Court ruling. Getting arrested for something else can not be foreseen, but is not something that anyone should allow to rule their life in my opinion.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: metatron on November 13, 2011, 05:41:47 AM
After having to use my BOB/GHB to get home (got a friend to drop my off about 60miles away, with no cash or cards) I ended up changing my BOB.

Yaesu VX6 with dry cell case
Solar charger
8 Sanyo Eneloop batteries (AA)
Single AA powered LED touch
Waterproof matches
Firesteel
Disposable lighter
Cottonwool 
Survival sack
Wiresaw
toothbrush and toothpaste
Ducttape 
Lock picks
Leatherman wave
Gerber eab
Stanley Blades
Brass wire
Small finishing kit
Small hot chocolate and coffee packets 
550 Paracord
Water purification tablets
Piece cloth
Piece of rubber inner-tube
All kept in a metal tin.

First aid kit
Water bottle
Large poncho
waterproof trousers
Clean wipes

I'm in the UK so, we don't really have a wilderness as such its all villages and urban.


Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: spooky-1 on November 13, 2011, 01:49:00 PM
I actually sewed together a zippered case for them and on top of that they reside in a locked truck box, screwed to my bed. Unless you have the key, find the specfic zippered pouch (among all the other things in my bug out gear), and then open it, you'd never know these tools are there. I figure if a LEO had enuf on me to do all that I deserve whatever is coming to me!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: steeltownknight on November 14, 2011, 10:23:39 AM
I'll post my whole BOB list soon.
 I will always however :
1. have water
2. and a way to filter/boil/clean/store  any water I find.
3. a portable shelter
4. weapon
5.Food
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on November 14, 2011, 02:28:19 PM
True. But if he gets stopped and arrested for whatever reason then the vehicle will be inventoried and towed. The tools will be found in the inventory search. So you could be skating on a fine line. Each states laws are different.
Context is everything for tools like this.  If a vehicle is searched and there's a bag containing a first aid kit, highway safety vest, hard hat, white/tan heavy leather gloves, eye protection, EMS credentials, and 'vehicle extrication tools,' no cop is even going to even give the tools a second look.  On the other hand, if it's in a bag with a black ski mask, thin black leather gloves, hooded sweatshirt, large commando knife, and is in the possession of a rather unsavory looking character, good luck with that.

I'm telling you, there's very little few things in the world that are as useful in an emergency as a $9.99 highway safety vest.  A vest, clipboard, hardhat and radio will give you access to just about anywhere on earth. ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: cranston on November 17, 2011, 08:02:53 AM
Added compression shorts and a small bottle of baby powder.  Taking longer day hikes with the pack has revealed a tendancy to chafe, then get raw, then .....well, you can imagine.  By the second 7 mile day I'd be walking like Gabby Hayes.  'Nuff said.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: surfivor on February 17, 2012, 01:27:54 AM

 I have alot of stuff in my car as it is, but I always think of the 5 C's that I think Dave Canterbury mentioned:

combustion devices, cutting tool, covering, container to boil water, cordage.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: nelson96 on February 18, 2012, 02:20:48 PM
This may sound simple and unimportant (which is why it often gets overlooked), but it takes up so little room and you'll be glad you have it.  I once went a week of hunting without and will never make that mistake again. . . .

I keep a good chapstick . . .  Chapped lips are so uncomfortable and only get worse if you have nothing to treat it with.   

Ointment/Gel & fingertip bandaids . . . .  When in a survival condition, even if you have gloves, you undoubtedly will get a small cut on your finger.  Even if you don't cut it, dry weather can cause your skin to split on its own.  With as many nerves as there are on the ends of your fingers this really affects you both physically and mentally.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Cedar on February 18, 2012, 02:24:20 PM
I keep a good chapstick . . .  Chapped lips are so uncomfortable and only get worse if you have nothing to treat it with.

I actually don't have any on my BOB, but in my SAR pack I used to keep a tube with SPF-something in it, as my search dog would constantly get the top part of her nose burn :-\

Cedar
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: digdug18 on February 29, 2012, 11:31:25 PM
Added compression shorts and a small bottle of baby powder.  Taking longer day hikes with the pack has revealed a tendancy to chafe, then get raw, then .....well, you can imagine.  By the second 7 mile day I'd be walking like Gabby Hayes.  'Nuff said.

Yeah, you really didn't need to inform us that you get chafed.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: nelson96 on March 01, 2012, 07:47:35 AM
Yeah, you really didn't need to inform us that you get chafed.

Nothing worse than "baboon butt", but yeah, we didn't need to know about it.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: YoungGunsPrepper on March 06, 2012, 12:55:19 AM
This is the list of gear I keep in my BOB that stays with me (well in my vehicle) at all times.

water proof match box with matches and striker
bottle of water purification tablets
zippo lighter
can of extra zippo fluid
2 extra zippo wicks
2 packs extra zippo flints
5 emergency waterpacks
10 small ziplock bags
bag of multi vitamins
50 ft of 550 paracord
100 rounds of .45 cal
1 tube of toothpaste
toothbrush
hand warmers
adjustable strap (in case I have to jimmy rig my bag)
emergency blanket
magnesium fire starter
P38 (Old GI style can opener)
utility knife
fighting knife
fishing/gutting knife
pair of boots
extra set of clothes (pants, long and short sleeve shirt)
shemag face wrap (forgive my bad spelling on that)
2 pairs boxes
2 pairs socks
4 MRE's (I field strip them to make them more easily packable)
lensatic compass
maps of local area and of bug out location with 3 planned routes
spotting scope
sterno cooking fuel
utensil set
pair of gloves
comb (works great to remove cactus from clothes or hands)
bar of soap
blood type tag
roll of 100 mph tape
swiss army knife
sharpening stone
surefire flashlight
30 extra batteries for flashlight (my light takes 2 batteries so I have enought to change them 15 times)
first aid kit
canteen ( change the water every week)
Para ordnance 1911 .45
5 10 round magazines
gerber multitool
weapon cleaning kit
box of 50 .308 ammo
tear down .308 single shot rifle with scope
cable saw
sewing kit
dental floss
set of cold weather gear
gator neck (military issued fleece to cover from your neck to nose)
belt
bottle of buproprian
bottle of naproxen
2 bottles anti biotics
fleece cap
paddle holster for 1911
mag holster
1 oz of silver in .2 oz bars
2 dollars face value worth of pre 1965 silver coins
$100 cash

I get all of this into a relatively small bag and as I learn more and more I swap some stuff out and look for ways to lighten my pack a bit.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mysphet on April 08, 2012, 12:58:04 AM
Dog muzzles.

We have a couple small dogs. In certain instances they would make great alarms, but when you need them to be quiet, having the muzzles is essential. Dogs can be trained that muzzle time is quiet time.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Jake on April 08, 2012, 12:43:09 PM
Just added a Henry AR7 survival rifle.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: flagtag on April 08, 2012, 01:18:34 PM
I just brought down the bags that were in storage upstairs since I totaled my (old) truck in January. I went through them and decided I could get rid of a lot of the stuff in them. But then, I decided to just seperate them (re-assemble) and designate them in order of most - least needed, but useful stuff. (Just in case).

Once that is done, I will put them in the tool box in the back of my "new-to-me" truck. There are three bags plus a first aid bag, a fishing bag and another with fishing gear, and a duffle bag with a blanket and hat, gloves, and scarf.  I also have a table top grill. (Now, if I could only remember where I put the small bag of charcoal.  :o) It also contains my saw and pry bar.

I also need to bring down the stuff in the locker type tub which has a tent, sleeping bag and pillow.
Depending on weather, I will have a bag with a change of clothes, shoes or boots, extra coat, etc.

Now, I just have to clean out the toolbox. I bought it used for $50.oo.  ;D It is much deeper than the newer ones.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Orionblade on April 08, 2012, 02:00:43 PM
I like keeping a partial roll of fine-gauge electronics or silver solder wrapped around the ink cartridge of a standard bic pen. Just pop the end off, pull out the ink cartridge, wrap your solder tightly around it, and re-assemble the pen. Also works pretty well for small gauge wire, and even a nearly useful amount of electrical tape, though the exterior of the pen might be a better spot for longer pieces. as long as it wraps tightly enough to allow reassembly of the pen, you can put pretty much anything youw ant inside one. Working up a little sewing kit at the moment. I might post some pics later.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Dollarbill on April 22, 2012, 08:55:18 AM
Here is the GHB I made for my girlfriend. I have a similar one.

Black canvas bag
Telescoping Tire Iron
Reflective Triangle
Folding shovel/entrenching tool
Hoodie/sweater
Pair of socks
Half a roll toilet paper
First Aid Kit
2 Energy Bar
NOAA Radio (with SAME)
Notepad and Sharpie
Hand and foot warmers
12 hr chem-light
Mag flashlight (2
Magnetic Mount LED flashlight (with red strobe light)
Bandanna
Work gloves
Tools (adjustable wrench, plyers, screwdriver, hammer, tape)
Recovery strap with 2 D-rings
Rope (parcord)
Folding knife
Pill FOB - $15 (holds $40 cash)
Whistle/compass/thermometer
BIC Lighter

All of the items have been waterproofed or put in zip-lock bags

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-Y6mIF-kf1tU/T5QZhh7BVZI/AAAAAAAAByI/YIV9T6VO2VQ/s512/IMG_20110916_132702.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RPZ on May 08, 2012, 05:18:44 PM
Like most folks, my bag is a work in progress, depending on the time of year, my level of fitness, and what I've learned through field testing.  My goal is to have a bag I can hump for five to seven miles, arrive in good shape, and do it again the next day, and a third day.  For me, a 52 year old police sergeant in reasonably good shape, but living with dents and dings from a misspent youth in and out of uniform that amounts to 35 pounds or less.

If I can stay dry, fed, warm and injury free, plus be able to brew a decent cup of coffee, I can weather most hardship- so the things that allow me to do that and add as little as possible to my carry weight are what makes the cut. This week I'm weighing the nutritional benefits of MRE's with the amount of space they take up.  I'm also taking to care to make my daily off-duty wardrobe something where I don't need a total costume change to begin my "First day of the collapse" hike.  Good footwear (Merrill high tops in summer, Oakley combat boots in winter- a gift my son in law gave me on his return from Afghanistan, decent socks and clothing) leave room in my pack for dry smartwool socks and undies, and items for my other needs.

Two knives, one small and sharp (Mora blade) and one big and hefty (recon tanto), accompany the kershaw whirlwind that's always in my pocket.

I've also started thinking modular.  My EDC mini maxpedition cargo pocket pouch containing my blow out kit, extra 123 batteries, G2 light, space blanket and leatherman....

attaches to my shoulder bag, Maxpedition fatboy) containing extra magazines, meds, cash, and solar charger for my cell phone, energy bar and med kit. That goes on before I put on my....

three day bag- a no-name brand with a big fanny back that zips onto a ruck sack, containing food, water, army poncho, extra wound kit. a small .22 semi-auto with extra mags, pocket new testament, and some comfort items, including a airline sized bottle of bulliet kentucky bourbon for medicinal purposes of course.  I've recently added a swiss army volcano stove, which I can fill with small items, so it doesn't really add to weight or bulk.  Total weight (including some items I didn't list, a hair under 35#.
Cranston 's runs right alongside much of my thinking here.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ChadK on June 15, 2012, 11:22:30 AM
I used to carry some under armour knock off brand "long underwear", thinking they'd keep me warm as an added layer if needed.  However after a recent very cold night on a camping trip I was talking with a sales rep at an outdoor store, and he said that stuff is made for activity (moisture/heat wicking) not warmth while sleeping. 
Made sense but just goes to show we need to use our gear to make sure it is operational for our intended purpose before packing it somewhere for an emergency  :)

I've switched to under layers intended for warmth now in case I need it overnight.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: SA Friday on June 16, 2012, 02:09:58 PM
I skipped a few pages of posts, but one thing I've carried for years and two different war zones is a couple of heavy duty sewing needles and a regular sized spool of 10 lb green kevlar fishing line.  It's exponentially stronger than thread and just a tad thicker.  I've used it to sew just about anything back together and make pouches, and belt pouches.  You blow a seam on your bag or tent, it's going to work to fix.  Cheap thread will fail.  Even can lash sticks together for an A frame etc with it.

It works for fishing too I'm told.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on July 03, 2012, 09:33:54 PM
I just went through my BOB today to trim a few pounds. I took out some "meal replacement bars" (which still gives me 2400 calories a day for six days) and a big Buck sheath knife (I have a Buck folder, a Myerco machete/axe and a leatherman in there). I did put something in, however. I had an older, black Casio DW 5200 G-Shock that I hadn't worn in years (replaced it with a Casio solar model). We are so dependant on time in our "civilized" lives that I thought a watch could give a little continuity to the situation if SHTF. It doesn't weigh much, is indestructable and after years in a drawer it was off by 30 seconds. I put in a new lithium battery and stapped it to my bag. From a practical standpoint, I could time water purification with it. You can use a digital watch to find direction (yes you can!). It might be comforting to know the date and time, or how many hours one has walked. God help us if things get so bad we forget what day of the week it is!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Bluegrass2003 on July 07, 2012, 09:06:33 AM
This will be my last post in response to you on my BOB. We have a difference of opinion. I will take the suggestion to lighten my gear and add more food because I agree with that. But leaving out what I consider vital gear to depend on any sticks and rocks I may or may not find I think is foolish.

Well put.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on July 07, 2012, 10:26:08 AM
I just did a quick experiment and thought I would pass this along. The hand sanitizer gel that's in my bag is highly flammable! This is probably obvious to everyone, but sometimes I'm a little slow on the uptake. I squeezed a dime size puddle out and lit it with a BIC. It, being mostly alchohol, burns with a nearly invisible blue flame for a nice long time. Voila, another dual-use item; kills germs/starts fires. If you put the gel on your forehead or a pulse point and fan it you get an immediate and intense cooling effect. It might help in heatstroke if there is no water available. I would think a gel saturated bandana would also work as a cooling device. I'm unsure about long term contact with skin and posible irritation. Best to check that out. BTW, if you mold the contents of a chapstick around a string, it makes a pretty decent candle/firestarter.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: rustyknife on July 08, 2012, 10:22:20 PM
I skipped a few pages of posts, but one thing I've carried for years and two different war zones is a couple of heavy duty sewing needles and a regular sized spool of 10 lb green kevlar fishing line.  It's exponentially stronger than thread and just a tad thicker.  I've used it to sew just about anything back together and make pouches, and belt pouches.  You blow a seam on your bag or tent, it's going to work to fix.  Cheap thread will fail.  Even can lash sticks together for an A frame etc with it.

It works for fishing too I'm told.

My wife just told me about how she uses a spoon as a thimble when having to push a needle through some heavy material. She said it is a old quilting trick.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: JamesB on August 13, 2012, 02:28:18 AM
The importance of being prepared was made clear to me on Feb 22 2011 when my home city Christchurch was hit with a major earthquake. We were without power for 2 days in my suburb (power co's were incredibly quick to restore power, linesmen working all night) and it took 2 weeks for water to be restored.
I always have made a policy of having 2 weeks' supplies of food and water on my property. This made it easy for us, compared to those who had empty cupboards and were probably planning to do their shopping the next day!
Our house was relatively unharmed structurally. But I have a bug-out kit in the back of the garden, which is three 80 Litre weatherproof plastic boxes containing tent, tarp, stove, fuel, stove, food and clean water, clothes for all the family, sleeping bags and spare blankets.
In addition I built my kids a play hut, which also serves as a bug-out hide-out in event of adverse weather coinciding with emergency.
At the time of the earthquake I was at work 9km from home. I am a doctor at an after-hours clinic, so I was busy that day, and did not get home for another 12 hours. But I drive a 4WD, and always have enough for an unplanned night out stashed in the truck. And if necessary I can walk/jog home, but the roads were very passable after a few hours' chaos.
Cellphone system was overwhelmed with speech signal, but it was possible to text for an hour or two until the batteries of the cellular sites ran out. I was able to make contact with my wife and kids. After that VHF radio would have been useful.
It is also useful to never allow the gas in your truck to go below halfway just in case.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: carbon on August 13, 2012, 09:09:59 AM
Just wanted to mention that it may be useful to have some of the electronics in your bag wrapped for emp protection. I have my radios and lights protected (untested foil and plastic method) when in the bag. I have an instruction as well for my wife so we know which channels to use.

I also have a plastic door wedge I can use to prop a door open (or close). It would help when I load stuff to the bov if we bug out. It would also add hindrance to a door in a room we decide to shelter in place in since you can use it to hold the door close. yes it could be forced open, but it would need to be forced open with difficulty and I would not be caught off guard.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Eriko on August 13, 2012, 01:43:03 PM
Great post JamesB!
I've been overthinking how to have supplies or bug out kit outside of my house in a very small suburban lot. Your way of doing it would work for me.
Thanks for sharing & welcome aboard,
Eriko

The importance of being prepared was made clear to me on Feb 22 2011 when my home city Christchurch was hit with a major earthquake. We were without power for 2 days in my suburb (power co's were incredibly quick to restore power, linesmen working all night) and it took 2 weeks for water to be restored.
I always have made a policy of having 2 weeks' supplies of food and water on my property. This made it easy for us, compared to those who had empty cupboards and were probably planning to do their shopping the next day!
Our house was relatively unharmed structurally. But I have a bug-out kit in the back of the garden, which is three 80 Litre weatherproof plastic boxes containing tent, tarp, stove, fuel, stove, food and clean water, clothes for all the family, sleeping bags and spare blankets.
In addition I built my kids a play hut, which also serves as a bug-out hide-out in event of adverse weather coinciding with emergency.
At the time of the earthquake I was at work 9km from home. I am a doctor at an after-hours clinic, so I was busy that day, and did not get home for another 12 hours. But I drive a 4WD, and always have enough for an unplanned night out stashed in the truck. And if necessary I can walk/jog home, but the roads were very passable after a few hours' chaos.
Cellphone system was overwhelmed with speech signal, but it was possible to text for an hour or two until the batteries of the cellular sites ran out. I was able to make contact with my wife and kids. After that VHF radio would have been useful.
It is also useful to never allow the gas in your truck to go below halfway just in case.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Scooter123456789 on October 30, 2012, 08:19:40 PM
Ok, I have looked allot of these post, and I am trying to figure out what size of BOB are you guys carrying.. It seems the list is pretty long of things in your bags, I just don't see how you carry it all with out a small trailer or mule, to tote it all. Any pics of bags  or links of what bag you use, would be great...
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: SA Friday on November 03, 2012, 09:14:15 PM
Ok, I have looked allot of these post, and I am trying to figure out what size of BOB are you guys carrying.. It seems the list is pretty long of things in your bags, I just don't see how you carry it all with out a small trailer or mule, to tote it all. Any pics of bags  or links of what bag you use, would be great...
I'm using a Camelback Mule that I've used since my 04 Iraq tour.  I have a different set of needs from my bag that others may or may not have.  So, I carry some additional stuff.  Living in CO, I spend time in the mountains and I commute into downtown Denver four times a week for college classes.  I know if I have to use it for whatever reason to get home from downtown, it may very well take me a couple of days and the terrain would vary from city to rural.  In the mountains, I may very well have absolutely nothing but what I have taken with me. 

Most other bags I've seen are this size and this type of bag.  http://thekeytosurvival.com/storetitles/packs/medtransportpk_foliage.html  It's a nice size, but if you plan on carrying something to cover up with in an overnight situation, I would plan on having to strap a wool blanket, poncho liner, or sleeping bag to the outside of it.

I have my kids carry a basic bag of stuff when we are camping in the mountains.  If they leave camp, they take the bag.  It's an old green canvas gas mask bag that opens on the top and carries like a messenger bag.  It's super minimal, but has the basic essentials they've been trained to use.  It's only a couple of pounds of stuff. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Vastnir on November 14, 2012, 01:09:14 PM
Lots of great info in the thread. I would suggest making some copies of important documents and keeping them in the BOB. Why not store your passport there? Copies of birth and marrage certificates (spend the money to get officail copies if you can).
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Wildthang on November 20, 2012, 06:28:46 AM
Just remember, the more you know, the less you have to carry! I would suggest that whoever builds a new BOB, to go on a 10 mile hike through some turf that really tells you how easy it is to carry all of that weight. I have seen some BOBs that would be near impossible to carry during a sustained hike through mountain or very hilly country.
All you really need are the basics and everything else is just weight! After a long hike, and wilderness camping trip, you will figure out that normally half of the stuff most people pack is not needed. Having the skills are more important than trying to pack a survival store along with you everywhere you go.
My backpack weighs around 25 pounds and has everything I really need and nothing more!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on November 20, 2012, 11:58:21 AM
Just remember, the more you know, the less you have to carry! I would suggest that whoever builds a new BOB, to go on a 10 mile hike through some turf that really tells you how easy it is to carry all of that weight. I have seen some BOBs that would be near impossible to carry during a sustained hike through mountain or very hilly country.
All you really need are the basics and everything else is just weight! After a long hike, and wilderness camping trip, you will figure out that normally half of the stuff most people pack is not needed. Having the skills are more important than trying to pack a survival store along with you everywhere you go.
My backpack weighs around 25 pounds and has everything I really need and nothing more!

Thank you, Wildthang, for your post.  Since this is a "Show and Tell"-type topic, would you care to show your BOB and what you keep in it?

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: nelson96 on November 20, 2012, 01:00:33 PM
Just remember, the more you know, the less you have to carry! I would suggest that whoever builds a new BOB, to go on a 10 mile hike through some turf that really tells you how easy it is to carry all of that weight. I have seen some BOBs that would be near impossible to carry during a sustained hike through mountain or very hilly country.
All you really need are the basics and everything else is just weight! After a long hike, and wilderness camping trip, you will figure out that normally half of the stuff most people pack is not needed. Having the skills are more important than trying to pack a survival store along with you everywhere you go.
My backpack weighs around 25 pounds and has everything I really need and nothing more!

So true, but I would rather have the ability to throw it out than wish I had it.  Many people simply don't know what they need and they pack their BOB based on their experience and knowledge, or simply what others recommend.  I agree that if you have the forethought to pack such a bag one should have the forethought to know how to survive with it, but betting most won't.  To another point, I think most pack a BOB not for the end of the world but for something like they got stranded (car broke down) and they need to walk the highway to help.

To help sell your point, it's a lot of fun to go out and use it and the reward of learning does a lot for your self worth.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Wildthang on November 21, 2012, 06:27:26 AM
So true, but I would rather have the ability to throw it out than wish I had it.  Many people simply don't know what they need and they pack their BOB based on their experience and knowledge, or simply what others recommend.  I agree that if you have the forethought to pack such a bag one should have the forethought to know how to survive with it, but betting most won't.  To another point, I think most pack a BOB not for the end of the world but for something like they got stranded (car broke down) and they need to walk the highway to help.

To help sell your point, it's a lot of fun to go out and use it and the reward of learning does a lot for your self worth.

Very true nelson, but who wants to throw good stuff away! Maybe I'm a bit old fashion, but there are places that you can get stranded in a car that will require hiking out for several miles, not too likely but it does happen. It just appears to me that a lot of folks make a game out of seeing how much cool stuff they can get in a backpack and do not consider the weight at all. I keep a plastic container in my truck with all of the stranded on the side of the road stuff in it, but still keep my backpack light.
I am 6'-3" and in pretty good shape, but packing a 60 pound backpack on an all day hike is not something I  dont want to do. That is for young soldiers and people that are top physical shape, and even then it wears on them.
I just think everybody needs to consider the weight, and try it out for a day or 2!
When I put together my first backpack, I took a 1 week hiking trip through some pretty rough country, and discovered that there was a lot of things I had in my pack that I would probably never use, and I also relized how the weight wore me down after a few hours of hiking. That was when I was in my 20's and I was in perfect physical condition.
I quickly learned that I needed more food, less weight, and pretty much just the basics. I cut my first aid supplys down to bandaids, gauze, medical tape, merthiolate, and a bottle of aspirin and Pepto Bismol tablets. To this day I have only used a couple of bandaids and maybe an aspirin or 2, so those huge first aid kits are just rediculous to me!
Carrying a hatchet and a folding shovel is a lot of weight, and you can do without either one. Those fancy little stoves are cool but I just build a fire and cook on that.
The only time I pack heavy is in really cold weather and that consists of extra clothes and a low temp rated sleeping bag. Extreme cold weather merits packing heavy and there is no way around that!
Any backpack is better than being stranded with nothing so it's all good, and it is great to see so many people trying to be prepared, but everybody owes it to themselves to really use the pack and elliminate unecessary weight, and learn the skills that will always get you through with less merchandise.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Medicineball on November 21, 2012, 07:16:14 AM
Amen, Wildthang!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Neilsan on November 29, 2012, 01:13:35 AM
Today I went out and made an insanely minimalist bug out bag. I got 3 days of food and 2 gallons of water for 20 bucks (I'm on a serious budget) and threw it along with a full pair of clothes in my old hiking backpack. I'm trying to do the best with what I've got, rather than going out and buying stuff, so I'm organizing things that I have lying around like a toothbrush, extra pair of glasses, leatherman, flashlight, lighter, rope, etc etc....
Simply put, I want to be somewhat comfortable for 3 days if I need to drive or hike somewhere. All the other fun stuff will come later, but for now, something is better than nothing. My big question for you all is am I totally overreacting with 2 gallons of water? I live in Southern California, in a place that everyone around me seems to continue to forget is just a well irrigated desert. Most of the water is pumped in over The Grape Vine, and I don't think that should be relied on if I have to bug out.
There are a few reservoirs, and I'm sure I could find water heaters or packaged water as I go, but I don't want to count on it, especially if my goal is to go away from the crowds. I have a water filter from when I went camping that I'm sure I could get up and running again fairly cheap. How much water would you recommend for a desert environment bug out bag? Am I shooting myself in the foot by carrying around all that extra weight instead of other gear? 
Thanks!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on November 29, 2012, 10:23:58 AM
Today I went out and made an insanely minimalist bug out bag. I got 3 days of food and 2 gallons of water for 20 bucks (I'm on a serious budget) and threw it along with a full pair of clothes in my old hiking backpack. I'm trying to do the best with what I've got, rather than going out and buying stuff, so I'm organizing things that I have lying around like a toothbrush, extra pair of glasses, leatherman, flashlight, lighter, rope, etc etc....
Simply put, I want to be somewhat comfortable for 3 days if I need to drive or hike somewhere. All the other fun stuff will come later, but for now, something is better than nothing. My big question for you all is am I totally overreacting with 2 gallons of water? I live in Southern California, in a place that everyone around me seems to continue to forget is just a well irrigated desert. Most of the water is pumped in over The Grape Vine, and I don't think that should be relied on if I have to bug out.
There are a few reservoirs, and I'm sure I could find water heaters or packaged water as I go, but I don't want to count on it, especially if my goal is to go away from the crowds. I have a water filter from when I went camping that I'm sure I could get up and running again fairly cheap. How much water would you recommend for a desert environment bug out bag? Am I shooting myself in the foot by carrying around all that extra weight instead of other gear? 
Thanks!
As a rule, you pay attention to the rule of threes:
A person can live without air for three minutes
Without shelter/protection from a harsh environment for three hours
Without water for three days
and without food for about three weeks.

There's obvious exceptions to all of those, like cold environments requiring more food to maintain body heat, etc., but it is the foundation of what your priorities should be.  In my opinion, two gallons in Southern California is a good place to start.  Ideally you want one gallon per person per day, but you also have to factor in time of year, outdoor temperatures, and level of activity.  If you have access to other sources along the way that you could quickly purify, you might be able to go lighter.  However, water is one of those essentials of life.  If you go without for even a couple of hours in 90F heat while trying to walk to safety you will find your body's performance dropping off precipitously.

It's always a trade off, which has been discussed countless times in this and other threads whether it is more important to have your pack as light as possible so you can move fast or as complete as possible so you are sure you have everything.  As you gain more experience you'll find some items redundant or that can be replaced with lighter, more effective gear.  In the meantime, make sure you have your bases covered, which is sounds like you do.

I have in my car no less than 5 liters, but I'm surrounded by streams and have both purification tablets and filters available.  For most of my hiking I now use an inline filter on my camelbak so I can simply dip in a stream and get back on the trail (the Sawyer SP121).  Fixing your filter would probably be a wise move, just in case the disaster spans weeks, not days before reliable water service can be restored.  If it's going to cost more than $50 to get it up and running, seriously consider replacing it with an SP121.  With a one million gallon guarantee, it's hard to beat for the money.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Neilsan on December 17, 2012, 12:42:42 AM
I have in my car no less than 5 liters, but I'm surrounded by streams and have both purification tablets and filters available.  For most of my hiking I now use an inline filter on my camelbak so I can simply dip in a stream and get back on the trail (the Sawyer SP121).  Fixing your filter would probably be a wise move, just in case the disaster spans weeks, not days before reliable water service can be restored.  If it's going to cost more than $50 to get it up and running, seriously consider replacing it with an SP121.  With a one million gallon guarantee, it's hard to beat for the money.

Thank you so much for the tips! I took it out for a hike the other day, and found a lot of holes, so now I'm going to plug em up. The first hole (literally) was in my cheapo $1 gallon plastic jugs. Those had to go. Also, after listening to a couple of shows and doing a bit of research and planning, it looks like canned soup and veggies are a poor plan for eating. MREs would be ideal, but boy are they expensive. I think an investment in a pocket rocket stove would be a good start, and allow to to give dried veggies and soup bases a try. Sound like I'm on the right track, or should I put money towards peanut butter, jelly and basics?

Most importantly, what do you use to hold your 3 gallons of water? Or, if you had to leave the streams behind, what would you do? I'm looking into HDPE barrels, but mostly for car storage of water and gasoline. Your (and everyones') thoughts?

Thanks!
Title: Bug Out Water
Post by: bcksknr on December 23, 2012, 09:48:33 PM
Winter presents some interesting challenges for storing water in a vehicle (or BOB kept in a vehicle). Along with the other considerations of gear to put in a pack, one has to think about the change in seasons, at least where I live. Freezing winter temps are to be expected here. Water containers left in a vehicle will freeze and possibly burst. So will many other liquids (liquid filled compass fluid, first aid liquids, chem lights, etc.). In the warm months I keep water in the thick, one gallon containers that medical re-hydration fluids come in. A couple of gallons are in my truck to fill canteens. In the winter, I can't do this. So far the 4 oz. emergency water packets seem to have enough expansion room to not burst when frozen. I suppose that a partially filled container may work as well. The problem is that you then have a block of ice to melt for water, requiring fuel or fire and time. Plus, there is the issue of a block of ice inside a plastic jug that can't go on a fire or stove. So far I just carry the containers in the winter and intend to find and filter water as possible. Hopefully, with a little advance warning, water could be gotten before "bugging out". Freezing temps throws a whole different set of considerations into the BOB thought process! 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on December 24, 2012, 08:18:17 PM
Thank you so much for the tips! I took it out for a hike the other day, and found a lot of holes, so now I'm going to plug em up. The first hole (literally) was in my cheapo $1 gallon plastic jugs. Those had to go. Also, after listening to a couple of shows and doing a bit of research and planning, it looks like canned soup and veggies are a poor plan for eating. MREs would be ideal, but boy are they expensive. I think an investment in a pocket rocket stove would be a good start, and allow to to give dried veggies and soup bases a try. Sound like I'm on the right track, or should I put money towards peanut butter, jelly and basics?

Most importantly, what do you use to hold your 3 gallons of water? Or, if you had to leave the streams behind, what would you do? I'm looking into HDPE barrels, but mostly for car storage of water and gasoline. Your (and everyones') thoughts?

Thanks!
Personally, I like everything about MREs except the entrees.  I like the crackers with the peanut butter spread, the jelly spread or the cheese spread.  I like the almond and lemon poppy seed bars.  I kinda like the ranger bars (they're actually good if you can drink enough water with them) and I love the potato strings and peanut packets.  I use them all on hikes and backpacking trips all the time because they are reasonably cost competitive with backpacking food.  For hot meals I do ramen, mashed potatoes, mountain house backpacking entrees, oatmeal, and macaroni and cheese with freeze-dried hamburger in it. 

That's all traveling food for me--it's light, easy and quick to prepare, and not prohibitively expensive.  When I hike most of my food is stuff I don't have to stop to eat; bars, fruit snacks, pretzels, and stuff like that.  Clif bars have a decent shelf life and are lightweight and calorie dense.  I also do things like rice crispie treats.

I recommend you stop looking at foods everyone else uses and start looking at foods you like, but meet the criteria of:  lightweight, easy to prepare, packaged for single servings, and good shelf life.  Those are the ideal foods to stock up on.

For water, I'm never more than a two hour hike from water.  I can carry 2-3 hours of water plus enough to prepare dinner in my 3L camelbak.  When I've done extended Grand Canyon hikes where water was much harder to find the MSR Dromedary Bag (http://www.campmor.com/msr-10-liter-deluxe-dromedary-bag.shtml?source=CI&ci_sku=87710&ci_gpa=pla&ci_kw={keyword}) fits the mission very well.  I've never needed to carry more than two gallons.  The lighter, cheaper route is the Platypus collapsible bottles (http://www.rei.com/product/820769/platypus-platy-bottle-70-fl-oz).  In a pinch they can be repaired with superglue and duct tape, but I have yet to have one spring a leak (with some care).

The dromedary also comes with the option of running a hydration system, filter system or solar shower off of it.  I've never tried any of the above, but it's nice to have options.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Nicodemus on December 28, 2012, 06:44:09 AM
I'll second the vote of confidence in the MSR Dromedary Bags. I have two 6 Liter bags and they work great. They're BPA Free food grade polyurethane laminated Cordura. The webbing and grommets make them easy to hang or attach to a pack. They pack fairly small as well.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Medicineball on December 28, 2012, 04:16:34 PM
I dropped the Dromedary bag thirty feet down a rock face. No damage!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: nelson96 on December 28, 2012, 09:37:22 PM
I'll second the vote of confidence in the MSR Dromedary Bags. I have two 6 Liter bags and they work great. They're BPA Free food grade polyurethane laminated Cordura. The webbing and grommets make them easy to hang or attach to a pack. They pack fairly small as well.

I like this one (http://coretacsolutions.com/products_ES_WXP3L.htm) because it's easy to open up and clean (can get your hand all the way to the bottom).  It also has an insulated drinking tube.  Since the bladder is always protected within my pack, I've never seen the need to have it protected with nylon.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Hootie on December 30, 2012, 07:38:54 AM
a couple of heavy duty sewing needles and a regular sized spool of 10 lb green kevlar fishing line.  It's exponentially stronger than thread and just a tad thicker.  I've used it to sew just about anything back together and make pouches, and belt pouches.  You blow a seam on your bag or tent, it's going to work to fix.  Cheap thread will fail.  Even can lash sticks together for an A frame etc with it.

It works for fishing too I'm told.

In my BOB mini fishing kit. I always replace the cheap fishing line with Fireline, just for thoses reasons.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: nelson96 on December 30, 2012, 10:35:16 AM
In my BOB mini fishing kit. I always replace the cheap fishing line with Fireline, just for thoses reasons.

Good point. . .  Spiderwire is another good choice.  Even for fishing purposes alone, products like Fireline or Spiderwire are better than the typical monofilament line because monofilament has a memory.  After being stored for long periods of time (especially if it's rolled around something very small in diameter), monofilament will no longer have the ability to be nice and straight for fishing with.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Connecticut Prepper on December 30, 2012, 03:55:11 PM
How come almost everyone leaves out a tooth brush?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Docwatmo on January 16, 2013, 12:43:48 PM
Toothbrush is a long term priority, but generally the short term you will be using a bob (1 to 3 days on average, maybe a little longer), the toothbrush isn't critical.   I do have one in my primary bag, (Which weights about 45 lbs), but not in my grab bag. 

At least that's my thinking. 

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on January 17, 2013, 01:39:10 PM
How come almost everyone leaves out a tooth brush?
I'm a little OCD, so I have a toothbrush in my work kit and my GHB/BOB.  I can't sleep unless I've brushed my teeth first.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: dixieprepper on January 20, 2013, 08:31:25 PM
I just set up my BOB.  I've been a country gal and a primitive camper my whole life, but it only recently occurred to me to get organized in case the world as we know it would end today.  So...here's what I've packed so far, and unless otherwise noted all food is homemade, dehydrated and vacuum sealed. 

5 cups trail mix
chicken vegetable soup mix (3 pouches) makes 4 cups each when added to water
3 (2 oz) pkgs beef jerky
10 granola fruit bars, high energy & fiber
8 pkgs welche's fruit snacks contain 100% RDA vitamin C
9 Wyler's powdered water bottle flavors
6 tea bags
3 hot choc mixes
mess kit including pan, plate, cup, bowl, spork
1 ltr stainless steel water bottle
water purification tablets
waterproof matches
magnesium and striker
6 votive candles
altoid tin of cotton balls soaked in vaseline
bic lighter
2 small led flashlights
1 small mag light
extra batteries for flashlights
1 pr jeans, 2 pr socks, 2 pr underwear, 1 short sleeved t shirt, 1 long sleeved t shirt, 1 hoodie, 2 bandanas, 1 sock hat, 2 pr cold weather gloves, 1 pr work gloves, 1 pair boots, small soap, small lotion, toothbrush, small toothpaste, floss, deoderant, hand towel, small pack baby wipes, chapstick.
10X10 tarp, sleeping bag, 50' propylene line, SAK type knife, machete, multi tool, duct tape, altoids tin fishing kit and altoids tin sewing kit, 5 gal. size zip lock bags, 3 qt size zip lock bags, 3 bottles water.

any suggestions are appreciated and welcome.  My idea was for the bag to get me a minimum of 3 days' worth of provisions, clothing, security and comfort.  I'm probably a little heavy on food but my husband hasn't found the bag he plans to use yet, so I'm carrying a little extra food for him. :-)  I know I need more water, and I'm working on getting a filter.  If I can bug out in my vehicle, I'll add a tent, more water and food, my cast iron skillet and my dutch oven, axe, maul, wedge, basic tools, 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on January 22, 2013, 03:44:29 PM
I just set up my BOB.
...
The one thing that stood out to me is no mention of a headlamp.  It just makes life so much easier to have both hands free when working in the dark.  Just food for thought.  There's also good AA flashlights that have a reversible clip on them that lets you clip them onto your hat brim.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: dixieprepper on January 22, 2013, 04:32:46 PM
yes Endurance, I thought of that too.  Seems like they were everywhere before Christmas, and the couple of times I looked for them since they were chintzy, or they didn't have them.  I'll run across them in the next few days, hope I won't need them before I find them!  thanks for the good advice.  I was also thinking two way radios would be good to have when the handsome husband gets his bag packed, in case we get separated or have to go to plan b, which is a secondary location for us to meet up if we happen to be in different places when the SHTF.  Need to do some research on range, expense, etc before I make a purchase.  Any advice? I've also seen hand held CB radios, which seem to be more useful since I could make contact with other people or monitor channels to see where problems may be along our bugout route(s).

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Nicodemus on January 22, 2013, 05:38:40 PM
yes Endurance, I thought of that too.  Seems like they were everywhere before Christmas, and the couple of times I looked for them since they were chintzy, or they didn't have them.  I'll run across them in the next few days, hope I won't need them before I find them!  thanks for the good advice.  I was also thinking two way radios would be good to have when the handsome husband gets his bag packed, in case we get separated or have to go to plan b, which is a secondary location for us to meet up if we happen to be in different places when the SHTF.  Need to do some research on range, expense, etc before I make a purchase.  Any advice? I've also seen hand held CB radios, which seem to be more useful since I could make contact with other people or monitor channels to see where problems may be along our bugout route(s).

Lowe and Home Depot around here have restocked their Headlamps since Christmas. They both have a wide range of solid headlamps.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on January 22, 2013, 06:46:53 PM
...
 I was also thinking two way radios would be good to have when the handsome husband gets his bag packed, in case we get separated or have to go to plan b, which is a secondary location for us to meet up if we happen to be in different places when the SHTF.  Need to do some research on range, expense, etc before I make a purchase.  Any advice? I've also seen hand held CB radios, which seem to be more useful since I could make contact with other people or monitor channels to see where problems may be along our bugout route(s).
There's an entire board oriented just toward communications:  http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?board=48.0 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?board=48.0) where you should be able to get all your questions answered.

I've used used GMRS, MURS, FRS, CB and SSB-CB.  I tend to think that anything handheld is going to be limited to line of sight to perhaps one half up to two miles at best.  A car mounted Single Side Band (SSB) CB will stretch that out to 15 miles pretty reliably and you can still use the regular CB channels for getting information from others within 5 miles.  MURS probably gives you the most privacy and most versatility, but still have a range of under 5 miles under ideal conditions, under two miles in real world conditions.

As for headlamps, I like one that dims so you can conserve batteries for up close activities, like reading, while still having adequate light for hiking and running.  IMHO, as dim as 2-3 lumens is adequate to read by and you can walk on pavement with 10 lumens and run on trails with about 25-30 lumens (although 40-50 lumens is preferred).  Brands that are generally reliable include Petzl, Princeton Tec, Black Diamond, and Fenix, although I have an Energizer that I keep in my glovebox that I've been quite happy with and was quite cheap, too.  I prefer wireless 3AAA models for a balance between weight and battery life.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: dixieprepper on January 22, 2013, 07:32:33 PM
Exellent information on the radios and headlamps.  I've been assembling the items for my husband's BOB and I believe  he is beginning to think I could be right about a probable collapse of our financial system, infrastructure, or food system in this country.  I'll spend more time exploring the other boards to get more info.  Thanks again for taking time to read my post and offer advice.  :)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: nelson96 on January 22, 2013, 08:27:21 PM
The one thing that stood out to me is no mention of a headlamp.  It just makes life so much easier to have both hands free when working in the dark.  Just food for thought.  There's also good AA flashlights that have a reversible clip on them that lets you clip them onto your hat brim.

I too highly recommend a good headlamp.  But have you considered a real redneck light?  ;D  I use one to do chores this time a year since it's dark before and after work.

(http://i00.i.aliimg.com/photo/v1/526906736/New_Style_Baseball_Cap_with_Built_in.jpg_200x200.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on January 22, 2013, 09:08:41 PM
Exellent information on the radios and headlamps.  I've been assembling the items for my husband's BOB and I believe  he is beginning to think I could be right about a probable collapse of our financial system, infrastructure, or food system in this country.  I'll spend more time exploring the other boards to get more info.  Thanks again for taking time to read my post and offer advice.  :)
Well, welcome to the boards.  Drop on by the Intro thread (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=89.5850) and tell us a little about yourself(ves).
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: North WI Thriver on February 20, 2013, 08:28:33 AM
This thread gives me a case of Bug out Bag envy. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: EagleSteel on February 25, 2013, 11:50:29 AM
This thread gives me a case of Bug out Bag envy.

There's an easy fix for that! Start out by checking Jacks Power Point on Bug out Bags. Then check out survivalgearbags.com. I bought their Modern Survival Online Go Bag and added the following.

1. A second folding knife.
2. A Ka-Bar fighting knife for my fixed blade.
3. A compact hatchet
4. A Aurora Firestarter
5. A Canteen
6. A water filter
7. Compact binoculars
8. REM's
9. Extra survival blankets.
10. Flashlight
11. Extra glow sticks
12. Spare socks

Things I still need. ( The bag has plenty of room for this)
1. A topigraphical map of my bugout area (15 mile radious)
2. Canvous tarp
3. Radio

If you can't do it all at once just start with the Bag itself and add to it when you can. Also check out places like ebay for items. You can find some good deals there but before you bid check out retail sights online. Sometimes on ebay you'll pay more if you're not careful.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mocowgirl on February 27, 2013, 08:43:02 AM
I've really enjoyed reading these posts. There are some great lists and opinions of such. It goes to show how survival can be a very personal thing. One person feels that item A is essential to what they carry and another person feels that item A is a luxery or even unneeded. I read the list and think well why do you need that? Then i read a critique, and think, well maybe the person they are critiqueing has a specific use for that item. Either wayI dont think survival or bobs are something that can be textbook.  Sure there are certain absolute musts, but how we accomplish those is a personal matter that hinges on whatever environment we are in and what skills we do or don't have. So having said that
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Docwatmo on February 27, 2013, 09:18:41 AM
Exactly Mocowgirl!    That is also why I like the "Modular" systems.   Have a main bag or bags, with either pounces or zip lock bags or whatever with different kit for different situations and times of the year.  You can completely reconfigure a bag in a few seconds for any situation. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mocowgirl on February 28, 2013, 08:04:34 AM
Exactly Mocowgirl!    That is also why I like the "Modular" systems.   Have a main bag or bags, with either pounces or zip lock bags or whatever with different kit for different situations and times of the year.  You can completely reconfigure a bag in a few seconds for any situation.

I also use a modular system with my bags. Although Im almost certain that my interchangible "packs are fairly unique...lol as i use the folding travel bags with the many pockets .   I find them to be usefull in my case as it keeps small items and kits organized and easy to get to.Not to mention that i can easily switch them from my bob to my saddle/cantle bags when I take a horse out for a ride. Along with my bob I also keep a larger emergency kit in my vehicle that i can take from or trade out with my bob. I wont go through every little thing i keep in my bob but here is a basic list
tube tent
Tarp
Lrg space blanket
Lrg rain poncho
hatchet
Paracord
Folding exacto blade w extra blades
Headlamp
Sm solar flashlight
sm led flashlight
Fire tin- w/ char cloth, non dairy creamer, hand sanitizer, homemade firestarters, mag bar, flint n' steel, and a few waterproof matches. Overkill? Maybe, but I'm comfortable with it.
first aid kit w/ but not limited to, vet wrap, sutures and needles, thermometer,  tweezers, and the basics.
sunscreen
bug repelant
Reflective tape
Extra phone battery ( charged)
Solar charger
Powerbars
waterbottle w/ filter
Small home packed dry soup packs
Individual packets of instant coffee

Individual packets powdered drink w/ vitamin c
Hard candy...usually mints or cinnamon jolly ranchers and throat losenges..
Small mess kit
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roamer on March 30, 2013, 07:08:25 AM
There's an easy fix for that! Start out by checking Jacks Power Point on Bug out Bags. Then check out survivalgearbags.com. I bought their Modern Survival Online Go Bag and added the following.

Where do I find Jack's Power Point on Bug Out Bags?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: doublehelix on March 30, 2013, 11:34:27 AM
I've been pretty happy with my newest addition to the EDC.

"Trick" birthday candles.  The kind with a little bit of magnesium dust in the wick that re-light if you blow them out (or the wind blows them out).

http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/science-questions/question420.htm

As for headlamps, I like the FoxFury LED line.
They even have a line for hunters that doesn't destroy your night vision.
http://www.foxfury.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=2&products_id=158



Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Hootie on March 30, 2013, 05:47:27 PM
Where do I find Jack's Power Point on Bug Out Bags?

He listed it on the TSP blog
http://www.thesurvivalpodcast.com/power-point-deck-from-my-bug-out-bag-presentation (http://www.thesurvivalpodcast.com/power-point-deck-from-my-bug-out-bag-presentation)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: steeltownknight on March 31, 2013, 08:27:22 AM
I have a large coleman MAX backpack as my B.O.B.  I don't mind changing the contents every season. gives me a chance to test/replace anything.
I see really good ideas in other posts.  It's starting to warm up here (finaly)
So I have removed most of my winter gear.   (I have a ton of winter items at my B.O.L)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: DesertCoyote on April 10, 2013, 08:58:01 PM
I'm loving all the info I'm getting from some of the posts on here, as me and my wife our getting our BoB's ready. I've got a question though: Those of you that keep one in your vehicles, do you keep a gun and ammunition with it? Or would you advise against that?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on April 11, 2013, 10:04:40 AM
I'm loving all the info I'm getting from some of the posts on here, as me and my wife our getting our BoB's ready. I've got a question though: Those of you that keep one in your vehicles, do you keep a gun and ammunition with it? Or would you advise against that?

I generally advise against it. My reasoning is thus:

My car kit falls more into the Get  Home Bag category, a 24-hour-or-less minimalist kit designed to provide enough support to get home from work, errands or play.  In any of these cases, I will have at least one handgun with me (usually two) and on my person.  I don't see much of a need for a long-gun in such a short-term scenario as it generally takes a bit of time for a non-permissive environment to be created.

About the only types of scenarios that I can foresee requiring long-guns is one where the air is filled with bulgogi-eating foreign invaders (please note, I am being culturally sensitive in order to not offend our Chinese Overlords) or, perhaps, a massive zombie outbreak (wherein a sword would probably be a wiser selection of sidearm).  Neither of these are scenarios I consider highly probable.

Your situation may be significantly different.  In my case, I am in a urban/suburban environment 95% of the time.  My general daily wanderings take me less than 25 miles from home.  As a rule, I drive a less-than-criminally-desirable vehicle (a 10-year-old 4x4) as a daily driver.

If you travel farther or are in a more wilderness-oriented environment, then you may wish to consider stashing a rifle or shotgun in the vehicle.  If you don't carry a concealed weapon, then I suggest you get a permit and do so, if permissible in your area (I will forego my usual recommendations to do so, anyway).

If you want to carry a full Bug Out Bag in your car, then I might suggest that you consider the realistic scenarios you are facing and think hard about going home, first, before you head to the hills.  The real scenarios faced by the average person seldom has them heading for the hills for an extended period of time with little or no notice.

Even the most common scenario, which is often overlooked by preppers as being too. . .mundane, of a house fire, doesn't have you hiding in the backwoods, foraging for food and shelter for any length of time.  Other, similarly realistic incidents involving overturned trains or trucks carrying dangerous chemicals, tornadoes, etc., don't necessitate going heavily armed to survive the event.

So, I'd say to have the option, but keep it at home.  Having some idiot bash in your rear window and walking away with your kits and a firearm just because he needs to pawn something for a fix, is no fun.

Just some thoughts.

The Professor

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: DesertCoyote on April 11, 2013, 10:55:56 AM
I generally advise against it. My reasoning is thus:

My car kit falls more into the Get  Home Bag category, a 24-hour-or-less minimalist kit designed to provide enough support to get home from work, errands or play.  In any of these cases, I will have at least one handgun with me (usually two) and on my person.  I don't see much of a need for a long-gun in such a short-term scenario as it generally takes a bit of time for a non-permissive environment to be created.

About the only types of scenarios that I can foresee requiring long-guns is one where the air is filled with bulgogi-eating foreign invaders (please note, I am being culturally sensitive in order to not offend our Chinese Overlords) or, perhaps, a massive zombie outbreak (wherein a sword would probably be a wiser selection of sidearm).  Neither of these are scenarios I consider highly probable.

Your situation may be significantly different.  In my case, I am in a urban/suburban environment 95% of the time.  My general daily wanderings take me less than 25 miles from home.  As a rule, I drive a less-than-criminally-desirable vehicle (a 10-year-old 4x4) as a daily driver.

If you travel farther or are in a more wilderness-oriented environment, then you may wish to consider stashing a rifle or shotgun in the vehicle.  If you don't carry a concealed weapon, then I suggest you get a permit and do so, if permissible in your area (I will forego my usual recommendations to do so, anyway).

If you want to carry a full Bug Out Bag in your car, then I might suggest that you consider the realistic scenarios you are facing and think hard about going home, first, before you head to the hills.  The real scenarios faced by the average person seldom has them heading for the hills for an extended period of time with little or no notice.

Even the most common scenario, which is often overlooked by preppers as being too. . .mundane, of a house fire, doesn't have you hiding in the backwoods, foraging for food and shelter for any length of time.  Other, similarly realistic incidents involving overturned trains or trucks carrying dangerous chemicals, tornadoes, etc., don't necessitate going heavily armed to survive the event.

So, I'd say to have the option, but keep it at home.  Having some idiot bash in your rear window and walking away with your kits and a firearm just because he needs to pawn something for a fix, is no fun.

Just some thoughts.

The Professor

Excellent points. Thanks for the input!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Hootie on April 11, 2013, 10:58:42 AM
I'm loving all the info I'm getting from some of the posts on here, as me and my wife our getting our BoB's ready. I've got a question though: Those of you that keep one in your vehicles, do you keep a gun and ammunition with it? Or would you advise against that?

Personally don't have in my car BOB.  As the Professor said, too risky of being stolen. Maybe pepper spray.

If you really don't want (or can't) "carry it on you" and still feel the need to have it in your car , then I would suggest installing a lockable safe in your car.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on April 11, 2013, 11:07:51 AM
Personally don't have in my car BOB.  As the Professor said, too risky of being stolen. Maybe pepper spray.

If you really don't want (or can't) "carry it on you" and still feel the need to have it in your car , then I would suggest installing a lockable safe in your car.
And I'd add another layer to that.  Look at Goatdog's 505 project if you want to see an amazing job of building concealed spaces in a car that are perfect for putting a safe into.  Using factor or factory-like carpet and masonite framing around a small in-car safe makes your gun a whole lot safer than just a locked glove box or stashed under the seat.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: PrepperJim on April 11, 2013, 01:51:47 PM
Personally don't have in my car BOB.  As the Professor said, too risky of being stolen. Maybe pepper spray.

If you really don't want (or can't) "carry it on you" and still feel the need to have it in your car , then I would suggest installing a lockable safe in your car.

I drive a hatchback and have a locked trunk cabled to the car. It would take a little more time to take my bugout bag. I would rather risk theft than not have it.

The only time I leave a gun in the car is when I am at work. I have a separate car safe for that. Otherwise, my gun goes inside at night. I do keep extra ammo in the car just in case I need to walk home. I've contemplated keeping my 10/22 there as well, but space is limited and I don't want it stolen.

Another thing: I put a can of pepper spray in my bugout bag during the summer of 2011 when it was over 100F for 90 straight days in Houston. The can leaked and I ended up having to decontaminate my entire GHB. It was not too bad because it was in a separate pocket, but I ended up throwing out a first aid kit that was in the same pocket and washing other stuff.

One last thing. I also keep a foldable cart in my car. I really don't think I can carry my bag and other stuff 35 miles to home. I know it will look weird, but I am strapping that sucker to the cart and walking home if I need to.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: soccer grannie on April 11, 2013, 02:13:51 PM
It seems there's a lot of mention of pepper spray. This is what I was told by my son who has been in law enforcement for a long time.

Do not "test fire" it. It will leak from then on and it will get on you.

If you use it on someone, it will get on you and may affect your ability to fight, run, or see.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on April 11, 2013, 03:51:36 PM
It seems there's a lot of mention of pepper spray. This is what I was told by my son who has been in law enforcement for a long time.

Do not "test fire" it. It will leak from then on and it will get on you.

If you use it on someone, it will get on you and may affect your ability to fight, run, or see.

When I was a cop, we all had to get sprayed with the stuff before we could carry it.  It sucks bad, especially the first time, when you think you are going to die.  Once you've been hit and you realize you'll survive and 'this too shall pass', it's a lot easier to deal with the secondary spray that you might get due to high winds, etc. 

Probably one of the most important things to realize with the stuff is that it takes out your vision first, your breathing next, and your will to fight last.  If you move so they can't get their hands on you, you are 100% better off.  Otherwise, they have about 30-45 seconds where they're still getting enough air and still have quite a bit of fight in them and they might be able to grapple with you and put you in serious risk of harm.  After that, they'll just want the experience to stop, but by then, you might be stabbed, have your head rammed into a concrete curb or in some other way, have a bad day.  Spray and move, spray and move, spray and move until the fight is out of them and you can flee and they can't pursue.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: mithgar50 on April 15, 2013, 05:48:05 PM
First off I just wanna say how against bugging out I am. History shows us that refugees are preyed upon and entirely too vulnerable. I do believe in evacuation from hurricanes and the like, but hunkering down at home to me has always been the sane thing to do.

As someone who doesn't really have anywhere to bug out to I am glad you addressed this.  I live in an apartment and don't have any family in the area and have not found any friends who are preppers yet.  Due to this I am trying to figure out how to make things work staying here at the apartment for now.  After I have this done I will consider other options but for now focusing on what I have available and I have not seen many posts to help me with this scenario.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag)
Post by: Roswell on April 23, 2013, 11:18:33 AM
[As someone who doesn't really have anywhere to bug out to I am glad you addressed this.  I live in an apartment and don't have any family in the area and have not found any friends who are preppers yet.  Due to this I am trying to figure out how to make things work staying here at the apartment for now.  After I have this done I will consider other options but for now focusing on what I have available and I have not seen many posts to help me with this scenario.

Check these threads out. I hope they help.

Protecting an apartment  (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=34012.0)

Prepping In An Apartment With Limited Space  (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=8425.0)

Apartment Dwellers - Learn from my emergency (story inside) (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=12323.0)

Roswell
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Evil kilt on April 25, 2013, 05:04:37 PM
(http://i1307.photobucket.com/albums/s586/evilkilt/DSCF3366_zps17d2f34c.jpg)

this is my bush craft gear ,I use an old army webbing set I have it set to last me for 36 hours at a push
the reason why I'm putting it up here in the bug out bag thread is its the gear i grab that i know what is in it and how to use it when i have to .I keep it on stand by and where my family can get to it it has a good first aid kit as well as a few other bits that are always useful
(http://i1307.photobucket.com/albums/s586/evilkilt/DSCF3367_zps557f689a.jpg)
here is the contents it has a full 24hrs ration pack gas stove ,saw,knives,sleeping bag ,bivi bag ,basha ,bungee cords ,a candle,lighters and a few other things
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Cyndy O on June 13, 2013, 03:46:23 PM
Howdy yall :)  I'm new on the site and thought I had a pretty good start on my bag, but now I see there are 2 separate bags and I'm no where near what I should be and will have to buy some more of what I already have for both bags plus one of some things to keep at home where they are supposed to be lol.    There are a lot of great things on these lists so I will be doin a lot more apparently lol. 

One thing I have that a very good prepper friend of mine didn't think of is baby wipes (for 2 different kinds of hygiene).  I get the ones with Aloe in them.  Water wont always be available for washing, so why not have those and save what water there is for cooking etc.
My 2 cents as a newbie lol

Cyndy
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: soccer grannie on June 13, 2013, 04:33:16 PM
Welcome to the TSP Forum, Cyndy O. Stop by the Front Porch and introduce yourself.  :)

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=89.0
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Solo23 on June 28, 2013, 05:07:53 PM
So after reading this I feel like I'm strange for carrying a soil testing kit. The soil down here isn't the best, and if I want to plant, I want to know the best location to!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on June 28, 2013, 09:28:53 PM
So after reading this I feel like I'm strange for carrying a soil testing kit. The soil down here isn't the best, and if I want to plant, I want to know the best location to!

I may be a little out-of-sorts, here, but I would think that you should know that before you choose a Bug Out Location.

Typically a BOB is meant for those situations where staying where you are poses a greater threat to your life than moving to Point B.  Preferably, you will have Point B (and subsequent locations such as Point C, Point D, etc.) already surveyed and have vetted them for relocation.

I would, of course, also have to ask if you carry enough seeds, etc. in your BOB to permanently support yourself?

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Solo23 on June 29, 2013, 09:17:15 PM
I've tested my A and B location, but I still just want to be sure, and it's extremely light weight, so I don't mind it. As far as seeds, I have enough for about 4 acres of food. my current bug out location is ready to plant, but It's far enough away that it's not realistic to keep a small plot going there.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: phil white on August 25, 2013, 02:53:22 PM
What I like to do, beyond wearing good clothes and foot gear is to have the big three in my pack.
(1) a decent knife
(2) a canteen
(3) a pancho
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Sephiroth on August 27, 2013, 07:30:48 AM
So.... this is the Topic for BOB´s  :P

Oh boy, where to start.

First an forthmost. I consider a BOB more of a "get home bag". If e need it, i will need it to either get home or to my "B Location" right ? It is not something i will have to live out of....

First of all, where should i leave my BOB ? Right know, i plan on leaving it in my car, since my plan is to get home in a crisis. And i always leave home in my car. So, that's my plan. Use me EDC carry to get to my BOB which will be in my car, which in turn will be 2km max away from me.

i read somewere, that the first thing one should have is a PLAN ! Although a plan seldom will adequate, it's a statting point. And my plan is simple;

- If the situation has a good chance of normalizing in 72 hours, i bug in at home.

- If the situation is bad enough to pass 72 hours, i relocate to "B" which is 140 KM away.

- if the situation is chaos, relocate to "C" which is 400 KM away. And fend from there.

In any case, my BOB has to get me home, or to my BOV (my car is a good bug out vehicle) so that i can relocate. My problem is what to put in my BOB....

I follow the water/food/shelter/protection path. I'm still in the process of figuring out what to buy. There are good lists here, but i live in São Paulo so I'll have to adapt.

Anybody think I'm going the right way ?

Thanks
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on August 29, 2013, 07:25:18 PM
I've tested my A and B location, but I still just want to be sure, and it's extremely light weight, so I don't mind it. As far as seeds, I have enough for about 4 acres of food. my current bug out location is ready to plant, but It's far enough away that it's not realistic to keep a small plot going there.

And what do you have to eat until the food starts sprouting?

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Black November on October 04, 2013, 11:58:09 AM
A great item for a bug out bag that nobody ever thinks about is a solar calculator.

How many ounces of silver is for a running vehicle?
How many days will it take for a family of four (walking 2mph) to travel 215 miles?
If there are 52 apples, and 13 starving people, how many apples does each person get?
 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Alpha Mike on October 04, 2013, 01:01:31 PM
If there are 52 apples, and 13 starving people, how many apples does each person get?

This is the time your math teacher told you "One day, algebra will save your life."
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on October 09, 2013, 12:01:45 AM
My bag is more of a get home bag than a bug out bag. I have no set BOL, and I don't have the money to put together a well stocked refugee bag, so I have a small backpack I take with me EVERYWHERE I go. Most of it was born out of necessity for my work, I work for a contractor and I basically get left at a job all day until lunch or quitting time, and if it's in town I go with my bike and I'm on my own all day. It is heavy in bicycling supplies, since my bike is my preferred mode of transportation and I plan on using it when the roads are gridlocked and there's no gas. 
So here is my kit:
>Tools:
Bike multi-tool w/ allen wrenches, screwdriver, wrenches, spoke tools. Comes in a belt pouch w/ tire levers and a tube patch kit.
Leatherman style multi-tool
A full tube patch kit
Mini hand pump
CO2 pump w/ spare CO2 cartridge
Small crescent wrench
Cheapo mini folding garden trowel from Wal Mart
>FAK
Lots of gauze pads. Road burn sucks without gauze.
Medical tape
A few small bandaids
Allergy medicine
Tylenol
Ace bandage
Alcohol wipes
Latex gloves
N95 dust masks (used for work all the time because cement dust is bad for your lungs)
Moleskin
Toilet paper
>Food
A day's worth of granola bars, trail mix, and cookies. Constantly rotated because I eat it at lunch.
Packets of nut butters
A few Clif Bar energy gel packets (non caffeinated) These things really work for biking or for mild hypoglycemia.
2 liter CamelBack full of water plus a 1 liter water bottle. 
>Camping/survival related
5x7 tarp
50 ft of para cord
Emergency blanket
Rain poncho
Waterproof matches
Water purification tablets
Esbit stove w/ fuel tablets
Canteen cup
Tin foil
Flashlight
4 AAA batteries
4 AA batteries
>Clothes (kept to a minimal because it's an edc bag)
Light jacket
Thermal underwear
Thermal socks
Light gloves
More clothes will be added as the weather gets colder.
>Misc.
Potassium supplement tablets in a small bottle for electrolytes
Restaurant salt packets
Hand wipes 
Albuterol inhaler for when certain people's "right to do what they want as long as it does no harm to another" actually involves blowing clouds of poisonous smoke from their coffin nails and giving me an asthma attack and/or re-triggering my exercise induced asthma so I can't get over 18 mph without my lungs shutting off.

I constantly add/remove items in my pack because I don't just eat what I store, I live my preps.     
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on October 09, 2013, 12:14:41 PM
...
>Food
A day's worth of granola bars, trail mix, and cookies. Constantly rotated because I eat it at lunch.
Packets of nut butters
A few Clif Bar energy gel packets (non caffeinated) These things really work for biking or for mild hypoglycemia.
2 liter CamelBack full of water plus a 1 liter water bottle. 
...
Since you're carrying an esbit stove, I'd recommend adding some chicken bullion cubes.  Nothing warms you up during or after a cold, rainy ride better than hot chicken bullion.  Plus, it's loaded with salt, so it's great for replacing electrolytes.  It was my favorite night drink when I was still 24 hour racing.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on October 09, 2013, 01:39:45 PM
That's a good idea! I might have to replace it with vegetable bullion though, rendered down chicken fat isn't very vegetarian ;) Although if the shit is hitting the fan hard enough I think I would be ok with a little chicken broth.     
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on October 09, 2013, 01:55:08 PM
That's a good idea! I might have to replace it with vegetable bullion though, rendered down chicken fat isn't very vegetarian ;) Although if the shit is hitting the fan hard enough I think I would be ok with a little chicken broth.   
Fair enough.  I just know that a hot, salty drink on a cold ride is great, which is why I always pack a 1 pint thermos on winter rides.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: allofthemonkeys on October 10, 2013, 05:05:29 PM
Diapers.  I have a kid who needs them and the idea is my wife carries some, I carry some and if one of us has the little one then we can change them if we need to.  If we are together then we have more diapers.  I made a Baby BOB but it is a really small bag and ran out of room for the diapers after food.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: zarathustra19 on October 10, 2013, 07:40:09 PM
Hi all,

This is obviously my first post, but I've been lurking around for a while and thought I'd share what I've currently got in my BOB.

First off, my philosophy doesn't concentrate on the get home bag portion of prepping just yet, as I work about five minutes from my house and take my BOB with me when I go out of town.  I plan on building one of those when the time presents itself (i.e. when I get a job outside my comfortable walking range).  In any case, my BOB is focused around getting out of town alone or with family and friends, so if you see a lot of redundancy, there is a theoretical method to my madness.  On to the list, which I've copied from my printed inventory:

Pack Contents:
Food:
1.    MRE crackers (2) – 180 cal. each
2.    MRE banana choc. muffin top – 260 cal.
3.    MRE wheat snack bread (2) – 180 cal. each
4.    MRE condiment kit (sugar, hot sauce, cracker, etc)
5.    MRE chemical food heater
6.    Cinnamon raisin granola bar (6) – 140 cal. each
7.    Cranberry pomegranate granola bar (10) 130 cal. each
8.    Beef stock packet (3)
9.    Chicken stock packet (3)
Calorie count: 3120

Fishing Supplies:
10.    Approx. 40 hooks, sizes 10-6
11.    Sinkers (4) – split shot
12.     5-10 yds 4lb line – bundle
13.    10 yds 25lb line – bundle
14.    210 yds 25lb line – spool
         Note: stored in a repurposed skoal tin

Emergency Pocket Kit:
15.   Snare wire
16.   Tinder bundle
17.   Split bandages (2)
18.   4”x11” foil sheet (moldable in a pinch to boil water)
19.   12’ thin cord (not 550, came with Les Stroud knife)
20.   Razor blade
21.   15 safety matches w/ strike pads
     Note: this is a repurposed skoal tin which I carry at all times, but which I toss into my bag while hiking.

Plastic Bag 1:
22.    Anti-diarrheal pills + 2 tylenol – pill bottle
23.    Loratadine allergy meds + 4 tylenol – pill bottle
24.    Slotted cleaning end
25.    9mm brush
26.   .22 brush
27.    Emergency blanket (foil, yes)
28.   Strike on box matches – ½ box
29.   Waterproof matches (3 box)
30.   Compass
31.   Fingernail clippers
32.   Small roll duct tape
33.   Whistle
34.   Plastic bag
35.   8”x11” foil sheet (as noted before for boiling, or wind break for stove
36.   Pens (2)
37.   Pencil
38.   wire saw

Plastic Bag 2:
39.   Pocket knife (3)*
40.   Eyeglass repair kit
41.    Pen
42.   Razor knife
43.   Knife sharpener
44.   Turkey call (not necessarily needed, but light and small)
45.   Electrical tape
46.     Plastic tubing
47.   Anti-fungal cream (prescription strength)

Plastic Bag 3:
48.    Medium adhesive bandages (6)
49.    Large adhesive bandage
50.    Flex bandage (3)
51.    Surgical blade
52.    Magnesium fire starter
53.    Striker
54.    Tinder (cardboard)
55.    Waterproof bag
56.    Emergency whistle
57.    Waterproof matches (1 box)
58.    Compass

Loose Items:
59.    Knife – Gerber big rock camp knife
60.    Survival knife (w/ whistle, flashlight, and fire striker)
61.    Boot knife
62.    4" Copper tubing (don't know why, but might come in handy)
63.    Small multi-tool
64.    Camp stove
65.    Fuel Canister
66.    Shorts (1 pair)
67.    Jeans (1 pair)
68.    Socks (2 pair)
69.    Underwear (2 pair)
70.    Shirts (2)
71.    Gloves (1 pair)
72.    Rubber band ball
73.    State map
74.    Writing paper
75.    Spare glasses

Carry On-Person
76.   Fire striker
77.   Bottle opener
78.   Standard screwdriver keychain
79.   Swiss army knife
80.   Gerber pocket knife
81.   Suspension Multi-tool
82.   Ruger SR-9
83.   100 rounds 9mm
84.   Hat (baseball or sun)
85.   .22 rifle (see below)
86.   100 rounds .22LR

OSK (Oh S*** Kit - .22 rifle)
87.    10 rounds .22LR
88.    Tinder
89.    Waterproof matches (1 box)
90.    Hand sanitizer (alcohol based, accelerant)

Carry if possible:*
91. 12ga Shotgun
92.   25 rounds shotgun ammunition

Still Needed:
1.    Water filter – Katadyn Hiker
2.    Sleeping Bag – 30 degree
3.    Tent – 1 Person
4.    Sleeping bag liner (fleece)
5.    Tent pegs
6.    Water purification tabs
7.    Steel canteen/cup
8.    Multi-vitamin/additional meds
9.    Anti-biotics
10.    Flashlight
11.   Radio (2 way)
12.   Radio (weather/AM/FM)
13.   Needle and thread

* - signifies the possibility of outfitting fellow travelers

Now, I realize I've neglected some pretty important items, but I plan to get all of the things on my "still needed" list in the next few months, as budget allows.  My pack is actually pretty light, as most of my inventory is comprised of small items which I have found myself needing or see practical use for in the future.  I realize that bugging out should be estimated to last about 72 hours, but I like to plan for worst case if possible.  Also, I have taken this pack on ten mile hikes with no fatigue noticed from the extra weight, though I had to leave the firearms behind due to regulations in the state and federal parks I like to frequent.

Any additions or criticism of my contents is welcome.

Edit: forgot to mention the OSK.  My "oh s*** kit" is stored inside the hollow butt-stock of my .22, so even if I happen to lose everything else (unlikely, but possible), I'll still have ammo and a way to make fire relatively easily.



Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: OutWestTX on October 10, 2013, 08:21:49 PM
I don't have a BOB because I live at my bug out, but I have a Get-Home Bag.  It weighs 15# because I know my limitations and I know I can't carry more than 15# for the 40 miles to get home from work.  People who think they are going to carry 50# of gear without actually doing it are not going to make it.

My bag contains:
my leatherman
paracord
tarp
extra socks
bandana
chapstick
a lighter
a LifeStraw
small first aid kit
two bottles of water
a couple MREs

I have practiced walking 10 miles with it a couple of times to make sure everything works and I can carry the weight.  I already have a weapon and flashlight for work so those aren't included, but would be with me.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on October 10, 2013, 09:31:26 PM
@OutWestTX, if you work 40 miles from home, have you considered keeping a folding bicycle in your vehicle with your bugout gear? It could be an option depending on how much room you have in your vehicle and would cut your travel time down by a LOT if driving isn't an option. Also, how long could you comfortably last on two MREs? You never know what might go wrong when you're bugging out. I'd throw some water purification tablets in there too, just because they're cheap and light and could make a world of difference.   
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on October 10, 2013, 10:22:03 PM
A few comments, worth exactly what you paid for them:


Also sprach Zarathusthra:

Hi all,

This is obviously my first post, but I've been lurking around for a while and thought I'd share what I've currently got in my BOB.

First off, my philosophy doesn't concentrate on the get home bag portion of prepping just yet, as I work about five minutes from my house and take my BOB with me when I go out of town.  I plan on building one of those when the time presents itself (i.e. when I get a job outside my comfortable walking range).  In any case, my BOB is focused around getting out of town alone or with family and friends, so if you see a lot of redundancy, there is a theoretical method to my madness.  On to the list, which I've copied from my printed inventory:

Pack Contents:
Food:
1.    MRE crackers (2) – 180 cal. each
2.    MRE banana choc. muffin top – 260 cal.
3.    MRE wheat snack bread (2) – 180 cal. each
4.    MRE condiment kit (sugar, hot sauce, cracker, etc)
5.    MRE chemical food heater
6.    Cinnamon raisin granola bar (6) – 140 cal. each
7.    Cranberry pomegranate granola bar (10) 130 cal. each
8.    Beef stock packet (3)
9.    Chicken stock packet (3)
Calorie count: 3120

The first question I'd ask is how far and how long do you intend to bug out?

The food you have is loaded with sugar and, honestly, won't provide you much sustenance for a day, if you are walking hard and fast (and carrying something).  You'll get a quick energy boost, but most of it is glorified candy and you'll burn through those simple carbs quickly.

I recommend, as a rule, 2500 - 3000 calories per day that provide you with a more balanced 40/40/20 combination of nutrients (Carbs/Proteins/Fats) with a concentration on complex carbs, not simple sugars.

Even two, full MRE's will give you a better mix than what you have here.  I might suggest bolstering that with a few other options.  Even adding three,  1-qt nalgene containers (one filled with mashed potato flakes, one with couscous or pasta stars and one filled with instant rice, instant barley or another, similar, staple) would stretch out your foodstuffs.

Later, you also indicate you have a "camp stove" and fuel canister.  Unless you're in a very monsoon-like area, you may want to consider lightening your summer-through-fall load by resorting to a debris stove such as an esbit, or similar.  Using twigs, grass, and other detritus that you can scavenge as you walk would lighten your load a bit.

Quote

Fishing Supplies:
10.    Approx. 40 hooks, sizes 10-6
11.    Sinkers (4) – split shot
12.     5-10 yds 4lb line – bundle
13.    10 yds 25lb line – bundle
14.    210 yds 25lb line – spool
         Note: stored in a repurposed skoal tin

Referring back to Question #1: How long/far do you expect to bug out?  A fishing kit IS a small, relatively lightweight addition to a kit, but it's predicated upon the concept of waiting (possibly a long time) for you to catch your food and then the necessary prep time.  I might suggest including more food and not expecting to rely upon catching your own, unless you're walking a LOOONG distance.

Quote
Emergency Pocket Kit:
15.   Snare wire
16.   Tinder bundle
17.   Split bandages (2)
18.   4”x11” foil sheet (moldable in a pinch to boil water)
19.   12’ thin cord (not 550, came with Les Stroud knife)
20.   Razor blade
21.   15 safety matches w/ strike pads
     Note: this is a repurposed skoal tin which I carry at all times, but which I toss into my bag while hiking.

#15: Indicates you are expecting to stay in one place for a while. Do you currently trap?
#18: I might suggest that you either add an aluminum camper's pot or get the aluminum canteen cup referred to in #7 on your "Still Needed List.

#19: You'll want more.  Either 550 cord or Decoy Line (thinner than 550).

#21: Consider adding an inexpensive Bic butane lighter or two or a Zippo Lighter. 

Quote
Plastic Bag 1

24.    Slotted cleaning end
25.    9mm brush
26.   .22 brush


Didn't see any reference to a cleaning rod for either the handgun or rifle and nothing in the way of a borebrush or swab for the shotgun.  Also,  no lube or cleaner for any of it.

Quote
Plastic Bag 2:
39.   Pocket knife (3)*
40.   Eyeglass repair kit
41.    Pen
42.   Razor knife
43.   Knife sharpener
44.   Turkey call (not necessarily needed, but light and small)
45.   Electrical tape
46.     Plastic tubing
47.   Anti-fungal cream (prescription strength)

Three pocket knives, a razor, a "razor knife," a surgical blade (below), two sheath knives (Gerber Big Rock Camp Knife and a "Survival Knife"), a boot knife, a Swiss Army Knife, a fourth pocket knife (Gerber), AND a multi-tool!?!?

Respectfully, I might suggest that you lose all but three of them: one of the sheath knives, the Multi-Tool and one of the pocket knives, preferably a locking folder.

#41: An additional Pen?  - I might suggest getting a decent one, perhaps one of the lesser expensive Space Pens and a mechanical pencil (a 0.9mm with it's thicker lead won't tear through wet or flimsy paper)

Quote
Loose Items:
59.    Knife – Gerber big rock camp knife
60.    Survival knife (w/ whistle, flashlight, and fire striker)
61.    Boot knife
62.    4" Copper tubing (don't know why, but might come in handy)
63.    Small multi-tool
64.    Camp stove
65.    Fuel Canister
66.    Shorts (1 pair)
67.    Jeans (1 pair)
68.    Socks (2 pair)
69.    Underwear (2 pair)
70.    Shirts (2)
71.    Gloves (1 pair)
72.    Rubber band ball
73.    State map
74.    Writing paper
75.    Spare glasses


My issues with #59, #60, #61 and #63, #80, #81 and #82 have already been addressed.

Quote

Still Needed:
1.    Water filter – Katadyn Hiker
2.    Sleeping Bag – 30 degree
3.    Tent – 1 Person
4.    Sleeping bag liner (fleece)
5.    Tent pegs
6.    Water purification tabs
7.    Steel canteen/cup
8.    Multi-vitamin/additional meds
9.    Anti-biotics
10.    Flashlight
11.   Radio (2 way)
12.   Radio (weather/AM/FM)
13.   Needle and thread


The water filter should be your first priority.  I also did not see any ways to carry water on your list. 

One other suggestion would be to knock out both #11 and #12 in one felled swoop by purchasing one of the inexpensive amateur radios that can be modified to receive AM and FM bands.  Getting a VHF transceiver would cover the weather band anywhere in the US.

You'll also need additional batteries.  I might also suggest standardizing your batteries so that all your powered items use the same size.

I would also suggest more medical items that will address the needs of walking long distances.  A few things such as moleskin, tincture of benzoin, tape such as Elastikon or Kinesio-Tex to prevent blisters and hotspots on your feet as you walk.

Just some suggestions, hope they help.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on October 11, 2013, 12:36:23 AM
I think he has like 5 knives is so he can outfit his family and friends a little bit if need be.
I think a lot of people's bug out bags would be improved greatly if they read stories about the Appalachian Trail and how in some areas the trail is littered with "camping gear" that people decide is too heavy to be worth the weight. EDCing a backpack full of stuff on my bike to work every day has certainly taught me the value in weight reduction in your kits and I've got it streamlined to a fair minimum of what I need.

I think one of the best things you can do is try your kits out and see what works for you.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: OutWestTX on October 11, 2013, 02:43:17 AM
@OutWestTX, if you work 40 miles from home, have you considered keeping a folding bicycle in your vehicle with your bugout gear? It could be an option depending on how much room you have in your vehicle and would cut your travel time down by a LOT if driving isn't an option. Also, how long could you comfortably last on two MREs? You never know what might go wrong when you're bugging out. I'd throw some water purification tablets in there too, just because they're cheap and light and could make a world of difference.   

I already keep a bicycle in the back of my truck.  But I keep my Get-Home Bag small in case I have to walk.  I don't want to depend on the bike.  I'm not bugging out, I'm walking home which is why I don't carry more than two MREs.  I carry the LifeStraw so that I don't have to have the water purification tablets.  I periodically walk with my bag to test the weight.  The furthest I went in one day so far was 28 miles.  My bag is to get me home, not live out of. 

The important thing is to get out there and practice.  Most people I know have never walked 28 miles in one day.  You need to experience what you are capable of.  People need to get out there and test their preps.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ncjeeper on October 11, 2013, 10:02:34 AM
The important thing is to get out there and practice. People need to get out there and test their preps.
Yep. We talk about that all the time and members here (including myself) have done dry runs and posted what worked and what needed to be changed.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Knecht on October 22, 2013, 05:31:32 AM
I guess my BOB concept is a little different. I actualy don't have a BOB! That's right. I carry some stuff all the time and the rest can be packed quickly. Let's see: I have an EDC "survival capsule" on me all the time (as seen in the EDC thread) and I carry couple more things in my pockets and belt (knives, Glock27, flashlight, extra magazine, mini-straightrazor folder (CountyComm) and such.
I have some more stuff in my everyday bag (Maxpedition Active Shooter's bag) - multitool and bit-kit (Leatherman Wave), another flashlight, extra batteries, another knife or two, Glock22, extra mags, MRE spoon, compressed bandage, first aid kit (including a flask of high-volume alcohol and a thin izothermic foil blanket), de-freezer capsule (ment for car locks, but being almost pure alcohol, it's a great firestarter, degreaser, EtcEtc..), windproof matches, lighter...

So that was my EDC stuff. Now let's see the rest. Even if I had a classic BOB, I'd still have to pack stuff like food, sleeping gear, clothes and such. So what's the point? My apartment is quite small, so I know well where all my things are. Guns and ammo are in a gunsafe. Knives are mostly in a big drawer. Another big drawer holds my small outdoor/survival equipment, such as purification tablets, space blankets, canteens, paracord spools, packed army bandages and such.
My tools are in a toolbox or at the workbench. Long-term supplies are stored in a kitchen closet.
My backpack is under bed and has a medic pouch attached to it, as well as a short 12" machete. There's an army poncho in on of it's pockets, as well as wool socks, cap, gloves and shemag. Also have couple large garbage bags in there (precious survival item), waterproof packed matches, some cord and such. My big survival kit also lives in one pocket.
So, the backpack itself is sort of survival set by itself, with nothing else added.
Now comes a nylon molle type shoulder bag that's the closest thing to BOB in my possession. But no, it's not the regular kit most people have. My bag is rather a set of untouchable supplies that I'd pack anyway, yet having them in extra bag means two things: 1) I know exactly where they are 2) I don't use them up in non-emergency situations. These are items such as duct tape, electro tape, spool of bind wire, some more garbage bags, isothermic foils, couple nails, backup knives (CS Mini Hunter and CS War Head - would make a nice spear if needed), some paracord, big pack of matches, steel and flint, kevlar sewing thread...guess you get the idea.
Well, the general idea comes now: how fast can an emergency situation happen in my area? Which leads to how quickly do I need to pack. Flood is known of days ago. Wildfires don't happen here, not dry enough. No earthquakes in this part of the world. No sea-related danger as we're inland country. No known active vulcanos. Not much mood for a large scale riots or civil war - and if it was, it's not gonna happen just overnight. The same for enemy invasion. I live in rather large city, yet on it's edge, so I can leave it quickly, without being too bothered by possible traffic jams. My car is 4x4 RAV4, so in emergency I can drive off-road easily. I don't have kids and my lady is like-minded so she won't slow me down at all, she's rather gonna load the mags while I pack the other stuff. She knows local land as she hiked here a lot, while I know very well the target area are where we would be heading. She can shoot all guns we have and she's probably better than me with a long blade (I'm better with knife and axe). Both of us are used to spend time outdoors with little gear, sleeping under tarp, cooking on fire, foraging edible mushrooms and berries, we both have some fishing experience, though none of us really enjoys fishing. None of us is too spoiled by modern comfort, either, which means we don't need to pack too much stuff.
With all of that in mind, I really don't need a classic BOB much. I work 15-20 minutes walk from my place. I can leave work and be on road/on foot in much less than hour. Having my EDC on me, I'm already well equipped in fact. When I come home, I'll take the backpack and fill it with spare clothes, food, ammo and other necessary stuff. I grab the non-BOB bag and pack it in as well, knowing I have all necessary handy materials on me. Depending on whether we go by car or foot and also on the current season, I'll pack either just basic or extended or reduced amount of tools and camping stuff (axe, speeping pad, sleeping bag, blankets, tarp....). If we go by car, I can throw couple ammo crates into the trunk. If on foot, each of us takes couple mags and some small amount of ammo in the pack. We have guns that can be easily carried concealed - aside of pistols it's AKSU74, 12"Fabarm stock-less shotgun, vz.61, shortened vz.58 with folding stock, KPOS2 PDW set for Glock  - all of that can be hidden in a small handbag, some sportsware pouch or just under coat easily - if the emergency situation would  be serious enough to be so armed, yet not enough to open carry them.

Well, that's about my BOB plans, based on my local situation.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on October 22, 2013, 12:59:12 PM
I guess my BOB concept is a little different. I actualy don't have a BOB! That's right.  I carry some stuff all the time and the rest can be packed quickly.

. . .snip. . .

So that was my EDC stuff. Now let's see the rest. Even if I had a classic BOB, I'd still have to pack stuff like food, sleeping gear, clothes and such. So what's the point? My apartment is quite small, so I know well where all my things are.

. . .snip. . .

Well, the general idea comes now: how fast can an emergency situation happen in my area? Which leads to how quickly do I need to pack. Flood is known of days ago. Wildfires don't happen here, not dry enough. No earthquakes in this part of the world. No sea-related danger as we're inland country. No known active vulcanos. Not much mood for a large scale riots or civil war - and if it was, it's not gonna happen just overnight.

With all of that in mind, I really don't need a classic BOB much. I work 15-20 minutes walk from my place. I can leave work and be on road/on foot in much less than hour. Having my EDC on me, I'm already well equipped in fact. When I come home, I'll take the backpack and fill it with spare clothes, food, ammo and other necessary stuff.

. . .snip. . .

Well, that's about my BOB plans, based on my local situation.


And if you wake up one night discovering your apartment building on fire, smoke rolling in under the door and the knob too hot to touch?

How long will it take you get your stuff together?

I'm sure Renter's Insurance will cover it all, but I don't want to explain all my kit contents to the insurance company, assuming they'll accept anything without receipts.

The idea of a BOB is for quick egress.  As an example, if my house caught on fire while I'm taking a shower, I can be out the door/window with my kit in under a minute.

I'll at least have the basics to survive if my house burns to the ground.  I may not have to sleep under a tarp in the back yard, but I'll have a set of clothes, a way to defend myself, food for a while and my personal documents all together in one place.

And while riots may not happen in a blink of an eye (they do, btw), what happens if you get home and find out the neo-Nazis have, once again, decided to eradicate some Roma people that they think are in your area?  Those Molotov Cocktails can't tell the difference between good and bad, involved and uninvolved.

To each his own.

The Professor

<<edited for spelling errors>>
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Knecht on October 23, 2013, 01:33:49 AM
Don't want to spam the thread any further with BOB-unrelated stuff, so just briefly: Neonazis? Don't know what kind of news do you read/watch, but there's little neonazi danger here. EDITED BY MODERATOR Any real fights are highly rare though, don't know what the foreign media say about it. And I doubt molotovs can be thrown up to 10th floor, if any riots start. Plus it's not likely to happen in this part of the city, there are better places to do so and everyone knows them... The house is an old commie era concrete block of flats, those don't burn very well (although the smoke can still kill you inside, so evacuation is a good idea), so if a fire started elsewhere than my apartment, I'm not likely to lose my possessions (sure, they may get damaged by firefighting and such). Also, even if the house burned to the ground and fell apart, we've got our families to stay with and help us, just like we would help them. So it's not like I would stand in front of the burning house, having nowhere to go. No need for a bag with water filter, matches and hobo stove at that moment (even if I needed a survival kit, I have some in my car). The apartment is not mine, it's rented - no harm done to me. I don't keep much cash money there and have little real valuables, aside of guns. My laptop isn't worth much and the data is backuped elsewhere. So, grabbing my EDC bag is quite enough (ID, driving license, gun license, credit card, some cash, car keys plus all the stuff I described above, including medic kit, couple knives and a pistol with ammo). If I have time to open the safe and sling my rifles on me, then good. If not, I just run to the stairs with wet bandana on my face... can't do much more. Got a gasmask, but those aren't actualy much helpful in fire.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Mr. Bill on October 24, 2013, 12:40:04 PM
MODERATOR NOTE:

A few things that are unacceptable on TSP Forum:

Thread has been cleaned up.  Back to bug-out bags, please.

edit: archer
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Ms. Albatross on December 27, 2013, 05:53:27 PM
Most people who have children also had a BOB for their kids.  Many parents pack items to keep their kids occupied/entertained.  Things like coloring books and crayons, packs of cards, MadLibs, etc.  My daughter just introduced me to something new that was a lot of fun for both kids and adults.  It was Bananagrams.

It's a Scrabble-like game without a board.  The letters tiles come in a banana-shaped zippered pouch.  It is fairly small and could be played anywhere.

Here's a link to it on Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Bananagrams-BAN001/dp/1932188126/ref=pd_bxgy_t_text_z

(http://i01.i.aliimg.com/img/pb/148/214/621/621214148_547.jpg)

The same company also makes Appleletters which comes in an apple-shaped pouch and Pairsinpears, which, surprise, comes in a pear shaped pouch.

I'll bet you could make your own if you came across some cheap Scrabble games at garage sale.  Just salvage all the letters and find/make a zippered pouch.  There are instructions on the internet on how to play the game.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Docwatmo on December 30, 2013, 08:25:26 AM
yep, we have that game at home, The bag tore because we used it so much and it's all in a ziplock bag now.  It is a GREAT game!!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Badhog on January 01, 2014, 06:26:45 PM
One thing I've decided as I'm making my BOB is anything I cut out is going into a large duffel bag I keep next to it. The bag will have extra food, water, and clothing in the event I'm able to take a vehicle.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on January 03, 2014, 03:13:13 PM
good job... I did something similar with setting a support bag.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on January 03, 2014, 03:58:45 PM
I've done similar, too.  I have one bag that's just my extreme cold weather gear.  It pays just to keep stuff organized and ready to go. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: OutWestTX on January 04, 2014, 02:01:35 AM
What does everyone do about prescriptions in their BOB?  Since my bag is to get home, I don't keep much in my bag.  Just wondering what others do.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on January 04, 2014, 03:26:12 AM
I would like to expand on this, whether the personnal meds be included in the FirstAid kit or in a seprate place in the BOB
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on January 04, 2014, 06:37:16 AM
I keep one of those stainless steel keyfob pill bottles filled with three days worth of my meed in my GHB. I get my prescriptions filled at a national chain, so could potentially refill anywhere.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on January 04, 2014, 10:22:17 AM
We're lucky.  Neither my wife nor I need prescription "maintenance" meds. 

However, I might suggest that, for those who need such things, keeping them in a crush-proof container on  their person would be the way to go.  This way, if you have to dump the back for the sake of speed or someone steals it, you have at least a short-term solution.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Badhog on January 04, 2014, 11:25:22 AM
The Professor makes a really good point. If I were on any kind of prescriptions necessary for me to stay alive I'd think about a fanny pack or some kind of setup on my belt or pants where I'd always keep them on me. Maybe even one of those packs jewelers wear that's hidden under your clothing. Like he said if you lose your pack for any reason you'd have them with you.  It would also make them easier to rotate.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: mech7.62 on January 04, 2014, 02:23:48 PM
My EDC GOOD bag has to go through multiple security checks so I've found that minimal works best for me. Snacks, fluid, para cord, and a marine radio because I work on the coast.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bob3 on January 13, 2014, 07:30:16 PM
This weekend I packed to go camping for one night and one day with my 11 year old son.  It took two hours to pack -- for a trip of about 22 hours.  Sure, we hadn't camped much or regularly, I wanted to forget nothing, and I didn't want to spend any money, but two things struck me hard.  1)  Thinking through what we needed/wanted for such a brief time was HARD.  2) If I didn't have the budget, it would have been easy, as we would have stopped along the way after thinking of something and just bought it.  So, I'm reconfiguring my BOB as follows.

If even a mini SHTF on a personal level, I'd rather buy what I need when I know I need it that try and guess ahead of time.  I'll save the money or segregate the credit card and spend/use it to buy the things I know I need in that particular situation.  YES, YES, I know the assumption here is that such things will be available, but the most likely local or personal catastrophes won't affect the regional supply chain.  Sure, I'll have a BOB, but the key thing in it will be a credit card and/or cash.

But it won't be the only thing in it.  MY focus won't be on things needed to survive three days, just the first few hours to get out of the affected area.  The classics of flashlight, knife, CCW, water, and powerbars, but also a few morale and information items to maintain a sense of normalcy and control for all involved so we keep our heads in the short-term crisis. 

All this is aimed at a more common set of problems, not a regional catastrophe like a hurricane, blizzard, floods, etc, for which bugging in might be a better solution, or more time to prepare will be available.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on January 14, 2014, 12:08:53 AM
You taking so long for packing reminds me of me in my school/college days.
You need a checklist (maybe sorted in groups of function) and yuo need to keep yuor backpack stuffed and ready.
After all backpacking gear and BOB have many commonalities
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Badhog on January 15, 2014, 01:40:19 PM
Bob3, having been in a disaster that hit with only 24 hours notice I would strongly advice against that. If something is going down shopping should be the last thing on your list.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: sbarber on January 24, 2014, 11:56:19 AM
Bob 3
I can see why that is route the you are choosing for your BOB or short term emergency kit but I hope it isn't the tactic that you take for all of your preparedness it seems to me that segregating money and credit cards is an extremely short sighted thing to do. I think that it only puts you one notch abovee the rest of the unprepared citizenry and that notch being because of a slight amount of fore thought. I think that preparing for personal emergency should also include things like being stuck on the side of the road for a day or so in which case a credit card wouldn't help so much or many other things where a credit card and some cash wouldn't help you very much. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on January 24, 2014, 02:32:47 PM
     I agree with Bob3 on having some familiar comfort items, for the psychological boost they may provide. One important thing for me is a watch. I have an older Casio G-Shock in my bag. It's run by a battery, but it's a ten year lithium. Think how dependent we are on knowing what time it is or how much time has past. Even a conformation of the day and date might help. And it is possible to tell directions on a sunny day using a digital watch if you know the trick.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Medicineball on May 07, 2014, 07:43:34 PM
I am concerned about the storage of medications in my BOB, which is in my trunk. I live in Kansas, and it gets hot. I read an article in the science section of the NYT that some medications are rendered ineffective just a few HOURS in the hot trunk of a car. (The story began with the author recounting how he made a five hour trip to discover on arriving that his son's prescription allergy meds were no longer effective.) Does anyone know of any additional info on this? Google didn't yield much. I currently rotate the OTC meds in my FAK every few months.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Roswell on May 09, 2014, 09:09:04 AM
I think this is true Medicineball.  If I were you, I'd make a much smaller bag for your meds and maybe add foodstuffs to it. maybe a MOLLE pouch that can buckle on to your large bag.  Take the small pouch with you when you go inside. Depending on the meds, you may want them close anyway.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on May 09, 2014, 07:33:47 PM
I am concerned about the storage of medications in my BOB, which is in my trunk. I live in Kansas, and it gets hot. I read an article in the science section of the NYT that some medications are rendered ineffective just a few HOURS in the hot trunk of a car. (The story began with the author recounting how he made a five hour trip to discover on arriving that his son's prescription allergy meds were no longer effective.) Does anyone know of any additional info on this? Google didn't yield much. I currently rotate the OTC meds in my FAK every few months.

Were it me, I would have a small go-kit solely of meds that I need.  I'd keep one at my home and at my work.  That way, if a situation DOES come up, I have a small bag that I can grab and throw in my kit.

Not knowing what types of meds you need, this may or may not be applicable.  But, perhaps not walking out the door without two or three days of meds in your pocket may be possible, as well.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Dainty on May 09, 2014, 11:17:32 PM
I am concerned about the storage of medications in my BOB, which is in my trunk. I live in Kansas, and it gets hot. I read an article in the science section of the NYT that some medications are rendered ineffective just a few HOURS in the hot trunk of a car. (The story began with the author recounting how he made a five hour trip to discover on arriving that his son's prescription allergy meds were no longer effective.) Does anyone know of any additional info on this? Google didn't yield much. I currently rotate the OTC meds in my FAK every few months.

It would be enlightening to hear precisely which "prescription allergy meds" were rendered ineffective in the article you read.

Unable to find it myself at the moment, my guess is that it was an EpiPen, since antihistamines wouldn't be definitive about actual drug ineffectiveness vs. the allergic reaction simply occurring too quickly/severely for the antihistamine to work properly. Whereas it's easy to spot when an EpiPen is ineffective - the medication discolors. And yes, they're very heat-sensitive. Then again, their use is designed for accessibility within seconds, which means they shouldn't end up in any more extreme temperatures than the average person is comfortable with. This medication wouldn't belong in the trunk - it belongs on or near the person who might need it. At all times.

Any concerns about specific meds should be brought to your pharmacist. Those folks are a wealth of info on drugs, and I find they're often very eager to help and share what they know. I recently peppered my pharmacist with a plethora of questions about the safety of my expired prescription drugs and came away from the conversation satisfied that I could make fully informed decisions about them.

Generally, I'd suggest that most meds within expiration may be assumed effective even if stored in a hot car. At worst, marginally less effective. But that's totally a layperson's opinion and you should take it with a shake of salt. ;)

To get more on topic, I keep a stash of my meds both in the car kit and as EDC, though EpiPens are only in the latter due to the heat issue (on-body would be even better...working on it). The car kit is more like back-up/addendum to what I always have with me, in case my purse goes poof or I'm surprised by an extended stay somewhere. I swap out with expiration. OTC meds I'd use are approached the same way.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: sbarber on May 19, 2014, 11:51:11 AM
I also keep a stepic pen in my bob and edc. It is a stick of aluminum sulfate in a plastic tube. It is meant for sealing shaving knicks. It also works on all manner of small cuts. It is vasoconstrictor and Antihemorrhagic which stop bleeding fast. I have only used it on small cuts and scratches. It works well! I like it because it weighs less then the amount of bandaids need to stop the all the bleeding it can stop. Little cuts are the ones that will kill you if not taken care in a bug out situation.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on May 19, 2014, 12:19:05 PM
I also keep a stepic pen in my bob and edc. It is a stick of aluminum sulfate in a plastic tube. It is meant for sealing shaving knicks. It also works on all manner of small cuts. It is vasoconstrictor and Antihemorrhagic which stop bleeding fast. I have only used it on small cuts and scratches. It works well! I like it because it weighs less then the amount of bandaids need to stop the all the bleeding it can stop. Little cuts are the ones that will kill you if not taken care in a bug out situation.
I'm not sure about this use in a SHTF.  In general, bleeding helps flush dirt and debris out of a wound and reduces the chance of infection.  Without having an environment where you can thoroughly clean the area of a cut with soap and water, I might be hesitant to stop bleeding too quickly.  An alternative that actually seals small cuts might be something like New Skin (http://www.newskinproducts.com/en/Products/Liquid_Bandage.aspx).  I use this stuff on papercuts at the office all the time and it works well on the little stuff.  Of course, I wash my hands before using it.  I'd be just as concerned about sealing in germs if I couldn't clean the wound.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on May 21, 2014, 04:38:56 PM
For anyone who's interested, I posted an update to my BOB on the "Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bag" thread.

It turns out my original posting was done about 5 years ago, so I thought it might be interesting to update it.

Here's the direct link to the updated kit:

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=1508.msg564381#msg564381 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=1508.msg564381#msg564381)

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on May 24, 2014, 01:44:28 PM
     I just received delivery of a Solostove and two of their brass alcohol burners. I was looking for something other than fuel tablets and a "wing" burner for my kit. An incentive was that they offered 10% off and free shipping. The Solostove is a genius design, compact, lightweight and beautifully crafted out of stainless steel. It will burn any "found" woodland materials in a gasifier fashion. The alcohol burners are solid brass and similar to Trangia burners. They seal securely with a gasketed cover and have a combination snuffer/flame regulator. The burner is sized to work with the stove or could be used in other "hobo" stove designs. They are almost too nice to use.
     The stove produces little smoke and the alcohol burner is great for a more covert situation. I carry a 32oz. nalgene bottle of 190 proof vodka as fuel, antiseptic and "snake bite tonic". I've combined the Solostove with the Stanley cookset and stainless cup. The fuel bottle fits in the Stanley set with an aluminum windsceen that I made. The alcohol burner fits in the stove.
     By the way, a good way to make "roll-up" windscreens for small stoves is to get a roll of aluminum flashing material from a Home Depot or Menards type building supply. You can cut it with scissors and by making interlocking tabs, it will form a cylinder when assembled, to fit over your stove. I used a paperpunch to make air vents around the bottom edge. It rolls up to fit inside my cookset. The second burner is for my wifes kit, with a homemade potstand and the same cookset combination.
     I have no connection with the Solostove folks, I'm just a satisfied customer and wanted to pass along my recommendation.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: signalsurvival on November 12, 2014, 03:21:24 AM
I think there are 7 basic types of gear you must have in your Bug Out Bag.

Water, food, clothing, shelter, weapons, first aid kit and basic gears.

Regarding First Aid Kit it should be included in bug out bag. Besides the bug out bags are designed according to the different conditions such as Urban Survival Kit Deluxe, Disaster Preparedness Kit and 72 Hour Emergency Survival Bug Out Bag. All theses kits are made to handle the conditions carefully.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on November 19, 2014, 12:35:10 AM
My bug out bag nowadays is also my EDC bag, my bedside table, my desk, my kitchen, and my sock drawer. The situation my bag is prepared for? My daily life! 
What I carry, in no particular order:
Phone chargers (including wall charger, car charger, and battery powered backup charger)
iHome speaker for my phone
Dental hygiene stuff
Mess kit (MSR Seagull pot, cheap tin cup and plate from a crappy Coleman mess kit, spoon and fork. These are the only dishes I personally own.)
Esbit stove (with plenty of fuel)
Roughly a couple days worth of food in freeze dried meals and snacks 
130 lumen headlamp (I use this literally all the time)
100 lumen headlamp (backup/share with coworker)
Flashlight
Batteries for everything
First aid kit
Glasses cleaning kit
Tea and stuff
Pocket bible
Pocket notebook
Winter clothes (wool socks, thermal underwear, gloves, face mask, etc)
Survival gear: matches, candles, emergency blanket, water purification tablets, stout little garden trowel with saw side, light sticks)
2 liter Camelbak

I can take my pack hiking with *most* of this crap in it and take on the local 2800 ft elevation gain 4 mile hike pretty easily.
I also have a couple external pouches I can add with more food and preps to turn it into a 72 hour kit.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on November 19, 2014, 01:01:17 AM
good and simple
but not even a poncho?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on November 19, 2014, 01:08:46 AM
I have a poncho-rain jacket thing rolled up strapped to the outside that I totally forgot about lol. I normally keep a spare light jacket/flannel shirt there too.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on November 19, 2014, 09:00:19 AM
BOB  =  Break Our Backs
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Cedar on November 19, 2014, 09:29:24 AM
BOB  =  Break Our Backs

Not if you do it right...
Most people overpack. Even when they had wagons.

http://books.google.com/books?id=0H7OAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA60&lpg=PA60&dq=oregon+trail+littered+with+household&source=bl&ots=-F02bC9GGY&sig=AsGIz0ajV_i8tWhldcntqAsrZwI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=CcNsVMODCJOdygS52IDIDw&ved=0CCMQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=oregon%20trail%20littered%20with%20household&f=false

Z I think is delusional. His pack weighs a lot, I am guessing 90 pounds? I am sure if we had to BO, he would be dropping a bunch out of his. He doesn't hike, he is getting a beer belly. He has a desk job, except for working on the farm on weekends. But it is his pack, he can deal with it.

My goal today is to (clean my truck) bring all the BOB's in from their various places (trucks, house etc), go through them and reweigh them. I like mine around 40 pounds, as I might have to end up carrying SP too. I try to do this quarterly, but I think I am behind 4 months on them. Need to change up SP's clothing, switch out/around some upgraded gear, put new thermal touques into the BOBs. Even SP has her own BOB, it is around 5 pounds.

Cedar
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on November 19, 2014, 09:48:36 AM
Brandi,my dog (avatar) has a vest that carries about 12 pounds of 'her' gear and she likes to show it off to the neighbor dogs.
She carries her own water bottle and milk bones...started as a joke,but could come in handy.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Cedar on November 19, 2014, 12:00:17 PM
Brandi,my dog (avatar) has a vest that carries about 12 pounds of 'her' gear and she likes to show it off to the neighbor dogs.
She carries her own water bottle and milk bones...started as a joke,but could come in handy.

I made all my animals carry their own gear. Up to 20-25% of their weight. Which was 32# for my last dog. Make sure to put all the gear inside waterproof bags in their packs if they are water loving animals.

Cedar
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Ms. Albatross on January 24, 2015, 06:39:12 PM
(http://www.utahsweetsavings.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/TaoTronics-TT-CL002-Ultra-Bright-Led-Lantern-Collapsible-Light-Weight-Camping-Lantern.png)

Bought this from Amazon for my bug-out bag.  Got it yesterday.  Compact, light-weight, bright light.

price is normally 19.99.  I got with a discount code for 9.99.  But the deal has expired.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00QWPGF7Y/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Fusilier on February 05, 2015, 09:49:57 AM
There a gazillion threads, books, online videos covering Bug Out Bags or BOBs. I’m starting posting this for a couple of reasons: 1. Some of my ideals might just be helpful or at least interesting to someone; and 2. If I post my intentions and progress, I’ll feel compelled to complete the project.

I have two sons, aged 15 and 18. I figure I can put together workable BOBs for the three of us. Perhaps once I get this all done I can begin the long and arduous process of bringing my wife onside. So first off, my plan is to make three basically identical BOBs. Once I get the basic kits completed, the boys can then tweak them to their hearts content. Or more likely, completely ignore them until the day they move out of the house.

First off, I decided to collect all the BOB’s contents AND THEN figure out what bag they’ll go into. I figure a lot of people start with the bag because they figure that’s where to start. I wholeheartedly disagree as it is not the bag you’re going to need in an emergency, it’s the stuff inside.

So in the corner of my den I currently have three brand new food grade 5 Gal buckets (once the BOBs are complete, the buckets will get cleaned and repurposed for food storage) with brand new Gamma-Seal lids (I love those things). As I put together another BOB item (in quantity 3) I just toss it into each bucket and tick it off the list.

The best thing about using the bucket process is that everything is organized in one location and I can move them around if I have to. And to add to that idea, if the crap hits before I complete the project, I could even just take the buckets and what they have so far with us in the car.

Next I assessed the most likely need for these BOBs. I do not expect we’ll be using these for heading into the Nova Scotia highlands to survive in the woods. The most likely need them if we have to either evacuate our home on short notice. Here in Halifax Metro there have been two instances in the last month where authorities have issued mandatory evacuation orders. One was a local water reservoir system dam was identified as putting down stream homes at imminent risk. The second case was someone was found to be stockpiling dangerous chemicals in a small residential house (the individual has been arrested and is working his way through the legal system). Note we were not located anywhere near either ‘ground zero’ but they are reminders that these things can happen in the strangest places on a moment’s notice.

Even more likely for us, my dad lives a good 5 hours drive away and is getting older and on occasion we drive up and back in a day to help him with the pool or the house or something. I usually toss the basics of an overnight bag in the car for these trips in case we have to stop for the night for some reason. I can easily see tossing these BOBs in the car for these trips as they’ll easily support spending a day or even 3 on the road somewhere.

Next I started out with putting together my list – detailed below. I use Google Docs to allow me to play with the list from home or work on break. I am an amateur stitcher so I sew up my own pouches and bags. You could use zip lock bags if you like but I prefer a fabric bag with a zipper or a draw string as they are more resilient.

Based on the concept that this is a 72 hour bag for living in a hotel, or a friend’s place, or even in a car, it helps me build the contents list. No machetes, no hammocks/tarps/tents, no sleeping bags, no hunting/fishing kits. A good toiletry kit and 3 days of clothes and a limited amount of food is more important. Now, once I collect everything and try to stuff it into a suitable bag, then I’ll see what else I have room for and then I’ll adjust fire from there.

Now I’m working my way down the list, one or two items at a time. Some of the items are DIY like the toiletry bags, the note tags and a few others. Some of the items I already have laying around the house so I had to go find them. I had to / have to buy some things too of course so I’m assembling them over time.

Here is my detailed list. Comments and suggestions are welcome. I won’t get into a discussion on my basic philosophy (a 72 hour living under a roof somewhere) for now. Everyone has to decide what their basic design concept is and run with it. In the meantime, at least I’m starting and as I’m well on my way to the first basic BOB. I can always branch out later.

I’ll post some photos this weekend if I get the chance.

Bug Out Bag (BOB) 2015 v 2.0

Carrier Pack
   Suitable Backpack
   Laminated ID Tag (w name, phone number, perhaps e-mail)
   3 Mil Plastic bag to line pack
Toiletry Kit
   My small sewn pouch
   Soap case
   Bar of Soap
   Toothbrush
   Toothpaste
   Small Purel/sanitizer
   Moist Towelettes/baby wipes
   Small compacted, water expanding towelettes
   2 x Disposable Razors (my bag only)
   Dental Floss or individual floss/picks
   Q Tips
   Laminated ID tag
   Small Bottle of Shampoo
   Deodorant
Cash
   My small sewn zipper change purse
   5 x Loonies (1 dollar Canadian coins)
   5 x Toonies (2 dollar Canadian coins)
   4 x $5 bills
Light
   Headlamp
   LED Light
   Vacuum bagged spare batteries
Tools
   Tool bag
   Knife
   Lifeboat matches
   Lighter
   Permanent match w fuel
   Notepad
   Mechanical Pencils
   Sharpie Marker
   Sewing Kit
   Gaffers Tape
   Pen
   Zip Ties
   2 x Glue Sticks
Rations and Water
   Lifeboat ration bars
   Granola/Energy Bars
   Hard Candies
   Bottles of water, 2 litres
   SS Water Bottle
   Life Straw
   Canteen Cup (for eating, drinking, boiling or cooking)
   Knife, Fork, Spoon
Clothes
   Cargo Pants
   Sweat pants / PJ pants
   3 x T Shirts
   3 x Underwear
   3 x Pairs of Socks
   Flip flops / lightweight travel slippers
   Touque / watch cap / hat
First Aid
   First Aid Kit (Purchased from shtfshop.com – or whatever one you want)
   Israeli Dressing
Misc
   Pack of playing cards
   6 x write on note tags w twist ties (for marking unattended kit or leaving notes/directions for friends/family)
   Para cord - perhaps skeined and on outside of pack
   Small self-storing fabric shopping bag (for foraging or shopping)
   Space Blanket
   Kleenex
   Towel
   Zip Lock baggies
   Plastic bags for dirty laundry or garbage (blue recycle bags with string)
   3 x Small postage size envelopes
   Padlock w keys
   House Key on Paracord Fob
   Copy of Eyeglasses Prescription
   Disposable poncho
   3mm green plastic bag
   3mm clear plastic bag
   Fox Whistle
Information
   Address book
   Maps to RV locations
   Family Photos
   Survival Info Cards
   Knots Cards/booklet
   Family Communication Plan card
   Flash Drive with important info
Optional/Other
   Sun screen
   Small portable radio (w batteries if not AAA)
   Bug Juice
   Multitool
   GMRS/FRS Radios w batteries/charger
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Badhog on February 12, 2015, 10:14:32 PM
It may not be perfect, but that  Small self-storing fabric shopping bag could also be stuffed with leaves and used as a pillow.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: trekker111 on June 10, 2015, 01:43:36 AM
I do not have a BOB per se, more of a GHB, and its contents are highly unusual due to my job. If I for some reason had to ditch my car, couldn't get a coworker to pick me up, and had to set out on foot there are several items of a sensitive nature that I would have to take with me. So, I would be carrying:

In a sniper drag bag:
Remington 700p (308 winchester), binoculars, rifle data book, spotting scope and tripod, wind meter, humidity and temperature meter, bean bags, camo face paint, several assorted sniper veils, 200 rounds of hornady 168gr TAP A-Max ammo, and a ghillie rifle cover.

In a small backpack suspended on the drag bag:
3 MREs, an assortment of granola and power bars, a couple bottles of water, small guage wire, 2 chem lights, a spare pair of socks, compass, hatchet, trauma kit, first aid kit, at least 100ft of 550 cord, Mora companion knife, 12 aa batteries, 2 123A batteries, a couple chem lights, 1 lime fuel 20,000mah battery pack, my buck nighthawk knife i've had sincebi was in the army,a head lamp, and I'm sure there are some odds and ends I left out, plus a ghillie suit hanging underneath.

My guns:
Glock 22 with a total of 4 15rnd magazines, glock 27 with total of 2 9rnd mags, Colt M4LE with 10.5" barrel, aimpoint comp ml2, surefire tlr1 mounted light, single point sling w/ a pmag of federal tactical rifle urban 55gr, a pmag of m855, and 10 more rounds of the TRU in a 20rnd colt mag. Remington 870p with 9 rounds of Remington 2¾" #1 buckshot, 5 polyshok slugs, 3 bean bags, 2 cs ferret rounds.

The rest of my EDC:
Bic lighter, magnesium fire starter, camillius barracuda folder, Boy scouts of America Deluxe pocket knife.

That's just the stuff that is going to be in my vehicle anyway, and do not want to leave behind. The stuff I added for GHB purposes is a katydyn hiker water filter pump, a pill bottle of strike anywhere matches, pill bottle of Vaseline cotton balls, bag of trail mix and a couple cans of Vienna sausages.

I would also toss in both my vhf and 800mhz portable radios, and headset. I would ditch the duty belt but take the oc spray, taser, and 2pr handcuffs. I haven't worked out a good way of taking the heavy entry vest, but would hate to leave it and it's too big and heavy to wear more than a few hundred yards (it will supposedly stop a 300 win mag point blank but I'm not willing to test that), and a concealable vest. I also carry a case of bottled water and would stuff as many as would fit in the empty spaces. I have clothes in the trunk to change into if possible.

A lot of this will depend on the situation, and the distance I need to go, since at any given time I could be anywhere in just over 500 square miles, and leaving this car is a last ditch desperate act.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on June 10, 2015, 08:37:43 AM
I do not have a BOB per se, more of a GHB, and its contents are highly unusual due to my job. If I for some reason had to ditch my car, couldn't get a coworker to pick me up, and had to set out on foot there are several items of a sensitive nature that I would have to take with me. So, I would be carrying:

In a sniper drag bag:
Remington 700p (308 winchester), binoculars, rifle data book, spotting scope and tripod, wind meter, humidity and temperature meter, bean bags, camo face paint, several assorted sniper veils, 200 rounds of hornady 168gr TAP A-Max ammo, and a ghillie rifle cover.

In a small backpack suspended on the drag bag:
3 MREs, an assortment of granola and power bars, a couple bottles of water, small guage wire, 2 chem lights, a spare pair of socks, compass, hatchet, trauma kit, first aid kit, at least 100ft of 550 cord, Mora companion knife, 12 aa batteries, 2 123A batteries, a couple chem lights, 1 lime fuel 20,000mah battery pack, my buck nighthawk knife i've had sincebi was in the army,a head lamp, and I'm sure there are some odds and ends I left out, plus a ghillie suit hanging underneath.

My guns:
Glock 22 with a total of 4 15rnd magazines, glock 27 with total of 2 9rnd mags, Colt M4LE with 10.5" barrel, aimpoint comp ml2, surefire tlr1 mounted light, single point sling w/ a pmag of federal tactical rifle urban 55gr, a pmag of m855, and 10 more rounds of the TRU in a 20rnd colt mag. Remington 870p with 9 rounds of Remington 2¾" #1 buckshot, 5 polyshok slugs, 3 bean bags, 2 cs ferret rounds.

The rest of my EDC:
Bic lighter, magnesium fire starter, camillius barracuda folder, Boy scouts of America Deluxe pocket knife.

That's just the stuff that is going to be in my vehicle anyway, and do not want to leave behind. The stuff I added for GHB purposes is a katydyn hiker water filter pump, a pill bottle of strike anywhere matches, pill bottle of Vaseline cotton balls, bag of trail mix and a couple cans of Vienna sausages.

I would also toss in both my vhf and 800mhz portable radios, and headset. I would ditch the duty belt but take the oc spray, taser, and 2pr handcuffs. I haven't worked out a good way of taking the heavy entry vest, but would hate to leave it and it's too big and heavy to wear more than a few hundred yards (it will supposedly stop a 300 win mag point blank but I'm not willing to test that), and a concealable vest. I also carry a case of bottled water and would stuff as many as would fit in the empty spaces. I have clothes in the trunk to change into if possible.

A lot of this will depend on the situation, and the distance I need to go, since at any given time I could be anywhere in just over 500 square miles, and leaving this car is a last ditch desperate act.

I'd add a couple items:
A gas siphon & can
A couple cans of fix-a-flat

There, now you don't have to leave it. ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on June 10, 2015, 10:20:37 AM
     I've opted not to include firearms in my 72hr. GBH BOB. I will in all likelyhood be alone. This is not a long term rig; two or three nights and two or three days. I can't afford to be in a gun battle nor do I have the skills to prevail against a group of armed thugs. One bullet and I'm essentially screwed. Avoidance of conflict is my strategy. Getting home is my goal. I want to travel fast and get to my place of refuge before it gets to the point where people start to prey on one another. I figure there will be a couple of day window before it all goes to hell (depending on the nature and severity of the event). Even when a town is destroyed by flood, fire, or weather, I have yet to see people killing strangers over a can of beans (yes, Katrina was a close call). I have firepower at home and in my vehicle. If I have to leave one to get to the safety of the other, I will have defensive gear available. On the road I don't want to appear as a "super trooper" with a big bullseye on my back. Also, there may still be some semblance of order in the form of police or National Guard checkpoints. They may not be too welcoming to a heavily armed and armored "civilian" who looks like he's ready for a fight. I want to get a smile and a wave through under such a circumstance. In my mind, the best BOB is a "Hello Kitty" or "My little Pony" book bag. If you have to carry a weapon, put the Glock and spare mags in a "Scobby Doo" lunchbox.   
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Bolomark on October 04, 2015, 07:19:18 AM
engineer775 just started this site uses real life data and amazon.com to help you design and stock a bug out bag check it out when you get time :clap:

http://www.ebugout.com/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2ZfR6kZn5c
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Odin's Son on October 17, 2015, 10:26:31 AM
So here is my pack list. It changes every week I swear but here it is.  if you have any questions about what something is or why I carry it please ask!  I'm always looking for good suggestions too, so please leave any ideas you have for me.  (edit) Not included in this bag are the things I carry on me or in my truck.  this is what is in the bag at all times.

Bottom of pack
     Dry-bag
o   BDU pants (jungle camo)
o   Thermal bottoms
o   T-shirt (OD ZETA)
o   Wool socks
o   Underwear
o   BDU top
o   More Socks & Silk socks
     Mess Kit
o   Sawyer bottle filter
Main compartment
Para-cord 100’
Skivy Roll in Zip-lock bag
Gun Cleaning Kit (black husky bag)
o   .40 cal bore snake
o   6 Rem oil wipes
o   Long Q-tips
o   Brushes and rod inside handle
o   Balloons
Snares x3
Tool Bag (black zip with molle)
o   Roll of Quarters 10$
o   Saw
o   Skinning Knives (Remington 3 knife set)
o   Gorilla tape
o   Electrical Tape
o   Small & med zip ties
o   Fishing line  #10 x 100yds
o   All in one Screwdriver
o   3 in 1 Oil
o   Crescent wrench
Fishing Kit (blue mesh bag)
o   Fish Hooks & Lures
o   Fishing Line 10# x100yds
o   Bobbers
o   Yoyo x3
o   Mouse traps x2
   Zip Ties
o   15 x 36”
o   11 x 24”
Boonie Hat (multi cam)
Emergency Blanket
Personal Hygiene Kit (Green Mesh Bag)
o   Tooth Brush & Paste
o   Foot Powder
o   Bug repellent
o   Lip Balm
o   Sunscreen
o   Soap & Deodorant
o   Nail clippers
Medical kit & Sewing
Alarm Kit (black husky bag)
o   Rat trap
o   Wire
o   Fishing Line 10# 100yds green
o   Zip ties black
o   Screws x10
o   Chem light x3
o   12ga 00buck x5
Fire Making Kit (Red Husky Zip Bag)
o   Matches
o   Dryer Lint
o   Wax cotton balls
o   Lighter
o   Pencil sharpener
o   Magnesium fire starter
Money
o   Paper 1’s & 5’s  x$100 (60)
o   Quarters  x$10
o   1 roll pre65 dimes
o   Silver Chart
o   Silver rounds  x2oz (1)
Zip Lock bags
Large Black Trash Bags
Sharpies
Quick Dry Towel (micro-fiber)
Leather Gloves
Ammo .40cal x50
Side Pockets
Canteen with cup
Bug out bottle with filter
Half Axe
Top
MRE’s  x 3
Drink mixes x8
Seasoning packets x10
Honey & Syrup
Booze
Vitamins
Outside
Poncho
Camo Tarp 5.5x7.5
Sleepmat/Roll
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ncjeeper on October 17, 2015, 04:15:24 PM
How much does your bag weigh Oldin?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on October 17, 2015, 07:13:47 PM
How much does your bag weigh Oldin?

I would guess ONLY 60 pounds or so...
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Odin's Son on October 17, 2015, 08:16:17 PM
With water in it, 53lbs.  I also figure in 10lbs for rifle, pistol and ammo.  7lbs of miscellaneous.  That brings the grand total to about 70lbs.  I already know what yall are going to yell at your computer screens.  TOO HEAVY.  I know, I know.  I thought the same thing and have time and time again changed gear and leaned it out.  What I learned in the end was instead of making my pack/gear lighter, I needed to make my self stronger/harder.  So that's what I did and what im still working on.  I placed a 25lb weight into my pack and me and my dog go for at least 3 walks a week.  What I have learned is I can keep up a 20min/mile pace for about 10 miles.  At about the 10 mile mark, my pace slows down.  That's over fairly flat terrain, though.  In the foot hills its more like 30min/mile.  The wife and I are good for about 20 miles with normal breaks until we are looking for a place to camp.  My path from couch potato to where I am now has led me through a divorce, second marriage, 3 jobs and weight loss totaling about 80lbs.  but that's another post all together.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: ncjeeper on October 18, 2015, 12:37:17 AM
That brings the grand total to about 70lbs.
Ouch.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Docwatmo on October 19, 2015, 05:40:33 AM
Heavy vs light is only an issue if you don't know what your intentions are.  if I'm "Road Marching" which we did many times in the army, hauling 60lbs of bag, 20 lbs of gear AND an M60 with a 16 slung over your ruck.  I've done 21 miles that way.  (the last 4 miles with both the spare barrel AND the tripod after my 2 assistant gunners dropped out).  Is it fun?  Hell no, Is it doable, Yep, is it something I'd want to do under fire?  F^%$ no.    If my goal is to just get from point A to point B and point B DOES NOT contain any gear, then it's ok to run heavy.  If I'm going from point A to point B and point B has a good cache, then I'm rolling  much lighter.  If I'm going from point A to point B and i'm under fire or expected contact, then I'm going light with extra ammo.   If I have no idea what is happening and going from point A to point B and I don't know if the cache will be available, I'm going medium to medium heavy.    There are just too many variables to say what is too much or what is not enough.    The one thing I do know, if I start out too heavy, I can always drop gear as I go.  if I start out too light and need something I didn't bring, yeah, that's not good either.  I like to roll somewhere in the middle.  My current kit is right at about 25 lbs (not including weapon and ammo or cold weather gear).  So I have some flexibility. 

There is no "Too Heavy" unless it's too heavy for you.  I'm also a 6 foot 3,  270 lb guy, I can haul a lot more than someone half my size for example. 

Basically what I'm trying to say is, It's on YOU to figure out what your plan is, what the gear needs to do for you, what the situation warrants and other variables like distance, terrain, etc.  I don't knock someone for going heavy and I don't knock someone for going light.   This is what we are here for to help.  You may find ideas from someone who goes light that could help you reduce your weight, and you could find ideas from someone else that may add some weight but be immeasurably worthwhile depending on the situation.   There really is no right or wrong.  In the end, it's your EDC that will be on you, you may not even have access to your BOB, Get Home Back, Ruck or other kit.   If you can get by on whats in your pockets, then anything else you may have with you is just a bonus.   

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Odin's Son on October 19, 2015, 10:57:05 AM


There is no "Too Heavy" unless it's too heavy for you..........There really is no right or wrong.  In the end, it's your EDC that will be on you, you may not even have access to your BOB, Get Home Back, Ruck or other kit.   If you can get by on whats in your pockets, then anything else you may have with you is just a bonus.

      I didn't quote the whole post but I agreed with all of it.  I did quote these three sentences because I think its really important for people who are new to this life style to hear.  Do what's right for you and your family!  I will add that the food element of my pact doubles as an assault pack and I can scale down to only a couple of lbs and haul azz if I have to.  Same with my wife's pack.  I will add her list next.
       I'm still going through the lists on this thread but im hoping for some ideas.  Either things that we need to add to our packs or ways to lighten them up.  I am currently trying to switch about half our food over to freeze dried food to cut some lbs.  I would also like some ideas for the packs we have for our two teenage girls.   Thanks yall!!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on October 19, 2015, 02:20:16 PM
It's pretty damn heavy for not having most of what you need and a lot of what you don't, at least for my desires.  Here's what I see:  all that stuff and only three days food.  What is the purpose of this kit?  Is it a BOB or an INCH (I'm Never Coming Home) kit?  If it's a BOB, it sorely lacks in food with only three MREs and is way overkill with probably over a pound in quarters, dimes and silver, two different water filtration systems, snares, 3 in 1 oil, sharpies, etc.  For an INCH kit, there's not enough tools to build long-term shelter (a saw, and axe, a shovel, a pick, etc.). 

IMHO, it's a combination kit that perhaps hasn't considered what the most likely scenarios are.  Why are you leaving home?  What mode of transit are you using?  How long will you need to be gone?  And, where are you going? 

Perhaps answering those questions will lighten your load... or increase/change it.  For now, it seems like a lot of stuff that I'm not sure I'd want to carry.  I don't care who you are, if you're going cross country, off road/off trail and you're carrying more than 40 pounds, you're begging for an injury.  I've walked over 700 miles this year, but four miles cross country yesterday crossing down timber was enough to have me hurting today, and that's with less than 20 pounds of kit.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Odin's Son on October 19, 2015, 03:22:06 PM
Well I would have to disagree and agree in a way.  I agree that you have to ask and answer certain questions like the ones you mention here. 

IMHO, it's a combination kit that perhaps hasn't considered what the most likely scenarios are.  Why are you leaving home?  What mode of transit are you using?  How long will you need to be gone?  And, where are you going? 

I would add what level of training you have.  I disagree with your thinking that the contents don't address most of the needs.  I think without knowing my specific answers to your questions, no one can say definitively whether or not any pack will work for its owner.  I understand this, which is why I was only hoping to gain general help and give general help about packs.  Thank so much for your response!  I love seeing everyone's opinion and gaining knowledge. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on October 19, 2015, 06:43:26 PM
Well I would have to disagree and agree in a way.  I agree that you have to ask and answer certain questions like the ones you mention here. 

I would add what level of training you have.  I disagree with your thinking that the contents don't address most of the needs.  I think without knowing my specific answers to your questions, no one can say definitively whether or not any pack will work for its owner.  I understand this, which is why I was only hoping to gain general help and give general help about packs.  Thank so much for your response!  I love seeing everyone's opinion and gaining knowledge.

Well. . . that's why Endurance was asking the questions.  If we knew a few more details, then we could make some educated suggestions.

For example:

Why camouflage? It's easy to replace those items with clothing that is just as, if not more, durable that still provides a modicum of ability to blend in under most circumstances.  For example, an OD BDU top with a Brown or khaki BDU bottom will blend into 99% of the environments you need.  Plus, won't stick out like a sore thumb if the authorities catch you in a spotlight.  Do you really want to be the guy trying to get back into your neighborhood wearing a full set of cammies, toting a rifle and a backpack?  Remember, they may see you before you see them.  That first impression may make a BIG difference in how you're treated.

Second, you have Three knives, an "all-in-one" screwdriver and a crescent wrench.  In most cases, you may be better served with a multifunction tool.  You alluded to having a tool kit in the truck.  Why not pare some of the weight down?

Third, I see nothing of a flashlight.  You have 3 cyalume markers, but these tend not to work very well by themselves.  There's no way to turn them on/off and when you use one, that's it.  They're difficult to aim to get light on something at any distance.  Personally, unless you're using them as a marker for others to find you, I'd do away with the cyalume and just go get an inexpensive AA-Battery-powered mini-Maglite.  Find the accessory pack that has a red lens in it and you won't draw attention to yourself when you don't want to.

Fourth, there's no commo gear.  This doesn't have to be a full-blown Ham set up.  It can be something as simple as a $10 AM/FM battery-powered pocket radio.  Add in a spare charger for your cell phone and, if the towers are still working, then you can at least try to get some calls or texts out.  The radio is to try and get updates as the situation unfolds.

Fifth, I'd suggest that you consider tightening up your water plan.  It looks like you're going to go around, find water holes or streams, etc., and dip your bottle into them and drink from the built-in Filter.  Yes, you do have a sawyer filter to back it up.   The problem is that these are, apparently, your only water filtration plans.  Those little Sawyer filters generally aren't used by people who go either in harm's way or packers who spend a lot of time in the backwoods where a bout of Giardia or Crypto will hang with them for several months. . .after they get back and start taking pills.  I'd recommend adding some chlorine tabs or iodine tabs as well as researching expedition-level filters.

Sixth, you've mentioned that you're considering swapping some of your MRE's for freeze-dried foods.  One option that works rather well at extending your meal plan, would be to consider adding pasta stars, instant potatoes and freeze-dried parboiled rice to your kit in 1-qt lightweight plastic containers.  With the flavoring packets you have, you can make some quick meals that add to your caloric intake with minimal prep time.

Seventh, your "Alarm Kit" sounds a bit like overkill and may end up with you in prison, if a child happens to wander by.  There are other options, many of which can't be heard beyond a few hundred feet.  I'd suggest getting rid of the rat-trap shotgun booby-trap and adding some small bells.  If you're afraid of sleeping through someone sneaking in, spend $20 and buy some magnetic window alarms at Home Depot.  Attach a string to the magnet and use a ziptie or 550 cord to tie the body to a tree, when someone trips the wire, a loud, piercing alarm will go off and you'll wake up.

I'll stop there with the equipment suggestions.

Additionally, while it sounds logical to some to say that you need to make yourself stronger so  you can carry your gear, I might suggest that experience will show you that about half of it is all you need.   Imagine if you can cut your kit's weight down to 40 lbs or even 35.  It's pretty damned impressive that you ca do 20 minute miles with a 70-lb. pack on for 10 miles.  Three miles per hour is a pretty respectable speed.  But how many calories are you burning?  How much wear and tear are you incurring?  Worse yet, as you indicated, that's over fairly flat terrain.  As others have pointed out, if you are forced off-road, then that 70-lb pack is going to prove to be a major burden.  What happens if you find yourself having to go through back yards or over fences? Climbing or traversing culverts or ditches?

Even worse. . .what happens if/when you twist an ankle?  Trying to hump that pack with a splinted ankle may prove not only inconvenient, but dangerous.

Absolutely should you make yourself stronger, but sheer strength alone may not overcome the problem.  Learn the skills and spend some time in the backwoods carrying that pack around with you and I'd bet dollars to donuts that you find quite a few things you don't need.

HOWEVER, all this having been said means absolutely nothing if you can't give us some specifics.  I could turn a lot of the things around if this were an INCH bag.  I could turn all THAT around if you have a well-stocked bug-out location or were using this as a GHB.  Then again, maybe it IS right for a GHB, if you expect to have to walk 3 days to your home.

But, I understand many of the motivations behind OPSEC and being all Secret-Squirrel.  It does make it a bit more difficult to make recommendations and easier to rebuff them with a convenient "you don't know my situation."


The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Odin's Son on October 19, 2015, 08:49:33 PM
Professor, thanks so much for your response.  I will answer some of what you said if i can.  I really liked the way you layed out your examples by numbering them.  It made it much easier to look at each example and compare it to my own ideas. 

     I guess first I will give some more information since we all know you can find out anything on the internet anyways.  Yes my truck has an extensive tool kit in it, as well as all my required gear.  Since I am on call, i keep with me enough stuff to fill one side of my back seat.  I have my SRT gear, consisting of a uniform (not camo), a wet suit, gloves, water boots, rescue swimmer vest, water proof flashlight and a helmet.  I have my hazmat gear, consisting of simple gas mask and SCBA, boots, and level A & B suits.  My SAR/USAR gear is another uniform (not camo), vest, helmet with light, rechargeable flash light, camel bak, boots, rain gear, searching & marking gear (like paint and chemlights) and a lot of 72hr bag equipment.  Our collapse gear is much the same but we were given a set of blue BDU's and steel toe/steel shank boots also.  Medical packs are kept at the station in climate controlled areas because of meds and will be brought to us.  My SWAT gear was stored in my department vehicle and now is in my garage.  Because of my on call status, I am very seldom without my truck.  Depending on the  situation i will adjust my gear as needed at the truck. 

     1) camo- i have the other uniforms and clothes if i need them, but for my one change that i keep in my pack i like the camo.  If im using the bag to get home, i will mostly be in wooded areas.  As far as the authorities go, i figure if they are still out and about, ill be one of them.  If my oath gets in the way of that, so many of them will be with me it wont matter. 
     2) tools- the walking trail i like to use is a family fav.  i have 3 times now stopped to fix bicycles for small children and those are the two tools i have needed.  i always have my leatherman and like you said i will adjust the tools at my truck before leaving. 
     3 & 4) i have the same problem with both of these.  batteries keep exploding in my truck.  The required lights that are in my gear just get replaced by the company every so often.  My radios both work and personal have to stay inside and i just grab them every time i leave.  Same with the flash lights.  I have yet another little bag that i throw that stuff into as i leave, every time.  the kids call it my purse. 

     5) water.  i really liked this and im going to look into expedition type filters and i put the tablets on our shopping list.  i have to do some research on the bottles but any suggestions would be great.  My team picked the little Sawyer because it can be screwed to water bottles which the local governments like to send us, but never enough. 
     6)  Like the batteries, food doesn't last long in our heat.  The MRE's are also issued to me so im able to swap them out every 6 or so months.  That is not to discount what you said, I am in fact going to look into putting some of your ideas into play.  I may move the MRE's to my USAR bag. 
     7)  Not much to say about this other than its a work in progress.  I will add that the rat trap is for squirrel hunting not the 12ga trap that your thinking of.  We found the rat trap and 12ga not easy to put together, nor "controllable enough" for lack of a better word.  Just seems like a good way to blow off a hand.  Just not any where else to put it where it doesn't rattle.  I have tried using the rat trap to snap a chem light but again not real effective.  I do really like the bells idea.  Simple but i never thought of it!  I am going to put bells on the shopping list as well.  Thanks for your input. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on November 29, 2015, 08:36:13 PM
Here's my full on bug-out bag, a 72hr evac kit:

Food:
One day's worth of granola bars, Clif bars, and beef jerky, plus a small jar of peanut butter.
One day's worth of Mountain House meals
One day's worth of: rice, instant mashed potatoes, tuna pouches, and instant dry chili mix
Hot coco mix, tea, and chicken bullion pouches (from ramen)

Water:
2 liter CamelBak, also shared with my hiking pack. A 3 liter one to be dedicated to my BOB is on my list.
Coffee filters for pre-filtering
Katadyn hiker pro water filter
Water purification tablets

Cooking:
2-ish quart pot
Esbit stove
More than enough fuel tablets to cook what needs cooking in my pack
Spoon+fork

Fire/energy/lighting:
4 small candles
4 snap lights
5 cotton+wax fire starters/Esbit fuel replacement (enough for 7-10 fires in awful conditions)
A Ziploc bag full of matchbooks, strike anywhere penny matches, lighters, and waterproof camp matches. Possibly a little overboard. But hey, barter goods.
A packet of fire gel (came with a cheap used Esbit stove and now I kind of just have it)
AAA multiple brightness 120 lumen max flashlight (cheapo from Walmart, need to upgrade)

Shelter
This is a, "oh crap there's a fire coming" or "oh crap ISIS just blew a dirty bomb" pack, not a "the Russians are here time to head to the mountains pack."
I have a wool army blanket and tarp in my truck that normally go with my BOB (yes I've slept with that as a shelter, it was ok.), they just seem more useful in the truck right now. I'll get duplicates as I add to my preps.

Medical/health+sanitation:
Toilet paper!
Lots of gauze in varying sizes
Plenty of bandaids
One quicklot
Rolled gauze
Medical tape
EMT shears
Small bottle of acetaminophen
Benadryl
Immodium
Salt/sugar for basic ORS
Caffeine pills
Toothbrush+toothpaste+travel size mouthwash
Shaving razor
Hotel soap bar
Ace bandage

Clothing:
One pair of jeans
Three pairs of socks
 -summertime moisture wicking
 -midweight
 -winter wool
Thermal base layer top
Thermal base layer bottom
T shirt
Underwear
Hat (OD green knit cap)
Military surplus wool glove liners
Bacalava

Tactical gear:
Binoculars
Camo net
Face paint
I'm not a soldier and I don't pretend to be one. If it comes down to it I'm avoiding a fight, until I take care of my firearms and training side of my preps.

Misc. outdoor and survival gear:
Paracord, 100 ft.
100 DEET bugspray, tiny pen bottle
Cheap folding knife
Garden trowel with brutal sharp weed pulling point
Black electrical tape
N95 masks, x5

Comms:
AM/FM/Weather band hand crank/USB charge radio

Anything that shouldn't get wet is in a Ziploc bag.


Any suggestions welcome and appreciated!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Odin's Son on December 05, 2015, 02:50:48 PM
Here's my full on bug-out bag, a 72hr evac kit:

Food:
One day's worth of granola bars, Clif bars, and beef jerky, plus a small jar of peanut butter.
One day's worth of Mountain House meals
One day's worth of: rice, instant mashed potatoes, tuna pouches, and instant dry chili mix
Hot coco mix, tea, and chicken bullion pouches (from ramen)


How does the jerky hold up?  i haven't had much luck with store bought.  How often to you rotate it, is it homemade or bought, how do you store it?

thanks! 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on December 05, 2015, 06:19:16 PM
It's store bought jerky, Old Trapper brand. I haven't had it in there long enough to tell yet, but the expiration date is 2017! I just keep it stored in the oroginal packaging. My BOB is in a cool dry place. How long does it normally last for you? Rotating it won't be an issue for me, it is jerky we're talking about  ::)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: r_w on December 05, 2015, 06:42:01 PM
Some brands to better than others, and much of it has to do with the packaging.  Some use pretty lame bags that get pinholes easily while others use really tough stuff that stays sealed even banging around a bag.

I haven't weighed my kit lately, but i know it is too heavy--15 lbs just in water and I wish I could get the whole thing down to around 15 lbs. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on December 06, 2015, 07:50:42 PM
Just a personal preference thing, the inline Sawyer filters on the Camelbaks rock.  You can just dip into a stream, fill and drink.  In camp you can use gravity by hanging the hydration part in a tree.  It's not fast, but it's faster than you might think.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on December 06, 2015, 07:53:52 PM
My Katdadyn came with hookups to directly attach the filter to your CamelBak tube, so you can pump it directly in.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on March 15, 2016, 01:35:30 PM
this is fresh of the press, my article on:

Essential Details in Choosing Gear for your BugOutBag
http://greekpreparedness.blogspot.gr/2016/03/essential-details-in-choosing-gear-for.html

I will be happy to receive your feedback and suggestions.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on March 15, 2016, 06:50:55 PM
this is fresh of the press, my article on:

Essential Details in Choosing Gear for your BugOutBag
http://greekpreparedness.blogspot.gr/2016/03/essential-details-in-choosing-gear-for.html

I will be happy to receive your feedback and suggestions.

Good coverage of personal needs ,but like most,this BOB does not appear to cover DOCUMENTS like medical history ...if it is truly a 'get out NOW' bag ...it should contain the photos and documents to keep,or rebuild your life...at least a digital copy if you have a BOL that original documents are secure in. Just my personal thoughts...I like ,and use ,a good headlight (I own several).
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on March 16, 2016, 02:08:36 AM
hmmm.....you make a good point, but there is something that I cannot understand from you.
This article was never meant to include all categories of bugout gear, just to pick up some details 0withing a category) people often miss. So do you make your point in the spirit of the former or the latter?

regardless, I have already started amassing the "details" for part 2 and i will include something on this.
question is. is there some tidbit that will make a difference other than carrying a dosier, your backup HDD and a thumbdrive?
Something like having your important copies resting in a private file repository or an unused e-mail account, or making an online survival library?

hmm.. that reminds me. I should already have uploaded my emergency radio thumbdrive contents in my mediafire account.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on March 16, 2016, 04:15:25 AM
Your suggestions are indeed great..
My BOB includes my document package,toilet paper,fire starter kit,tarp for shelter/ground cover, gloves,spare sox,rain gear,windbreaker,coat in winter,water filter and 2 water bottles.SOS lifeboat rations,First aide kit, flashlight and a 100 foot of paracord,plus some duct tape...that is all,and even this light weight kit is HEAVY and the plan is that it rides in the car till I must carry it.

Note that I have a place to go within 10 mile and it is well stocked and secure, I don't need ,or want to carry my whole world on my back.
I would rather call it a MINIMAL SUPPORT KIT than a BOB.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on March 17, 2016, 04:38:23 AM
this is fresh of the press, my article on:

Essential Details in Choosing Gear for your BugOutBag
http://greekpreparedness.blogspot.gr/2016/03/essential-details-in-choosing-gear-for.html

I will be happy to receive your feedback and suggestions.
I really enjoyed the article.

 I concur that mobility is highly underrated and the moleskin/tape is an excellent jumping off point for the discussion. For me the bigger challenge is seasons and goals and it's a long and challenging debate. Where I live summertime can mean five months of fast travel with temperatures rarely dropping below 0c at night, and frequently getting between 15-30c. The last thing I want during that time of year is big, heavy leather boots on the trail. My preference is for trail running shoes which allow me to comfortably carry a 20-25 pound pack as much as 26 miles a day (at peak fitness). To do so requires rotating three to four pairs of good quality mid-weight wool socks every day, washing them as I hike at every opportunity. I'm also a huge fan of Dirty Girl Gaiters (https://dirtygirlgaiters.com) on the trail. They keep sticks and stones out of your shoes, which means less time fussing with your feet and more time moving (fast).

On the other side of the coin, for our seven months of winter we are likely to see low temperatures down to -25c for at least a handful of days, but still have days where high temperatures might reach 13c several times every month. With mobility in mind, Sorels just aren't going to cut it, so I've fallen in love with the perfect compromise for my environment; an insulated hunting boot. My current pair are thinsulate 1000 insulated and have been comfortable down to -23c. A double layer sock system is essential for comfort and warmth, generally a thin synthetic liner sock and heavy wool-blend outer sock work well together. I always carry a spare pair, but rarely change out mid-day. A good day under ideal conditions might allow 10 miles of winter travel with such kit, since I'm also going to be burdened with more clothing, a heavier pack full of winter kit and higher calorie demands to manage the cold weather.

Canterbury's assessment of fire cannot be understated. I've failed to get fires going when it is cold and wet. There is so much working against you when it's damp that even with all the kit in the world it can sometimes feel like an exercise in futility. I've resorted to using 2.5cm sections of toilet paper tubes filled with cotton balls or lint and impregnated with wax, and still failed when everything was soaked from a week of steady rain. The energy input into a fuel to drive out the moisture under such conditions make one consider gasoline or napalm as reasonable items to carry.

Regarding cordage, I agree. The more I ultralight backpack the more I find lighter cordage makes more sense. In the last few years I've discovered a new product that is a spool of 125' of 1/16" diameter reflective
cord rated at 85 pounds breaking strength. Considering it can serve as a means of flagging trails, prevent tripping hazards at night and allows easily carrying many times what you could carry in 550 cord, I'm completely sold. True, it's too thin to replace boot laces or pack straps, but it has definitely earned a place in my BOB.

I'm a camelbak guy so carrying a 3l container is the norm. Lately I've been eyeing the Vargo Bot for a potential cooking container that also doubles as a water carrier. It's not a cheap solution, but it does fill two needs with one item and makes a great container for a lot of your kit items when not in use.  That said, it lacks a cup handle, so I'd likely end up making a slide-on leather handle (similar to what is available for Mason jars).

For food, I'm a fan of no-prep food for the move, but chicken boullion cubes are my go-to for colder weather. A great way to get salt and warm liquid into the body. To me, it's more satisfying than coffee or tea and gives you the illusion of fullness despite containing practically zero calories. Carrying a dozen cubes will cost you a couple ounces.

I despise ponchos as a one items solves many needs solution. They suck in the wind and as you pointed out, having a shelter that's also your garment makes no sense in the real world. My lightweight solution has become a 4oz sil-nylon wind jacket during the summer.  I carry the disposable ponchos, but I carry them to give away to others who aren't prepared, not for myself. You could make a shelter with them, but I carry a two person space blanket just for emergency sheltering. In a lean-to configuration with a long fire with reflective rocks at the opening you have a great expedient shelter at minimal weight.

For my hiking kit, I consider that adequate. For my BOB I like a sil-nylon 8x10' tarp for shelter and if I lived somewhere buggy, I'd consider both a mosquito net and head net for protection and sanity. Deet is a must in every pack as both bug spray and fire starter.

Other items worth considering include water filtration. Boiling consumes too much time and an SP101 in-Line filter lets you purify your water on the move, which means less stopped time and allowing your to gather water as you hike so you can carry less. A broad brimmed hat to protect you from the sun and keep the rain off of you is another basic essential folks might not think about. Put a small light like a fenix LD01 or Olight e3s on the brim and you have a headlamp that works on a single AAA battery and weighs about an ounce. Consider some of the molle light carrying options out there that can turn your pack straps into another source of light without having to look at buying a separate anglehead light. Gloves are another invaluable item. Insulated work gloves can fill two roles during the winter, although I prefer mittens when it's truly cold and I don't need the dexterity of gloves. Cargo pants are something I wouldn't want to live without, either. A great way to have everything you need, from snacks to fire starting and signalling available at all times.

Of course in the end, skills become a vital part of not needing the kitchen sink in your pack. The more you play in the field the more you learn to improvise and make the best of what you have.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on March 17, 2016, 07:45:59 AM
hmmmm nice points made...
i have some thigns toadd on yours and soem questions

On mobility/shoes
I am amiss on this. I think goretex boots are stupid in the mediterranean summer, I have resorted to buy a pair of ventilated trail shoes.
(and i was stupid to miss a bargain on ventilated boots). Do not know about the rest of the people but I ma uneasy wearign anything lower than a low cut boot. Has a bad ankle sprain when young 9the one the basketballers often do), and it easy for me to fall.
now these ventelated shoes are ajoy in the summertime, you can flink yuor toes and feel the air coming in, but they are hell when raining.

Endurance, i it true what i ehard? that a kilo on your feet equals 25 kilos (pounds?) on your back?

Quote
Canterbury's assessment of fire cannot be understated. I've failed to get fires going when it is cold and wet. There is so much working against you when it's damp that even with all the kit in the world it can sometimes feel like an exercise in futility. I've resorted to using 2.5cm sections of toilet paper tubes filled with cotton balls or lint and impregnated with wax, and still failed when everything was soaked from a week of steady rain. The energy input into a fuel to drive out the moisture under such conditions make one consider gasoline or napalm as reasonable items to carry.
The solution in the conditions you describe is ONE! Flares.
You would see them in my kit but their ownership is illegal here.

Quote
Regarding cordage, I agree. The more I ultralight backpack the more I find lighter cordage makes more sense. In the last few years I've discovered a new product that is a spool of 125' of 1/16" diameter reflective
cord rated at 85 pounds breaking strength. Considering it can serve as a means of flagging trails, prevent tripping hazards at night and allows easily carrying many times what you could carry in 550 cord, I'm completely sold. True, it's too thin to replace boot laces or pack straps, but it has definitely earned a place in my BOB.
time for us to push the "high-low Mix" idea

Quote
Lately I've been eyeing the Vargo Bot for a potential cooking container that also doubles as a water carrier. It's not a cheap solution, but it does fill two needs with one item and makes a great container for a lot of your kit items when not in use.  That said, it lacks a cup handle, so I'd likely end up making a slide-on leather handle (similar to what is available for Mason jars).
interesting find.
it is close to what i am searching, a 0.75-1lit stainless cup with handle. Cooking in a GSI 0.5lit cup is marginal.

Quote
For food, I'm a fan of no-prep food for the move, but chicken boullion cubes are my go-to for colder weather. A great way to get salt and warm liquid into the body. To me, it's more satisfying than coffee or tea and gives you the illusion of fullness despite containing practically zero calories. Carrying a dozen cubes will cost you a couple ounces.
Interestingly when I was reseaching teh article i found a recipe for hypontremia using boullion cubes. (IIRC was 4 cubes in a liter of water?)

Quote
I despise ponchos as a one items solves many needs solution. They suck in the wind and as you pointed out, having a shelter that's also your garment makes no sense in the real world. My lightweight solution has become a 4oz sil-nylon wind jacket during the summer.  I carry the disposable ponchos, but I carry them to give away to others who aren't prepared, not for myself. You could make a shelter with them, but I carry a two person space blanket just for emergency sheltering. In a lean-to configuration with a long fire with reflective rocks at the opening you have a great expedient shelter at minimal weight.

this seems like an issue that can never be resolved.
I think that hiking in raingear during the summer is a killer within an hour. Even the poncho can be marginal and warm.
hat I have with my poncho -but did not had the chance to try yet- is a length of thin stretch cord. The idea is to puting it around your waist, over the poncho

Quote
Consider some of the molle light carrying options out there that can turn your pack straps into another source of light without having to look at buying a separate anglehead light.
Interestign...have yuo got an example. ATM mement i can think only of the Zebralight headamps with the add on clip.
I tend to shy away from the idea cos i feel the light will rrely be centered on one's line of movement.
 (never used the anglehead during my military service) I would like to hear on your's or anyone's experience.

Quote
Cargo pants are something I wouldn't want to live without,
On the contrary i cannot STAND them and having things that low on the pant banging around. I even had the a specific jeans pocket shorten....

Quote
Of course in the end, skills become a vital part of not needing the kitchen sink in your pack. The more you play in the field the more you learn to improvise and make the best of what you have.
yep.....and that was a reason for that article. To drive the point that you do not need More gear, yuo need smarter selectiosn of gear.

So....untill now we have the following addition for part 2 of the article
- document pack (courtesy of Carl)
- broad brimmed hat (enurance)
- gloves (enurance)
- something that i remembered to add but forgot to write it down



Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on March 17, 2016, 09:33:58 AM
hmmmm nice points made...
i have some thigns toadd on yours and soem questions

On mobility/shoes
I am amiss on this. I think goretex boots are stupid in the mediterranean summer, I have resorted to buy a pair of ventilated trail shoes.
(and i was stupid to miss a bargain on ventilated boots). Do not know about the rest of the people but I ma uneasy wearign anything lower than a low cut boot. Has a bad ankle sprain when young 9the one the basketballers often do), and it easy for me to fall.
now these ventelated shoes are ajoy in the summertime, you can flink yuor toes and feel the air coming in, but they are hell when raining.
This (http://www.backcountry.com/altra-lone-peak-1.5-trail-running-shoe-mens?CMP_SKU=) is my current running/hiking shoe.  I'll carry up to 10kg with it.  Anything more than 15kg and you need more stability from a shoe than a running shoe can provide, IMHO, but I can pack five days of food and everything I need for the trip in under 9kg.  As for rain, show me a shoe that will keep your feet dry in four hours of pouring rain and I'll show you a blister factory.  If it's that good at keeping water out, it's that good at keeping water in and feet sweat a lot.  I'd rather have something that gets wet quick but dries just as quickly when it finally stops raining.  I roll my ankles all the time, but haven't actually sprained one in years (touchwood).  The less you support them the stronger and more resilient they get.
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Endurance, i it true what i ehard? that a kilo on your feet equals 25 kilos (pounds?) on your back?
  Sounds a little exaggerated to me, but I know the heavier the boot, the less distance I can comfortably travel.  I've never covered more than 14 miles in a day with a full leather hiking boot, but I've covered 26.5 miles in a day with a full pack in running shoes.

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The solution in the conditions you describe is ONE! Flares.
You would see them in my kit but their ownership is illegal here.
That's a heavy solution.  Wax is the most energy-dense fuel you can easily acquire, so it's my winter and wet weather go-to.

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interesting find. (regarding the Vargo Bot)
it is close to what i am searching, a 0.75-1lit stainless cup with handle. Cooking in a GSI 0.5lit cup is marginal.
Interestingly when I was reseaching teh article i found a recipe for hypontremia using boullion cubes. (IIRC was 4 cubes in a liter of water?)
Here (http://www.survivalresources.com/Products/Water_Containers.html) is one of the best selections of options I've seen for the class of containers.  Great store and I love doing business with them. I don't know what international shipping will do to the prices, but it's a good place to generate ideas.  They carry a lot of unique products and a lot of times their prices are lower than Amazon (although with shipping that might not be the case).

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I think that hiking in raingear during the summer is a killer within an hour. Even the poncho can be marginal and warm.
hat I have with my poncho -but did not had the chance to try yet- is a length of thin stretch cord. The idea is to puting it around your waist, over the poncho
Regardless of what rain gear you have, if you're moving and it's raining and you're wearing waterproof clothing, you're going to sweat and get wet.  The only solution for me is to wear wool and synthetics that still keep you warm when they're wet.  I own a lot of Ibex merino wool stuff because of this issue, but that's because sometimes I like foul weather hikes.

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Interestign...have yuo got an example. ATM mement i can think only of the Zebralight headamps with the add on clip.
I tend to shy away from the idea cos i feel the light will rrely be centered on one's line of movement.
 (never used the anglehead during my military service) I would like to hear on your's or anyone's experience.
There's a lot of options.  Here's a few that I've found, but if you search amazon and e-bay, there's always new options coming on the market.

ITW QASM Ramp / Picatinny Plastic Rail for Molle Webbing (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I8YWUG2?) If you're looking to mount a weapon light on your shoulder strap, helmet, etc., this is a pretty unique item that gives you some unusual options.
Tactical Gear Clip - Multipurpose Fastener For Clipping Gear To Backpack (Compatible With Molle Bags) (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007N6TF9G)  I have one of these and it's great for my 18650 and RCR123 lights, but it can't adjust small enough to accommodate AA or AAA flashlights.  Another product with a lot of flexibility in mounting it so it gives you some good options.
BCP Pack of 6pcs Black Color TW MOLLE Web Dominators with Elastic string (http://www.amazon.com/BCP-Black-Dominators-Elastic-string/dp/B00W56966Q/) (also available on ebay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/10pcs-MOLLE-Webbing-Tactical-Cord-Clips-Buckle-Elastic-Tie-down-Strap-Carabiner-/351532274285?))  I haven't tried these and don't know how they'd work, but they look interesting.
EDCgear Flashlight EDC Universal Quick Release Clip MOLLE System Tool DJ-02 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/EDCgear-Flashlight-EDC-Universal-Quick-Release-Clip-MOLLE-System-Tool-DJ-02-/262129820511)I just ran across this and it seems a bit more complicated, but also potentially more secure since the light clamps in.  It also seems to fit wider webbing.

And finally, and kind of unrelated:
Black MOLLE System Strobe LED Light Multi-color (http://www.ebay.com/itm/131506727613?)This is actually something I searched high and low for after seeing a review in a tech magazine and they were for sale for $27 each.  This ebay has six for $8.11.  I haven't received them yet and I'm hoping they're as good as the review I read.  The review touted something like 300 hours on the battery when in strobe mode.  For identifying members of your group or keeping track of children it seems like a great idea for the money, but I can't say anything for the quality of the product until I have them to play with for a few months.
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On the contrary i cannot STAND them and having things that low on the pant banging around. I even had the a specific jeans pocket shorten....
yep.....and that was a reason for that article. To drive the point that you do not need More gear, yuo need smarter selectiosn of gear.
There certainly is a point of overloading them and having them bounce annoyingly, but for keeping a few snacks, a small camera, and a notebook, I love them.  I wouldn't carry anything heavy or dense like a multitool or 18650 flashlight.  To each their own.  Kit is always personal and the only way you ever know what will really work for you is to get out there and use it.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on March 17, 2016, 10:56:51 AM
Quote
BCP Pack of 6pcs Black Color TW MOLLE Web Dominators with Elastic string (also available on ebay)  I haven't tried these and don't know how they'd work, but they look interesting.
hey! i have those! but never occured me to rig a flashlight with them

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Wax is the most energy-dense fuel you can easily acquire, so it's my winter and wet weather go-to.
And i was about to ask you on this...But does wax releases its energy fast enought (of course it can be tinkered to byt increasing he burning surface). And otehr "violent" fuels except gasoline?

als, taken from your previous post
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but I carry a two person space blanket just for emergency sheltering. In a lean-to configuration with a long fire with reflective rocks at the opening you have a great expedient shelter at minimal weight.
wouldn't it be better if there was a sturdier/thicker space blanket at rolls to cut as much as you want....

Endurance thanks for your insight and sharign your experience on hiking gear ...
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on March 17, 2016, 01:18:43 PM
    There is a great product available from construction materials stores, such as Home Depot, Menards, Lowes. etc. It provides a high insulation value, compact size (when tightly rolled) and lightweight ground sheet. I don't have the product name exactly at the moment, but it consists of a roll of insulating material made up of 1/4 inch thick "bubble wrap" sandwiched between two layers of what I assume is a Mylar film, similar to space blanket material. It is available in different widths and lengths. The "bubble wrap" seems to keep the Mylar foil from tearing and the Mylar keeps the bubble wrap from "popping". As a lightweight insulating Ground sheet, it works great. Its totally waterproof and heat reflective. If I was in a desert environment I would think this stuff could also keep you from frying, if used as an overhead shelter. I have seen YouTube videos of making an expedient sleeping bag out of this stuff with duct tape. I might also experiment with making a vest out of it to add warmth to a winter coat in emergencies. I guess you could also line the legs of pants if you were caught in the cold with only jeans (think stalled car in winter). I think I'll throw a small roll in the trunk. In an emergency, I might have the right clothing, but someone else might not.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on March 17, 2016, 01:26:24 PM
it seems yuo are talkign about the material windshield sun protectors are made of..

BTW let's not forget TYVEK house wrap.. (what is the price there by the square foot?)

BTw...have a llok at this
Hooded Tyvek Rain Jacket and Chaps for Under $10
http://gossamergear.com/wp/tip-of-the-week-make-a-hooded-tyvek-rain-jacket-and-chaps-for-under-10
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on March 18, 2016, 10:39:44 AM
hey! i have those! but never occured me to rig a flashlight with them
Let me know how they work.  You sure can't beat the price.

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And i was about to ask you on this...But does wax releases its energy fast enought (of course it can be tinkered to byt increasing he burning surface). And otehr "violent" fuels except gasoline?
Part of the challenge is drying out the fuel, which takes time.  I'm not opposed to more volatile fuels, but the quantity you need vs. the risk to the other kit in your pack if they leak and the weight leads me to sticking to solid fuels or alcohol (for stove fuel and libation).  Worst case scenario with wax is it melts in its container and is poorly confined, leading to the nearest item getting wax on it, but not spreading throughout your pack.  I've had White Gas leak in my pack and everything smells like fuel until the trip is over and it can ruin food with just the vapors.  I'll still carry a White Gas stove during the winter sometimes, but it is not without significant risks.

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als, taken from your previous postwouldn't it be better if there was a sturdier/thicker space blanket at rolls to cut as much as you want....
That would be nice, but not always available.  I like the bubble wrap stuff, but it is rather bulky for carrying compared to mylar space blankets alone.  There's probably a good niche for it, like it might make a good ground pad or something.  Might be worth experimenting with, but even with the space blankets, one risk is condensation of sweat on the inside of the sheet.  The less breathable seams, the greater the challenge.   Maybe using it just as a blanket and ground pad when bulk isn't an issue would avoid this problem?

Regarding Tyvek, I have a Tyvek ground sheet and one issue is the stuff is LOUD!  It really helps if you toss it in your dryer on the fluff/no heat setting with a couple tennis balls for a half an hour.  This goes a long way to making it tolerable for noise.  That said, something like that suit, I'm not sure how the seams would hold up to that kind of abuse.  I've only used this method with a 6x8' sheet I have.  It now looks much more worn, but I don't wake the dead every time I roll over.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on March 18, 2016, 10:46:55 AM
     I'm pretty sure the one piece, disposable coveralls for spray painting, that are sold at Big Box "Home" stores are made out of Tyvek. I'll check it out for price and get back to ya'.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on March 18, 2016, 01:04:18 PM
in the DIy article i posted he defines what he use sas
"DuPont “white disposable coveralls with hood”, style number TY127SWH"

That would be nice, but not always available.  I like the bubble wrap stuff, but it is rather bulky for carrying compared to mylar space blankets alone.  There's probably a good niche for it, like it might make a good ground pad or something.  Might be worth experimenting with, but even with the space blankets, one risk is condensation of sweat on the inside of the sheet.  The less breathable seams, the greater the challenge.   Maybe using it just as a blanket and ground pad when bulk isn't an issue would avoid this problem?
I meant thsi to be more as a lean to shelter/tarp material, especially with a fire
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on March 18, 2016, 03:13:44 PM
     Creek Stewart"s "Fat Guys In The Woods" survival show, last season showcased his "heated" minimalist shelter. He starts with a sleeping platform of branches to keep you off of the ground. Over that he builds a "wickiup" style, woven branch half dome covered with a sheet of thin plastic tarp that drapes over the front opening. A space blanket is tucked on the inside of the structure. A fire built out front sends infra red heat thru the plastic and the space blanket reflects it down onto the occupant. I think he said it could get up to 70 degrees inside when it was 30 outside. Not a long term shelter, but meant for a night or two in emergencies. I have seen videos of similar shelter made with more robust materials that would last much longer.


 video episode showing build https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nv8ykoqIF14
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on March 19, 2016, 12:40:06 AM
nah!!!! he took the idea from Mors kochanski and his "Super Shelter"...
A teacher of his also made a variant called "harlton haccienda"
https://www.youtube.com/user/KaramatWW/search?query=super+shelter

of course this is where I got the idea of a reflective shelter tarp on the inside.... 8)

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: endurance on March 19, 2016, 10:29:20 AM
Yup, also a useful tool in the right environment... Assuming you're not dealing with wood that tends to pop and send large embers flying in all directions. ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on March 21, 2016, 07:44:49 AM
     A basic space blanket and a sheet of 1 mil clear plastic will compact to the size of a deck of cards (especially if you vacuum seal it) and you have two valuable assets: shelter and the ability to stay warm. The plastic can also be used as a rain or dew catchment (as well as a "solar still"). In a sudden downpour, it can keep you dry. Highly reflective space blankets can act as a signaling device and just as they keep heat in, they can keep heat out as in a desert climate. They are somewhat fragile and probably have a limited life span, but in a pinch I'd rather have them than nothing. In a larger kit, thicker plastic and a reinforced space blanket would make a more permanent shelter.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on March 21, 2016, 03:37:31 PM
Since we're on the topic of staying warm, here's a good one I've actually done:

If you have a campfire, put some rocks in the fire and when they're hot wrap them in cloth and keep them in your sleeping bag. Yeah you have to be careful. Put some more rocks on the fire before going to sleep so you have fresh hot rocks when you wake up at 3 am freezing.

I've done this camping with just my regular blanket not a cold weather sleeping bag, it got well below freezing overnight. I stayed plenty warm.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: CandyGram4Mongo on March 22, 2016, 10:50:44 AM
Need to be careful selecting the rocks.  If you put sandstone with embedded moisture in your fire, the water will turn to steam and the rock may explode in the fire.
Look for solid rocks up and away from any river, stream, pond, etc.
If you do it wrong, you get the double-whammy of high-speed rock shards AND embers shooting around your campsite.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on March 22, 2016, 05:50:23 PM
     I had this happen on a camping trip; used rocks from a dry stream bed. Apparently enough moisture to cause a couple to explode. Luckily no one was nearby when they went off. Good tip.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on April 05, 2016, 08:14:07 AM
     Here's a might be useful tip. Recently I found some packages of plastic "Pirate" compasses (party favors) at Hobby Lobby. I bought a package (6 compasses) and broke one open. They seem to have a strong needle, magnetically speaking. The center pivot is easy to remove, leaving you with a flat compass needle about an inch long. The next step was to float it in a glass of water. If carefully placed the surface tension of the water keeps it floating. As the glass is turned, the North marked end of the arrow shaped needle faithfully points north. I next tried this with a puddle of water in my cupped hand. That worked as well. Of course a breeze will mess things up.
     I have since tucked these compass needles in all of my kits, and wallet. They are so small, flat and easy to conceal that I think I'm going to incorporate them in "survival bracelets". They seem to be much stronger than a magnetized sewing needle, and float on their own. I certainly wouldn't make this my only navigation tool, but the Vikings and Chinese sailed the open ocean with the same basic set up. Anyway, it's a nice piece of survival "bling" to put in your kit and it weighs next to nothing.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on April 05, 2016, 12:07:47 PM
an Idea i will pobably follow....

Cos any low ost compass coming from China develops a bubble eventually
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on April 05, 2016, 12:30:41 PM
My GPS sank when I put it on a bucket of water...compass must be better. ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Knecht on April 07, 2016, 05:54:19 PM
The compass needle sounds like a cool idea, thanks. I rarely needed a compass in my life though.
One thing I keep in most of my pockets, not to mention any outdoor packs (I don't really have a BOB) is a bunch of folding razor knives by Dermasafe.com - very cheap, lightweight and useful tool.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on April 07, 2016, 09:08:54 PM
     I keep an up to date inventory list in each kit with what's packed inside. I generate them on my laptop, so I also have an inventory there. I use categories more or less in order of priority; Shelter, Fire, Water, First Aid, Signaling and Communication, Tools, Food and Self-Defense. Anything that would require replacement over time has the expiration date, like batteries, meds, food etc.  I also put in potential uses for items that may be dual purpose, such as alcohol hand sanitizer/fire starter, or coins/screwdrivers, etc.
     The idea is to keep everything fresh and current, to give an overview of what you have to work with, and a few tips on usage. I figure I may not be the one who uses the kit and this way whoever uses it can be a little more organized and instructed. As the seasons change or I reassess the contents, I change the inventory and print out a new one (and archive the old ones). By having a duplicate on the laptop, I can check on what is where and ponder it's usage without having to tear a kit apart and lay it all out
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on April 28, 2016, 09:59:24 AM
Recent addition - blood glucose test kit for my son.  Even with we have insulin, it's not really useful unless we know how to calculate the appropriate dosage.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on April 28, 2016, 10:13:22 AM
Recent addition - blood glucose test kit for my son.  Even with we have insulin, it's not really useful unless we know how to calculate the appropriate dosage.

allow for small snacks when in high activity avoid high carb meals,but carry high carb snacks and or sugars for when swings appear this has helped me ,also a 5 meal a day plan has kept me better regulated lately..
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on April 29, 2016, 08:52:39 AM
allow for small snacks when in high activity avoid high carb meals,but carry high carb snacks and or sugars for when swings appear this has helped me ,also a 5 meal a day plan has kept me better regulated lately..

Indeed.  We carry both carb free beef jersey as well as portioned carb snacks.  If he is "low" we follow the 15 rule, so have items that are close to 15g carbs to be consumed and tested 15 minutes later.  Mix and repeat, so we can incrementally adjust.  Better than scarfing down a jelly donut all at once.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on May 01, 2016, 04:36:19 AM
Indeed.  We carry both carb free beef jersey as well as portioned carb snacks.  If he is "low" we follow the 15 rule, so have items that are close to 15g carbs to be consumed and tested 15 minutes later.  Mix and repeat, so we can incrementally adjust.  Better than scarfing down a jelly donut all at once.

Just sort of curious. . .why not just toss a couple tubes of Glucose Tablets in your kit? They're usually 15 grams of carbs and they store quite well (2-3 years).

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on May 01, 2016, 07:32:46 PM
     I'm not a diabetic and I'm not British, but I find a hot cup of tea, with a restaurant packet of sugar gives me a great lift. A tsp. of sugar has 4 grams of carbs. This seems relatively reasonable to me as far as a blood sugar "spike". As I said, I'm not a diabetic, but the mechanics of energy and calorie release are of interest. Back in the day we used to melt half a stick of butter in a cup of hot chocolate when snow cave camping before bed. The slow release of calories from the fats kept the inner furnace fueled throughout the night. As I understand it, unrefined carbs like boiled potatoes (15 grams of carbs in 1/2 cup) will convert to sugars, but slowly. Refined carbs, like white sugar give up their energy much more quickly.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: RuggedCyclist on May 03, 2016, 03:03:42 PM
When I put sugar in my tea, even a little bit, I feel like my blood sugar goes down quite a bit and I get super out of it.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Knecht on May 04, 2016, 10:22:44 AM
I always carry tea in my bags when going out for more than a day. Black leaf tea, I'm quite addicted to it and having none for a whole day often gives me headache, guess due to blood pressure drop(?).

Let's see what else I carry in never-emptied pockets of my backpack (which is basically closest to a BOB for me, I just fill the main compartment with stuff I currently need and have no worries about stuff like firemaking, cordage, first aid and such, because that's in the pockets already). Cordage - always have a bunch of rdry awhide straps, mostly leftovers from some of my reenactment products. Just soak them for a while and they're ready to use. In extra need, I can always cook glue of them and they could be even chopped fine, boiled and eaten in total emergency. What else...not sure if I've mentioned it already, but I carry a Mosin-Nagant metal oil flask. These are very cheap and easy to find in gunshops and such. I cleaned mine very well  and filled it woth molten tallow. Now I can scrape some out with a stick, or shortly heat the flask in ashes or aside fire and pour the tallow out. Takes care of leather, gun, metal and wood protection, as well as dry lips, sore heels, burns and such. Is edible, so I can use ot for cooking and frying, as well as lighting...lots of uses for such a small and cheap thing. Got the idea from Dave Canterbury. What else to mention from the less usual items ...perhaps a sharpening stone and a small file, hacksaw blade (or a a half of it), small roll of binding wire...
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 04, 2016, 01:04:31 PM
Just sort of curious. . .why not just toss a couple tubes of Glucose Tablets in your kit? They're usually 15 grams of carbs and they store quite well (2-3 years).

The Professor

We may eventually do that.

Different foods containing the same amount of carbohydrates may release at different rates. 
Things like orange juice are rapid, while complex carbs take longer to enter the blood stream.

So responding to a tactical hypoglycemia scare might call for juice.  But if we just want to raise his BG before bedtime, a slower release is more desirable.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on May 04, 2016, 02:05:38 PM
We may eventually do that.

Different foods containing the same amount of carbohydrates may release at different rates. 
Things like orange juice are rapid, while complex carbs take longer to enter the blood stream.

So responding to a tactical hypoglycemia scare might call for juice.  But if we just want to raise his BG before bedtime, a slower release is more desirable.

As a diabetic,I must say that glucose tabs hit fast and unless he crashes....better to use a carb snack.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 05, 2016, 11:33:38 AM
As a diabetic,I must say that glucose tabs hit fast and unless he crashes....better to use a carb snack.

We were prescribed these special glucagon kits.  They are for emergency hypoglycemia when the patient is unconscious or at least unable to eat/drink.
(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.medimove.co.uk%2Fimage%2Fcache%2Fdata%2Fimages%2Fglucagon-emergency-kit-for-low-sugar-500x500.JPG&f=1)

From everyone I've talked to, none have ever had to use it. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Greekman on May 05, 2016, 01:30:43 PM
good...and i see some room for tabs etc.
Kit mentality yuo see...
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Ben Hageman on January 05, 2017, 06:23:09 PM
This has always been a great topic on other forums so let's do it here.  Post your BOB inventories and let's all learn from each other.

I've found a ton of bob lists online, most of which are 72 hour, super heavy, even military grade.  In searching for a checklist I discovered I already, as an ultralight long distance hiker, have everything I need.  Light weight, durable gear IS expensive, but @ 28 lbs, worth it.  I can easily pack 7 days worth of food making it an 84 hour pack/B.O.B.  The gear on this site http://blackwoodspress.com/blog/25623/erik-the-blacks-backpacking-gear-list-2016/? is a good a source for ultralight weight gear.  Not my list, but a great base list.

Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on January 06, 2017, 07:37:00 AM
     I'm pretty sure animal fats like tallow or especially lard need to be kept cool or cold. Vegetable shortening, like Crisco, stores at room temperature. It will all melt in the heat so a leakproof container is best. Crisco is, of course, edible (lots of slow release calories); you can fry in it. It can be used as a candle with a cordage wick (might be a good idea to include some length of candle wicking in your kit, you can always make a grease or oil lamp). I assume it would help with dry skin, conditioning leather, baiting traps, etc. It also makes a pretty good patch lube for muzzleloading guns.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: trekker111 on January 08, 2017, 08:54:20 PM
Crisco is, of course, edible

There are many here that would argue with that
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on January 09, 2017, 06:40:28 AM
 I carry an old school LED light,the LIGHTWAVE 2000 has 4 LEDs powered by 3 AA batteries and provides light enough to walk or work in the dark ,
but not overpowering and causing light blindness where you see nothing outside the brightest area of the light.
I think it is a perfect brightness in this day of over compensating devices and it runs for OVER 250 HOURS on the same set of 3 AA batteries.
They have been out of business since 2007 but ,if you look a bit,it should not be hard to find a 3 AA mini MAGLITE that uses the same DRIVERLESS
LOW TECH system usually found in 3 cell AA LED lights.

http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/lwave.htm   Lightwave 2000

I also carry some 10 hour BLUE chemlights.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on January 17, 2017, 11:11:59 AM
     I just finished up a "survival" hiking staff. This is a project that I wanted to do for some time. At one location on the staff, I wanted to wrap some cordage on before I did a final paracord wrap over that area. Since I had also been making candles at the time, I put on a couple of yards of beeswax soaked wicking. I then put on a layer of a thin, braided nylon cord, followed by a top over wrap of paracord. The beeswax wick is flexible and wraps well, being slightly "sticky". It would make a good tinder for firestarting, being waterproof. It also is another type of useful cordage, and it could be used as a wick for a tallow or grease lamp.
     I think it's useful enough that I'm going to wax pieces a yard long, roll them up and include one in each of my kits.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on January 17, 2017, 11:15:20 AM
     I just finished up a "survival" hiking staff. This is a project that I wanted to do for some time. At one location on the staff, I wanted to wrap some cordage on before I did a final paracord wrap over that area. Since I had also been making candles at the time, I put on a couple of yards of beeswax soaked wicking. I then put on a layer of a thin, braided nylon cord, followed by a top over wrap of paracord. The beeswax wick is flexible and wraps well, being slightly "sticky". It would make a good tinder for firestarting, being waterproof. It also is another type of useful cordage, and it could be used as a wick for a tallow or grease lamp.
     I think it's useful enough that I'm going to wax pieces a yard long, roll them up and include one in each of my kits.

How about waxed dental floss? I have used this for many needs.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on January 17, 2017, 11:53:29 AM
     Carl, I'm not sure about waxed dental floss as a wick. I think its a nylon or synthetic material. The much thicker all cotton wick that I have "wicks" the liquid wax, tallow, grease or whatever so that it vaporizes and then burns. I think dental floss would just melt and not act as a candle wick. You are right though, dental floss is lightweight and strong. I'll have to try some in a candle and maybe Crisco and see if it will act as a candle.
 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on January 17, 2017, 11:59:06 AM
     I wanted to add that I have a finger nail clipper, with a nail file/cleaner blade, in each of my kits. Aside from the obvious use of keeping nails short, they are great for cutting line or cordage; eliminating slipping with a knife when cutting fishing line or paracord. There's nothing as frustrating as a split nail catching on things or a "hangnail" and a knife just isn't the answer.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on January 17, 2017, 04:31:21 PM
     I wanted to add that I have a finger nail clipper, with a nail file/cleaner blade, in each of my kits. Aside from the obvious use of keeping nails short, they are great for cutting line or cordage; eliminating slipping with a knife when cutting fishing line or paracord. There's nothing as frustrating as a split nail catching on things or a "hangnail" and a knife just isn't the answer.

TSA says it can bring down an aircraft...in the right hands. Use with caution.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: tkeetch on March 30, 2017, 11:57:08 AM
It took me 3 afternoons, but I actually read through the last 18 pages of this thread and I found some great ideas.

As I stated in my intro thread, I'm a SAHM of almost 4 kids (due in August) and the last thing I want to do is to "bug out" to the Rocky Mountains with only supplies on my back. The kids hate half of my home-cooked meals.. why would I want to listen to them complain about dehydrated backpacking food AND being cold AND sleeping under a tarp AND...  ::)

I digress. I have a backpack GHB/Mini Emergency Rescue Bag stored in my car to get us home, where we could meet up with my husband and decide to hunker down or go. Plus, 90% of the time I'm within 15 minutes drive of my home, and the rare exceptions are trips to the zoo - maybe 35 miles away? Other then that, I'm either home or we are out together as a family anyway.

I live in the Mountain West, and aside from the more common small threats to our home or immediate area (I do live very close to a freeway, so overturned trucks could pose an issue), is an earthquake. I've done some research and if it is the size they predict, roadways will be completely unusable except for off roading. I'm not even sure if I could use a jogging stroller, but it might be my best bet. It is proposed that several dams will break when our "big one" hits and the valley will flood. But I live in an interesting spot - fairly close to a freeway that is much lower than me. I'm assuming the water will fill that portion of the freeway and our home will stay dry. (Would I be able to count that as a good source of treatable water??)

Here's what I've got in my car bag now. I've been grateful for it on numerous occasions when the kids needed a change of clothing because of a potty accident, or we were caught in a sudden rainstorm and I pulled out the ponchos, etc. But any tips are greatly appreciated because realistically, I have no idea how I would carry this heavy bag AND encourage/carry/drag the kids home as well. Not to mention carry the baby when he gets here. I imagine a walk home from the zoo would take our group a few days! (Haha..)

NUTRITION
Foldable plate, bowl and cup (similar to this http://www.backcountrygear.com/fozzils-solo-pack.html?gclid=Cj0KEQjw2fLGBRDopP-vg7PLgvsBEiQAUOnIXJ-QYIqJzrbQtfK_vNiVPvCScY5cjDGUhmc9iviuPK8aAuUO8P8HAQ (http://www.backcountrygear.com/fozzils-solo-pack.html?gclid=Cj0KEQjw2fLGBRDopP-vg7PLgvsBEiQAUOnIXJ-QYIqJzrbQtfK_vNiVPvCScY5cjDGUhmc9iviuPK8aAuUO8P8HAQ). I love using the plate as a cutting board when we go on picnics at the park, and I figure it will be useful for dividing/prepping the snacks on one of our many rest stops)
Utensils (light my fire minis for everyone)
GI can opener (Honestly don't know why I included this. I don't have any canned goods packed, but maybe we could find some?)
3 SOS Food Bars (3600)
3 Millenium food bars
3 quart ziplocks with 12-14 snacks each (pb crackers, tuna pouches & ritz, raisins, trail mix packets, granola bars, stretch island fruit leathers, gum, apple sauce pouches, kool aid mini mix packets, etc)
Sawyer mini water filter
2 oz container/dropper with bleach
27 oz single wall, stainless steel water bottle (to store water, or put close to fire and boil water if absolutely needed).

CLOTHING/SHELTER
sweatshirt and sweat pants for each child and myself
1 change of underwear per person
2 pairs of wool socks for me, 1 for each kid
warm hat/person
gloves/person
rain poncho/per person
2 mylar sleeping bags
3 mylar blankets
10-12 hand warmers
2 emergency tube tents (the bright orange ones  :-\)

FIRST AID KIT - https://www.rei.com/product/784495/adventure-medical-kits-womens-outdoor-first-aid-kit (https://www.rei.com/product/784495/adventure-medical-kits-womens-outdoor-first-aid-kit)
I also stuffed in the following:
mini vicks vaporub tin
more tylenol 500s
children's liquid tylenol
children's benedryl
nuskin
teething tablets
forehead thermometer
extra kid-character bandaids
biofreeze pouches
1 instant ice pack
aquaphor (diaper rash, chapstick, etc.)
duct tape around a credit card (to prevent blisters + a billion other things)

HYGEINE BAG
washcloth
wet ones
shampoo/conditioner
johnsons/johnsons head to toe tear free soap
hand sanitizer
chapstick
deodorant
toothpaste
tooth brush
cotton swabs
travel comb/brush combo
kleenex
small finger nail clippers
compact mirror
sunscreen
feminine products

(Although I love having many of these things in the car for day-to-day things that come up, I'm thinking I will keep them in the front of the car and have a smaller bag in the emergency kit with just the basics - all purpose soap, sunscreen, feminine hygiene, and hand sanitizer)

TOOLS/SUPPLIES
toilet paper
handy saks (plastic bags)
flint and steel (ha, told my husband that I need to actually start a fire with it this summer)
2 bic lighters
whistle / compass /waterproof match container with matches
ziplock of fire starters (made by dipping/coating cotton make up remover rounds into my Sentsy Candle Warmer after the scent has worn off. Waterproof until you rip them a little to expose the cotton fibers before lighting. They burn for like 5 minutes!)
a very small flashlight for each kid (entertainment? comfort?)
2 headlamps with extra batteries
permanent marker
$100 cash - small bills, plus whatever change is in the car..
multi tool from emergency essentials
little bigger single folding knife

ENTERTAINMENT/COMFORT
tiny scriptures
sudoku
tiny bubble container (from a wedding send-off)
Yahtzee assembled into the little white containers that travel first aid kits come in
chalk
pen & small notebook
a travel game that we got as part of a kids' meal
3 hotwheel cars
mini 4"x4" versions of my kids' blankets for the younger ones

I also keep a case of mini water bottles in the car, and a basic camelbak for each of us so we could fill them up and the kids can at least carry their own water. The downside is they will probably drink it faster than they should just because of easy access.

Plus, after August I'll need to add in diapers, wipes, and a few other baby related items. Also thinking about purchasing an emergency childbirth kit just in case. (I deliver at home with a midwife, so at least I have better-than-most experience in that area as long as there are no complications).

No idea what to do about protection/defense. And I'm probably a target with a bunch of kids and a big backpack of supplies, aren't I?
Nor communication. I do have a couple 2 way walkie-talkies, but I think they have a 2 mile range. Not really helpful to get ahold of my husband if I'm further than that.

Thoughts? What am I missing? What can I ditch?? TIA
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on March 30, 2017, 12:37:38 PM
Rubber gloves make roadside cleanups easier and I would say that you have a good plan so communications is not of great importance often as you KNOW what the plan is and where each other should be an at home dry erase board with trip itinerary posted and a preplanned out of area phone to leave info in event of localized emergency should have you in pretty good shape . Your 'bag' is well sorted and should cover most events..

Pepper spray might be a good addition as no permanent harm should a child find it and a full size,well constructed umbrella is good for dog defence and can get pretty stabby when needed.Welcome to the group.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: bcksknr on April 01, 2017, 06:50:15 PM
     I'd be concerned about using flood water as a drinking source, even if you treated it or filtered it. While filtration with a particulate filter (like a coffee filter) and then running it through a quality water filter unit will take out the "chunks" and the bacteria, viruses, spores, etc., you still have to consider chemical contamination. In floodwaters, who knows what farm chemicals, oils, pesticides, gasoline, diesel fuel or whatever has mixed in. A biological filter will do nothing to remove these. I think an adequate activated charcoal filter might do the job, but you are getting pretty technical. Children have a much smaller resistance to damage from chemical contamination. I wouldn't chance it.
     After a flood, assume everything you come into contact with has been contaminated with fecal material, either from farms or human treatment systems. A gallon of fresh bleach (or more, if your staying in) will be needed to wipe down everything the kids come into contact with. Four kids and possibly you too, with severe diarrhea isn't an option. You will go through much more water than you might think, store as much as you can.
     As to self defense, if you aren't comfortable with a firearm (and I understand that herding four kids and trying to be "gun safe" could be a bit much), pepper spray is probably your best option; even if used against you, you'll live. I wouldn't count on the good intentions of strangers (and I'm as sceptical as anyone), but if you are rural, chances are people will all be in the same boat; it's not like you're living in Mogadishu. Smile, keep your distance and have that pepper spray in your hand until you are completely at ease with the situation.
     One other thought. I'm a big fan of Polarfleece. It's soft and warm, will keep you warm when damp and has that "comfy" feeling. Mylar space blankets are great for many situations, but they are somewhat fragile, slippery and noisy. I thing a reasonably sized Polarfleece "woobie" would keep the kids happier. If that's not warm enough put the space blanket over them too. Just remember, mylar blanket sheets don't breathe. It's great that they are waterproof, but your bodies water vapor will condense on the inside (much like a plastic raincoat on a hot day). You need to keep your insulation as dry as possible. In fact, in severe cold weather the method of use is to wrap up in the space blanket and then get into your sleeping bag or fabric insulating layer. You will get damp (but very warm) while the space blanket keeps your fabric insulation dry. It's called a vapor barrier and can be a lifesaver. If your feet get cold, even in "Pac-Boots) try putting on plastic bags before your socks, then the boots, Your socks will stay dry and your feet will feel damp, but will be deliciously warm. Just remember to periodically dry your feet thoroughly at intervals.[size=78%] [/size]
 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Chemsoldier on April 02, 2017, 01:11:49 AM
Tkeetch;

Jogging strollers are amazing. They are more off road capable than you know. That is also how you can move the weight of your pack. Make sure you can break your pack into a subload or two. Some stays on your back, other bits on or in the stroller. Little cheapo kids backpacks are useful also, games, chapstick and other sundries are off your back and it isn't much for them but every bit helps you. Also, don't be afraid to just not take a bunch of stuff if you don't think you will need it. Just leave it in the trunk. If you are trying to leg it home 10 miles in high summer perhaps leaving some winter gear is a worthy risk for instance.

I would recommend a little bit of trauma medical gear. Tourniquet, field dressing, an Israeli dressing perhaps. The chances of traumatic injury in a major earthquake makes it prudent.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Hishossithe on April 11, 2017, 06:27:38 AM
This has always been a great topic on other forums so let's do it here.  Post your BOB inventories and let's all learn from each other.

Here is my list,

shelter
8'x10'Siltarp
Footprint for my 2-man tent
(The tent is in the truck.  If I have to hoof it, I may leave the tent behind)
Grommet kit
Tent repair kit
 
tools
Folding shovel (on a belt)
Folding bow saw
Gerber folding saw (like a pruning saw)
Leatherman with pliers, screwdrivers, etc
Leatherman with needlenose, knives, etc
Little Stanley kit with ratchet that uses screwdriver tips
SAK (Swiss Army Knife)
 
fire starting/cooking
I know Rick has stuff, but here's what I pack:
Matches in waterproof carriers (3 different ones)
Flint & steel - couple different ones
Magnesium fire starter
Bic lighter
Refillable butane lighter
Cotton balls soaked with vaseline
Tommy stove and about 20 fuel tabs
 
food gathering
snare wire
backpack fishing rod/reel
small fishing kit packed in a .410 shell
Breakdown .308 rifle with 16.25" barrel
20 rounds of ammo for .308
1911 with 3 8 round mags +1 in the spout
.22 conversion kit for 1911
100 rounds .22 ammo

So what do you guys keep or as Jack would say  ;), what do ya'll keep in your BOB?
Well yeah, its a pretty good list of stuff you may need, but the most interesting thing is when you have to do it fast, grab the most important and go!
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Alan Georges on August 09, 2017, 10:20:50 PM
This is not so much IN the BoB as what the BoB is (briefly) hanging from: a digital luggage scale.

I picked one up at Wally-World this evening for a big $7.  It's a lot like this one (https://www.walmart.com/ip/Ktaxon-Electronic-Luggage-Scale-With-Built-In-Backlight-Thermometer-Suitcase-Bag-100lb/146328128), but American Tourister brand.  It reads up to 88 lbs and has two decimal places in the the readout; one would've been plenty, but as long as it can get down to a 1/10 of a pound or an ounce, that's plenty of accuracy.

There was also a spring mechanical scale, but it was maybe good to the 1/2 pound.  That's plenty of precision for the entire pack or the bigger items, but not good enough for shaving the weight on smaller things.  A lot better than nothing, but for the same price the digital one is the one to get.

So... walking around the house weighing assorted items... medium ALICE pack w/frame is 7 lbs.  The good hiking pack is only 4 lbs (but holds about twice as much the ALICE).  Two-man tent.. 6.5 lbs. – not bad!  And the BoB... the BoB is 22.2 lbs. which is lighter than I would've guessed.

It's important to know these weights in order to keep the weight trimmed down and under control.  The BoB needs re-packing soon anyway, and I'll be weighting and judging things item-by-item when it gets done.  It's an interesting tool with a lot of practical impact.  Should have picked one up years ago.  $7, cheap.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 10, 2017, 09:30:30 AM
This is not so much IN the BoB as what the BoB is (briefly) hanging from: a digital luggage scale.

I picked one up at Wally-World this evening for a big $7.  It's a lot like this one (https://www.walmart.com/ip/Ktaxon-Electronic-Luggage-Scale-With-Built-In-Backlight-Thermometer-Suitcase-Bag-100lb/146328128), but American Tourister brand.  It reads up to 88 lbs and has two decimal places in the the readout; one would've been plenty, but as long as it can get down to a 1/10 of a pound or an ounce, that's plenty of accuracy.

There was also a spring mechanical scale, but it was maybe good to the 1/2 pound.  That's plenty of precision for the entire pack or the bigger items, but not good enough for shaving the weight on smaller things.  A lot better than nothing, but for the same price the digital one is the one to get.

So... walking around the house weighing assorted items... medium ALICE pack w/frame is 7 lbs.  The good hiking pack is only 4 lbs (but holds about twice as much the ALICE).  Two-man tent.. 6.5 lbs. – not bad!  And the BoB... the BoB is 22.2 lbs. which is lighter than I would've guessed.

It's important to know these weights in order to keep the weight trimmed down and under control.  The BoB needs re-packing soon anyway, and I'll be weighting and judging things item-by-item when it gets done.  It's an interesting tool with a lot of practical impact.  Should have picked one up years ago.  $7, cheap.

As a bonus, you can measure the trigger pull weight of all your bug out weapons.  You know, so you have something to do while hiding in the woods ;)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Alan Georges on August 10, 2017, 06:39:52 PM
 ::
I'll try to make sure the chamber's empty.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Alan Georges on August 10, 2017, 07:36:31 PM
::
I'll try to make sure the chamber's empty.
What happened to the roll eyes emoticon?   ::)
OK, that's better.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on August 11, 2017, 03:30:14 AM
What happened to the roll eyes emoticon?   ::)
OK, that's better.

The first one was probably too heavy...did you weight it?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 12, 2017, 07:53:03 PM
First-aid item:  moleskin.  Any semi-experience hiker brings that and spare socks along.  Not as sexy as a firearm or geiger counter, but if you can't comfortably walk, you're not bugging out too far.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: TheLastBoyscout on September 25, 2017, 05:06:31 AM
Good items Smurf Hunter.  Staying healthy is important as well.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Cupric on August 19, 2018, 08:26:46 AM
Wow, what in interesting read!  After perusing all of these posts, I decided I should take a look at the GHB I keep in my pickup's toolbox and share what I found.  A little background, I live in Texas and commute 35 miles to work and put a bag together a few years ago with getting home from there in mind.  I'm in my 50's and overweight according to my doctor but my wife fibs and says I look great.  I figure best case scenario, I hump home in 2 days, worst case, 3 days.
After dumping the contents of my GHB (which has sat untouched for at least two years in my truck's metal toolbox), here are my observations:
1. The bag itself!  It's camo and screams tactical (i.e. might draw unwanted attention).  I'm swapping it out for one my son used in high school which is ordinary looking and weathered.
2. Batteries!  They were all dead and the ones left in lights had leaked and pretty much ruined them.  One exception was the square 9v battery with a snap-on LED light, it still works great.
3. Disposable lighters!  I had two of them which had failed.  When I tried to light each, there was a puff of dust and then very little resistance while spinning the thumbwheel.  They also seemed to be empty of fuel although were brand new when I placed them into the bag. 
4. Food!  All I had was a brick of Mainstay 3600 which is made for life boats I think with a shelf life of 5 years.  Not sure I trust it now.
5. Tape!  Duct and electrical was a gooey mess and was promptly tossed into the trash.
6. Cheap First Aid kit!  Pretty much toast.  The adhesive used to seal the individual bandages had failed with loose bandages floating around the kit.
7. Miscellaneous crap!  Shampoo, mouthwash?  What was I thinking?
All in all, here's my takeaway from this inspection.  A BOB or GHB is not something you put together and then forget about hoping it will serve you well if ever needed.  For my location, it's too damn hot to store in a truck tool box.  Since my truck is a Crewmax, I'll start storing it on floor of back seat.  I always leave my windows cracked a quarter inch anyway for ventilation so it should be better than inside a metal toolbox baking in the sun.  I will also see it more so will be more prone to inspect it more often.  Thanks to all of you for taking the time to share on this thread.  Your experience and insights are helping others more than you may know. 
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carl on August 19, 2018, 08:40:48 AM
  GREAT IDEAS Cupric set it and forget it just does not work for prepper lifestyle.  PLUS ONE on the Karma
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Chemsoldier on August 19, 2018, 04:41:53 PM
Cupric;
There are two ways to tackle the batteries. If you are disciplined enough, switch them out with your smoke detector battery. If you are not (I am not), spend a bit more and go lithium. They are better and dont leak (to my knowledge).

The other potential is to switch much of it with your smoke detector battery (I use my email program's calendar feature to to remind me on the smoke detector batteries) as an opportunity to refresh your GHB.

once upon a time I had two identical pairs of Duluth Trading Company Hose Pants.  I vacuum packed one and threw it in the bug out bag.  Years later I pulled it out and realized the two pairs looked completely different due to lack of sun fading and no wear.  I switched them but finally had to toss them because I had apparently...expanded.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Carver on December 14, 2018, 08:25:09 PM
I maintain a gizmo bag for batteries, chargers, mp3 players, usb sticks, cables, and whatever I would need to get connected while on the road. I take it with camping or traveling hotel style.
I do not have a handle on the logic on which batteries use for everyday use and which to use for power outage, on the road. I once heard Steve Harris say you should use one type for everyday use and in the event of a power outage to switch to the other. Can't remember which was which or the logic. My problem with using rechargeable batteries for everyday use is that if I want to gather them all up I don't remember where I am using them. Is there any rhyme or reason to which batteries to use for everyday use and for outages use?
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Alan Georges on December 15, 2018, 08:34:21 AM
Is there any rhyme or reason to which batteries to use for everyday use and for outages use?
Carver, Steve's advice on batteries seems to change over time as battery technology changes.  Without repeating his latest (which I would probably mis-remember anyway), here's what I do:

- BOB: 10-year shelf life AA Energizers; they can sit

- Camping/travel: a medium-sized usb device charger batt pack; hopefully I'll remember to stick it in the BOB if it comes to that.  It's always charged, ready to go.

- Everyday: a large pool of Eneloop AA and AAAs.  One of my kitchen drawers has 3 bins, for "just charged," "charged," and "dead."  "Charged" gets used first, and when it's empty (counting AAs and AAAs separately), all of the "just charged" get moved up to the "charged" bin.  This way, things get rotated out and nothing ever gets too stale.  About twice a year they all get a refresh cycle in the charger, or whenever something seems shaky.

- Specialty: a few specialties, mostly for ham radios.  These get treated as specialty items, separate from the battery pool.

That's not exactly what you were asking, but I hope it helps.  Overall, just keep a big enough pool of Eneloop rechargeables that it's no big deal when some of them get sidelined into the TV remote for a year.  It's pricy at first, but after a couple of years it pays for itself.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: The Professor on December 15, 2018, 09:47:13 AM
Well, first off, I made the decision to limit the number of battery-operated devices in my kits.  Right now, I only have Flashlights and a radio that require AA batteries.  For these, I use the Energizer Lithium batteries, mainly because they store for so long.  As a side note, I have added portable "Power Banks" to my GHB and BOB, just in case the situation still allows me use of my tablet or phone.

As a side note, I used to be against tablets or laptops in a BOB or GHB but  now that the size, weight, memory and useful apps and features have greatly increased, I can see a use for them as long as they're not damaged via EMP/CME, etc. 

Downloading things like maps with both topo and satellite views can be very helpful in navigation.  No, I haven't tossed my printed maps and compasses, but it does help with route recon and the like.  Adding in a bunch of manuals and other how-to books may come in handy.

What I wish I could find are some of those rechargers that use AA batteries to charge a phone.  I don't want to carry solar panels if it becomes an extended walk because of the extra weight.  I still have some old ones made by Energizer that take 2 AA batteries and lets you recharge your cell phone.  But, that's why I now use the portable battery banks.

The Professor
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Alan Georges on December 15, 2018, 10:03:53 AM
What I wish I could find are some of those rechargers that use AA batteries to charge a phone.
https://www.goalzero.com/shop/rechargers/guide-10-plus-power-bank/ (https://www.goalzero.com/shop/rechargers/guide-10-plus-power-bank/)  Pricy (Amazon is a little cheaper), but it will get the job done.
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: David in MN on December 15, 2018, 10:16:07 AM
Carver, Steve's advice on batteries seems to change over time as battery technology changes.  Without repeating his latest (which I would probably mis-remember anyway), here's what I do:

- BOB: 10-year shelf life AA Energizers; they can sit

- Camping/travel: a medium-sized usb device charger batt pack; hopefully I'll remember to stick it in the BOB if it comes to that.  It's always charged, ready to go.

- Everyday: a large pool of Eneloop AA and AAAs.  One of my kitchen drawers has 3 bins, for "just charged," "charged," and "dead."  "Charged" gets used first, and when it's empty (counting AAs and AAAs separately), all of the "just charged" get moved up to the "charged" bin.  This way, things get rotated out and nothing ever gets too stale.  About twice a year they all get a refresh cycle in the charger, or whenever something seems shaky.

- Specialty: a few specialties, mostly for ham radios.  These get treated as specialty items, separate from the battery pool.

That's not exactly what you were asking, but I hope it helps.  Overall, just keep a big enough pool of Eneloop rechargeables that it's no big deal when some of them get sidelined into the TV remote for a year.  It's pricy at first, but after a couple of years it pays for itself.

100%. Those Eneloops were a game changer. Especially having a child where all baby toys require batteries. I got a few packs and even got the C and D adapters for emergency. Yes, we still buy bulk packs of whatever is cheapest at Costco as a backup but the container of Eneloops is awesome. Ironically the biggest problem is the required "battery check" when we donate an outgrown toy. Also real good if before kids you and your wife play a little too much Nintendo Wii...
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Hootie on December 15, 2018, 07:02:59 PM
Carver, Steve's advice on batteries seems to change over time as battery technology changes.  Without repeating his latest (which I would probably mis-remember anyway), here's what I do:

- BOB: 10-year shelf life AA Energizers; they can sit

- Camping/travel: a medium-sized usb device charger batt pack; hopefully I'll remember to stick it in the BOB if it comes to that.  It's always charged, ready to go.

- Everyday: a large pool of Eneloop AA and AAAs.  One of my kitchen drawers has 3 bins, for "just charged," "charged," and "dead."  "Charged" gets used first, and when it's empty (counting AAs and AAAs separately), all of the "just charged" get moved up to the "charged" bin.  This way, things get rotated out and nothing ever gets too stale.  About twice a year they all get a refresh cycle in the charger, or whenever something seems shaky.

- Specialty: a few specialties, mostly for ham radios.  These get treated as specialty items, separate from the battery pool.

That's not exactly what you were asking, but I hope it helps.  Overall, just keep a big enough pool of Eneloop rechargeables that it's no big deal when some of them get sidelined into the TV remote for a year.  It's pricy at first, but after a couple of years it pays for itself.

Agree about the Eneloops, teaching your kids to change/recharge their batteries... "game changer". http://battery1234.com has some good recommendations (look near bottom of the page)
Title: Re: What do you keep in your BOB (Bug Out Bag) & Why?
Post by: Gamer on June 09, 2019, 09:16:22 AM
I'd suggest one of our top priorities in our BOB's should be MAPS..:)
A few years ago my friend and his wife invited me to visit them in their home city, so I threw a few things in my small rucksack and jumped on the coach, but forgot a map of his city.
When I arrived we went strolling out and about on foot but because I had no map I felt totally disoriented in the strange streets, I didn't even know which way was north and it was a very unsettling experience.