The Survival Podcast Forum

News => Current Severe Emergency Situations => Topic started by: endurance on June 26, 2012, 11:53:14 PM

Title: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: endurance on June 26, 2012, 11:53:14 PM
While the fire near Fort Collins continues to grow at 87,000 acres, tonight the Waldo Canyon fire near Colorado Springs has exploded.  The numbers haven't been updated since early today, but it's clear this fire took dozens of homes today and thousands of additional acres.  I suspect that tomorrow will reveal a fire that tops 20k acres.

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/31226184/detail.html (http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/31226184/detail.html)

To complicate matters, we had a dry lightning storm roll through around 4-6pm today that likely started another half-dozen fires spread throughout the foothills west of Denver.  Uggh.  Just on of these near Boulder started a fire around 1:15pm and by 4:30pm it was already 300 acres.  Given that we got just enough rain to make things lay down for a few hours, I suspect by 4pm tomorrow we'll be looking at another level of complexity for the state.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Josh the Aspie on June 27, 2012, 12:13:28 AM
I hope that the people that need to evacuate manage too, and that folks will learn to let small fires burn, to make these big ones more manageable.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: endurance on June 27, 2012, 12:20:21 AM
In a year like this, you can't let a damn thing burn.  Every lightning strike is becoming a major fire taking many homes.  Looking at the latest, there could be several hundred homes lost tonight in Colorado Springs.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Josh the Aspie on June 27, 2012, 12:22:53 AM
Yeeeeouch.  I meant in general, so that under-brush and such are taken care of FOR years like this (less fuel for the fires), but I take your point.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: endurance on June 27, 2012, 12:35:15 AM
I'm just frustrated.  I've been on dozens of fires in my life, from Yellowstone in 1988 to the Hayman fire in 2002 and with big fires like this, there's nothing you can do but pray the wind stops, the rain comes and the temperatures fall into the 70s.  Tonight was a combination of the hottest day ever in June in Colorado (105F officially in Denver), single digit relative humidity (4-9%), and 65mph winds kicking up late in the afternoon.  The fire had been advancing north and west all day long, then turned hard to the east, taking out the northwest corner of a large section of Colorado Springs.  I wouldn't be surprised to hear about multiple deaths in the morning, too, as fast as this fire moved.  Those without reverse 911 likely had no warning until it was too late.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Josh the Aspie on June 27, 2012, 01:21:00 AM
Ouch.  Yeah, the loss of life really is not encouraging, and I apologize if I made your frustrations worse.

Maybe some constructive knowledge-sharing will help?  What is reverse 911, and how do you get it?
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: CrunchDog on June 27, 2012, 03:19:09 AM
I remember back in '07 when California was on fire. I was working the fire lines and there really is nothing you can do. I hope the weather starts agreeing with you guys there man. I'll keep you in my prayers.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: endurance on June 27, 2012, 06:54:04 AM
What is reverse 911, and how do you get it?
Reverse 911 is a system that allows local officials to make a mass outgoing call for an emergency message.  While the hard lines in homes are relatively easy to do it with because they're fixed to an address, the fact that more and more folks have cell phones as their only phones makes the system much more complicated.  In my county you can register up to ten numbers to your address and when they call for an evacuation the call goes to your cell phone.  Unfortunately, most people aren't even aware they can register their phones and the system isn't perfect.

Earlier this year there was a fire south of me where the reverse 911 call went out at the very last minute and they estimate that up to 40% of people in the area didn't get the call.  Three people died in that fire and everyone wanted to blame the county, but all three had called 911 to report the fire in the first place, so they were well aware of the fire and would have been better served listening to their own judgement than waiting for a call to evacuate.  It's tragic.  It's just another example that technology cannot be relied upon for your safety and sometimes you need to exercise your own judgement in spite of what the authorities say.

Yesterday when I saw the Waldo Canyon fire blowing up on the news, I turned on my scanner.  At that point I heard the traffic about new lightning-ignited fires in my area.  With that information I called my wife and she started to hook up the horse trailer in case we needed to evacuate.  While we were fortunate that none spread (yet), I didn't wait around for a reverse 911 call to set things in motion.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Bradbn4 on June 27, 2012, 07:58:16 AM
I could do without the front seat view of this going on.  I have always been a bit sensitive to smoke and now it seems like I have been camping for the last few days.

From the evacuation map it looks like folks expecting FedEx packages might have a larger than normal wait.  With 32K of folks being evacuated - I would expect all the local hotels to be booked.  A neighbor up the street seem to be sheltering a family that was evacuated. 

A friend of mine is waiting to see if he is part of the next group to have bail out due to the fire.

Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: endurance on June 27, 2012, 10:08:10 AM
Hey Brad, thanks for checking in.  I wasn't sure what part of town you lived in. 

This thing has turned into another monster and while I predict they'll be able to get the upper hand on the eastern front soon, the northern and western ends are likely to grow for weeks now that it's advanced so far up the Rampart.  Only significant rain is going to change thing for this fire.

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_20949291 (http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_20949291)
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Chemsoldier on June 27, 2012, 11:32:14 AM

From the evacuation map it looks like folks expecting FedEx packages might have a larger than normal wait.  With 32K of folks being evacuated - I would expect all the local hotels to be booked.  A neighbor up the street seem to be sheltering a family that was evacuated. 

Dangit, I just got the shipment notification for a Shelfreliance can rotation system that I ordered.  Oh well, it will get here eventually.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Nicodemus on June 27, 2012, 11:36:36 AM
Stay safe, Folks!
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Josh the Aspie on June 27, 2012, 12:35:33 PM
Huh.  Is this "reverse 911" system near universal or is a Colorado thing?  If it's fairly universal, I think I'll want to look into it.  It's not like the government can't track where my phone sits most of the time, or raid records on address associations anyway.  I may as well get a version of the association that does me some good.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: endurance on June 27, 2012, 01:33:49 PM
Huh.  Is this "reverse 911" system near universal or is a Colorado thing?  If it's fairly universal, I think I'll want to look into it.  It's not like the government can't track where my phone sits most of the time, or raid records on address associations anyway.  I may as well get a version of the association that does me some good.
It's becoming more and more popular with many counties and they're even using it for localized incidents, like chemical spills and wanted fugitives in some areas.  Usually you just need to go to your county emergency services webpage and they'll be links to sign up.  I believe most counties are using a GIS-based system so they can simply draw a polygon on a map and it calls up all the numbers registered in that area. 

There's numerous contractors doing these programs across the country and it's my understanding that some are much more flawed than others.  I know that the criticism of our fires earlier this year have led my county to explore different contractors at the next renewal.  That said, if you don't register, you have no room to gripe if it doesn't work.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Josh the Aspie on June 27, 2012, 01:50:40 PM
Thanks Endurance.  I'll look into it when I get back home.  Maybe I can find a similar service for some of my relatives, and give them info they'll appreciate.  My mother and grandmother are concerned over weather events, etc, so they might sign up.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: endurance on June 27, 2012, 02:15:31 PM
Thanks Endurance.  I'll look into it when I get back home.  Maybe I can find a similar service for some of my relatives, and give them info they'll appreciate.  My mother and grandmother are concerned over weather events, etc, so they might sign up.
There's also text alerts and e-mail alerts available from companies like emergencyemail.org (http://emergencyemail.org)  They're great for weather alerts, sometimes a little too good (lots of silly texts, like warnings about high wind advisories, etc.).

Regarding the fire, this latest map update is pretty terrifying.  Switch to satellite view and zoom in along the eastern edge and you can see how deep into the neighborhoods the fire reached.  Again, confirmation that probably well over a hundred homes were lost last night.   Map link (https://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=embed&hl=en&geocode=&q=http:%2F%2Frmgsc.cr.usgs.gov%2Foutgoing%2FGeoMAC%2FActiveFirePerimeters.kml&aq=&sll=39.737567,-104.984718&sspn=0.307305,0.441513&ie=UTF8&t=p&ll=38.901454,-104.930077&spn=0.106873,0.20565&z=12)

I just got a report that we're getting more dry lighting around my place right now.  Please let it rain!
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: TwoBluesMama on June 27, 2012, 03:57:43 PM
It's trying to rain here in Arvada at this moment - have been praying for it but also having severe lightning.  Just walked out with my DH as he was leaving for work opened the metal gates for him and sha-zam!  Somebody's watching over me anyway. 

I've lived here for all but a few years of my life and I've never seen anything like this.  I remember the 1980's being hot like this but not this dry.  So scary.  I feel so bad for all those who've lost their homes.  What a horrible thing to have happen to you.  A good lesson in being prepared to flee and not having all your eggs (preps) in one basket. 

Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: raphterman on June 27, 2012, 04:38:31 PM
It was kind of funny yesterday when my wife asked me if we should get bags together in case we get the pre-evac/evac order.  I have the kids' and my stuff all ready to go along with the data backups but I've told her in the past that she needs to get some of her clothes wrapped up.  Luckily we're on the eastern side of the city but you should have seen her BOB go from zero to hero pretty quick.  Obviously the "just-in-time" preparations aren't the best but I think she's now a believer from here on out!  My thanks to this show and the TSP community. 
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: TwoBluesMama on June 27, 2012, 04:55:50 PM
It was kind of funny yesterday when my wife asked me if we should get bags together in case we get the pre-evac/evac order.  I have the kids' and my stuff all ready to go along with the data backups but I've told her in the past that she needs to get some of her clothes wrapped up.  Luckily we're on the eastern side of the city but you should have seen her BOB go from zero to hero pretty quick.  Obviously the "just-in-time" preparations aren't the best but I think she's now a believer from here on out!  My thanks to this show and the TSP community.

Hope all goes well for you.  Keep us posted if you can.  Blessings and prayers sent your way, TBM
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Herew on June 27, 2012, 04:59:12 PM
Even though I live on the southeast side of the Springs, we have our BoBs already loaded in the cars and are ready to go at a moments notice. My wife and son are leaving for Kansas (to stay with her parents) on Friday or Saturday.

The smoke was thick like fog this morning and hasn't really gotten better. It tried to rain earlier this afternoon, but as far as I know, it did no good.

I hope the rest of you in the area are well.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Morning Sunshine on June 27, 2012, 04:59:43 PM
wow, Colorado, you are on fire!  I was looking at that map and you have a lot of red.

I was looking at some of your fires, and our one fire, and wonder - do the highways make a natural firebreak?  it seems to me, from these maps, that the fires are not crossing major highways.

I guess I ask because I am right on the edge of a large highway, not an interstate.  and all of our wind comes from that direction.  I guess I am hoping that means I am safe :D

meanwhile, I have banned fire from our fire pit for the summer.  much to the son's dismay.  to bad for him :)
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Chemsoldier on June 27, 2012, 05:17:12 PM
The highways are ok firebreaks (especially interstates) but they are not the be all end all.  Embers can apparently drift quite a ways and start secondary fires that spread and join up with the original fire.  So a natural firebreak has to be worked by fire crews that widen the breaks and extinguish secondaries that start on the non burning side.  I am getting a crash course in all this.

There has been a small amount of rain over here on the east side, the problem is it has been accompanied by a lot of wind, which is not what is desirable apparently.  So I am told that while rain is good you need a fair amount of it to overcome the undesirable effects of high winds.  Additionally, if it comes from thunderstorms, the lightning can start secondaries.

We are on the far eastern side of Colorado Springs (ie a pretty good distance away with the bulk of the city between us and the fire) and we can still smell the smoke inside the house with the AC on.  The family truckster is ready to go if need be.  I also signed up for the Reverse 911 last night.  Funny how being close to a disaster refocuses you and gets you thinking. 
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: fndrbndr on June 27, 2012, 06:52:56 PM
I could do without the front seat view of this going on.

Same here, bro...we're just north of the mess in the Monument area. Pre-evac called for us today.

It's kind of like a mini-SHTF for all of us here. Gas station lines are getting a bit long and I hear rumors of a few grocery shelves being stripped (especially in Woodland Park). Most everyone is really rallying together to provide help and support, but some people have "that look" in their eyes (borderline zombie panic).
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: TwoBluesMama on June 27, 2012, 07:49:44 PM
Herew, Chemsoldier, and fndrbndr - praying that all goes well for you all too.  Do keep us posted.

I am a little concerned about my daughter who lives about 50 miles from the Waldo Canyon Fire.  She has asthma and is expecting a baby any day and the smoke at her house is awful.  I would love for her to come to my house but the hospital she is to deliver at is there and she wants to stay. (Even though she's grown and married this Mama still worries a little).

Funny how being close to a disaster refocuses you and gets you thinking. 
^This! +1
Title: Waldo Canyon Fire
Post by: eronious on June 27, 2012, 10:42:35 PM
Well shoot.  I wish I knew whether or not I have a house any more.  I live in the Mountain Shadows area of Colorado Springs that they keep talking about.  Thanks to TSP, I think I was more than prepared to bug out, but until you actually have to do it, you never know how it's going to affect you. 

I have alternatly had moments of zen and wild sobbing fits, but I think I'm ok now.  My husband (who is currently contracting in Afghanistan) as a part of our prep planning recently went in and reorganized all our important files, tossing papers that we no longer needed and consolidating everything that we would have to grab in case of emergency in one drawer.  I plopped those folders in a box along with everything else I had pre-planned for a bug out and was surprised when I looked at the clock and it had only taken about 15 minutes.  Whoa!  That's a hell of a return on investment for a little pre-planning!  I did this (again as a prep) days before we were actually evacuated, then I had the luxury of a few days of wandering through my house and plucking sentimental items and stuff I just wanted, but I was secure in the knowledge that at any given moment, the important stuff was already ready to go.

When we got the evacuation orders, it came fast and furious.  I had signed up for reverse 911 calls and texts, which worked exactly as promised.  If you don't know what that is, google it NOW and get signed up for it.  They'll tell you if there's an amber alert in your area, an evacuation notice or a killer or gunman on the loose in your neighborhood.  Good stuff to know!  Anyway, I got the call and text and then the power went out 5 minutes later.  I had staged the last of my clothes and toiletries to go in the last few minutes (right before the pet crate) because I didn't really want to re-iron all that stuff if I didn't have to and hey, a girl's gotta have her beauty products up until she gets in the car, right?  So in that 5 minutes, I was loading the last suitcase in the car and was in a windowless, closed garage when the power went out. 

It was then that I realized i had no idea how to open an electric garage door manually.  Wow.  What a dork!  Anyway, when I found my way out of the very dark smokey garage, my awesome neighbor laughed at me, ran to my house and showed me how the release/lock works and then wished me luck and we were off to my parent's house in Parker about an hour away.  Again, more tears and more zen on the way, but I was safe, I performed my final bug-out inside of 10 minutes and now I'm just kind of proud of myself.  Also I'm exhausted.  They don't tell you how exhausting this is.

Anyway, if anyone knows of anyone that is in a position to know whether I still have a house, I'd love to get an inside scoop, but other than that, I think I'm going to be ok.  Because I was prepared.

Thanks Jack and TSP! 

<3 Heather
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: Bradbn4 on June 27, 2012, 10:44:11 PM
Nice to be on the east side - I figure about 50% of colorado springs would have to go before I get taken out. 

Summary:

an ex coworker - had the houses on 3 sides burn down - but his escaped without too much damage.
a co-worker was forced to evacuate
2 co-workers can't get to work without 150 mile commute
1 friend is on the far south edge of the fire and has the car packed encase of a bug out order
1 friend is evacuated from Woodland park down to Colorado Springs - however; his business is semi-close to another area under close watch

Way too much smoke - way too hot with no real rain expected - these are the shows I only like to watch on crappy TV - not in real life HD.




Title: Re: Waldo Canyon Fire
Post by: Pathfinder on June 28, 2012, 05:29:03 AM
Can't help with the house, sorry, I'm about a 1000 miles away. My granddaughter and her mom and grandmother are all up northeast, east of the Ft. Collins fire. No danger at the moment, but smoke everywhere.

But kudos on the prep work and the quick ability to respond. That was excellent. In your sobbing moments, try to remember it's just stuff, you have the important things - and your life, and insurance will get the house rebuilt. YOU did awesome!!!!

Prayers aloft for you and everyone in CO these days.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: endurance on June 28, 2012, 08:16:19 AM
The highways are ok firebreaks (especially interstates) but they are not the be all end all.  Embers can apparently drift quite a ways and start secondary fires that spread and join up with the original fire.  So a natural firebreak has to be worked by fire crews that widen the breaks and extinguish secondaries that start on the non burning side.  I am getting a crash course in all this.
A prime example of this is the fire map with fire on the north side of Rampart Reservoir.  The fire jumped across a lake and started on the far side.  That's a lot wider than an interstate.

Thankfully all three major fires on the front range got at least some rain on them last night.  Certainly not enough to put them out, but perhaps enough to decrease fire behavior to the point where they can do direct attack and put in some effective line. 
Title: Re: Waldo Canyon Fire
Post by: endurance on June 28, 2012, 08:59:25 AM
Hey Eronious, sorry I missed this post yesterday.  There's a parallel thread in the breaking events forum here (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=35975.0). (topics merged by TBM) Really the only way to know if your home was impacted or not is to do your best zooming in on the google maps image of the fire while in satellite view.  If you PM your street name I can help with this.  Otherwise, here's the link to the latest update: https://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=embed&hl=en&geocode=&q=http:%2F%2Frmgsc.cr.usgs.gov%2Foutgoing%2FGeoMAC%2FActiveFirePerimeters.kml&aq=&sll=39.737567,-104.984718&sspn=0.307305,0.441513&ie=UTF8&t=p&ll=38.901454,-104.930077&spn=0.106873,0.20565&z=12 (https://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=embed&hl=en&geocode=&q=http:%2F%2Frmgsc.cr.usgs.gov%2Foutgoing%2FGeoMAC%2FActiveFirePerimeters.kml&aq=&sll=39.737567,-104.984718&sspn=0.307305,0.441513&ie=UTF8&t=p&ll=38.901454,-104.930077&spn=0.106873,0.20565&z=12)

From what I've seen from those images, Mountain Shadows has not been directly impacted.

You're in our thoughts.  Glad you made it out safe.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: TwoBluesMama on June 28, 2012, 09:36:31 AM
eronious - Sorry to hear what is happening with you.  I can imagine that it's very difficult not to know.  I'm adding you to my prayers in hopes that all goes well for you.  Keep us posted when you can.  Blessings, TBM
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: Cedar on June 28, 2012, 09:38:46 AM
Hey Eronious. My friend "D" lives in Colorado Springs, to the SE I think. They are still holding in there at her place as they have cows to calve any day. If you PM me an addy I can see if she can find out about your house.

I hope you still have a house as well.

Cedar
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: eronious on June 28, 2012, 10:28:50 AM
I'm just frustrated.  I've been on dozens of fires in my life, from Yellowstone in 1988 to the Hayman fire in 2002 and with big fires like this, there's nothing you can do but pray the wind stops, the rain comes and the temperatures fall into the 70s.  Tonight was a combination of the hottest day ever in June in Colorado (105F officially in Denver), single digit relative humidity (4-9%), and 65mph winds kicking up late in the afternoon.  The fire had been advancing north and west all day long, then turned hard to the east, taking out the northwest corner of a large section of Colorado Springs.  I wouldn't be surprised to hear about multiple deaths in the morning, too, as fast as this fire moved.  Those without reverse 911 likely had no warning until it was too late.

So having been through it the evac in Mountain Shadows, I was surprised to see people choking their way through the smoke to knock on their neighbors doors to see if they needed anything or to make sure they knew before they bugged out.  I myself went to each adjoining neighbor before I left and had several people check on me.  People don't suck in that neighborhood at all.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: endurance on June 28, 2012, 10:42:35 AM
That's great to hear.  Hopefully this monsoonal moisture continues to come into the state, providing cloud cover, higher humidities, lower temperatures, and rain.  Yes, there's wind and lighting with those thunderstorms, but without the rain, this state can't survive.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires
Post by: eronious on June 28, 2012, 10:47:20 AM
I'm just frustrated.  I've been on dozens of fires in my life, from Yellowstone in 1988 to the Hayman fire in 2002 and with big fires like this, there's nothing you can do but pray the wind stops, the rain comes and the temperatures fall into the 70s.  Tonight was a combination of the hottest day ever in June in Colorado (105F officially in Denver), single digit relative humidity (4-9%), and 65mph winds kicking up late in the afternoon.  The fire had been advancing north and west all day long, then turned hard to the east, taking out the northwest corner of a large section of Colorado Springs.  I wouldn't be surprised to hear about multiple deaths in the morning, too, as fast as this fire moved.  Those without reverse 911 likely had no warning until it was too late.

My buddy was up there deer hunting in the Waldo Canyon area last year and he said the undergrowth was almost totally impassable.  If the timing hadn't been so bad weather-wise a nice controlled burn was probably in order, but stuff is catching on fire right now if you look at it wrong around here.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: eronious on June 28, 2012, 11:00:53 AM
So actually, mountain shadows is where the 'several hundred' houses have burned down.  I THINK my house is ok, but I think Cedar might be able to help me check.  Thanks all for the good wishes!
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: nimzy88 on June 28, 2012, 11:25:02 AM
A few of my friends are from Manitou Springs and own hotels, I believe they sent a few wives to bug out already, but as of this morning I saw a status update from Manitou Springs . He posted a few pictures back on the 24th:

From silver saddle motel in Manitou springs

(http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/543283_887339592418_1418194607_n.jpg)

View from manitou elementary school

(http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/529631_887669017248_860325227_n.jpg)

Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: SA Friday on June 28, 2012, 02:50:00 PM
Wow.  You all down in the springs, I hope you are getting the clouds like I am here in Castle Rock.  I'm hoping these clouds drop a couple inches of rain and spans the entire state.  I haven't seen it this dry here since 2002, Haymen Fire, time. 

We've been watching the pre-evac pretty close.  It's going all the way to  south DougCo county road right now.  Rain damn it.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: endurance on June 29, 2012, 10:07:07 AM
Unfortunately the first fatality has been reported.  On the plus side, no new homes have been lost since Tuesday night/Wednesday morning.

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/31236482/detail.html (http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/31236482/detail.html)

Quote
The Waldo Canyon Fire has killed one person and burned 347 homes. The adult victim was found at a home at 2910 Rossmere St., in the Mountain Shadows subdivision. A second adult from the same address is missing, said Colorado Springs Police Chief Peter Carey.

This could be the first of several.  It's often difficult to find human remains in buildings that were completely consumed in fire.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: BerserkerPrime on June 29, 2012, 10:13:21 AM
My prayers go out to all of the folks in CO affected by these fires.  I grew up in Grand Lake CO and know the fear that comes with wildfire.  Stay strong, positive, and know that we're pulling for you!

V/r BP
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: eronious on June 29, 2012, 10:40:15 AM
And robberies of evacuated homes have been confirmed.  Sometimes I really hate humans.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: Bradbn4 on June 29, 2012, 11:53:01 PM
Robberies yes and two have been arrested - 
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: Morning Sunshine on July 02, 2012, 02:11:46 PM
what is the news about the fires?  also, Endurance - where do you find your map updates?
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: inconel710 on July 02, 2012, 02:21:55 PM
what is the news about the fires?  also, Endurance - where do you find your map updates?

I'm not sure where Endurance gets his, but here's the official Forest Service site - http://www.inciweb.org/state/6/
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: inconel710 on July 02, 2012, 02:28:02 PM
Eronious - I don't know if you've seen this yet, but the initail damage assesment by the city is available:
http://www.springsgov.com/units/communications/WaldoFire_PreliminaryDamageAssessment_062912_8pm.pdf

I hope you find good news in there.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: Morning Sunshine on July 02, 2012, 02:48:25 PM
Eronious - I don't know if you've seen this yet, but the initail damage assesment by the city is available:
http://www.springsgov.com/units/communications/WaldoFire_PreliminaryDamageAssessment_062912_8pm.pdf

I hope you find good news in there.

wow - that is really random.  you have a destroyed house surrounded by "no visible damage" or a "no visible damage" surrounded by "total loss".  I wonder why some burned and some did not, especially in the areas where the others are opposite.  I mean, I understand a whole street or area burning or not burning, but wonder about the lone ones...
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: endurance on July 02, 2012, 04:34:03 PM
wow - that is really random.  you have a destroyed house surrounded by "no visible damage" or a "no visible damage" surrounded by "total loss".  I wonder why some burned and some did not, especially in the areas where the others are opposite.  I mean, I understand a whole street or area burning or not burning, but wonder about the lone ones...
I can't be sure in specific cases, but a lot of it has to do with mitigation.  Those folks who used a lot of juniper around their homes for landscaping have no home to return to.  Those who's homes were surrounded by water-loving trees, like mountain ash, honey locust, etc., had a much better chance of surviving.  Also, if one home had rock trim to 4' up the walls while another had vinyl siding to the ground, the rock trim home has a much better chance. 

What may appear to be random by address is often the result of a very conscientious home owner vs. someone trying to save money with Xeroscaping.  By no means does mitigation guarantee survival or an unmitigated home is doomed, but many times it can make all the difference.

And inconel has the right source: Inciweb is the best source for the most accurate information.

It appears the monsoonal moisture is here and while we're not getting any soaking rains, just the increase in relative humidities, cloud cover, and 10F cooler has made an enormous difference in controlling the fires and preventing any new big ones (although we've had more than our fair share of small one's in the last week due to dry lighting).
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: Cedar on July 02, 2012, 05:14:02 PM
Any news Eronious? I heard they are letting some people in now

Cedar
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: TwoBluesMama on July 06, 2012, 07:27:40 PM
It is raining in Colorado tonight.  We desperately need rain and I'm not sure about Colorado Springs area but the Parker area and all the way north to Arvada saw some rain.  More heading our way tomorrow.  Keep your fingers crossed all.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: Chemsoldier on July 06, 2012, 07:37:37 PM
Colorado Springs (at least my part) got significant rain. 
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: Bradbn4 on July 06, 2012, 07:56:13 PM
it' don't take much to have significantly different weather reports in this city - did get a good steady rain - but as I always say - more please?  slow rain for long periods what makes my yard happy.

Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: endurance on July 06, 2012, 08:44:11 PM
Considering we just went onto 'no outside watering' restrictions in my neighborhood, I'm dancing a jig at the downpour we're getting at the moment.  I hadn't watered since Monday and usually water only Mondays and Fridays, so the timing is perfect, too.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: SA Friday on July 06, 2012, 11:29:48 PM
FINALLY!!  Rain... ;D
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: eronious on August 11, 2012, 05:28:58 PM
Hey gang!  Endurance pointed out to me that I'd kind of left my status hanging out there!  Sorry to worry anyone, but everything is ok.  My house is still standing and I'm alright.  It does really make you think about maybe putting the gas pedal down on the preps though, hu?  Now if I could just talk the hubby into getting behind this whole homestead thing...  :)

Thanks for thinking of me gang!
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: Chemsoldier on August 11, 2012, 08:57:51 PM
Glad your place made it through eronious.  I had been wondering but didnt want to pry.
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: eronious on August 12, 2012, 12:28:01 AM
Yeah, I think the closest house to my own that was lost was about 3 blocks away, but strangely enough, the only thing that happened to my place directly was that once I watered the you-know-what out of everything and it perked up, my "growies" seemed super excited about all the extra ash that got dumped on them.  I had about 3 full days of dusting, sweeping and vacuuming because the ash was seriously all over everything. I've discovered that I have the least air-tight house in the world.   ;)

Other than that, though, all good.  Anyone else have any issues?
Title: Re: Colorado Wildfires/Waldo Canyon
Post by: endurance on August 12, 2012, 07:14:21 AM
The only fallout for us was both me and my wife joined our local volunteer fire department.  She's working on a RN to EMT 1 week bridge class, then after a year, she'll take a 2 week RN to Paramedic bridge class.  I'm trying to find the time for an EMT class (if you're not an RN, it's a 178 hour program).  I'm also getting my wildland certification again.