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Farm, Garden and The Land => Gardening and Agriculture => Show Us Your Garden => Topic started by: Cedar on January 07, 2015, 10:48:18 PM

Title: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 07, 2015, 10:48:18 PM
Today I started moving flats around, moving lights around on the seed starting racks. Got into my seed 'box' and sorted all the seeds into large bins by 'like kinds' and got them all reinstalled into the 'box'. I figured out what needs to go in first. Watered down my flats and hopefully will start planting peppers and tomatoes tomorrow.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on January 08, 2015, 08:41:12 AM
 :popcorn:
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: PorcupineKate on January 08, 2015, 11:10:37 AM
I am looking forward to seeing how the farm develops this year.   :popcorn:
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: busymomx3 on January 09, 2015, 09:05:39 AM
 :popcorn:
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 21, 2015, 09:48:52 PM
Tomorrow is the day....
Tomatoes are being seeded into flats tomorrow with my friend to keep me company. Here is my tomato lineup for the year. All OP heirlooms.
 
Ailsa Craig - an English Heritage variety dating from 1925
A Grappoli D'Iverno - "Winter Grape" tomato of old Italy
Amber - Bushy plant that produces 2-inch amber-colored globes
Amish Paste - the ultimate paste tomato
Aunt Ruby's German Green - are a cultivar originating with Ruby Arnold (d 1997), of Greeneville, Tennessee
Austin's Red Pear - very productive
Babywine
Baylor Paste - No blossom end rot as is common with other pastes.
Big Rainbow
Black Krim <--- My favorite
Black Seaman
Bread and Salt
Beefsteak
Big Red
Boxcar Willie - 1950's
Brandywine
Brandywine Red
Cherokee Purple
Cherry Roma
Chocolate
Chocolate Cherry
Comstock Slice and Sauce
Copia
Cyril's Choice - An English family heirloom, kept alive by D. Rankilor, who's brother Cyril grew it on his allotment before he died.
Dester
Dr. Wyche's Yellow
Egg from Phucket
Emerald Evergreen <-- makes great salsa verde
Evergreen
Forest Fire
Garden Peach <-- it is really fuzzy like a peach
Gemini
German Gold
German Pink
Gold Metal
Green Sausage
Green Zebra
Gregory's Altai
Hartman's Yellow Gooseberry - A very old heirloom tomato that was popular in the 1830's
Hillbilly Potato Leaf
Homestead
Hungarian Heart
Isis Candy Cherry
Italian Heirloom
Jaune Flamme
jon's Yellow Cherokee
Kentuky Beefsteak
Lemon Drop
Marmande
Manitoba - GOOD early tomato I grew in Canada
Martino's Roma
Mexico Midget <--- great for canning whole
Missouri Pink Love Apple
Moneymaker
Moonglow <--- this is a very pretty one.
Morado
Morning Sun
Mortgage Lifter
Mule Team - Main crop, all purpose tomato
Nature's Riddle
Nebraska Wedding - My favorite golden
Old German
Omar's Lebanese - Disease tolerant.  Huge, pink fruit can grow as large as 3-4 lbs!
Opalka
Orange King
Ozark Pink
Pantano Romanesco - Very rare from Italy and very tasty
Peron Sprayless
Persimmon Type
Plum Lemon
Polen Yellow Pear
Principe Borghese
Pritchard Scarlet Topper
Purple Prince
Red Rock
Red Zebra
Riesentraube-  in Philadelphia by the mid-1800's. Tthe name means "Giant Bunch of Grapes" in German
Roma
Ropreco
Rose
Rutgers
Rutger's Select
San Marzano
Siletz
Silvery Fir Tree - Great as a hanging basket plant. Lovely silvery carrot top like leaves
Sophie's Choice
Speckled Roman
Striped Roman
Stupice -My dad started growing these from some of the first brought over from Czechoslovakia. EARLY!
Summer Cherry
Sungella
Sunshine Cherry
Sweet Pea Currant
Thessaloniki - Greek tomato that was introduced to the USA in the 1950's
Tommy Toe
Tonnelet L.F.
Tula
Uncle Mark Bagby - Named for Mark Bagby brought the seed from Germany in 1919
Wisconsin 55 - developed by plant pathologist JC Walker at the University of Wisconsin in 1949
Yellow Pear

Yes, that is 100 varieties. I am only planting 2-6 of each however. There are at least 5 colours represented. Paste, cherry, giant, slicing... all them them worth preserving their genetic heritage.

I do have history on most of the varieties, but I was trying to rush the post, so I could get SP in bed. If you like tomatoes, look up the history for them.. the history is as wonderful as their taste.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on January 23, 2015, 07:56:02 AM
Do you save seed from every one each year? What do you do about cross-pollinating, since I assume you're trying to keep each variety going for years to come.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 23, 2015, 08:39:43 AM
Do you save seed from every one each year? What do you do about cross-pollinating, since I assume you're trying to keep each variety going for years to come.

Not each year. I usually have them on a 3 year rotation, planting out 1/3 each year, but I have my new commercial greenhouses, so I am going hog wild. As I want to finally do a good trial and see what works and does not work for our climate and then I will give the varieties which are not going so well for me, out at a Seedy Saturday.

Generally if you can keep insects away, tomatoes are self pollinating, but I use these bags meant for weddings for my "bug screens". 
(http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.607988875005330665&w=192)

On the plants I had pollinate, or the tomato blossoms I want to keep, I pop one of these bags over until fruit has formed, and then I pull it off, label the branch/fruit as "DO NOT EAT" and the date, any other into on pink surveyors tape and attach.

I have also grown favorites in the house as a houseplant and saved seed from them.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on January 23, 2015, 08:45:06 AM
Woah. I had never thought of those little wedding bags. Such a good idea!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 23, 2015, 08:47:53 AM
Woah. I had never thought of those little wedding bags. Such a good idea!

I was helping a friend fill them for a wedding once and I was like, "Hey.. these would be great for seed propagation". So I ordered 400 of them off eBay. Some are printed. Some are red, some are white... but they don't seem to matter what color they are.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: SuburbanGardener on January 23, 2015, 09:08:39 AM
That's a whole lot of tomato varieties!  I envy you the room to plant so many different kinds, and hopefully keep them from cross pollinating.  I figure I would be lucky to work with 5 at a time, and may only go for three.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 23, 2015, 10:09:02 AM
You guys realize I let 98% of the flowers cross on ALL my veggies right? I only choose a few select plants to save one section off to keep pure. It is not like every single flower/plant.

So I might choose 1 limb each off of three "Small Red Cherry" tomato plants to bag. Maybe 5 plants of "Yugoslavian Red Butterhead" Lettuce (they are perfect pollinators, which pollinate before the flower opens, so I don't have to bag). Maybe 5 fruits of "Small Sugar" pumpkin to bag.

Not all plants are worthy of passing their genes on, and like those 5 fruits of "Small Sugar" pumpkin, I could easily get 1,000 seeds from. 600 from the "Small Red Cherry" tomatoes.. but by planting alot, I have more of a selection for the traits I want to go into the next generation.. and then alot for us to can up/preserve and the rest to our extremely small community Farmer's Market.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 26, 2015, 02:51:03 PM
Got all the tomatoes seeded out.. Now I am working on the peppers.

Aji Cristal (4)
Anaheim (4)
Aurora (5)
Beaver Dam (3)
Black Hungarian (3)
Bulgarian Carrot (4)
Bull Nose Bell (0)
California Wonder (0)
Carribean Red Hot (4)
Cayenne Long Red (4)
Cayenne Long Thin (4)
Cow Horn (0)
Cyklon (5)
Early Jalapeno (3)
Fatalii (5)
Feher Ozon Paprika (0) <--- this one I think I will have fun with this year
Fish (3) <-- probably one of the prettiest peppers.
Georgia Flame (4)
Gernika Basque Pepper (2)
Goat Horn (4)
Golden Californian Wonder (0)
Habanero (4)
Healthy (0)
King of the North (0) <--- if this one doesn't do well this year, I am dumping it
Hinkelhatz (4)
Hungarian Yellow Wax (3)
Italian Marconi Golden (0)
Jalapeno (4)
Jimmy Nardello Italian (1)
Joe's Round  (4)
Lemon Drop (4)
Melrose (0)
Miniature Red Bell  (0)
Miniature Yellow Bell (0)
Mustard Habanero (5)
Napolean Sweet (0)
Nepalese Bell (4)
Nosegay (4)
Orange Bell (0)
Pasilla Bajio (2)
Pepperoncici Greek (1)
Portugal Hot (4)
Purple Beauty (0)
Quadrato d'Asti Giallo (0)
Quadrato d'Asti Rosso (0)
Red Cap Mushroom (4)
Red Marconi (0)
Sante Fe Grande (3)
Serrano (5)
Sweet Banana (0)
Sweet Chocolate (0)
Taltos <-- the only one I cannot find info on. Anyone?
Tequila Sunrise (1)<--- one of my favorites
Thai Hot (4-5) <--- my favorite as a houseplant, if I can keep my cat from eating it
Tobago Seasoning (3)

56 varieties to plant this year. The 0 means sweet/not hot, and a 5 generally means stupidly hot. I am not a 'pepperhead'. I do not wish to be one.

Like tomatoes, peppers pollinate themselves, so I will just bag the ones I want to save seed from and then label so no one eats the fruits,to keep insects from re-pollinating them.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 26, 2015, 05:45:03 PM
Found another tomato... "Gregory's Altai". So seeded those out. They originated near the Altai Mountains in Novosibirsk, Siberia, near the Russia-China border.

101 varieties of tomatoes. We shall see who wins and who doesn't this year. I think I want to dump 10% of the varieties which do poorly this year, since they will all have the same growing conditions for a trial.

Got the peppers planted and then did 19 varieties of eggplant.

Eggplants:
Applegreen - Developed by the late Professor Elwyn Meader in New Hampshire in 1964. Got mine from the UK
Black Beauty - old American standby, introduced in the 1800's, the only type usually seen in grocery stores
Black Long Early - It is early.
Casper - Shiny white fruits are 6 inches long
Cote d'Ivoire - heirloom originating in France in 1850.
Kazakhstan - Seed collected at a state-run market in Alma Ata, Kazakhstan, by A.T. Whittemore, donated to the USDA Germplasm Repository in 1991.
Korean Red -Rounded bush to 3 feet tall, red-orange fruits
Lao Purple Stripe - aka Purple Tiger Stripe. Heirloom from Laos
Listada de Gandia - Introduced into southern France around 1850
Little Fingers - These fruits grow in clusters of 3 or more.  They can be harvested when no larger than your little finger
Ping Tung Long - Classic eastern-Asian type
Red Ruffled - Looks like miniature pumpkins
Ronde de Valence - the size of a grapefruit, with deep purple color. French heirloom named after the city of Valence, a quaint city on the Rhone River.
Rosa Bianca - Italian heirloom, light pink-lavender fruits
Rosita - Developed in Puerto Rico in the 1940's. Lovely pink
Thai Green - mild and sweet, the 10” to 12” long, very slender fruit are a beautiful light-lime green.
Tondo Chiaro di Nizza - Seed I got from the UK many years ago. Round green striped eggplant.
Tonda di Manfredonia - Heirloom from Italy. Extremely rare and endangered.
Udumalapet - From India. Heavy yields of pear-shaped fruits are light green streaked with purple, ripening to golden-yellow with lavender stripes

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 28, 2015, 01:49:19 PM
Remembered where my artichoke seed was located. I forgot to put them in my pocket from the truck as I was grabbing 7 other things and a small child to get into the house.

So at 5 am I was planting artichokes. Put in 53 of them. I should put in a bit more, but I did not want to go outside and fill more flats yet. You should sow heavily and expect 70% germination. Of these seedlings, about 20% will not produce high quality plants. Cull out the small and albino plants.

Green Globe
Green Globe Improved
Purple of Romagna <-- new one for me. "Catherine de Medici moved to France in 1533 to be the queen of Henry II, she took her passion for artichokes with her. Her appetite for this vegetable scandalized the people of her day, as the artichoke was considered an aphrodisiac and only eaten by men. In time, artichokes became a culinary delight only afforded by the elite. The French brought this vegetable to Louisiana, while the Spanish introduced it to California. California still produces nearly all of the United States' supply of artichokes, with Castroville, CA being named as the Artichoke Capital of the World. The Purple Romagna variety is the top choice of Italian chefs because of its unusual tenderness and beauty."

I also started on windowboxes and hanging planters.

Crocus mix
Windowbox SweetPeas - Heirloom Cupid.


Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 28, 2015, 04:08:49 PM
Just went out to take stock of my grafted apples and pears I did last spring, as well as take their tape off. They have been in buckets for the last year, as I was waiting to get the orchard fence up first before planting them, but I have now given up on that happening anytime soon, so I have gone to Plan B of 4 pallets around each tree, so I can get them in the ground and keep sheep, donkeys, deer and elk from munching on them.

Over the heat of the summer, and failing to water them for a week or more, and then no protection with that blast of cold we had, I only had 2 losses of apples. I am surprised I did not have more losses with the August abuse I put them through. So I will replace those this year in March. I will start putting the remaining 15 live ones into the ground tomorrow. I started to pull pallets out of the dairy barn, but it is too wet to haul them all the way to the new orchard area, it will just leave huge ruts.

I have been researching ancient apple varieties for some years now for various reasons. My main concentration has been on apples of the medieval period in England pre-1500's, although the occasional one from France, Germany and other places/times 'snuck' in. Apples have been cultivated in England for 1,200 years, ever since the Roman's brought them to the area. Many of the varieties are so close to going extinct and stock can be difficult to find. I have been in contact with many different historical orchards all over the world to get information and potential 'seed stock' for these varieties.

In 1900 in the United States alone, there were over 5,000 varieties of named apple trees, today there are less than 1,000 named varieties. That is how many have gone extinct in America in around 100 years.

Looking over my 'want lists' for the HOS Scion event, and writing them down. My criteria is heirloom to ancient fruit mostly from Britian and France pre-1950's, but I do have a few from Americana 1800's. They have to be multipurpose, taste good and store well. They have to be able to pollinate each other (which is why it takes me FOREVER and a half to figure out what cultivars I desire).

So far on my list is:
PEAR 'Hosui' which is an Asian pear from Tsukuba, Japan in 1954. Stores 4 weeks.
PEAR "Red Bartlett", which would be a summer apples, VS all the fall ones we have
APPLE 'Calville Blanc d'Hiver'
APPLE 'Ashmead's Kernel"

But I am researching various figs, medlar and quince.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 29, 2015, 10:42:44 PM
This morning I woke up the greenhouse and got it ready for the year.

47F outside temps/61F temps inside the greenhouse, 98% humidity at 10 am, then it was 89F inside with the doors open, while 58F outside at 2pm.
SweetPea and I re-laid down the black visqueen again, staked it for the area the tomatoes, peppers and eggplants are going into. Then I brought up plants I overwintered in the greenhouse for planting at the house. Took the blueberry cuttings down to the greenhouse. Took all the hanging planters down to the greenhouse ( 8 ) to start  hanging flowers in for the house and the Lodge. SweetPea and I cut the soaker hose to the correct length, and getting the watering system started. It is modular, so I can make single rows or wide rows. Been using the system that I made in Canada,  brought it down and used it in the last house garden, and at the Lodge.

A really weird pic SP took of me, (maybe it is her height?), but I look happy planting.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/01/Greenhouse01292015d.jpg)

I tilled three rows (can't do too much at a time, as the exhaust from the tiller stays in the greenhouse) for peas and squash. I have to keep all the doors and windows open when I till it.

Put in a start for the trellis system for the peas, even though the dwarf varieties might not need it. But a couple are 4-5' tall. My summer ones for outside are 10-14' tall for comparison. Tall varieties are becoming lost, as they cannot be machine picked, so I tend to 'specialize' in tall varieties. But these are early for Farmer's market.  In this photo, it was taken just before the second row went in, and there will be four total to the right side of this greenhouse. Lettuce and strawberries are the next to go in.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/01/Greenhouse01292015c.jpg)

Planted today:
Peas - Green Arrow (Alaska origin) <-- this takes really COLD weather
Peas - Opal Creek (Oregon origin) <-- golden pea
Peas - Parsley Pea (British origin?) <-- First year for this one
Peas - Dwarf Grey Sugar (pre-1856)
Peas - British Wonder (British origin)
Pea - Feltham First (British origin pre-1890)

Summer Squash - Tondo Chiaro di Nizza Zucchini <-- round
Summer Squash - Lebanese White Bush Marrow <- I have not grown before
Summer Squash - Yugoslavian Finger Fruit <-- Awesome looking
Summer Squash - Cocozelle Zucchini <-- my fav

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/01/Greenhouse01292015a.jpg)

This evening figuring out my final plan for tomato, pepper and eggplant trellises.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 30, 2015, 11:19:53 AM
Pretty sure it froze last night. 35F when I looked at the thermometer at 8 am

"Red Zebra" and "Riesentraube" tomatoes won the germination contest.. they are both up.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on January 30, 2015, 09:03:23 PM
You might have explained this somewhere else, but I gotta ask. Do you grow for farmer's markets? Or is your production primarily for your use? I know you give away seed sometimes, but do you sell to seed companies?
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 30, 2015, 09:21:37 PM
You might have explained this somewhere else, but I gotta ask. Do you grow for farmer's markets? Or is your production primarily for your use? I know you give away seed sometimes, but do you sell to seed companies?

I have a SMALL farmer's market that I attend locally, at the weekly community get-to-gether. There are two vendors there at best, usually I am the only one. But I sell to the local community of about 82-120 people (depends on if the other community comes in too), not everyone buys, or buys each week, but they usually come by and talk to me. I am diversified in freerange eggs (chicken, duck, turkey and usually quail), USDA pork, USDA lamb, usually 20 or so varieties of vegetables (which change weekly, and I will often have 4-5 varieties of lettuce, beans, peas at a time), jams, honey, soon 6 varieties of mushrooms, and the odd thing here and there. Most of my vegetables are unique, my customers now know it and they like being able to support a local community member and get cool produce (picked an hour before or so) that they have no other way of obtaining, as the stores do not carry them.

My main things are growing for ourselves (fresh, freezing, canning, drying), surplus plants/produce to the farmers market to sell, and then seed production. Will I sell seed under our farm name at some point? Maybe. I just want to make sure these seeds stay viable and that someone is raising them. I have sold seed to seed houses before, and they marketed it under their company name. Many of these varieties of seeds, I think there are only 3 of us growing in North America, so they could easily be lost/go extinct. Not every plant is good to pass on its genes, so they get culled as food, which is why I grow out many of each kind. Usually seed varieties are on a rotation. Some plants have to go through a second year to go to seed, and I want varieties/individuals/genes which will survive through various weathers.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on January 31, 2015, 07:54:24 AM
Very cool! Thanks for sharing :) I had my first conversation where your name came up the other day with my wife. I told her some day I wanted to grow as many varieties as Cedar haha.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 31, 2015, 08:47:21 AM
Very cool! Thanks for sharing :) I had my first conversation where your name came up the other day with my wife. I told her some day I wanted to grow as many varieties as Cedar haha.

OH NO... be careful what you wish for. I would pick no more than 10-15 tomatoes. 1-2 carrots. 1-2 cabbages...

I started seed saving as my dad was a seed savers. It was not the 'in or cool thing' then. He was just saving tomato, pepper and lettuce seeds back to acclimate in our area.. which can be cool, wet and rainy half the summer. So I am guessing he was saving back traits that grew well in that weather.

When I really started saving seeds was after dad died, when I found his stash of seeds in the winery, in the bottom drawer of a cabinet. I actually still have those seeds, but over time I have collected varieties that he often grew or were favorites of his.

Then I found out we are losing 10,000 named varieties of named vegetables each and every year from our agriculture heritage. Since 1900, when we had 5,000 named varieties of apple trees in North America we are below 800 varieties today, and only 10 of them can be found at best in a grocery store.

I did not mean to have so many. I honestly was going to stop at 50, then 100.. and then 200, then, OMG I have 400.. 500... and now after 500 varieties, it it s huge responsibility. Well, it was a huge responsibility at 100.. especially with some of the varieties I have. Like one corn variety I have, I sent up to an Experimental Station in Alaska this year. I am pretty much returning it to where it originated, to the work of a well known corn breeder (who has since died), but someone else has picked up his work, or trying to recreate it. So the corn I have, was lost commercially. Unknown if any seed bank has it, or if anyone else is growing it. But I came across some from one of those commercial houses before it went out of business (mice ate the other corn seed at the other seed house) and I have grown it in two countries. Last summer, I had a neighbor across the valley grow this variety out for me, and I have had a TSP moderator grow out a variety called "Howling Mob" for me. I can never grow out more than 4 varieties of corn a year, so sometimes I will find someone who I can trust to grow it out under my instructions to keep the line pure.

But having a huge collection like this, is indeed a huge responsibility. If I die, what will become of them? Will my family respect my wishes and send them into someone else who cares about them more than just 'gardening seeds'? Will they get grown out and preserved? Will they get thrown away? Will they sit for years? Since 2000, I have had them in some kind of container, that I can grab and run in case of a house fire. Currently they are in a wheeled job box. Sometimes I wish I had never accumulated so many in my collection, other times I cannot dream of being without them.

Even if you only have 1 tomato variety, just start saving seeds from it. It will take 3 generations to acclimate to your soil, climate, weather, what traits you desire in it. You will still be protecting agriculture biodiversity.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on January 31, 2015, 02:05:49 PM
I can imagine the responsibility. This coming year will be the 4th generation of sunflower I've grown and that one variety already feels like something that I could never just let go of or toss away.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on January 31, 2015, 02:46:06 PM
Do you have a recommendation for a seed-saving reference or book? Which vegetables can be bagged, which must be separated by time/distance, which ones it doesn't matter? There's so many out there.

I know in the end I can just save seed haphazardly and see what works, but some varieties I'd like to keep pure.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on January 31, 2015, 03:35:39 PM
Do you have a recommendation for a seed-saving reference or book? Which vegetables can be bagged, which must be separated by time/distance, which ones it doesn't matter? There's so many out there.

I know in the end I can just save seed haphazardly and see what works, but some varieties I'd like to keep pure.

This is a good book for beginners and honestly, you probably won't ever need another one, unless you go crazy on genetics and such like I am.
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61X6JBNQPQL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)


Seed to Seed: Seed Saving and Growing Techniques for Vegetable Gardeners
by Suzanne Ashworth
ISBN-10: 1882424581
ISBN-13: 978-1882424580

Many libraries have it too.

I think I have it on another year of "Cedar's Garden", but the Easy 5 to collect seed from are:

1. Pea (you can't mess up unless you try REALLY hard)
2. Bean (you can't mess up unless you try REALLY hard)
3. Lettuce Pea (you can't mess up unless you try REALLY hard)
4. Peppers
5. Tomatoes

and I would probably add potatoes to that list actually.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on February 02, 2015, 03:13:35 PM
I've saved those 6 before plus pattypan squash and sunflower (can't imagine you could mess that one up). Thanks for the recommendation on the book.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on February 02, 2015, 04:48:16 PM
I've saved those 6 before plus pattypan squash and sunflower (can't imagine you could mess that one up). Thanks for the recommendation on the book.

If there are other sunflower varieties around, they would cross. Same with the pattypan if you have other Cucurbita pepo where bees can get to them.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on February 03, 2015, 08:32:38 AM
If there are other sunflower varieties around, they would cross. Same with the pattypan if you have other Cucurbita pepo where bees can get to them.

Cedar

The nearest sunflowers are probably a half mile away across town. Not too worried, but even if they cross I don't actually know what variety they were to begin with. So now they're just "Virginia" variety :)

The pattypans I wasn't too worried about crossing, though I only saved it 1 year. I decided I don't like the taste much so I probably won't keep that one going. It's common enough among gardeners and farm-market folks in our area that I'm not worried about adapting it or maintaining a genetic line.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: soupbone on February 03, 2015, 06:13:01 PM
Heritage Plants, Cedar? For your enjoyment:

http://archaeology.about.com/od/historyofagriculture/tp/The-Eight-Founder-Crops-and-the-Origins-of-Agriculture.htm?nl=1

Enjoy,

soup

PS: Mrs. s said, "Hi and thanks for asking about her".

s
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on February 03, 2015, 06:57:44 PM
Thanks soup. I love reading on the history of the plants. One of the first I learned was the carrot. Where it originated, that the original colour was not orange and how it became orange as we know it.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: soupbone on February 05, 2015, 06:39:13 AM
Cedar,
Came across this and thought I'd pass it on, just in case your looking for a cash crop. Don't know how much work is involved, or if your soil is right for it, but.......

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/02/hop-farming-hops-beer-aroma-alpha-ruhstaller

soup
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on February 05, 2015, 05:11:18 PM
Cedar,
Came across this and thought I'd pass it on, just in case your looking for a cash crop. Don't know how much work is involved, or if your soil is right for it, but.......
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/02/hop-farming-hops-beer-aroma-alpha-ruhstaller
soup

Thanks again soup. Where I am, it is not a great spot for growing hops commercially, due to our Class 2 soils, although we do have hops here in Oregon. The Willamette Valley is one of the world's top spots for growing hops. I am sending you a link to my blog on the day I went to interview one of the largest growers for hops in Oregon for the newspaper. It was highly interesting.. super hot above the kilns and smelled really good and really bad at the same time.

I think we are too far to truck it to these guys. We would never be able to afford the facilities, or the equipment to harvest/process it.

I took these pics on that day.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/Z5.jpg)

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/Z8.jpg)

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/Z2.jpg)

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/Z11.jpg)

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/Z1.jpg)

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/Z14.jpg)

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/Z13.jpg)

This is the owner I was interviewing and he is filling a bag of "Magnum" hops for me to take to Z.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/Z3.jpg)

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: soupbone on February 05, 2015, 09:08:36 PM
. ;)

s
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on February 27, 2015, 08:58:21 PM
Ok.. one of these days I will go down and take some photos of the growing plants. I was kinda waiting until the tomatoes had 4 true leaves to make it look a little more impressing. Tonight however, I want to show you what I was so happy about yesterday. Both, when restored will technically be used in the garden and on the farm.

Today I acquired some really neat stuff with the help of Z. I have been eyeballing an old beat up piece of agricultural history for a little over two years sitting at someone's run down uninhabitated property and during all that time, I have failed to make contact with the owners after multiple tries. So I kept watching and watching, until a real estate sign went up the other day, so I called the realtor’s office. And he contacted the owners, who gave me their blessing after I told him why I wanted this piece of possible junk.. and they told me to take it and where to find other pieces of agricultural equipment at the site.

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/02/HeroFanningMill02272015a.jpg)

So what is this really cool thing which makes me so happy? A very misused poorly-kept "Twin City Separator Co. Hero Fanning Mill". It is between 110-116 years old. Fanning mills are used to separate grain from chaff and sort grain size. They were originally hand operated, but later adapted to utilize horse power. Manufactured in Minneapolis, patented June 13, 1899 this is the "Hero" model. It looks like they quit making this particular model in 1905. Unfortunately this piece of machinery has been sitting outside for numberous years. Fortunately it has been under a covered roof and against the inside of the single walled building. Sadly, there might not be alot of salvagable wood on it. Why do I want this piece of 'junk' then? Two words.. the pattern, the cast iron pieces.. and ok.. three words.. the fan. The fan is inside, thankfully protected by the louvers to allow air in were shut, protecting it. The fan is completely made of wood and it was intact and dry. The cast iron turns freely.

Many early fanning mills, had such furniture-like details as pinstriping or stenciling. This one does/did. Later fanning mills were not necessarily as well made as the earlier ones. How it works is there are several layers of screens, which produced cleaner grain as they go through the screens. Adjustable wind boards were installed after the fan to direct the air blast up or down and outside the fan to change the amount of air moved. These were hand powered, because most farms did not have the luxury of electricity until the middle 1940's. Even by hand, this "Hero" will do 60 bushels per hour. Twin City Manufacturing, out of Minneapolis and Winnipeg, Canada, made mills of both high and low quality. The company's Competition model was cheaply constructed out of pine; the New No. 1, constructed by Twin City for Deere & Company, had an all-oak frame, mortised joints, a threaded feed adjustment and an adjustable damper on the fan. I need to look closer to see which model this is, but I am pretty sure it is not a New No. 1. It is very light, so I guessing NOT oak. Again, it was pouring down rain and I did not want to get it, or us any more wet than we were. I will be happy with the 'cheap' model, as as a novice woodworker, I won't have to deal with all the mortised joints? I can also get pine or fir easily and relatively cheap. Including from our own on-site lumbermill if need be.

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/02/HeroFanningMill02272015b.jpg)

I have not been able to find alot of information on the Twin City Separating Co. yet, but I have actually contacted a couple of agricultural museums that have this model of fanning mill to see if they can tell me more. When I thought this was a "Clipper 2", I actually found the manual for it, but the company who makes it, is still in business. The "Clipper" and the "Hero" were two of the best known and used fanning mills of their day.

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/02/HeroFanningMill02272015c.jpg)
Inside the fanning mill to check on the actual fan

I had to shove my cell phone through the little louver door, which allows more air in or less air into the fanning chamber to take this photo and check out conditions. The fan looks to be intact and in perfect shape. This is one of the componants I know I will be able to use in the restoration of this machine. I will have to dig my pocktknife into various sections of wood to check the quality, like I know I have to replace at least two legs.

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/02/HeroFanningMill02272015d.jpg)

It always amazes me how paint which is on things like this and on headstones up in Canada whch get so weathered, but can hang around for so many years after it was painted. This was painted somewhere between 110-116 years ago.

Like I said, it is alot easier to find information on the Clipper 2 Fanning Mill which was sold by Gurney Seed and Nursery Co./A.T. Farrell & Co.  I found manuals, seed screen sizes and all sorts of information on cleaning grains and seeds for the Clipper, I ought to be able to use it on the Hero, if I cannot get more info for the Hero.

Here is a short video made of a working "Hero Fanning Mill".  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iO7mvKJggxQ

There are options of not running it by my hand, but those are projects for another year. One involves a sheep or a dog, and goes back to the 1800's as well. http://www.americanartifacts.com/smma/advert/ay184.htm Why use alternative power instead of a half horsepower engine? Cause it's COOL! THAT's Why!

(http://hannibalkennels.on.ca/box/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Dog-Power-641x266.jpg)

When I called to see if I could acquire this fanning mill, the owners, who were pleased with my plans for this, through the realtor also said that there were other agriculture related items outside the building that we could have if we wanted them. So along with two dairy cow headgates, we also discovered there was a Banner Root Cutter there. It was made sometime between 1896-1914, but I will know better when I look at model numbers and such. It was monsooning out, so I figured that could wait until a much drier day. The same for another item there, but we could not take it today, since we ran out of room with something we picked up previously, and it was raining enough we did not want to get wetter on a wild goose chase.

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/02/BannerRootCutter02272015a.jpg)
This is a photo after we got it loaded onto the trailer

What on earth is a root cutter? I had never seen one in person, but I knew what it was. A root cutter is for cutting potatoes, cabbage and other vegetables into thin strips for chickens and other livestock to cut down on feed costs. This particular one I could find alot of information on. One of the missing pieces is on eBay right now and I am not sure I want to spend the $75 for it. It is a lovely piece of cast iron and I just know someone is going to use if for something other than restoration. Which is cool and sad at the same time. There is nothing on it to ID it, so most people would not have a clue. It is the cast iron part which goes over the blade.

The man who made this cutter was Oliver E. Thompson was born in Ypsilanti in 1838, the son of a pioneer family. In 1856 O. E. Thompson began the manufacture of wagons, and began to make carriages in 1870. He became a wagon dealer in 1871, when he began to sell Jackson wagons made by Tomlinson & Webster. Then in 1873 he became a dealer in agricultural implements, including root cutters, grass seeder, and krut and slaw cutters. These were made in the building, and many were of his own invention. Thompson and his sons, Benjamin, Edward and John, were also active in the house, sign and carriage painting, as well as the sale of porch swings and patterned wallpaper. In one year, Thompson & Sons sold more than 200 bicycles. Oliver E. Thompson died in 1910, and his sons took over the business. The long occupancy of the Thompson family ended in 1950, when the family closed the last of their business interests.

The Banner Root Cutter, was a hand-cranked cutter with multiple gouge knives mounted on a large steel disk. The cutting disk is mounted at the back of a large wooden stand with a wide tray, painted red with gold lettering. The crank handle is mounted below the tray. The knives only cut in one direction. Here is a restored one, or one in good condition.

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/02/24854586_3_l.jpg)

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/02/24854586_1_l.jpg)

The one we picked up today, looks intact, including it's handle, except for the very front piece, which can be easily (I think) rebuilt, and the cast iron shield (?) which arches above the blade.

It will be fun to restore these and actually get them functional. Many of the seed companies like Siskiyou Seed Cooperative in southern Oregon use something much like the fanning mill we have to clean their seeds. When we do farm tours, it will also be fun to show folks how things were done on the farm 'in the old days'. I would think that the original owners of our heritage farm would not have used a seed cleaning fanning mill, but it is highly likely they used some sort of root cutter for feeding their dairy cows, their pigs or turkeys and chickens.

But I honestly enjoy saving our agricultural heritage items like this, and using them. I am not brave enough to tell Z about the 1930's (?) thresher down the road. I have been eyeing that for the last year.   :rofl: But I do actually want to contact someone at Powerland in Brooks, Oregon and see if I can get on the threshing demo crew during the Power Up.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Carl on February 28, 2015, 06:43:05 AM
Cedar,There soon won't be many items like this history to pass to future generations as wood and steel make way for plastic and fiberglass and pot-metal.Wood and steel built our past and soon,if not now,our past will be disposable and we will only have photos (crap,photos are gone too) Images (if you keep a back-up and don't get a virus) of our past to show the future how we lived.   :'(
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: RitaRose1945 on February 28, 2015, 06:58:01 AM
Wow!  Those are really great finds!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: archer on February 28, 2015, 11:23:14 PM
great finds!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: nelson96 on March 01, 2015, 08:43:03 AM
I am sending you a link to my blog on the day I went to interview one of the largest growers for hops in Oregon for the newspaper.

Goschie Farms in Silverton? . . .  I've been there.  Fixed some problems they were having on a welder.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 01, 2015, 08:50:37 AM
Goschie Farms in Silverton? . . .  I've been there.  Fixed some problems they were having on a welder.

Annen Bros. Farm in Mount Angel. His family started farming that land in 1865 and Annen grows 16 hop varieties on 265 acres.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 01, 2015, 09:10:50 AM
28F when I woke up this morning. Glad I did not out the 50-some artichoke plants out like I almost did yesterday, before taking a 'lazy day'.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: nelson96 on March 01, 2015, 09:21:43 AM
Annen Bros. Farm in Mount Angel. His family started farming that land in 1865 and Annen grows 16 hop varieties on 265 acres.

Cedar

They all look alike when you lack field of view.  Goschie Farms grows 12 varieties on 500 acres and other crops on an additional 600 acres.  They've been farming in Silverton for over a century.

Some more facts about Oregon hops:
Quote
Oregon has been at the center of hop production almost as long as it’s been a state. The crop was first introduced in the 1850s, and by the late 1860s, it was being grown commercially, according the Oregon Historical Quarterly. In the early twentieth century, there were 1,500 growers in the Willamette Valley, and Oregon produced more hops than any other state in the country.
 
The 1940s brought new machinery for processing hops, which helped advance the industry. When prices hit a low point in the 1950s, however, many farmers gave up on hops. Today there are only a couple of dozen commercial farms remaining in the Willamette Valley—most of them between Independence and Hubbard.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 01, 2015, 09:25:12 AM
Goschie Farms grows 12 varieties on 500 acres and other crops on an additional 600 acres. 

I know them too. Pretty sure that is who I got some of my grains from. I think they also have been growing pumpkins for the cannery the last two years.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 01, 2015, 07:11:14 PM
Been doing a bit more research on the Thompson's Root Cutter. It is from 1891-ish. And it is a "Thompson's Banner Root Cutter No. 20." It cost about $12 new. What cost $12 in 1891 would cost $311.39 in 2014. Before you all jump up and want to get one of these dubious beauties, it could cost me $200 in money and time to restore it.

In doing online research (the museums likely won't contact me on the weekend, and it might be a few days yet before they do), looking for photos for restoration, I found these really neat photos a man posted up.

(http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n210/wrenchguy49/SAM_0883.jpg)

That date is March 7, 1891.. for a seeder, and it is signed by E.O. Thompson
(http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n210/wrenchguy49/SAM_0880.jpg)

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 01, 2015, 07:22:51 PM
On the gardening front in the 48' greenhouse (I am thinking of naming them when the other one gets finished.. like "Frog" and "Dragonfly" or something and painting that character above the doors), it was 85F in there at 1pm, I woke up with the outside temps at 28F (which is a great deal colder than it has been). I saw 2 pea plants out of 5 varieties in a 40 foot row had come up.. and the only ones to come up. I dug up some seeds to check on their germination and lo-and-behold, NO SEEDS. I am thinking a vole or field mouse has dug up and eaten them all, but for those two. I am currently brainstorming on how to remedy that situation. The same can be said for the summer squash test row I put in there.

I am not happy with how my tomato seedlings look. I cannot tell what is 'off' with them, other than they do not quite look right to me, so today I scooped up a bucketful of rabbit poo, added water and I will let that sit overnight before I strain it and then use it as bottom water for the plants.

The peppers are looking lovely, but as normal, the 56 varieties are staggered coming up. Happy to say my "Tequila Sunrise" favorites are up. The 'mini Bells' which is fresh seed from last fall from a commercial seedhouse are failing to come up yet, three different varieties, so that one I am keeping an eye on. Hopefully they are just stragglers.

I would have put out 96 feet of celery of one variety, and 96 feet of celery on another variety if it had not frozen this morning. With the huge fluctuation in temps, it will cause it to bolt. So I will have to wait for it to stabalize a bit.

This week I am finalizing my seed saving event which is coming up soon, but it always gets me in the mood for PLANTING! My beekeeper who was supposed to come, is stuck in Germany with a sick family member, so I had to find a new one this weekend. I love putting this event on, this will be the 10th year I have held it between two countries. A sandwich sign needs to get painted and stenciled, but if it stays dry, I will do that Tuesday maybe.

We picked up a 275 gallon ICB tank for a water reservoir for the smaller greenhouse and hope to get that moved down tomorrow or Tuesday.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: cohutt on March 13, 2015, 06:47:14 PM
(http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m284/cohutt/goofy%20stuff/eating_popcorn.gif)
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 16, 2015, 10:34:46 PM
A few days ago, I held my 10th Seedy Saturday that I have put on (although there was a little second one, two years ago to make 11, but I will stick with ten). It was not as large as some years I have put on, but it was just community and a few from surrounding areas, and I like that too, as I can have better conversations with people. Not only did we talk seeds, but I have been invited to a camp I went to as a child to give a talk, invited to a grange to talk about seed saving, invited to another grange to give talks, putting on a grafting party for our community, invited to go along with a marine biologist that does research for Oregon State University, on a hike with a local to one of our hidden gem waterfalls, and was given an interesting looking book about seed saving (maybe).

There was 40-60 people in the hall when I had time to take a couple quick photos, not that it looks like it.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/SeedySaturday2015a.jpg)

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/SeedySaturday2015b.jpg)

There were local plants people brought in ranging from heritage strawberries from one of the founding families in the community, who settled here in the 1860's; yellow iris's from another community nearby; live mint, feverfew, chocolate mint; cranberries, pears and apple scions from the United States Germplasm Repository. Many people brought in packet remains from their gardens in years past and some that they had saved. Even had people who got seeds from last year's Seedy Saturday, grew the seed out to seed again and returned them this year to pass onto others.

Out of 10 years, this is the first time I have had so many returned seeds, which is wonderful. A couple people asked what was a priority to grow out and I wanted them to grow out for me, so since those people were now trusted in growing out and returning seeds, I gave them some good ones. A couple people who have grown out corn for me last year are getting some really special varieties this year.

I took some of my "Bloody Butcher" corn, and parched it and showcased it as something different for people to try. Z really is enjoying eating that type of 'snack food'. Parching corn nowadays is mostly known by the brand name "Corn Nuts". But Corn Nuts are not as good as homemade parched corn. It is the original Trail Mix. This is not a very good photo of it, but it pops, but mostly 'cracks', but a few pieces will pop. Known in the U.S. since 1845, it was originally grown in Virginia. Plants grow up to 12' tall and have at least two ears per stalk; each ear is 8-12" long. Striking maroon and red-black kernels. Used for flour, cornmeal, or corn-on-the-cob when young. It also has good drought tolerance.It is not the BEST parching corn, there are varieties which are better, but it is still pretty good. If Z keeps dipping into it, it must be OK.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/SeedySaturday2015e.jpg)

Out of 10 years, this is the first time I have had so many returned seeds, which is wonderful. A couple people asked what was a priority to grow out and I wanted them to grow out for me, so since those people were now trusted in growing out and returning seeds, I gave them some good ones. A couple people who have grown out corn for me last year are getting some really special varieties this year.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/SeedySaturday2015d.jpg)
I also popped up some of my homegrown "Calico" popcorn. I did not think about it until around the 20th person stated, "Oh, you even added butter!".. but I didn't. I only added a little bit of sea salt. "Calico" is a miniature looking 'indian corn',on small stalks, but they come in so many colours. No two ears looks the same. It pops up marveously You can see the popcorn in thebowl under my hand and the unpopped kernels. This is probably the best tasting popcorn I have ever had. I will grow this one out this summer at the large greenhouse garden, but I am growing out a black popcorn this year too at the Lodge garden.

--------


98F in the greenhouse today with the high being 53F outside. Because only the two peas are in there, I was not too worried about it getting warm.

So after much procrastination due to thought for two weeks.. today I decided what plan of attack I will take in the greenhouse with the peas. Hopefully this will keep those [insert bad word of your choice here] voles and field mice at bay. Out of 48'x2 they ate all those seeds except TWO. A single "Parsley Pea" and a single from another variety survived. None of the 48'x2 squash seeds survived the probably vole/field mouse snacking frenzy either. I soaked all the peas in their individual quart jars and when they sprout, I will plant them out. So I am starting three varieties of summer squash tomorrow in the basement, so I can plant them out too.

The peppers are looking awesome, as is the celery and artichokes. A couple varieties did not come up, so I will replant the seed. It was fresh seed too from a company for 2014/5, so I wonder what happened to it, since some seed I plant on peppers can be up to 5 years old and I have few fails. However I keep them cold, very dark and very dry.

The tomatoes look way better after their rabbit poo drink, and I have more set up tonight to strain for them tomorrow. I hate this particular brand of potting soil and I will not be using it again. I really miss my Canadian brand in the huge bales.

Started laying out more of the field fencing around the frame of the larger greenhouse to keep the geese and ducks out of it (one duck will be moved to the breeding pens, and one will be eaten). We are not planning on skinning the large greenhouse until fall at least, but I am going to use it as a garden anyway. Planted more cutting flowers in there today, as well as 10 cuttings for native Blue Elderberry. Tomorrow I might get carried away and plant 10 more cuttings of elderberry. I figure it is better to propagate my own, then fight blackberries and scramble down cliffs anymore. I did that for 20 years. Easier having them in my backyard, although I did enjoy those adventures of finding them.

I gave away all the former skin for the smaller greenhouse to two community members who want it for a 'sunroom' and for cold frames. I want to do something different for my cold frames and I did not want to just haul it to the dump or recycle it. So I was happy with that, and getting it off the grass and the 'floor' of the large greenhouse.

Tomorrow I am starting multiple flats of herbs. Probably some melons and squash as well. I am itching to get the onions in. I think I have 7 different kinds? I would also like to get the kales planted and several varieties of lettuce, but I am wavering on in the small greenhouse or in the skinless larger greenhouse. Maybe both. I do not look forward in tilling the small greenhouse. I pull up the sides, open the windows and doors, and still only make one pass through, holding my breath the whole way until I get to a door, turn off the tiller and then breathe outside and then do it again the opposite direction. Thankfully it will be weed free next year, but I have all these millions of wild onions coming up in there.

My 500+ feet of soaker hoses for the newest section of watering system arrived today, but it was a fail on the connectors. Instead of like MANY in a package. There was ONE.

Soon the 1,500 gallon former tilapa tank will get installed on it's berm(?) to get some head on it. We also have a 225 gallon IBC cube we picked up off CL for under $100 for the start of the watering system from the North Barn, which will go about 300-some feet down to the former tilapa tank (and there will be another enclosed water tank there eventually), which will water the two greenhouses. As soon as it is dry enough to get the trackhoe, tractor and dumptruck down there, that project will be happening.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 17, 2015, 01:41:49 AM
I was pretty sure it was something to do with the potting soil. Everything but the tomatoes likes it however, so I thought the tomatoes themselves was the clue. I did not like the seed starting soil last year either. So I did some research tonight (yes it is 12:40am) and was trying to figure out what the deal with my tomatoes is. They are not stunted, but stunted looking. They have purple leaves and stems, like they would if it was cold, which it isn't. It is 60F down there. And also near an egg incubator.

I bottom water, but let it dry out between a bit. Apparently when the artificial soil is saturated no nutrients can be taken up, especially phosphorus. "When deficient in phosphorus, tomatoes have rigidly erect leaves which are dark green to bluish green in color. The stems are thin and fibrous with a dull purple discoloration.' Ta-Da!.. That is exactly what the problem looks like. So tonight I added more liquid rabbit manure tea to the flats. I used a very dilute ratio before.

Rabbit manure is packed with nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and many minerals, lots of micro-nutrients, plus many other beneficial trace elements such as calcium, magnesium, boron, zinc, manganese, sulfur, copper, and cobalt just to name a few.

(http://florida4h.org/projects/rabbits/MarketRabbits/Graphics/table_manure.jpg)

So I triple strengthed the rabbit manure tea tonight. We have always even planted in 100% rabbit manure in dad's greenhouse, so I know it will not burn the plants. Let's see what happens in a few more days time.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Carl on March 17, 2015, 03:52:11 AM
Killer tomatoes?
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: mountainmoma on March 17, 2015, 11:03:18 AM
The dilute rabbit manure sounds like a good idea for your tomatoes. I use dilute human urine for seedlings that look like they need Nitrogen -- but doing this bothers some people.... you dont even need to do it all the time, but for the sake of plants needing a quick nitrogen fix, pee in a bucket and add water......
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: ResidentCelt on March 17, 2015, 01:02:19 PM
Yep, it's a phosphorus uptake problem. I had it last year. It fixed itself when I moved the tomato plants into their beds that were prepped with composted horse manure. That provided enough phosphorus I guess, or at least enough phosphorus in a consumable format.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 27, 2015, 10:33:58 PM
The reason SP and I made a trip this week to Colorado was due to an addiction I have started having. I have a friend who collects many Oliver tractors, I have another friend who owns 14 Studebakers, I have a friend who collects antique barb wire. On our trip home, I just saw a man who collected about 10 acres of antique farming equipment at his home. So my addiction is I have accidentally started to collect mid-sized farming equipment for seed collection and other crops. This time it was for an original complete "The Winner Improved" fanning mill, made by the American Grain Separator Co, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and sold by E.E. Scott of Denver, Colorado in 1911, to the Doll family of Gypsum, Colorado. Franklin and Lucy Slusser Doll, came from Ohio to the small settlement of Dotsero, where the railroad ended, in 1887. The next year they moved to the town of Gypsum where they lived the rest of their lives. In 1911 they bought this fanning mill. Except for the 8 years the man whom I got it from had it, the rest of it's life it had been in the Doll family barn. At this point, I do not know for sure what they used it for, but I presume wheat. It would/will clean 500 bushels of wheat a day. 60lbsX500bushels= 30,000 pounds of grain. Who needs to work out at the gym?

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/ColoradoTripCleaner2.jpg)

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/Winner1.jpeg)

It actually makes sense for me to start collecting these fanning mills and root cutters with my seed collecting. This particular one is fully functional, has all the original screens with it (10?), the original grain elevator (which is mostly wooden, with a hand forged chain), and the original handle. Often the handle is nowhere to be found, as after 1940 and electricity was more common, the handles were taken off, and misplaced, as electric motors were put on. The metal at the bottom needs some repair where the elevator hooks on, but I believe it is fully functional.

After I had been talking to the man who owned it, I told him the history of the machine, what it was worth, how they were used and all of the other information I have been gleaning (no pun intended) about these machines and the stuff I had been given by museums, he told me to come get it for the price of a hamburger dinner, as he felt like I would give it a good home. I traded him a cooler full of homegrown pork, which he was also very happy about.

This "The Winner Improved" is much heavier than the "Hero". But both will be wonderful to use for separating the garbage out of the seed, and I won't have to do large quantities by hand, and also for using for demonstrations when I hold Seedy Saturdays or have demonstrations here at the farm.

These are definitely part of my garden, just at the harvest end of the gardening season.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Carl on March 28, 2015, 04:22:35 AM
There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness.......
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 30, 2015, 08:36:02 PM
There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness.......

Like this. I had to take a survey today of what we had for fruits, as I have to order rootstock this week for grafting more.. 12 rootstocks for apples, 4 for plums/peach, 1 cherry. (*) denotes the ones I have to graft up next week.

Apples - 24
"Arkansas Black"
"Baldwin"
"Braeburn"
"Bramley's Seedling"
"Calville Blanc d'Hiver"
"Cortland" *
"Darcy Spice" *
"Dyer" *
"Empire" *
"Fameuse"
"Flower of Kent" *
"Fuji"
"Geneva Early"
"Grimes Golden"
"Irish Peach" *
"Margil" X2
"Mother"
"Pound Sweet"
"Sheepnose" (aka "Black Gillyflower") *
"Smokehouse" X2
"Summer Rambo"
"Twenty Ounce"
"White Pearmain"
"Winter Banana"

Considering grafting up: "Jonagold", "Liberty", "Brock", "Belle de Boskoop" and "Mutsu" (aka "Crispin"). This does not include the heritage apples which have been here 50-100 years, which include "King", "Red Delicious", "Yellow Delicious" , "Transparent", and 6 more I have no idea what they are. Yes, after this year, I think I am done planting apples. That will give the farm around 40 apple trees.

Pears: - 3
"Aurora"
"Ubileen"
"Seckle" - 3 already established here

Plum - 3
"Green Gage" (?) which was already on the farm and hit hard by winters the last 2 years.
"Opal" *
"Middleburg" *
"Shropshire Damson" *

Cherry - 2
"Bing"
And two kinds which is on the farm for 20+ years

Medlar - 1
'Monstreuse d'Evreinoff'

Peach - 1
"Reliance" *
(I have to find one more variety to plant for pollinating)

Quince - 2
"Limon"
"Pineapple"

Grapes - 11
"Canadice"
"Einset"
"Dad's Gamay"
"Glenora"
"Himrod"
"Manitoba" (anyone know about this variety? It seems to be a native landrace?)
"Niagra"
"Reliance"
"Suffolk Red"
"Vanessa"
"Venus Blue"

Blueberries - 9
"Berkley"
"Bluecrop"
"Blueray"
"Chandler"
"Collins"
"Herbert"
"Jersey"
"Pink Lemonaide" - which I think I might hate
"Toro"
and I really want to propagate "Brunswick" for landscaping purposes, none of my soft cuttings made it.

Highbush Cranberry - 1
"Ukraine"

Lowbush Cranberry - variety unknown

Wintergreen - variety unknown

Strawberries - "Hamar"
Hope to get 5 more varieties this summer.

Cedar

PS I took photos of my garden seedings today, so I will finally get them up this evening. I FINALLY remembered to take a camera down there with me.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 30, 2015, 09:30:33 PM
I have kept thinking that each time I go down to the seed starting area, I will take my camera. And each time, I fail and say, "Well I will grab it next time." So today, I finally remembered to take my camera down.

Here are a few flats of tomatoes and peppers. The tomatoes look way better after their rabbit poo drink, and I have more set up tonight to strain for them tomorrow. I started 102 varieties of tomatoes this year to trial them all with the same conditions as I have room this year. Each tag represents a different variety. I planted around 6 of each variety.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/Seedlings03302015a.jpg)

Some of the flats of lettuces. At this point I am growing out 10 of my favorites, out of 41 varieties I have in my collection. I hope they go out soon.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/Seedlings03302015b.jpg)

Some more of the flats in one of the seed racks under grow lights. Some of these were planted out 2-3 weeks ago. Each of the two racks has 5 tiers, so I can get 30 flats between the two which is around 2,100 plants. I also have flats I just sow into .
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/Seedlings03302015c.jpg)

Some of the 48 "Green Globe" artichokes. There is another variety I am trialing this year, called "Purple of Romagna". Yes, it is purple-y. I could not get a very good angle of them due to the lights, but hopefully they can go outside this coming weekend if it stays dry enough.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/Seedlings03302015d.jpg)

All of the peppers are looking nice. I think I planted 56 varieties of them.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/Seedlings03302015e.jpg)

This is my favorite celery. It is "Golden Self Blanching". I also planted two other kinds to trial against it. "Utah Green" and "Tendergreen". It doesn't look like it, but there are hundreds of celery plants in there.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/Seedlings03302015f.jpg)

The stupid mice/voles in the greenhouse have once again eaten all the peas seeds I put out last Monday. I tried to sprout them and then plant, and Friday, there were none to be found. They ate all my squash seeds too, so it may just be peppers, tomatoes and melons in there after all.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 31, 2015, 06:32:24 PM
This is not my garden, but I am hoping that by what I did today, instills love of gardening and growing into the next generation. A local school invited me to teach two classrooms about seed saving, and the circle of life of seed-to-seed. Today was the day. The kids had been studying plants for the last few weeks. So they asked intelligent questions and I was also able to ask them questions about how they thought seeds ought to grow.

I put together seed packs with six kinds of different named heritage vegetable seed in it, plus instuctions of what the vegetable was (all of them were 80 years or older varieties), how to grow them, and how to save seed from the plants to go to the next year... and maybe even years to hand off to their children or grandchildren. How growing and saving seeds in their area each year would custom make perfect vegetables for their needs and our climate.

I delibrately did not label the seeds inside their packs, but they were all different shapes and sizes. I had them draw out the shape on their paper and then label if it was a bean (white kidney shape), a pea (round and green), a squash seed (tan and teardrop shaped), a cucumber (small and pointy on both ends), a zinnia seed (brown to black and arrow shaped) or corn seed (yellowish and looked like dried corn). Then they could match it up with the variety on their papers and in their seed packs. It was the spur of the moment to have them draw them out and label their drawings, but it worked out great and made the talk more interactive. The kids were very excited to go home and share their seeds with their parents.

They have enough seed to plant a 4x5' garden space.

First classroom, you can see the kid in the grey shirt putting his hand up for a question.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/ClassroomSeedSaving03312015b.jpg)

Second classroom. all the kids holding up their seed packets and instructions.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/03/ClassroomSeedSaving03312015a.jpg)

Cedar

Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: RitaRose1945 on March 31, 2015, 06:51:44 PM
I am SO very jealous!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: soupbone on April 01, 2015, 02:26:16 PM
Seems to me that Cedar just planted a new crop of gardeners - WAY TO GO, MA'AM!!!

soup
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Bonnieblue2A on April 01, 2015, 03:23:22 PM
There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness.......

When drawing that line it is best to use a chalkboard so the line can be erased and redrawn as needed; or, if need be, wiped clean entirely.   ;D

Seems to me that Cedar just planted a new crop of gardeners - WAY TO GO, MA'AM!!!

soup

^^^^
This!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on April 01, 2015, 05:40:36 PM
Seems to me that Cedar just planted a new crop of gardeners

This is my dream every time I have a Seedy Saturday, a grafting party or do a school 'thing'...

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on April 01, 2015, 05:48:02 PM
I sent in the rootstock order to the guy who is picking it up for our community for our 'Grafting Party' next week, and lo-and-behold.. Mr. UPS Man, brought me an order I forgot I ordered from last summer. My almond order was most exciting, especially since I was expecting rhubarb.

Almonds:
"Dessertniy" (aka Bounty) - A hardy, late blooming Ukrainian variety that bears heavy crops of sweet, soft shelled nuts.
   
"Foros" (aka Oracle) - A very late blooming variety. This hardy variety ripens its large, sweet semi-soft-shelled nuts early, making it an excellent variety for short season areas where other varieties fail to fruit.
   
"Primorskiy"  (aka Seaside)- Hardy and late-blooming variety. Very heavy production of sweet, semi-softshell almonds

I am going to plant three in the backyard for landscaping as well as edible. They are supposed to start producing in 3-5 years and produce about 25 pounds of nuts per tree.

These are all almond scionwood which I will be grafting and with luck, I will end up with 9 trees.

How gorgeous are they?
(https://demirceren.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/almond-tree.jpg?w=719&h=543)

(http://www.motherearthnews.com/~/media/Images/MEN/Editorial/Blogs/Renewable%20Energy/California%20Almonds%20Receive%20Solar%20Energy%20Solution/Oct%2011%20Energy%20Matters%20almonds%20on%20tree.jpg)

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on April 03, 2015, 11:03:03 AM
As a 'Spin Off' from Seedy Saturday, I am holding a community apple & pear tree grafting party in a couple weeks. This is the second year I have put this on. I put the order in this morning for what rootstocks we need, and I was very pleased that there will be 60-70 new fruit trees in our community. Not bad for a population of 82 people. One lady wants 10 apples and 10 pears, the rest want 2-4 trees each.

At our Grafting Party,  I am teaching our local community members how to graft up their own fruit trees, but I will do the grafting for them if they chicken out. This year I have 23 varieties of scionwood for them to graft. It will be fun, and there will likely be a potluck sort of thing involved.

I will post pics when we have it.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on April 18, 2015, 10:05:42 PM
Photos tomorrow....

The 100'x30' greenhouse got tilled for planting on Thursday night. One duck snuck through the fence and darn near became fertilizer as it went under the tractor and was not even an inch from being mincemeat from the tiller tines. So the two drakes I was saving for dinner (oxymoron there hey?), got tossed out of the greenhouse complex, and now have 2 fences between them and this particular greenhouse. I put three alpacas in the greenhouse complex to mow, as the geese are not keeping up with it, are only mowing the 'front end' and not down closer to the river end. I am hoping that when the 48'x20' greenhouse is planted and the sides rolled up, they will not squeeze their way in there. The alpacas do not respect hot fence, so there are limited places I can currently put them.

The 10'x20' structure for the aquaponic project is up. Z and SP did that on Wednesday when I was at Farmer's Market. It still needs some leveling and then to be skinned with whatever we are skinning it with. Both the tanks are currently here, but not in the greenhouse complex yet. Z ordered a whole bunch of books on aquaculture, so I guess he is taking over that project. My friend from Wisconsin is coming for 10 or so days on Monday, and he is helping us set up the lumbermill. With the lumbermill, we will be able to get many more of our projects accomplished. Including the two additions for the North Barn. One of which is the turkey breeding facilities, the quail rearing area, and the hopefully last version of pig facilities (I think I have Z talked into doing it my way this time). Why does this tie into the garden? ROOF SPACE! Water catchment from the North Barn, will be caught into large tanks and gravity fed to another tank to water the greenhouses and aquaculture systems. 2,500 gallons will be caught with a 1" rain. We have alot of 1" rain days. Two nights ago, it rained 0.80-something just overnight. We get 90-120" of rain here a year at the farm. Any overflow we have will continue its merry little way into the ravine which it has gone into for years, and continue its way to the river.

I woke at 2 am due to Z snoring due to his allergies and SP coughing. So I decided I was really thirsty since I could not sleep, and went downstairs. After not being able to go back to sleep due to other family members, I went into the basement to candle eggs. I kicked out 2 turkey eggs and 2 duck eggs. Not bad out of 5 trays which hold about 36 eggs each. The goose eggs are not far enough along to see if they are fertile or not. I have to hand turn them 4x a day and give them a spritz bath at the same time. They will get hand turned 120x before they hatch. The Royal Palm turkeys are laying two eggs a day for the two hens and the Bourbon Red turkeys are younger than the Royal Palms by a month or so, and the Bourbons are laying 1-3 eggs a day this last week, for all 6 hens. I am still looking for Slates, which are my favorite turkey variety.

Our post office is only open like 2 hours a day, but thankfully on Saturdays, so this morning I finally got my package of Rhubarb in the mail. I am trialing these particular varieties for an elevation of 800', see what grows best in our maritime climate, selecting for deep reds, and tartness of taste will also be tested. For 5 years I will be keeping track and documenting each variety to send back to Washington State University Regional Plant Introduction Station for whom I am trialing these varieties. These were planted inside the 'large unskinned greenhouse'.

I selected four varieties:
"Plum Hutt" from Ontario, Canada
"Crimson Wine", from Washington State
"Cawood Delight", from the United Kingdom
"Valentine", from Ontario Canada

By 9 am I was in town to hand off 2 dozen chicken eggs to a lady who wanted them, and I went to gleaner's to help out, then got home in time that Z did not have to do Farmer's Market. Someone suggested to us to meet at the same time as the mobile library van and have our wares of meat, eggs and honey. So we were there for two hours. I picked up a book on felting and SP picked up 4 children's books.

My fruit tree rootstock order for me and our community came in today and we picked that up. Tomorrow is my Community Grafting Party, after fire practice. Once again I grabbed a salad from the house and then ate it as Z drove. Too often lately I have been cooking something for dinner in 5 minutes and taking it with me to eat at the meeting. I did that three times last week.

Z wanted to go to a U-Pullit for seat belts for the 'new' Farmer's Market truck, but I told him NAPA had lap belts for about the same cost, so he picked up two of those. We also picked up fencing on sale, so we got everything (plus) for the orchard fencing. Hog panels were also on sale, so we picked up a gazillion of those, so I can put in temp fencing myself without Z, to keep the animals away from my grafted trees before the permanent fencing is in, so I can get the 40-some trees in the ground before who-knows-when-we-can-get-the- deer-fencing in. Had a fire call for an out of control slash fire not far from our house in some pretty mountainous area where they had just clear cut, so that was a little exciting as we were still in town and I am calling my neighbors giving them the heads up and see if they can tell me how close it is to our houses and how bad. We were just getting the last of the fencing load on the trailer, and only tossed two straps on, instead of the normal 5 and sped home. About 6 miles from home, I get the text that it has been cancelled, so I called the non-emergency 911 number to confirm. I am glad it was nothing more, but mightly upset people do not check out things better before calling 911. Not one of our crew could even find a wildfire in our area. No smoke. Nothing. It rained 0.8" a couple nights ago and I thought the humidity was a little higher, but right now as I am typing this it is 45% humidity. I went to the fire station as our trucks were returning, to see what the deal was and get the skinny on it.  I am really glad it was nothing, but maybe it gives us a 'trial run' before the real fire season starts.

After unloading all the orchard fencing, I did chores, talked to a neighbor for a few minutes about babysitting if we do have another wildfire, I got 200 feet of transplants of 2 kinds of celery, 5 kinds of lettuce, two kinds of artichokes planted from 5pm-9pm.  Came in to take a shower, cooked dinner, turn the goose eggs, did the last two days of dishes, made some semblance of order to the house that seemed to have exploded in the last two days.

In a few minutes I might just start grafting fruit trees. I forgot how many I need to do for us. I know I have 9 almonds, 3 figs, 1-2 pears and a BUNCH of apples. Maybe 20 of those. After this year, I think I am done planting apples. That will give the farm around 40 apple trees, each one a different variety. I am not sure how many people want to graft their own trees, so I may have quite a few to do for them.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on April 20, 2015, 07:33:00 AM
Seedy Saturday Part II - The Grafting Party

The order for rootstock came in on Saturday and Sunday afternoon was the grafting party. I had at least 20 varieties of apples and pears scions to share. I took some whips off a tree I left unpruned this year for practice 'sticks' and had them work on 'whip and tongue' and 'cleft' types of grafts before I turned them loose on the good stuff.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/04/GraftingParty2015a.jpg)

I helped several ladies graft their fruit trees and showing other people how to practice on 'scrap'. I had a demonstration on how to do 'whip and tongue' and 'cleft' grafting and when and where to use each. After practicing on junk wood I took along for the occasion, I turned them loose on their rootstocks and scion wood they selected. It was really fun, there were a couple people who will soon be pro's at grafting. They wanted to pay me for the class, but I told them to go out and teach others. I think one lady had 20 to do of both pears and apples, another had 10 apples, and a few others, 2-4 each.

Grafting is where you take two plants and stick them together n a special way for them to grow. In most cases, one plant is selected for its roots and this is called the stock or rootstock. The other plant is selected for its fruits and is called the scion. The scion contains the desired genes to be duplicated in future production by the stock/scion plant. So, the apple or pear variety is on the top and the rootstock is to determine how tall it will get, disease resistance and other traits.

In whip grafting the scion and the stalk are cut slanting and then joined. The grafted point is then bound with tape and covered with soft wax to prevent dehydration and germs. Also known as the whip and tongue graft, this is considered the most difficult to master but has the highest rate of success as it offers the most cambium contact between the two species.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/04/GraftingParty2015b.jpg)

The stock is cut through on one side only at a shallow angle with a sharp knife. (If the stock is a branch and not the main trunk of the rootstock then the cut surface should face outward from the centre of the tree.) The scion is similarly sliced through at an equal angle starting just below a bud, so that the bud is at the top of the cut and on the other side than the cut face.

A notch is cut downwards into the sliced face of the stock and a similar cut upwards into the face of the scion cut. These act as the tongues and it requires some skill to make the cuts so that the scion and the stock marry up neatly. The joint is then taped around and treated with tree-sealing compound or grafting wax. The elongated "Z" shape adds strength, removing the need for a companion rod in the first season.
In cleft grafting a small cut is made in the stalk and then the pointed end of the scion is inserted in the stalk. The most common form of grafting is cleft grafting. This is best done in the spring and is useful for joining a thin scion about 1 cm diameter to a thicker branch or stock.

This lady had done 20 trees last year and two did not take on the pears, so with the root stock still alive, we put on new scionwood. I suggested she might try two kinds on one, and she cleft grafted two varieties onto one tree.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/04/GraftingParty2015c.jpg)

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: sshickson on April 20, 2015, 09:12:55 AM
I want to grow up to be you!!! You are amazing!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: TexasGirl on April 20, 2015, 09:22:46 AM
That's cool.

I haven't grafted in years.  Dad and I grafted tons of pecan on native hickory 35 years ago.  Whip and tongue worked the best, made the strongest graft over time.  The data is gone now, but certain pecan varieties had a much better success rate.  Dad loved the "Indian" varieties (such as Choctaw).

I need to refresh and do some grafting.

Thanks Cedar!

~TG
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on May 21, 2015, 07:46:40 PM
Photos would be pretty boring at the moment, hence why there is none, but finally I started to make a video that Nicodemus asked me to make awhile back ago.

This is the last photo I have of the Small Greenhouse before I got another two lengths of trellis in.... the tomatoes, peppers and eggplants are installed since this was taken on the 9th. There is a total of 384 row feet for tomatoes in here.

SP and I worked on getting the trellises for the tomatoes set up. I had black visqueen down for 5 months on the left side where we put the trellises to kill the foliage in there. I have since moved that plastic to the right for the melons to grow on. If you look close you can see SP in blue by the back doors waving at you.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/05/GreenhouseTrellis05092015a.jpg)

After going through several scenarios and idea of what I wanted for trellises, I finally decided on cattle panels as there was a closeout on them. They will last FOREVER! They are about 3-4" above the ground so they are not getting wet from the watering system. The watering system has been put on an automatic timer. It goes on for 15 minutes 3x a day. I have left the sides of the greenhouse down the last few days. Currently it made it to a high of 63F today. The alpacas finally ate the grass down alongside the walls to the top of the boards. I still need to take a weedeater in there, but don't want to do it until the sides are up for ventilation.

These are the Brown Chinese geese flock (3) to mow in the Greenhouse complex. See how they do such a nice job on the fenceline? Now if I can only get them to eat Daisies. The Buff American geese will live in the newly established orchard to keep the grass down in there. I am crossing my fingers for at least a flock of 9 this year.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/05/BrownChinese05012015a.jpg)


Been harvesting some of our mint which grows here on the farm for Farmer's Market. In about 3 days.. maybe Sunday, I am planting a WHOLE LOT of herbs. Including 12 varieties of Basil.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/05/Mint05132015a.jpg)


These are the swarms I tried to catch 8 days ago. No takers for the bait hive. I am guessing these ones are dead or found somewhere else, and a new swarm arrived in the same tree yesterday. These are about 30 feet up the tree, the new swarm is at least 5-10 feet higher.
(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/05/Swarm05142015a.jpg)

This is the bait hive I put out for them. I have a bottom board which is solid with that single hole in each side for a door. That is the only base I had, so I used what I had for spare parts. I currently have 30-40 scout bees checking it out this afternoon and then zooming back up to the swarm. They better decide. It rained on them last night and likely tonight if they don't find a home soon. There is no way I can climb up to where they are and I am not going to shoot them down out of there.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/05/Swarm05142015b.jpg)

This is my squash lineup for 2015:

Summer Types ( 8 )
 Yellow Crookneck 50 days
 Cocozelle 52 days
 Costata Romanesco 52 days
 Golden Zucchini 50-55 days
 Dirani Lebanese 50 days
 Lemon 55 days
 Patisson Panache, Verte et Blanc 60-70 days
 Early White Bush Scallop 70 days
 
 Winter Types (20)
 Spaghetti Squash for Bruce (C. pepo)  88 days. Introduced by Sakata Seed Co. of Japan in 1934
 Cheyenne Bush Pumpkin (C. pepo) 80-90 days
 Jack Be Little (C. pepo) 90 days
 Tours(C. pepo) (aka Citrouille de Touraine, French Tours) 90-100  1856
 Delicata (C. pepo) 100 days (C. pepo) 100 days  1894
 Ole Zeb's Pumpkin (C. pepo) 105
 
 Potimarron (C. maxima) 82-96 days
 Galeux d' Eysines (C. maxima) 95-100 days
 Crown (C. maxima) 100 days Old from NZ
 Golden Hubbard (C. maxima) 100 days Also called "Genesee Red Hubbard" and was introduced in 1898.
 Oregon Homestead Sweet Meat (C. maxima) 100 days.
 Boston Marrow (C. maxima) 105 days. 1831
 Sibley(C. maxima). 110 days. New York in 1887

 Chirimen (C. moschata) 91 days 1922
 Kikuza (C. moschata) 95 days 1927
 Sucrine Du Berry (C. moschata)  100 days
 Waltham Butternut (C. moschata) 105 days
 Long Island Cheese (C. moschata) 105 days
 Canadian Crookneck ****** (C. moschata) 110 days. 1834
 Shishigatani (C. moschata)  110 days 1804

Apparently I did not write down what melons I planted, so I have to remedy that this evening so I have a record. I might add that in a bit. They are up about 1" as of today.

I figured out my lettuce and spinach lineup this evening:

Spinach: (6)
Monstrueux de Viroflay
America
Giant Noble
Bloomsdale Long Standing
New Zealand [not a true spinach]
King of Denmark

Lettuce: (21)
Yugoslavian Red Butterhead (never without this variety, it is my fav)
Tennis Ball
Pirat Butterhead
May Queen
Reine des Glaces
Red Flamingo
Greek Maroulii Cos
Pandero
Rougette du Midi
Hungarian Winter Pink
Summertime
Garnet Rose
Galisse
Sanguine Amerliore
Red Velvet
Pinot
d'Hiver de Sante Marthe
Tom Thumb
Big Boston
Freckles
Rouge d' Hiver

I will try to get more photos up this weekend.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: RitaRose1945 on May 21, 2015, 07:56:58 PM
Dang!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on May 21, 2015, 09:49:32 PM
I went down to put more turkey eggs in the incubator and the seed starting racks are right next to it for the residual heat. 118 turkey eggs in the incubator right now, along with the 8 American goose eggs. Only 7 turkey eggs were infertile (I candle every few days). Not too bad.

Melons (24):
Oregon Delicious
Petit Gris de Rennes (very rare in the USA)
Charentais
Boule d'Or
Prescott Fond Blanc
Noir de Carmes (comes from medieval French Monks)
Amish
White Sugar Lump
Green Nutmeg
Pride of Wisconsin
Osh Kirgizia
Melitopolski
Moon & Stars
Ananas
Sweet Siberian
Minnesota Midget
Golden Honey
Golden Midget
Small Shining Light
Sugar Baby
Schoon's Hardshell
Banana
Blacktail Mountain
Bidwell Casaba

I believe I have enough melon seed that thankfully I am not saving seed from them this year. I am only trialing them this year for how well they grow here and how well they taste. I have two of each, three of some.

Cedar


Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on May 25, 2015, 12:47:47 AM
Finally got some half decent photos of the new orchard.

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/05/NewOrchard05282015a.jpg)

(http://www.downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/05/NewOrchard05282015b.jpg)

In my travels I checked on the new orchard. I really need the geese to go in there and mow for me. I put the recycled chick brooder shavings around some of the trees and I checked on the status of my newly grafted trees. Two don't look happy, but the other 40 look pretty good. I will be disappointed if some don't take, but I am happy that the rootstock is doing well, as I can always replace the cultiver next year.
 
It is really difficult getting a good photo of the trees, but they are in there spaced 20 feet apart from each other. In the far distance is where I will plant the grape vines one of these days.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: RitaRose1945 on May 25, 2015, 08:38:37 AM
That property is just beautiful.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: sshickson on May 28, 2015, 11:38:04 AM
Cedar, you are truley an inspiration!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on May 28, 2015, 12:07:47 PM
Cedar, you are truley an inspiration!

I am not sure how, still a month behind on planting the main crops. The watering system has been a pain in the patooetey as it really is a 2 person job, not 1-person and 1 small child job. But late tonight or tomorrow I should be able to get the corn in at least. I have only said that for a week now though. ..  :-[

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on June 05, 2015, 02:18:02 PM
What I got planted last night and today at the Lodge Garden other than noted:

===================================
Corn (6)
I am separating my corn varieties by distance and time. The two gardens are 1/2 mile apart with dense forest and hills between them. (Wind pollinated)

Lodge: This has been in for 2 weeks now
"Yukon Supreme" 45 days
"Stowells Evergreen" 80-100 days
"Calico" popcorn 90-105 days (started 2 weeks before Stowells)

Greenhouse (large, not skinned)
"Golden Bantam Improved" 70-75 days
"Roy's Calais" 90-95 days
"Dakota Black" popcorn 90 days (started 10 days before Roy's Calais)

(If you have never grown your own popcorn.. and like popcorn, you MUST grow it!!!)
===================================
Greens (3)
Mizuna mustard
Asian spicy greens
Asian Mix

I also planted more lettuces last night. About 22 varieties of them? I will plant more around October in the greenhouses and Lodge garden.
===================================
Carrots (4) I may or may not plant more during the summer. Space pending.
Little Finger
Kuroda (new one for me)
Royal Chantenay
Berlicum 2 (growing out only for seed production this year, only variety which overwintered for me last year)
===================================
Radish (3) I will plant more in in about 40 days or so
Helios
Easter Egg Blend (to use it up)
Watermelon Mantang Hong
===================================
Beets (3) I decided to go light on beets this summer, and plant 6 more kinds in the fall.
Bulls Blood
Dolce di Chioggia
Golden
===================================
Soybean (1)
Disoy
===================================
Celery (4) - Finally I get to trial all of them at the same time. I will only save seed from one variety a year
Golden Self Blanching - (My Fav) 80-85 days.  Dwarf plant with yellow foliage, cream-colored 9" stalks.  Thick, heavy, stringless.
Utah Green - The long stalks of Utah Green are sweeter and much more flavorful than the celery sold at supermarkets.
Tall Utah 52/70 Improved 100-120 days.  Dark-green, 11-12" stalks.  Very compact disease resistant plant.  Bright green and stringless.
Golden Bar - 90 days.  Self-blanching with nearly stringless ivory stalks and tender leaves.  Hearts are good quality. (This is probably my choice on growing out for seed production this year).
===================================
Beans (5) - I decided not to grow any pole beans this year, I farmed 3 varieties out to others to grow
as I did not want to buy any more cattle panels, as look up in the orchard fencing photos ^^. All those are my trellises next year. I think there are 60 of them?
Contender
Black Valentine
Derby
Burpees Stringless
Fin de Bagnol
===================================
Peas (7)
Asparagus pea (which is not a pea)
Parsley Pea (new one for me, has leaves which look like parsley)
British Wonder
Melting Sugar
Carouby de Maussane - this one gets 12' tall and is my fav
Blauschokkers
Golden Sweet
===================================
Cucumbers (6) - I will start more in the little greenhouse when the melons are done. These are in the Lodge garden.
Mexican Sour Gherkin
Russian Pickling
Telegraph Improved
Boothsby's Blonde
Double Yield
Poona Kheera
===================================

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: designergirl28 on June 07, 2015, 09:53:08 AM
I want to grow up to be you!!! You are amazing!

I am in total agreement! I have cedarenvy.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on July 01, 2015, 08:54:30 PM
I finally got the last of the melons into the greenhouse. I have been holding off due to the water situation and I have not gotten to plant everything I have wanted to. But the tomatoes, eggplants and peppers are looking good. 192 feet of tomatoes in 102 or 104 different varieties. I was so excited to finally actually be able to do that. I planted them close this year to get them all in. They don't look too tall in the photo, but they are 18-24" tall at this point, and starting to flower.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/06/Greenhouse06282015a.jpg)

Many of the tomato plants are blooming, so soon there ought to be tomatoes for seed savings, Farmer's Market and for canning for home. Now that the trellises and watering is in, I am going to make a greenhouse in a greenhouse and plant the tomatoes, eggplant and peppers in January. With the way it is set up now, I think I can just arch PVC over the top at the t-posts and then add over clear plastic which I already have all those things.

Everything in the gardens is still just at the growing stage, so nothing too exciting to put into text or photos about them yet. Soon. The hot weather has made the lettuces bolt. I got more of that planted out. I gave up on peas until late August.

(http://downtotherootsmagazine.com/Blogs/2015/06/Greenhouse06282015b.jpg)

Z thinks he got everything ordered, so he may take next week off and get three of the 2,500 gallon water tanks set up.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: artephius on July 03, 2015, 07:53:12 PM
I am in total agreement! I have cedarenvy.

Me as well! Thanks for keeping us posted on all your work Cedar! Your garden threads are beyond inspiring!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on July 22, 2015, 04:29:36 PM
This garden is done for the year due to unforeseen circumstances. Oh well, there is always next year.
Stay tuned for 2016.

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: archer on July 22, 2015, 08:37:01 PM
good luck/skill next year!
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: lifeiscrazysomedays on February 29, 2016, 10:59:12 PM
I absolutely love reading your posts. Thanks for all the information. :)
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: bigbear on March 22, 2017, 01:22:56 PM
Have any updates on the garden/homestead?
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 22, 2017, 02:32:31 PM
Gimme a week or so, and then I have a helluva post to share....

Cedar
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Jeremy Downing on March 23, 2017, 07:08:27 AM
Gimme a week or so, and then I have a helluva post to share....

Cedar

Pictures or it didn't happen! ;)

I'm jonsing for good garden pr0n.
Title: Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
Post by: Cedar on March 23, 2017, 04:47:38 PM
Here is the start of the rest of the story.. and yes, there are photos. I have been typing posts for the last 2 years I have not been able to publish, but hanging onto ready to post the day I was able to starting to do so.
http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=60135.msg713169#msg713169

Cedar