The Survival Podcast Forum

Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Communications => Topic started by: Smurf Hunter on January 04, 2017, 10:01:32 AM

Title: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 04, 2017, 10:01:32 AM
I think it was Alan Georges who requested (perhaps jokingly), this is a thread to discuss posts from https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/
While that site is largely ham radio centered, there's a whole lot of non-ham radio preparedness topics.  Most prepper/radio folks I know really like that site, and there's a lot of though provoking content.
My hope is this TSP thread can be a sort of "Book Club" where we read the latest post, and have our own discussion.

There are older posts on his site, but I'll start with the most recent:

https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/01/03/the-foundation-squaring-away-communications-needs-in-2017/

Things I am doing well:
Improvised Field Antennas
Understanding Capabilities


Things I want to improve:
Operating Skills
Scanning, Monitoring, Signals Collection

We can elaborate more, but I wanted to get this thread started.  Enjoy...
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 04, 2017, 05:56:19 PM
Thanks for starting this thread, Smurf.  Lots to learn at that year end wrap-up post.

I have got to work on the scanning part too.  Even though most local police etc. is digital/trunked, in a real disaster I'm guessing that least-common-denominator interoperability FM channels would get a lot of use.  The National Interoperability Field Operations Guide (NIFOG) has these listed, and Radio Reference will have your local frequencies.  Got to pick up a Baofing 5R and program it to just scanning these.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on January 04, 2017, 08:38:18 PM
Thanks for starting this thread, Smurf.  Lots to learn at that year end wrap-up post.

Got to pick up a Baofing 5R and program it to just scanning these.

NO,the UV82 has a much better receiver and transmitter is more effective,,THESE UV5's ARE NOT THE ONES YOU WANT,use the force Alan...

Really ,the UV82 is a better choice ,and don't pay the higher price for a HIGH POWER radio as it isn't worth the extra price.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 04, 2017, 09:55:32 PM
Interesting info.  Thanks Carl!
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 06, 2017, 04:05:34 PM
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/01/06/icom-7200-is-back-for-now/

I bet the comment thread becomes a fan-boy love fest without quantifying anything.

Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 07, 2017, 08:22:11 AM
Today's post isn't so much about comms as about general survival.  https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/01/07/the-witch-of-the-winter-came-slashin/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/01/07/the-witch-of-the-winter-came-slashin/)  Specifically, it's about having the presence of mind and a deep enough pantry to say "nope, not going out in that storm."  Best quote:
Quote
... around 80% of Survivalism is being aware of your surroundings. The other 15% is skill, given you recognize the reality of your situation, and another 5% actual ‘stuff’ to use.

Dragging it by the nose-ring back to comms, frozen-over weather is a good time to sort out comms gear, study/do paperwork for a new license, or learn a new skill.  Lots of other bored people hanging around their radios to talk with, so that's a bonus.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 26, 2017, 06:35:55 PM
New post up, on Winter Field Day (https://www.winterfieldday.com (https://www.winterfieldday.com)):
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/01/26/winter-field-day-2017/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/01/26/winter-field-day-2017/)
Between weekend chores, I may find time to jump on the air as a "1H" station.  Anybody doing it big in the snow?

And yeah, this is more of a ham thing, but people out there with SW receivers that have SSB capability can listen in on the fun too.  It's a good chance to practice.

Culled out of the pages of contest rules, the things a SWLer needs to know are the times and frequencies, so here you go.  Event times run from 2pm Saturday thru 2pm Sunday, Eastern time (adjust to your local time)
Suggested daytime bands:
and nighttime bands:
Also maybe some activity in the neighborhood of 146.52 FM on the 2m band and 446.0 FM on the 70cm band.  There're a few more bands available, but this is where the bulk of the traffic'll be if there's anything to be heard (not to mention CW & digital modes, but that's TMI for now).

Related podcast over at SCW's place: http://hamradio360.com/index.php/2016/12/27/ham-radio-360-winter-field-day/ (http://hamradio360.com/index.php/2016/12/27/ham-radio-360-winter-field-day/)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 27, 2017, 10:18:30 AM
New post up, on Winter Field Day (https://www.winterfieldday.com (https://www.winterfieldday.com)):
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/01/26/winter-field-day-2017/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/01/26/winter-field-day-2017/)
Between weekend chores, I may find time to jump on the air as a "1H" station.  Anybody doing it big in the snow?

And yeah, this is more of a ham thing, but people out there with SW receivers that have SSB capability can listen in on the fun too.  It's a good chance to practice.

Culled out of the pages of contest rules, the things a SWLer needs to know are the times and frequencies, so here you go.  Event times run from 2pm Saturday thru 2pm Sunday, Eastern time (adjust to your local time)
Suggested daytime bands:
  • 40 meters, 7.175 - 7.205 MHz LSB (probably good)
  • 20 meters, 14.225 - 14.255 MHz USB (probably best)
  • 15 meters, 21.275 - 21.305 MHz USB (maybe something)
  • 10 meters, 28.4 - 28.425 MHz USB (probably not much)
and nighttime bands:
  • 160 meters, 1.800 - 1.830 MHz LSB (maybe something)
  • 80 meters, 3.800 - 3.830 MHz LSB (probably best)
  • 40 meters, 7.175 - 7.205 MHz LSB (meh-to-good)
Also maybe some activity in the neighborhood of 146.52 FM on the 2m band and 446.0 FM on the 70cm band.  There're a few more bands available, but this is where the bulk of the traffic'll be if there's anything to be heard (not to mention CW & digital modes, but that's TMI for now).

Related podcast over at SCW's place: http://hamradio360.com/index.php/2016/12/27/ham-radio-360-winter-field-day/ (http://hamradio360.com/index.php/2016/12/27/ham-radio-360-winter-field-day/)

I'm going to play tomorrow.  I will setup in the back yard using an HF vertical whip on a coil.  I have to manually adjust the coil as I change bands, but contesting is a good use case.

I've updated my FLDigi macros so my PSK31 exchanges are optimized for WFD. 
Also installed logging software from http://www.n3fjp.com/

I need a dozen more states to reach "WAS".  Hope to get a chunk this weekend.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 27, 2017, 05:26:58 PM
I'm going to play tomorrow.  I will setup in the back yard using an HF vertical whip on a coil.  I have to manually adjust the coil as I change bands, but contesting is a good use case.
VOACAP says we may have a shot at a QSO on 15 & 20m with PSK.  Maybe see you there.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on January 27, 2017, 05:34:36 PM
VOACAP says we may have a shot at a QSO on 15 & 20m with PSK.  Maybe see you there.

I'm going to start on 14.070 as usual and work the folks parked there.  I might QSY if that's jam packed.  I often get good propagation on 15m across the pacific from my place using my attic dipole.  (realize that doesn't help us).  But I have not tested my whip/coil on 15m, but I'm sure I can tune it up.  From my experience 21.070 is much less crowded on psk.  Maybe people don't realize their 40m antennas are a harmonic of 15m???

Anyone, happy contesting!
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 03, 2017, 06:12:32 PM
A podcast-link post up over at brushbeater: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/03/the-spearhead-transmission-2feb17/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/03/the-spearhead-transmission-2feb17/)  Haven't listened yet, but will use it to help me get through income tax forms this weekend.  From the description:
Quote
We talked about the usual commo stuff, license free options for community networking, and even Alex Jones versus Remington Steel. ;)
Discussion to follow.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 05, 2017, 01:50:11 PM
A podcast-link post up over at brushbeater: ...
After 22 minutes of blather about a run-and-gun event, the radio stuff started and ran for about an hour.  TLDL version: (1) Practice with your radio gear.  (2) Some people worry about getting on The List when they get a ham license, but don't give a worry to all of the NFA paperwork they've filled out.  This makes no sense.  (3) Don't be the guy who buys a Baofeng and stuffs it into a Faraday cage with vague plans to learn to use it after the flag goes up.  (4) Some gear talk.  No topics we haven't beat to death here.  Came off as kind of lame, especially with one of the podcast host's tries at humor.

Several more posts up over at the blog today however, some of them pretty good.  One's politics, one's firearms related, but here's a "which bands & modes would you use?" exercise, good for discussion here:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/keypounder-sends/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/keypounder-sends/)
Will try and post some answers soon.

Another comms question a reader wrote in was about small-group UHF 2-way radios:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/question-from-a-reader-ii/

And a two parter about Beverage antennas:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/beverages-for-listening/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/beverages-for-listening/)
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/beverages-for-listening-ii/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/beverages-for-listening-ii/)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Chemsoldier on February 06, 2017, 12:06:23 AM
After 22 minutes of blather about a run-and-gun event, the radio stuff started and ran for about an hour.  TLDL version: (1) Practice with your radio gear.  (2) Some people worry about getting on The List when they get a ham license, but don't give a worry to all of the NFA paperwork they've filled out.  This makes no sense.  (3) Don't be the guy who buys a Baofeng and stuffs it into a Faraday cage with vague plans to learn to use it after the flag goes up.  (4) Some gear talk.  No topics we haven't beat to death here.  Came off as kind of lame, especially with one of the podcast host's tries at humor.

Several more posts up over at the blog today however, some of them pretty good.  One's politics, one's firearms related, but here's a "which bands & modes would you use?" exercise, good for discussion here:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/keypounder-sends/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/keypounder-sends/)
Will try and post some answers soon.

Another comms question a reader wrote in was about small-group UHF 2-way radios:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/question-from-a-reader-ii/

And a two parter about Beverage antennas:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/beverages-for-listening/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/beverages-for-listening/)
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/beverages-for-listening-ii/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/beverages-for-listening-ii/)

Some great material in these blog posts.

Good stuff, thanks for posting it up.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 09, 2017, 07:29:48 PM
... here's a "which bands & modes would you use?" exercise, good for discussion here:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/keypounder-sends/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/keypounder-sends/)
Will try and post some answers soon.

Spoiler alert: here come my answers.  May not be the right ones, they’re certainly incomplete, but here goes.

Q1: What frequency segment and time will you select to minimize DF likelihood and maximize the chance that HQ will acknowledge it?  What will your alternate(s) frequencies be, and under what circumstance will you use them?

After playing with http://www.voacap.com (http://www.voacap.com)'s point-to-point predictions for a bit (result plot below) I'm going with 40m @ 0830z as primary.  The reasons for this are (1) it's in the dead of night so we're less likely to be seen, and (2) the message being passed was received just after dark, and this is the soonest window.  For secondary, I'll go with 17m @ 2200z.  Both of these are centered on the red-est, most probable checkers on this plot:
(http://i1215.photobucket.com/albums/cc502/AlanGeorges/voacap_3.jpg) (http://s1215.photobucket.com/user/AlanGeorges/media/voacap_3.jpg.html)
Could've also gone with 20m @ 2230z, but it's a lot easier to get a 40m antenna to tune on 17m than on 20.  BTW, this was done with the model input set to 100w CW (about equal to 20w PSK31), with dipoles strung at 50’.


Q2: What antenna(s) systems will you use for transmitting this message?  How high will they be placed?  How will you orient and erect them and take them down to minimize possibility of observation? Explain in detail, including specifics of antenna and transmission line.

Slightly long 40m dipole, strung at 50' on some of those 50'+ trees described in the problem statement.  A day ahead of time, tarred bank line (thin, almost invisible) is set up over two suitable tree limbs.  Nothing too conspicuous there, just guys out slingshotting rocks and twine up in there air.  Dipole broadside bearing is about 315deg, eyeballing it on a map.  Close enough.  Decent coax fed (say LMR240, but RG58 would be fine too), with an ugly balun up at the feed point.  Cut a little long, it'll need a little bit of tuner to get to the target frequency on 40m, and definitely some tuner to get up to 17m.  (get an auto-tuner, they're faster)  Main thing is that we're not screwing around with trying to get a dipole perfectly resonant on 40m – just cut that sucker 5% long, hang it, hit the "tune" button, and go.

Also with four helpers, when sending's done it's easy to pull down the wire and bank line, stuff it all a bag, and get out of Dodge.

Honestly, I’d’ve preferred to run a single vertical wire antenna from a tree limb.  It’d be a lot simpler.  Just couldn’t get the receive level up enough without running an amp, or relying on the receive station to have a mega-beam.  Also, a dipole has at least some beam pattern, so that’d cut down on the direction finding and detection.  I really wouldn’t want to run a vertical wire with extra power.


Q3: What mode will you use for transmitting the message?  If digital, which specific mode and why?

BPSK31 @ 20w.  It's robust and packs the most punch of any of the common digital modes, doesn't require an external amp.  Also, it's fast enough to send 125 random characters in < 50 seconds, leaving open the possibility of re-transmission within the 2 minute time window.  As modeled with voacap, that's about the minimum that'll reliably get through.  If the receiving station has a beam to give some gain, I'd maybe want to back off on the power a corresponding amount to cut down on detection.  Or conversely, maybe keep the send power the same and use the extra receive gain to improve reception.


Q4: Before you leave for Venezuela, you will be given an opportunity to study data available through NOAA on radio propagation.  Which ionosonde stations will you study, and why?

No idea on this one.  I'd just look at the usual ham space weather sites and postpone transmission a day or so if conditions are unusually bad.


Q5: What will your cover story be if you are stopped by Venezuelan security forces?

Um, we're like on a DXpedition.  See, fat guys in Hawaiian shirts.  ...?  Well it explains the radio gear.  NGO studying cropland soil leaching?   Dunno, this one would depend a lot more on local conditions not given in the problem, or maybe other factors that I don't understand.

ps: Looking over at Brushbeater to see if the solution from somebody who actually knows about this stuff had been posted yet, they're still floundering around with partial answers.  So... discussion?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on February 10, 2017, 02:43:00 AM
  Alan,your reasoning is sound and there are many correct answers as HF direction finding requires time as only your ground wave ,within miles of you can provide good directional data as the reflected skywave would have DFers ( two meanings) a bit far away and only with generalized direction and guess as to distance as absorption and reflective property of ionosphere is not stable.Also a wire BEAM could be constructed and further aide direction and power of signal.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 10, 2017, 04:33:10 PM
Good points about DFers, Carl.  I suspect that a beam is going to be in the blog's answer.  Maybe some kind of "garden beam" that is pretty close to the ground?  There are indications over at brushbeater that the One True Answer will be posted tomorrow, with hints about some kind of beam (hex beam maybe?).  In the meantime, I'll stand by my dipole, and hope that the receiving group in the Intermountain West has time to put up something with directivity and good receive gain.

In other news, there's this flogging of Yaesu's recent and coming product line changes:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/10/new-from-yaesu/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/10/new-from-yaesu/)
We'll see.

And finally, a post in praise of voacap:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/09/voice-of-america-voa-coverage-analysis-program/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/09/voice-of-america-voa-coverage-analysis-program/)
There're some questions in the comments section about other digital modes besides CW.  The CW calculation can be adjusted by dialing the power up or down as needed from the comparison in Fig. 3 from this article: http://www.qsl.net/k4fk/presentations/Mode-sensitivity-2013-Dec-QST-Siwiak-Pontius-1.pdf (http://www.qsl.net/k4fk/presentations/Mode-sensitivity-2013-Dec-QST-Siwiak-Pontius-1.pdf).  For example, PSK31 gives you +7 dB relative to CW, so if you're transmitting PSK at 20w, set voacap's transmit power to 100w.  BTW, voacap does 11m CB also, so this isn't just a ham-only thing.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 11, 2017, 08:54:36 AM
Answer posted last night:
Quote
DING DING DING! We have a winner!

Yes, I would choose a sloping Vee beam antenna with terminating resistors. If you make it more narrow than the classic formula you will get a very nice compact highly directional main lobe with well over 20 db f/b. If you use terminating resistors, the main lobe gain goes down, but you lose the bidirectional pattern, a distinct advantage in avoiding DF efforts.

The longer the wires the more directional it will be, and you can change the half power beamwidth by squeezing or spreading the ends.

Another possible answer would be a long wire with a resistor, but that has more lobes.
And here's what he's talking about when he says "sloping Vee beam":
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2016/07/29/someone-is-always-listening-part-ii/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2016/07/29/someone-is-always-listening-part-ii/)

ps: Another reference showing how to make this and many others: http://www.biggerhammer.net/manuals/23-10/ch7.htm (http://www.biggerhammer.net/manuals/23-10/ch7.htm)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 13, 2017, 07:21:45 PM
New post up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/13/situational-awareness-and-wargaming-your-ao/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/13/situational-awareness-and-wargaming-your-ao/)
Main points:
OK, probably nothing new to the crowd around here.  Similar to Jack's ongoing advice, but with a more step-by-step escalation path.  Anyway, it's a quick read.

Any discussion in the context of communications?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: cidyl on February 14, 2017, 05:52:14 PM
New post up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/13/situational-awareness-and-wargaming-your-ao/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/13/situational-awareness-and-wargaming-your-ao/)

I'll read his blog sometimes when a title catches my eye, but his arrogant and demeaning comments interlaced with the technical content often makes it hard to stomach.  He takes the "snobbish ham" attitude to a whole new level that's for sure -- quite a feat considering he's only been one for less than 2 years.

Read this post and it looks like more of the same attitude.  It'd be more fun to discuss the situational awareness and wargaming from the perspective of a Boko Haram cell operating in his AO in north-central North Carolina.  Maybe they wouldn't care that he served in Iraq and Afghanistan fighting their brothers-in-arms, just like the DHS/FBI under some future administration will never care about his patriot associates or associations, even for something as trivial as his future children getting denied a security clearance to follow in their Dads military footsteps because of it.  No one is ever going to care what he did or said, ever.  "Think on that one for a second", like he says. 

Any discussion in the context of communications?

Only that if you like to piss people off or draw attention from enemies both foreign and domestic with your communications, it's usually best to not tell them who you are and where you live.  If the proverbial S-hits the fan for Ma** some day I'll bet it likely ends up splattering on his family, friends, and associates too because he talks, and says, too much.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 14, 2017, 07:33:21 PM
Well cidyl, all fair points.  However I will take technical knowledge anywhere I can find it, even if I do not subscribe to the man's politics – or his attitude.  Anyone is, of course, perfectly welcome to take his guff personally, but I'll push past it and learn about vee beams and the like.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on February 15, 2017, 10:41:14 AM
Politics are often a temporal thing.  You'll waste a lot of time if you attempt to align ideologies perfectly with each person.

Something I've observed from reading countless self-published books in the "prepper fiction" genre, is each author describes a scenario where their own skills, experience and preparations allow them to prevail in the conflict.  A possible exception would be William R. Forstchen, who's style is very dark (e.g. everyone dies in the end).  If the main character has a bug out cabin, that cabin is inevitably a key factor they survive in the story.

This pattern is evident on blogs and forums too.  The more time and resources you spend on that nuclear fallout shelter, the more you'll convince yourself it's necessary and important.

Back to the topic, understanding technical aspects of radio lends itself it countless scenarios.  Whether contesting, DXing, ARES or as the comms specialist in the future  partisan resistance - a deep knowledge of propagation would be helpful.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 19, 2017, 03:29:57 PM
... here's a "which bands & modes would you use?" exercise, good for discussion here:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/keypounder-sends/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/keypounder-sends/)

The questioner's answer is now up:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/19/resolving-the-clandestine-radio-question/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/19/resolving-the-clandestine-radio-question/)
I dunno.  Putting all that aluminum wire up in the sky seems a bit more involved than hanging a dipole.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 27, 2017, 05:55:42 AM
New post up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/27/communications-in-a-come-as-you-are-war/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/27/communications-in-a-come-as-you-are-war/)  Downloadable pdf manual, circa 1990 but claimed to be still useful.

"Communications in a Come-as-You-Are Disaster"?  I only have a few minutes to leaf through it this morning; a lot of it looks like a how-to with obsolete military gear nobody has anyway, and some of the rest looks like interesting ideas for emergency comms.  More later.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on February 27, 2017, 06:55:48 AM
New post up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/27/communications-in-a-come-as-you-are-war/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/02/27/communications-in-a-come-as-you-are-war/)  Downloadable pdf manual, circa 1990 but claimed to be still useful.

"Communications in a Come-as-You-Are Disaster"?  I only have a few minutes to leaf through it this morning; a lot of it looks like a how-to with obsolete military gear nobody has anyway, and some of the rest looks like interesting ideas for emergency comms.  More later.

Just a repost of a military field manual,you can get one here:

http://cnqzu.com/library/Anarchy%20Folder/Combat/US%20Military%20Manuals/FM%2024-12%20Communications%20in%20a%20'Come%20as%20You%20Are'%20War.pdf
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 27, 2017, 06:51:18 PM
Just a repost of a military field manual,you can get one here:
Yes, but it is nice to have it pointed out as being useful.  And there are some good ideas and general principles buried in there, between the tables of 60's-to-80's radio compatibility issues. 

For example, there's this jewel of advice:
Quote
NOTE: Under no circumstances will citizen's band procedures be used.
Can't argue with that one.  Worth a half-hour to skim through, assuming you're just sipping your after-supper coffee and not doing anything more pressing.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on February 27, 2017, 11:09:04 PM
Today's post regarding the USMC antenna handbook seems more interesting.  I know from conversation that marines made use of NVIS and have studied loads about field expedient antenna setups.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on February 28, 2017, 05:08:41 AM
Yes, but it is nice to have it pointed out as being useful.  And there are some good ideas and general principles buried in there, between the tables of 60's-to-80's radio compatibility issues. 

For example, there's this jewel of advice:Can't argue with that one.  Worth a half-hour to skim through, assuming you're just sipping your after-supper coffee and not doing anything more pressing.

But CB LINGO can be as effective as navajo code talkers when two real mudflaps get to jawin' on the superslab, 10-4?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 28, 2017, 06:27:28 AM
But CB LINGO can be as effective as navajo code talkers when two real mudflaps get to jawin' on the superslab, 10-4?
Forsooth, I do grok your jive!
(link, because I was too lazy to log into photobucket: https://xkcd.com/771/ (https://xkcd.com/771/))

Today's post regarding the USMC antenna handbook seems more interesting.
I read that manual years ago, now it's time to get back in there and do some of that stuff.  A vee beam in particular seems like a cool alternative to the giant-tower-and-rotator-on-the-back-40 someday dream.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on March 21, 2017, 07:38:42 PM
After 2+ weeks dwelling on the ideal practical combat rifle (something we'd never do on this forum ::)), Keypounder is back with another challenge: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/03/22/keypounder-sends-radio-question-iii/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/03/22/keypounder-sends-radio-question-iii/)
Boy howdy, it's a long, grim one about how to set up a guerrilla resistance comms team, using a recently executed ham's miscellaneous gear.  Not super-relevant to any situations I consider likely, but hey, maybe the answers people post will prove educational.  Think I'll sit this one out and reach for the popcorn.
:popcorn:
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on March 26, 2017, 12:55:13 PM
... Keypounder is back with another challenge: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/03/22/keypounder-sends-radio-question-iii/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/03/22/keypounder-sends-radio-question-iii/)
Preliminary summary of posted answers, a the link.  Search down to the string "Keypounder with a recap so far".  Again, this is getting pretty far afield, but it's interesting background reading.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on March 26, 2017, 01:46:00 PM
It's a trick question.  If you had the right battle rifle, you can shoot the occupying forces and take their tier one common gear.   :P
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on March 29, 2017, 06:20:02 PM
And answers to the latest question are up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/03/29/radio-question-3-my-response-of-sorts/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/03/29/radio-question-3-my-response-of-sorts/)
Not that interesting in general, just sort of a "what would you do with this assorted pile of random crap gear" problem.  About all I can summarize that'd be of relevance here is (1) don't discount FRS, it sometimes fits the job; (2) SHTF+1year, odds are you'll still be able to find a few AA batts; (3) you can get some 12v off of scrounged batteries (abandoned cars?  unless they've been salt water flooded) if you have battery clamps w/PowerPole connectors; and (4) PowerPole the world.

(note to self: make up another set or two of clamps-to-PowePole leads.)

It's a trick question.  If you had the right battle rifle, you can shoot the occupying forces and take their tier one common gear.   :P
If it's that bad, I'd probably settle for raiding their food supplies.  Or maybe just eat their brains.  Brains?  Brains!  :zombie:
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on March 29, 2017, 08:13:16 PM
  lead acid batteries would not survive a year of not being charged and discharged
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on March 29, 2017, 08:34:07 PM
  lead acid batteries would not survive a year of not being charged and discharged

I don't disagree, but more moderate climates seem to extend that duration a small amount in my experience. 
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on April 28, 2017, 07:30:52 PM
A downloadable book on NVIS: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/04/28/fiedlers-nvis-handbook/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/04/28/fiedlers-nvis-handbook/)

On one hand, 144 pp. of geeky goodness.  Some info about NVIS operation during a sunspot cycle minimum.  On the other hand, it's probably better to stop over-thinking things and just string up a low wire and start talking around your region with it.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 16, 2017, 05:31:05 PM
Some discussions on working knowledge, mentoring, theory, practice, and the real world: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/making-things-work-in-the-real-world/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/making-things-work-in-the-real-world/)  Wraps with an admonition to get out there and actually try using your radios.

Also down in the comments there was a mention leading to a blog about "Backpacking, Camping, Hiking and Radio Adventures" that may be worth a follow: http://www.backcountryjournal.net (http://www.backcountryjournal.net)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 18, 2017, 11:00:09 PM
Semi related, I recently visited a fascinating alpine campground that would be excellent for portable ops.  It's at 2800ft elevation and is a rural air strip with free campsites on either side.  There is over 3000 level feet in a strsight line that one could run a 160 meter dipole if desired.

As a bonus, the elevation still has me within the range of metropolitan VHF repeaters, even though there is no cell coverage.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 19, 2017, 06:08:39 AM
As a bonus, the elevation still has me within the range of metropolitan VHF repeaters, even though there is no cell coverage.
This is really cool, Smurf.  I like the idea of backcountry adventures beyond cell coverage but within VHF repeater range.  It's a nice comfortable middle ground before having to halt, break out the HF rig, and string up a great big wire antenna.

Two new posts up yesterday.  The first is about making HF work in an HOA https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/psyops-notes-on-practical-hf/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/psyops-notes-on-practical-hf/).  Hats off to the guy for getting on the air under self-imposed adverse conditions, I guess.  The second is about an upcoming event in coastal NC, where ncscout will be teaching a beginner class in license-free off-grid comms https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/heads-up-nc-patcon/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/heads-up-nc-patcon/).  With barbecue. 8)  That sounds like a practical all-'round course for a lot of people.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on May 19, 2017, 10:25:35 AM
Semi related, I recently visited a fascinating alpine campground that would be excellent for portable ops.  It's at 2800ft elevation and is a rural air strip with free campsites on either side.  There is over 3000 level feet in a strsight line that one could run a 160 meter dipole if desired.

As a bonus, the elevation still has me within the range of metropolitan VHF repeaters, even though there is no cell coverage.

At 2800 feet you should have even better luck with simplex as the line of site range would be 150 miles or so. Perfect place for 2 meter SSB with a modest yagi and horizontal polarity.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 30, 2017, 05:39:57 PM
New comms-related post up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/the-motherlode-all-the-radio-pdfs-you-didnt-even-know-you-wanted/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/the-motherlode-all-the-radio-pdfs-you-didnt-even-know-you-wanted/)

Which is really mostly a link to this cache of pdf's: http://www.n5dux.com/ham/files/pdf/  (http://www.n5dux.com/ham/files/pdf/)  Certainly a lot there, everything from shack grounding to SETI.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 31, 2017, 10:58:02 AM
New comms-related post up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/the-motherlode-all-the-radio-pdfs-you-didnt-even-know-you-wanted/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/the-motherlode-all-the-radio-pdfs-you-didnt-even-know-you-wanted/)

Which is really mostly a link to this cache of pdf's: http://www.n5dux.com/ham/files/pdf/  (http://www.n5dux.com/ham/files/pdf/)  Certainly a lot there, everything from shack grounding to SETI.

I have crawled and archived these locally.  Is there any interest in a single big *.zip file containing all the PDFs?  It's about 1GB in total, but I'm willing to post to my google drive and share the link to those interested.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 11, 2017, 07:25:28 PM
New post up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/11/quantity-vs-quality-putting-the-handheld-radio-in-context/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/11/quantity-vs-quality-putting-the-handheld-radio-in-context/)

It's something between a data dump of good general advice and a stream-of-consciousness rant – Baofengs are crap, some people are stuck on stupid, practice with your gear now, etc.  And of course, because it focuses on handhelds, it's only about VHF/UHF bands.  Worth a read.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 12, 2017, 09:55:41 AM
New post up: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/11/quantity-vs-quality-putting-the-handheld-radio-in-context/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/11/quantity-vs-quality-putting-the-handheld-radio-in-context/)

It's something between a data dump of good general advice and a stream-of-consciousness rant – Baofengs are crap, some people are stuck on stupid, practice with your gear now, etc.  And of course, because it focuses on handhelds, it's only about VHF/UHF bands.  Worth a read.

I got a bit more from it.  Regarding the classic "license vs no license" debate that we often see in prepping circles, he brings up the salient point that even a technician class amateur is going to be a vastly better CB/FRS/GMRS/etc operator because of the knowledge about antennas and basic RF concepts.

I know the Baofeng rant is tired. I don't like dull knives, but I own a few. They are used for opening shipping boxes, or loading to teenagers who are likely to be careless. If you understand the technical details about receive sensitivity, and other concepts, you are more likely to appreciate a more expensive unit.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 12, 2017, 06:57:50 PM
Yeah, some worthwhile stuff there; sorry if it sounded like I was denigrating it.  It's just kind of hard to summarize an overall theme.  Or to put it another way, it's so chock full of content that it defies a brief summary.  I like how he spells out:
Quote
There exists a strong differentiation which must be made; Survivalist or Retreat Communications is a different animal from Tactical Communications.
There are lots of other useful nuggets of wisdom running around in that post.
Quote
  • You have an unpredictable set of needs to address.
It’s super common to get confused, especially if all that you’re doing is snapping up and stashing kit without working through its bugs or thinking past plug n’ play.
Brother, that's the truth. 

ps: if you've got to go all tacticool like the HT setup in one of the pics, here's a Moxon beam calculator: http://www.moxonantennaproject.com/design.htm (http://www.moxonantennaproject.com/design.htm)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 12, 2017, 09:55:16 PM
He writes rather "stream of conscious" a lot of the time.  As you noted, many wise nuggets, but it's not really structured like a non-fiction guide to communication strategy.

If we were sitting around a campfire, we could interact with questions, ask for examples or to paraphrase. Something I learned working with offshore engineering teams in different time zones, was to write concisely and unambiguously.  Too much could be lost if an email reply was sent to me at 3am asking for clarification.

On that topic, you likely have come across survival archives of PDFs.  Often they are old military field manuals, scanned articles on homesteading, bushcraft, etc.  I know several people who have saved this type of material off onto backup storage media, and even printed hard copies in some cases.  They one thing almost no one does is read the damn stuff before hand.  Some of that material is crap, and not really useful in practice.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on June 12, 2017, 10:02:16 PM
He writes rather "stream of conscious" a lot of the time.  As you noted, many wise nuggets, but it's not really structured like a non-fiction guide to communication strategy.

If we were sitting around a campfire, we could interact with questions, ask for examples or to paraphrase. Something I learned working with offshore engineering teams in different time zones, was to write concisely and unambiguously.  Too much could be lost if an email reply was sent to me at 3am asking for clarification.

On that topic, you likely have come across survival archives of PDFs.  Often they are old military field manuals, scanned articles on homesteading, bushcraft, etc.  I know several people who have saved this type of material off onto backup storage media, and even printed hard copies in some cases.  They one thing almost no one does is read the damn stuff before hand.  Some of that material is crap, and not really useful in practice.

This is why one must work to separate the gems from the dirt.I have spent 40 plus years mining for high content ore and gems.

Cheap China radios do have a place in communications just as throw down phones...they work reasonably well and yet are expendable.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 20, 2017, 05:06:17 PM
New post up: Back to Basics: Data Books and What Should Be in Them (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/20/back-to-basics-data-books-and-what-should-be-in-them/).

Not unlike Jack's documentation package idea, with more emphasis on field and (of course) radio operations.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 20, 2017, 05:13:44 PM
New post up: Back to Basics: Data Books and What Should Be in Them (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/20/back-to-basics-data-books-and-what-should-be-in-them/).

Not unlike Jack's documentation package idea, with more emphasis on field and (of course) radio operations.

I read that, and it reminded me to print and laminate this for winlink wellfare traffic purposes:

How to Send a Text Message (SMS) Via Email:
To send a text message via email, you must use a SMS to email gateway. Just substitute a 10-digit cell number for ‘number’ for each carrier below:

Code: [Select]
AT&T: number@txt.att.net
T-Mobile: number@tmomail.net
Verizon: number@vtext.com (text-only), number@vzwpix (text + photo)
Sprint: number@messaging.sprintpcs.com or number@pm.sprint.com
Virgin Mobile: number@vmobl.com
Tracfone: number@mmst5.tracfone.com
Metro PCS: number@mymetropcs.com
Boost Mobile: number@myboostmobile.com
Cricket: number@mms.cricketwireless.net
Ptel: number@ptel.com
Republic Wireless: number@text.republicwireless.com
Google Fi (Project Fi): number@msg.fi.google.com
Suncom: number@tms.suncom.com
Ting: number@message.ting.com
U.S. Cellular: number@email.uscc.net
Consumer Cellular: number@cingularme.com
C-Spire: number@cspire1.com
Page Plus: number@vtext.com
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 20, 2017, 07:16:50 PM
I read that, and it reminded me to print and laminate this for winlink wellfare traffic purposes:

How to Send a Text Message (SMS) Via Email:
To send a text message via email, you must use a SMS to email gateway. Just substitute a 10-digit cell number for ‘number’ for each carrier below:
That's a good one to know, Smurf.  As a side note, my carrier wants a "1" in front of the phone number; some do, some don't, so test this out ahead of time.

Brushbeater's data book is a good idea, but one more "mega data book" is the National Interoperability Field Operations Guide, or NIFOG.  FEMA has it for free download (here (https://www.dhs.gov/publication/fog-documents)), and I would say that you can buy a nice spiral-bound copy off Amazon for $15 like I did last year, but all they seem to have now is used copies for $50. (!!)  Anyway, NIFOG is a little much to haul around in the field, but it does have everything – and I mean everything – having to do with comms, down to telephone wire stripe codes, ham bands, GMRS channels, and the like.

(Now that I see what they're going for, think I'll go magic marker my name & call sign into my spiral bound copy.  Holy cats, these things should be everywhere.)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 21, 2017, 08:36:43 AM
This past spring at emergency comms convention, I heard some presentations from FEMA region X about NIFOG.

FEMA, DHS seem to place a lot of focus on region X, as we have volcanoes and 3 seismic fault lines intersecting.  Alaska is also included and those dudes are hardcore. 72 hour kit for 20 below zero, and a much bigger area of operation place additional demands on their comms planning.

You'd think some prepper store would be selling USB drives loaded with reference material like this for $20.



Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on June 21, 2017, 08:43:07 AM
This past spring at emergency comms convention, I heard some presentations from FEMA region X about NIFOG.

FEMA, DHS seem to place a lot of focus on region X, as we have volcanoes and 3 seismic fault lines intersecting.  Alaska is also included and those dudes are hardcore. 72 hour kit for 20 below zero, and a much bigger area of operation place additional demands on their comms planning.

You'd think some prepper store would be selling USB drives loaded with reference material like this for $20.

Man...and here I give such stuff away... :facepalm:
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 21, 2017, 08:53:04 AM
Man...and here I give such stuff away... :facepalm:

If you've been to a "prepper" flea market, it's amazing how many vendors are reselling crap from Harbor Freight, packaged up in "tactical" molle pouches.
$20 in eBay grade Chinese kit sells for $100 at the gun show.

Willful ignorance? Laziness? Apathy? Who knows.

Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 21, 2017, 05:38:58 PM
If you've been to a "prepper" flea market, it's amazing how many vendors are reselling crap from Harbor Freight, packaged up in "tactical" molle pouches.
$20 in eBay grade Chinese kit sells for $100 at the gun show.
Toss in a Baofeng pre-programmed with GMRS, FRS, & MURS, call it a "Tactical Comms Kit," and charge $200.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 24, 2017, 08:02:51 AM
Late yesterday, there's a post announcing ARRL Field Day:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/23/get-on-the-air/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/23/get-on-the-air/)
Starts at 2pm Eastern time, ends 24 hours later.  Yes, it's primarily a ham event, but non-hams are welcome to show up at the local Field Day sites.  Many clubs will have a "get on the air" radio and a friendly helping ham, just for non-ham visitors.  Or if you want to practice receiving ham transmissions on your shortwave, there'll be plenty of traffic.

ps: More on the subject over at The SWLing Post: http://swling.com/blog/2017/06/its-field-day-weekend-2017-find-a-local-event-have-fun/ (http://swling.com/blog/2017/06/its-field-day-weekend-2017-find-a-local-event-have-fun/)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on June 29, 2017, 10:57:04 AM
This post is back to radio, specifically the 6 meter amateur band:

https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/29/6-meters-survivalist-magic/

Virtues of the 6m band:
Privacy through obscurity.  Because there isn't a $30 chinese 6 meter handheld, you will have relative privacy.
FM and SSB options allow it to work in a variety of operating environments.

It's a good simplex band, also has some repeater infrastructure and doesn't have a lot of the unlicenses preppers with baofengs involved.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 29, 2017, 06:08:53 PM
This post is back to radio, specifically the 6 meter amateur band:
...
It's a good simplex band, also has some repeater infrastructure and doesn't have a lot of the unlicenses preppers with baofengs involved.
That last part may be the best part.  Another good point is that many (nearly all?) new HF radios are "HF+6m," so even if people aren't using it, the capability's there.  Maybe better or at least different terrain interaction than 10m, 2m, and some of the other VHF/UHF bands for local line-of-sight work.

There aren't any affordable new HT's or mobile units, at least nothing I could find for less than $300.  Saw one used Yaesu VX-7R on ebay for $220.  There's not a "6m FT-60" in the $150 range or any $120-ish monobanders out there.  That's kind of a hang-up.

The only people I know who dabble in 6m are hams who like to fool around DXing when the band gods smile.  It's the unpredictability that draws them in, which makes for a fun hobby band but detracts from serious communications.

All I've ever done with it is some town-to-town simplex LOS on SSB & FM.  Worked great, maybe a little better than 2m, maybe a little less prone to skip than 10m.  I could see using it as base-to-base comms in a SHTF situation, since most people's HF rigs have it.  Kind of like CB, but a little more VHF-y and with smaller antennas.

Anybody else out there using 6m?  Carl?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on June 29, 2017, 06:49:08 PM
I use either wire or an old 3 element 6 meter beam and mostly use it during E cloud openings during the summer though it does do good for 'local' work and is much more private for one on one comms and does travel a bit better than 2 meters.Also NOTE that a 5/8 wave two meter antenna does work fine as a 1/4 wave six meter antenna. Many business radios and Motorola radios can also work on 6 meters FM is fine for local and DX when the band opens.

  I once used my Yaesu VX5 handy talkie to talk to Chicago and the other operator used a cherokee (looks like a CB HT) for some fun.

http://www.mtcradio.com/wouxun-kg-uv5d-vhf-plus-six-meters-handheld-sale-price/
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 29, 2017, 07:08:48 PM
http://www.mtcradio.com/wouxun-kg-uv5d-vhf-plus-six-meters-handheld-sale-price/
The price is right on that one; thanks for finding it.  All kind of longer-ranges uses come to mind.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: SCWolverine on July 01, 2017, 07:17:18 PM
This post is back to radio, specifically the 6 meter amateur band:

https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/06/29/6-meters-survivalist-magic/

Virtues of the 6m band:
Privacy through obscurity.  Because there isn't a $30 chinese 6 meter handheld, you will have relative privacy.
FM and SSB options allow it to work in a variety of operating environments.

It's a good simplex band, also has some repeater infrastructure and doesn't have a lot of the unlicenses preppers with baofengs involved.

That's ALL it took to keep me from selling the pair of Wouxun's I have! (2m/6m) thanks Smurf!
*I notified Sparks31 a few years back of the MTC offering; he blogged, they sold out in less than 1 day and couldn't figure out why till I called to congratulate myself!  Every time I mention on the show, the sell a bunch  ;)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on July 02, 2017, 08:35:37 AM
That's ALL it took to keep me from selling the pair of Wouxun's I have! (2m/6m) thanks Smurf!
*I notified Sparks31 a few years back of the MTC offering; he blogged, they sold out in less than 1 day and couldn't figure out why till I called to congratulate myself!  Every time I mention on the show, the sell a bunch  ;)

Quote
Do not use any other software for this radio other than the software offered in our store. Using any other software or programming files from another version will damage the radio.

Telling that to a software developer is very dangerous - LOL


I would be happier if CHIRP supported it. 

Code: [Select]
Wouxun
KG-UVD1P/UV2D/UV3D
KG-UV6D/UV6X
KG-UV8D


I've got a sort of "code plug" for all my radios using CHIRP.
I commonly max out all the memories in my area, programming in public service, airband and other things depending on the radio and bands supported.
There are a couple of GMRS repeaters that I program into my chinese radios just for future reference, etc.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on July 02, 2017, 08:40:42 AM
  Of course you can get more effective Handheld with obscurity by using the Chinese made 220 MHZ radios.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on July 02, 2017, 08:46:09 AM
  Of course you can get more effective Handheld with obscurity by using the Chinese made 220 MHZ radios.

If I got into 220mhz, I would want a radio that could do digital packet. The smartest emcomm folks are advocating this, as emergency field setups typically have a VHF voice station in close proximity to a VHF digital station.  Using 220mhz for winlink traffic would lessen interference between them.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: SCWolverine on July 04, 2017, 09:08:47 AM
If I got into 220mhz, I would want a radio that could do digital packet. The smartest emcomm folks are advocating this, as emergency field setups typically have a VHF voice station in close proximity to a VHF digital station.  Using 220mhz for winlink traffic would lessen interference between them.

now to convince my fellow ARES member to give up their $30 UV5's and pony up for a decent $200+ 220MHz rig (insert ROFLMAO gif)
I do have a few getting ready for Winlink P2P with spare VHF rigs....

Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on August 10, 2017, 06:54:19 PM
It's about drones, but there's also some scanning, comms, and jamming in there:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/open-source-drone-warfare/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/open-source-drone-warfare/)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on August 11, 2017, 02:30:17 PM
It's about drones, but there's also some scanning, comms, and jamming in there:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/open-source-drone-warfare/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/open-source-drone-warfare/)

I really enjoyed that post. Gave me a lot to think about. Drones really are a "force multipler". One could drop a water balloon filled with some seriously unpleasant substance into a living area.  No risk to attacking personnel, and attribution of the attack could be more difficult.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on August 27, 2017, 02:14:54 PM
NVIS contest!  Looks cool!  (right?)  I mean NVIS is the regional coverage propagation mode.
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/27/nvis-contest-via-mapoa/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/27/nvis-contest-via-mapoa/)

Onward to the contest organizers' announcement page:
https://midatlanticportableoperatorassn.wordpress.com (https://midatlanticportableoperatorassn.wordpress.com)
From the rules:
Quote
Date: 30 September 2017
Start time: 1500 UTC (about an hour after sunrise on the West coast)
End time: 2100 UTC (about an hour before sunset on the East Coast)
Run is 6 hours.

Frequency/Band– 80 meters only; licensed segments between 3.5 and 4.0 mHz
Um, am I missing something?  1500 UTC = 11 AM EDT start, to 2100 UTC = 5 PM EDT end.  Which would work great for 40m, but 80m's going to be dead that time of day.  Surely there's been a typo.

Will watch their web site for updates.  If it's on 40m, it might be worth a try for anyone in the eastern half of the U.S.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on August 27, 2017, 03:19:38 PM
NVIS contest!  Looks cool!  (right?)  I mean NVIS is the regional coverage propagation mode.
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/27/nvis-contest-via-mapoa/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/27/nvis-contest-via-mapoa/)

Onward to the contest organizers' announcement page:
https://midatlanticportableoperatorassn.wordpress.com (https://midatlanticportableoperatorassn.wordpress.com)
From the rules:Um, am I missing something?  1500 UTC = 11 AM EDT start, to 2100 UTC = 5 PM EDT end.  Which would work great for 40m, but 80m's going to be dead that time of day.  Surely there's been a typo.

Will watch their web site for updates.  If it's on 40m, it might be worth a try for anyone in the eastern half of the U.S.

REMEMBER that NVIS does not need to pass through as much "D" layer at the higher angle and often works well during the day too as 'normal' propagation rules do not apply to the higher angle of operation and 40-60-80 will often work fine during daylight hours.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on August 27, 2017, 05:34:31 PM
Good points Carl.  And yet, I've had virtually no contacts on 80m during mid-day hours.  Perhaps this is because everyone else also believes that 80m is closed and goes elsewhere.  Is broad daylight NVIS practiced much on 80m?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on August 27, 2017, 06:00:39 PM
Good points Carl.  And yet, I've had virtually no contacts on 80m during mid-day hours.  Perhaps this is because everyone else also believes that 80m is closed and goes elsewhere.  Is broad daylight NVIS practiced much on 80m?

Old habits are hard to die....Just as so many new Hams learn that 'contesting' is how they are supposed to operate and actual conversation is not part of Ham radio communications...just the obligatory FIVE-NINE.

  Forty meters is often better supported during the day,but often 60 and 80 will work for NVIS ...propagation is still a fickle mistress and often uncooperative.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: SCWolverine on August 28, 2017, 06:36:38 AM
FWIW; I spent some time on HF yesterday  :o doing some FSQ on 40m to a station in Central NC with 10w on a dipole up at about 30'
I also qso'd with a buddy at the top end of the county with the same, on 40m FSQ- this was after lunch / before supper.  We (my bud in the same county) usually always have good luck with 40m.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on September 19, 2017, 06:30:48 AM
Brushbeater's dialing back on the blog so that he can dial up on local issues:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/better-things-or-doing-versus-talking/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/better-things-or-doing-versus-talking/)

I'm sure he'll be around, but not quite as thick with the posts as in the last couple of years.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on September 29, 2017, 05:27:21 PM
Reminder, the MAPOA NVIS contest is tomorrow: https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/09/27/reminder-mapoa-nvis-contest-30-sep-17/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/09/27/reminder-mapoa-nvis-contest-30-sep-17/)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on October 16, 2017, 05:33:09 AM
New post up:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/10/15/reflections-on-puerto-rico/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/10/15/reflections-on-puerto-rico/)

Puerto Rico is starting to look like the worst of the Katrina aftermath writ large.  Lots of comms lessons there.  The main one he presses is to be ready to operate bare-bones HF after a disaster, especially using NVIS.  Also, teach others so that you're not the only HF radio operator in your group.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: LodeRunner on November 05, 2017, 09:14:09 PM
...
Things I want to improve:
Operating Skills
Scanning, Monitoring, Signals Collection


Hey Smurf,

When it comes to Scanning/Monitoring and Signal Collection, probably the best thing you can do -gear wise- is to start using an SDR receiver.

Running an SDR, all the most important parts of your "equipment" are software, so it's easy to try different things and find what's best for you.
Trunking decoders, protocol decoders, noise reduction "filters", and adding entirely new modes to your capabilities is all done in software.
After trying several RTL/SDR "dongles" and other solutions that were of limited use, I found the SDRPlay, and it's a pretty amazing piece of gear.
http://www.sdrplay.com/

I now have two of their RSP-2 receivers, and with them I can capture 16Mhz of spectrum for immediate monitoring, and for recording to HD for later review.  I mostly use them for MF/HF monitoring and capture, but the RSP receivers cover all the way up into the lower microwave spectrum, and they do a very nice job as an SDS (Software Defined Scanner) for VHF/UHF. 
I already have several (hardware) scanners covering VHF/UHF; and I live way out in the country so there's not much to be heard unless I point my beams at one of the urban areas... so my focus is more towards MF/HF monitoring - but I have a friend who lives in a very urban area - he's right in the thick of things V/UHF wise being <20 miles from the state capital.  I brought one of my RSP-2s to his place and we used his existing scanner antenna to try it out in a high-RF environment and it did very well.  So well that he ordered one for himself - he now has it covering all the frequencies that two of his older scanners had been.  He really likes the fact that if he records the direct-sampled RF spectrum to his HDD, then he can go back later and look for activity on frequencies that he didn't even have programmed when the recording was made.    Taking that concept to the extreme, I don't 'program frequencies' at all - I select chunks of spectrum and record them, then go back and look for the interesting bits later.  As I do a better job building tools and scripts to search through these massive recordings, I am missing less and less of what pass through the MF/HF spectrum because I don't 'scan', I Data-Mine the recordings.

I will probably buy another one or two RSPs as soon as budget permits, because I want to be able to set up a remote-receive station and 'pipe' it back to me as a private WEB-SDR (and share it with a few friends).   The remote-receive site I'm looking at is extremely RF quiet, and is far enough away from my friends and I so that we could run Full Duplex on MF/HF -- and not de-sense the remote RX site even if we ran 1500 watts.  Cheap laptop + SDRplay receiver + Internet connection = a high-quality, private remote-RX facility that you can access from anywhere.  <-- It's becoming really easy to do stuff like this with the newer technologies available, so the whole monitoring scene is changing rapidly

Best of all, they're very inexpensive for what they can do - the RSP-1 is less than $150 now, and the RSP-2 was $189 when I bought mine, I think they have/are going to lower that to $169.

The first SDR I ever bought was an Icom PCR1500 back in 2001/2, and I don't even want to tell you what it cost.  The SDRPlay receivers do way more than the PCR1500 ever dreamed of, and have a much better software front end (SDR-Uno application) than anything else available right now.

Cheers

Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: LodeRunner on November 05, 2017, 09:22:18 PM
Is broad daylight NVIS practiced much on 80m?

Not in the last 5 to 7 years.  But as we go deeper into the trough of the sunspot cycle, 80M NVIS comms will become more viable during daylight.  Plan on it becoming very useful in another 2 or 3 years.  At the same time, you'll NEED 160M for nighttime NVIS, because 80M will be 'running long' very shortly after local sunset and NVIS will become difficult. (40M is like this now, and the further towards solar bottom we go, the lower the Optimum Frequency' will fall at any given time of day)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on November 06, 2017, 09:33:27 AM
Not in the last 5 to 7 years.  But as we go deeper into the trough of the sunspot cycle, 80M NVIS comms will become more viable during daylight.  Plan on it becoming very useful in another 2 or 3 years.  At the same time, you'll NEED 160M for nighttime NVIS, because 80M will be 'running long' very shortly after local sunset and NVIS will become difficult. (40M is like this now, and the further towards solar bottom we go, the lower the Optimum Frequency' will fall at any given time of day)

160m NVIS seems like it'd require quite a tall mast.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on November 06, 2017, 09:35:55 AM
160m NVIS seems like it'd require quite a tall mast.

160 meters pretty much just flows along the ground at night,it my bounce a bit but I picture it more as a 'flow'
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 02, 2018, 05:24:16 PM
brushbeater is back with two new posts:
Top Band Magic: The Inverted L on 160M (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/12/31/top-band-magic-the-inverted-l-on-160m/)
and
High Frequency Ops: A Dedicated QRP Rig vs. Full Power in the Field (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/12/29/high-frequency-ops-a-dedicated-qrp-rig-vs-full-power-in-the-field/)

I need to give them a reading-over again, might even have something to add after that.  Anyway, brushbeater's still around.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on January 02, 2018, 06:18:01 PM
brushbeater is back with two new posts:
Top Band Magic: The Inverted L on 160M (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/12/31/top-band-magic-the-inverted-l-on-160m/)
and
High Frequency Ops: A Dedicated QRP Rig vs. Full Power in the Field (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/12/29/high-frequency-ops-a-dedicated-qrp-rig-vs-full-power-in-the-field/)

I need to give them a reading-over again, might even have something to add after that.  Anyway, brushbeater's still around.

In the QRP/QRO...he is wrong to say you need 21 amps to run a 100 watt HF radio in transmit...SSB or Voice uses a PEAK of 20 to 23 Amps ,but an AVERAGE of SEVEN AMPS and this is doable with a 7 of better 12 Amp Hour SLA battery and can be greatly enhanced with a capacitor in line near the radio like ONE FARAD or even less to better provide the 20 something Amp peaks better than a battery can. I use a 3 FARAD at home on a VHF SSB amplifier that will put out 330 to 366 watts without the capacitor and as much as 550 Watts with the 3 farad cap ($35 on Amazon)
  Worthwhile boost in the but for small investment and even a 100,000 Microfarad capacitor will work for this trick.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 03, 2018, 06:49:47 AM
Yeah, more of the same.  We thrashed around with QRP more and better in another thread (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=60859.0), and 160 meters is mostly a fun wintertime pursuit, at least for anyone not running a big amp.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 17, 2018, 06:55:17 AM
Top Band Magic Part II (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/01/16/top-band-magic-the-inverted-l-on-160m-part-ii/)
The author finishes construction, gets on 160 meters with a QRP rig, makes contacts, and promptly gets lectured by the rag-chew regulars about using low power on *ahem* their band.

But it worked.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on January 20, 2018, 07:24:12 PM
The Inverted L Antenna and NVIS (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/01/20/the-inverted-l-antenna-and-nvis/)
Interesting EZ-NEC modeling, but it seems like a lot of extra trouble for little gain compared to a low dipole or even a low random wire tuned against shack ground.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 27, 2018, 06:16:59 AM
Catching up a little on the brushbeater blog:

Winter Field Day '18 After Action Report (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/wfd-18-aar/)
There's a short list of takeaways regarding low sunspot levels, crummy propagation, battery & power management, and the value of operating experience.

A Recent Course Review (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/02/20/a-recent-course-review/)
Just like the title says, a student writes a review of a class recently presented by the blogger.  Worth a read.  Nothing too specific, but you may pick up some training ideas here.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on February 27, 2018, 07:24:25 AM
Catching up a little on the brushbeater blog:

Winter Field Day '18 After Action Report (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/wfd-18-aar/)
There's a short list of takeaways regarding low sunspot levels, crummy propagation, battery & power management, and the value of operating experience.

A Recent Course Review (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/02/20/a-recent-course-review/)
Just like the title says, a student writes a review of a class recently presented by the blogger.  Worth a read.  Nothing too specific, but you may pick up some training ideas here.

Per the WFD post, I agree those 35ah harbor freight batteries are a deal when you apply the ubiquitous 20% off coupon.
Aside from the built in carry handle, they are reasonable weight to carry by hand.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on February 27, 2018, 05:54:26 PM
Per the WFD post, I agree those 35ah harbor freight batteries are a deal when you apply the ubiquitous 20% off coupon.
Aside from the built in carry handle, they are reasonable weight to carry by hand.
Holy cats, you're right Smurf.  $70 - $14 = $56 for a safe, reliable, non-exotic, man-luggable power solution is a deal.  Very suitable for car camping or home emergencies.  Had to go look it up, here's the link: https://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-35-amp-hour-universal-battery-68680.html (https://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-35-amp-hour-universal-battery-68680.html)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on February 28, 2018, 10:01:10 AM
Holy cats, you're right Smurf.  $70 - $14 = $56 for a safe, reliable, non-exotic, man-luggable power solution is a deal.  Very suitable for car camping or home emergencies.  Had to go look it up, here's the link: https://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-35-amp-hour-universal-battery-68680.html (https://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-35-amp-hour-universal-battery-68680.html)

I was on my phone last post and too lazy to link.  :)
Glad you found it.  On certain holidays the coupons go up to 25% off.

I have 2 of those sitting under my work bench. Each is fitted with 30amp power poles so I can lug them into the shack, or the field in a pinch.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on February 28, 2018, 10:35:52 AM
I was on my phone last post and too lazy to link.  :)
Glad you found it.  On certain holidays the coupons go up to 25% off.

I have 2 of those sitting under my work bench. Each is fitted with 30amp power poles so I can lug them into the shack, or the field in a pinch.

Watch for on line discounts or coupons as the physical stores often don't co ordinate well though they must honor a printed on line sale price.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on March 06, 2018, 06:36:22 AM
Next up:
Open Sources: Of Spies, Sedition, and Ham Radio (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/03/06/open-sources-of-spies-sedition-and-ham-radio/)
Haven't read through the linked articles yet, but it all revolves around the curious case of Nellie Ohr.  Will read when time and work allows, maybe have something coherent to say then.  In the meantime... maybe this better fits under the Political Sandbox or even Tin Foil Hat Brigade, but this thread was already here.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on March 06, 2018, 05:46:29 PM
Not a lot there.  Tech ticket only, political commentators trying to gin things up like she was beaming signals back to Stalin's tomb in Mother Russia, and lots and lots of speculation down in the comments section on how VHF/UHF could be used to circumvent internet surveillance.  Absolutely no solid connection between her professional activities and radio transmissions, though there was some rampant speculation (if you can imagine that).  For bonus points, LodeRunner makes an appearance.

What's more, there's not much of a comms lesson to be learned.  Tight beams, low power, data transmission, blah blah blah.  Nothing that hasn't been hashed over in many places many times.  Ah well, at least I got filled in on what's been in the news these last couple of weeks and why friends and family keep asking me about the ham radio connection.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on March 06, 2018, 08:57:22 PM
Not a lot there.  Tech ticket only, political commentators trying to gin things up like she was beaming signals back to Stalin's tomb in Mother Russia, and lots and lots of speculation down in the comments section on how VHF/UHF could be used to circumvent internet surveillance.  Absolutely no solid connection between her professional activities and radio transmissions, though there was some rampant speculation (if you can imagine that).  For bonus points, LodeRunner makes an appearance.

What's more, there's not much of a comms lesson to be learned.  Tight beams, low power, data transmission, blah blah blah.  Nothing that hasn't been hashed over in many places many times.  Ah well, at least I got filled in on what's been in the news these last couple of weeks and why friends and family keep asking me about the ham radio connection.

Because the only thing stopping all these preppers from forming effective insurgent groups during a collapse are their comms?

Any student of cold war history knows a great deal of kinetic action was facilitated by dead drop paper communication and implemented with a sharp object or poison.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on March 08, 2018, 05:36:23 PM
The latest:
Jailbreaking DMR (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/03/07/jailbreaking-dmr/)
It's not my thing, but there it is for those so inclined.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on April 09, 2018, 07:26:31 PM
New one up, first in a while:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/09/guidelines-for-inter-team-communications-and-integrating-it-into-your-kit/ (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/09/guidelines-for-inter-team-communications-and-integrating-it-into-your-kit/)
This goes even more tacticool than usual.  Lots of little hints and techniques, worth a quick read if only to get how others are thinking.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on April 29, 2018, 08:19:24 AM
Catching up a little on recent posting over at brushbeater:

Updates on CommRadio’s CTX-10 (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/updates-on-commradios-ctx-10/)
It's a QRP rig.  'nuff said.

Ground SIGINT: Low Noise Receiving Loop Antenna (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/26/ground-sigint-low-noise-receiving-loop-antenna/)
OK, this one's a little more interesting.

The Brevity Matrix (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/27/the-brevity-matrix/)
Honestly, the ARRL standard Q's and #'s (links below) are more practical for normal and survival situations.  Maybe in a true hog-wild SHTF situation something like what brushbeater's talking about would begin to make sense, but that's getting out there.
http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Get%20on%20the%20Air/Comm%20w%20Other%20Hams-Q%20Signals.pdf (http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Get%20on%20the%20Air/Comm%20w%20Other%20Hams-Q%20Signals.pdf)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARRL_Numbered_Radiogram (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARRL_Numbered_Radiogram)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on April 29, 2018, 09:31:01 AM
Catching up a little on recent posting over at brushbeater:

Updates on CommRadio’s CTX-10 (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/updates-on-commradios-ctx-10/)
It's a QRP rig.  'nuff said.

Ground SIGINT: Low Noise Receiving Loop Antenna (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/26/ground-sigint-low-noise-receiving-loop-antenna/)
OK, this one's a little more interesting.

The Brevity Matrix (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/27/the-brevity-matrix/)
Honestly, the ARRL standard Q's and #'s (links below) are more practical for normal and survival situations.  Maybe in a true hog-wild SHTF situation something like what brushbeater's talking about would begin to make sense, but that's getting out there.
http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Get%20on%20the%20Air/Comm%20w%20Other%20Hams-Q%20Signals.pdf (http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Get%20on%20the%20Air/Comm%20w%20Other%20Hams-Q%20Signals.pdf)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARRL_Numbered_Radiogram (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARRL_Numbered_Radiogram)

What's not to love about a thousand dollar QRP rig?  It's ruggedized too! What if I built 10 uBitx transceivers and just threw them away when they failed?

For the RX antenna, maybe if I retire on a ranch where I have 70'x 70' I can dedicate to an antenna I'll try that out.

While the budding boyhood secret agent in me enjoys the idea of covert words to communicate, the two obvious blocking problems are:

1) we cannot legally obscure the meaning of communications on amateur bands (encryption or code words)
2) the understanding is not ubiquitous.  Of course if everyone knew the secret code words they would not be secrets, but this stuff only works for a pre-arranged group.

Sorry for the snark, I haven't finished my coffee as I write this.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on April 29, 2018, 10:06:01 AM
Sorry for the snark, I haven't finished my coffee as I write this.
Snark on, Smurf.  brushbeater occasionally has something relevant to say, but lately he's been more infrequent and more out-there.

In the meantime, instead of making up a set of secret squirrel codes nobody else is using, it's an idea to spend a minute to print out the standard Q-codes and radiogram message numbers to put in a shack notebook.  Yes, we all have them in a book or two on the shelf, but they'll be more handy in the notebook.  Even brushbeater can spur a good idea, even if he doesn't directly hand them out.

You got your second cup yet?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on April 29, 2018, 05:14:08 PM
Snark on, Smurf.  brushbeater occasionally has something relevant to say, but lately he's been more infrequent and more out-there.

In the meantime, instead of making up a set of secret squirrel codes nobody else is using, it's an idea to spend a minute to print out the standard Q-codes and radiogram message numbers to put in a shack notebook.  Yes, we all have them in a book or two on the shelf, but they'll be more handy in the notebook.  Even brushbeater can spur a good idea, even if he doesn't directly hand them out.

You got your second cup yet?

A more likely scenario is that some foreign land has a calamity and they are desperately calling DX to get some news out. Could be a political revolution, natural disaster, etc.

For example, while my contacts to Venezuela have been limited to concise digital modes like PSK31/JT65/FT8, and it's been nothing but a signal report exchange, I have to think we could get accurate intel more readily from a fellow amateur on the ground compared to CNN/FOX/MSNBC. 

Or less dramatic, you might pick up a may day call from a blue ocean sailor in distress, injured hiker, etc..  These sound a bit dramatic, but they are probably much more likely than another American Civil War or whatever the crisis du jour is.

Good tip on printing out the Q codes and radio grams forms.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on April 29, 2018, 06:17:43 PM
A more likely scenario is that some foreign land has a calamity and they are desperately calling DX to get some news out. Could be a political revolution, natural disaster, etc.
Definitely.  Last September, for example, there was a ton of health & welfare traffic out of Puerto Rico.

Quote
Or less dramatic, you might pick up a may day call from a blue ocean sailor in distress, injured hiker, etc..  These sound a bit dramatic, but they are probably much more likely than another American Civil War or whatever the crisis du jour is.
The check-ins go on every day on the 14.300 maritime mobile net, and occasionally they handle emergency traffic.  Seems like more regular activity than the other events you mention.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on April 30, 2018, 05:35:15 PM
AmRRON Dark Labs: ADL-1 OTP Generator (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/04/30/amrron-dark-labs-adl-1-otp-generator/)
An automated one time pad generator? :tinfoily:
Scroll down for the comments regarding EMP-proofing the thing.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 01, 2018, 07:36:04 PM
Well that was grim.  Realistic though.  Of course, brushbeater's going to some dark places.  Go dark places, expect dark stuff.

Is that blog (and by extension this thread) getting too weird for the forum?  I mean, when the guy's reminding everybody about Winter Field Day and suggesting that people get out in the great outdoors and operate, that's pretty positive.  Then he goes off into Secret Squirrel Land with OTP generators.

So... is the discussion of that blog getting too far afield here?  Mods?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 01, 2018, 08:33:27 PM
Well that was grim.  Realistic though.  Of course, brushbeater's going to some dark places.  Go dark places, expect dark stuff.

Is that blog (and by extension this thread) getting too weird for the forum?  I mean, when the guy's reminding everybody about Winter Field Day and suggesting that people get out in the great outdoors and operate, that's pretty positive.  Then he goes off into Secret Squirrel Land with OTP generators.

So... is the discussion of that blog getting too far afield here?  Mods?

In of themselves skills like OTP or lockpicking can be positive pursuits, but context is everything.

Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 01, 2018, 09:46:18 PM
In of themselves skills like OTP or lockpicking can be positive pursuits, but context is everything.
Yes, context seems to be the key.  Let's keep this thread rolling then.  Besides... it's fun to learn some of this stuff even if we never need it.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on May 02, 2018, 06:18:07 AM
Well that was grim.  Realistic though.  Of course, brushbeater's going to some dark places.  Go dark places, expect dark stuff.

Is that blog (and by extension this thread) getting too weird for the forum?  I mean, when the guy's reminding everybody about Winter Field Day and suggesting that people get out in the great outdoors and operate, that's pretty positive.  Then he goes off into Secret Squirrel Land with OTP generators.

So... is the discussion of that blog getting too far afield here?  Mods?

Even when digging in pay-dirt, a miner must still separate the dirt from the GOLD nuggets.


And as far as the code pad / secret squirrel stuff....I long ago learned that plain English with no 10 code.Q-codes,or techno babble was always most efficient at getting the message correctly to the recipient.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 11, 2018, 05:56:59 PM
The Pirate Radio (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/05/11/guest-post-the-pirate-radio-by-henry-bowman/)
A sort of down-and-dirty version of some things Steve Harris discussed on Jack's show a while back regarding little FM broadcast transmitters.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: NC Scout on May 14, 2018, 05:49:45 PM
Interesting thread. As the name would suggest, I'm NC Scout of the Brushbeater blog.

Looks like some good commentary (thanks)

*EDITED BY MOD*
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: NC Scout on May 14, 2018, 07:22:50 PM
Now that I'm here, if anyone wants a topic discussion or just bounce swap ideas, feel free. Solid feedback is always welcome. I only do what I do to help preppers, patriots and good folks out. I've got some upcoming posts that I think y'all will like. A fairly positive review of an inexpensive dual band mobile, some signals collection stuff, and a current buyer's guide (by reader request). Got some bugout/EDC survival things wrapping up also that I think y'all might find interesting.

There's a whole lot that can be done with a 4 watt Baofeng and a wire, and we're gonna talk about that too.  ;D
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 14, 2018, 08:20:18 PM
Welcome NC Scout. This is funny and awesome.

I feel like we've had a long time book club here. 
You'll find some critique and deep relections on topics.  But generally we wouldn't bother discussing if these subjects weren't important or interesting.

Thanks for making an appearance and I hope you stick around.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 15, 2018, 05:49:33 AM
Hello NC Scout and welcome.  We've learned a lot from reading and discussing your blog, and it's good to have you stop in.  Thanks for giving a few previews of upcoming posts, they all sound interesting.  I'm sure we'll have a lot more to discuss in the future. 
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 15, 2018, 06:14:19 AM
New as of yesterday:
Guerrilla Radio: Getting Your Local Station Running (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/05/14/guerrilla-radio-getting-your-local-station-running/)

Some interesting advice that I can get onboard with:

I can see where "never repeaters" applies to guerrilla comms.  For more general disasters, repeaters are OK and useful at the primary level.  Better have the alternate, contingency, and emergency plans lined up though if the repeater's power goes out.

In my relatively radio-impoverished region, it's hard enough to scrape up enough people on 2m & 440, let alone with the newest whiz-bang digital voice modes.  Simplicity rules if only by default.

It's a big step for a lot of people to put up an antenna in the yard (HOAs, spousal conflict, gray man considerations, etc.), but the payoff is enormous.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on May 15, 2018, 06:48:53 AM
NC SCOUT I enjoy your posts and often find nuggets of wisdom along with perspective on some things I had little prior thoughts on.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: NC Scout on May 15, 2018, 07:14:07 AM
New as of yesterday:
Guerrilla Radio: Getting Your Local Station Running (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/05/14/guerrilla-radio-getting-your-local-station-running/)

Some interesting advice that I can get onboard with:
  • a repeater should never be part of your communications plan
  • first time around, skip digital voice and stick to analog.  simpler & more reliable
  • think past handhelds, and toward mobile radios and base antennas
  • primer on coax and coax types
  • some useful discussion of line-of-sight and power considerations

I can see where "never repeaters" applies to guerrilla comms.  For more general disasters, repeaters are OK and useful at the primary level.  Better have the alternate, contingency, and emergency plans lined up though if the repeater's power goes out.

In my relatively radio-impoverished region, it's hard enough to scrape up enough people on 2m & 440, let alone with the newest whiz-bang digital voice modes.  Simplicity rules if only by default.

It's a big step for a lot of people to put up an antenna in the yard (HOAs, spousal conflict, gray man considerations, etc.), but the payoff is enormous.

I hear you, especially on LOS simplex. The downturn in the solar cycle has helped a bit.

The problems with repeaters, in general, are this:
1. There's a wide variety in build quality, location, power source, and coverage. So while the repeater everyone hangs out on is great for the morning commute, and might even have awesome coverage, using one for disaster preparedness is really a case by case basis. Simply relying on it because it's there and convenient might be an issue. That goes with what you said regarding power.
2. Everything might be great with the owner today, but next week he has a falling out with the club and yanks the cord. It happens.
3. Repeater traffic can get plugged up in an emergency. Even if there's a designated net control, things can get out of hand in a hurry.
4. Sometimes they just break. It happens far more often than not.

That said, there's nothing saying you can't build your own low powered repeater-especially a cross band type. Plans are pretty abundant out there to do it even on the cheap. Its not something I talk about much because I prefer mitigating the probability of interception when it comes to tactical use. But if you're living on a fairly large or rural homestead, it can be a good option. The rule of thumb is to listen for a while for traffic patterns to see what you can do and not bother anyone.

Talking about outdoor antennas, etc, there's nothing saying you can't paint up that J-pole and mount it in a tree.  You'd be shocked how easily they vanish.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: NC Scout on May 15, 2018, 07:15:37 AM
NC SCOUT I enjoy your posts and often find nuggets of wisdom along with perspective on some things I had little prior thoughts on.

Thanks man. I appreciate the compliments.  :)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 17, 2018, 07:42:55 PM
Fresh up today:
The Prepper's Signal Kit: Line of Sight Equipment Suggestions Based on Requests (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/05/17/the-preppers-signal-kit-line-of-sight-equipment-suggestions-based-on-requests/)

Kind of like the title says, gear recommendations for VHF/UHF radios.

Just to pick out one item among many for comment, I was a little curious about the recommendation for the Yaesu VX-6R for the HT over the "old reliable" FT-60R.  Looking up specs & features, with a lithium battery, tri-band (2m, 220, & 440, and with MARS mod, 6m) capability, and AM MW/SW receive, yeah, it's a better radio.  Time marches on.

Good all-round read even if you've been radio for a while.  It's especially good if you just got your Tech license and are looking around at gear.  It is a gear post, and while skills are in general more important, it's still good to look around at gear occasionally.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 18, 2018, 09:34:52 AM
Fresh up today:
The Prepper's Signal Kit: Line of Sight Equipment Suggestions Based on Requests (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/05/17/the-preppers-signal-kit-line-of-sight-equipment-suggestions-based-on-requests/)

Kind of like the title says, gear recommendations for VHF/UHF radios.

Just to pick out one item among many for comment, I was a little curious about the recommendation for the Yaesu VX-6R for the HT over the "old reliable" FT-60R.  Looking up specs & features, with a lithium battery, tri-band (2m, 220, & 440, and with MARS mod, 6m) capability, and AM MW/SW receive, yeah, it's a better radio.  Time marches on.

Good all-round read even if you've been radio for a while.  It's especially good if you just got your Tech license and are looking around at gear.  It is a gear post, and while skills are in general more important, it's still good to look around at gear occasionally.

I really enjoyed this one.  I think more discussion about alternative vhf/uhf bands would be interesting.

Tomorrow I'm volunteerin at a municipal 5k fun run event.  As I'm one of the younger and more fit in the ARES team (terrifying to consider both), I'm at he far end of the course.  I know from past experience I cannot hit our reprates due to the local topography.  So we use the repeater output on simplex and relay as needed across check points.  Crude, but almost idiot proof.

Last time I worked this event I got to practice my first aid.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 18, 2018, 05:00:27 PM
As I'm one of the younger and more fit in the ARES team (terrifying to consider both),
Even more terrifying is that I can say the same, and I probably have 10 years on you!

Quote
Crude, but almost idiot proof.
Exactly as it should be.

Quote
Last time I worked this event I got to practice my first aid.
Bonus!

Good going and good luck on tomorrow, Smurf.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 18, 2018, 05:39:34 PM
Thanks.  I may post an after action report if anything of interest happens.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: NC Scout on May 19, 2018, 09:13:46 AM
Fresh up today:
The Prepper's Signal Kit: Line of Sight Equipment Suggestions Based on Requests (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/05/17/the-preppers-signal-kit-line-of-sight-equipment-suggestions-based-on-requests/)

Kind of like the title says, gear recommendations for VHF/UHF radios.

Just to pick out one item among many for comment, I was a little curious about the recommendation for the Yaesu VX-6R for the HT over the "old reliable" FT-60R.  Looking up specs & features, with a lithium battery, tri-band (2m, 220, & 440, and with MARS mod, 6m) capability, and AM MW/SW receive, yeah, it's a better radio.  Time marches on.

Good all-round read even if you've been radio for a while.  It's especially good if you just got your Tech license and are looking around at gear.  It is a gear post, and while skills are in general more important, it's still good to look around at gear occasionally.

This one was an answer (actually three answers) to several emails I've had. Much of my own focus is on getting the new folks on the air or more capable than they are currently, and they keep asking about gear. My opinion, and something I state in class, is that no matter what you have, one 2m radio is pretty much the same as any other while transmitting. The real difference comes down to build quality and versatility. I mean an FT-270 or IC-80 are absolute tanks, but are limited in being one band only. Yaesu's VX series are built very rugged and are DC to daylight, so I tend to favor them. That's not to say other options are no good, because that's definitely not the case.

I didn't mention the old standby, the FT-60, because one of the questions I had was regarding current production gear. From my source at Yaesu, the last of the FT-60s are on the shelf now. The FT-65 is phasing it out, much like the FT-891 will eventually for the 857. It's unfortunate, because a local friend here has one and it's been nothing but problems. Motorola owns a large chunk of Vertex now (which is the parent company of Yaesu) and amateur radio takes a backseat to public service equipment.

For the moment they have no plan to discontinue the VX-6R, so I mentioned it for a couple of reasons- the stated versatility and durability (it's mil-spec rated for IP and shock resistance) but what I didn't say is that aftermarket batteries- the FNB-80 -have been around a LONG time and can be found very cheap. They work for the VX-5, 6 & 7, so you can stock up inexpensively and each of those radios can be run via a SLA battery the same way you can with a Baofeng UV-5R's extended battery.  Believe it or not they all use the same plug as the Yaesu  817- so if you've got a power cable rigged for one you can run them all off-grid. That's another idea if you're building a solar power QRP repeater...but that's a whole other topic entirely.

The VX series also have great receivers for their size. A lot of handhelds, even dedicated communications receivers, have marginal performance on the lower end of the spectrum, but each of the VX models do pretty well, even receiving WWCR and Radio Havana with the stock duck. With the addition of a loop you can do some nice RDF stuff if you're into foxhunting. They are somewhat complicated to use though, especially if you're coming from the relatively straightforward Baofeng menu system.

Based on y'alls needs for Ares, doing simplex on the output frequency is a quick solution. The only thing I'd worry about is if you get some jackwaggon wanting to QSO on the repeater in the middle of your transmission. It may or may not be an issue, that's a local thing, just know it *could* happen. What you might want to do instead as a group is build antennas you can string in a tree at your positions.

https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2015/10/15/the-jungle-antenna/

Build it for the input frequency and it should have no problems hitting the repeater. Even if you just build a dipole and suspend it vertically, you're averaging 2.15dB of gain which is a huge advantage over the stock duck on that HT. Some folks like roll up J-poles for the same purpose, but you can build your own for much cheaper than what they sell for and learn quite a bit in the process.

Anyway, running long here but I hope the ARES event goes well. God bless.  :)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: SCWolverine on May 19, 2018, 11:36:43 AM
So for the folks that buy a case of Baofengs on Alibaba and then never take them out of the box, you’re doing yourself a disservice.

the absolute 1 thing that isn't said enough!

Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on May 19, 2018, 11:57:56 AM
  SKILL must be kept in an ever expanding box.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 20, 2018, 02:26:59 PM
Thanks.  I may post an after action report if anything of interest happens.
How'd it go?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 20, 2018, 10:02:29 PM
How'd it go?

Pretty uneventful.  This time I brought my FT60 with a high(er) gain whip antenna.  I was prepared with a roll up j-pole I might throw into a tree.  But as it turned out all of us could hit the repeater.  I'm not sure if the FT60 or the whip I used was just a bit better radio than the baofeng uv5r I used last time.

Also, the weather was fair, and no injuries or other incidents.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 21, 2018, 05:01:01 AM
I'm gonna go with the "a bit better radio."  Not only does this jibe with my 60-vs-Baofeng experiences, it makes me feel better about spending 5x as much for an FT-60 that I hardly ever use, while wishing I had a VX-6R.  ;D

Also, the weather was fair, and no injuries or other incidents.
That's a good day in the outdoors.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on May 21, 2018, 09:11:50 AM
I'm gonna go with the "a bit better radio."  Not only does this jibe with my 60-vs-Baofeng experiences, it makes me feel better about spending 5x as much for an FT-60 that I hardly ever use, while wishing I had a VX-6R.  ;D
That's a good day in the outdoors.

Here's some photos from my checkpoint.  We do have decent scenery up here (my biased opinion)
https://imgur.com/gallery/wvcvl5d
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 21, 2018, 04:57:19 PM
A day well spent, playing radio and standing by to help people.  Nice scenery.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on May 31, 2018, 06:13:23 PM
New post up:
Additions to the Library (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/05/31/additions-to-the-library/)
All interesting stuff, most of which has been floating around these parts for years (thanks Carl!).  Wouldn't do any harm to review though, since it's out here in front now.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on June 01, 2018, 09:59:07 AM
  My files are now available for anyone who wants to download some items of interest...this is a small part of my ARCHIVE of thousands of magazins and publications that hits the highlights of Prepper materials.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5ZIZLZV4AwIMFlYMTI5OTNlUTA
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 06, 2018, 05:57:06 PM

Why the RTO Course Exists and A Course Review From The Volunteer State (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/06/05/why-the-rto-course-exists-and-a-course-review-from-the-volunteer-state/)

Even if you never contemplate taking ncscout's class, it's a worthwhile read that clearly distinguishes tactical (or more to the point here, survival) comms from hobby ham operation.  It's also a call to action, to get your skills down while the gettin's still good.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: SCWolverine on June 07, 2018, 05:24:45 AM
I like patches  ;)
(https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0010/3841/7986/products/resistor-v3-coyote_1024x1024@2x.jpg?v=1520801266)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on June 07, 2018, 05:58:12 AM
Does this translate to DEAD RESISTANCE ?? 8)
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on June 07, 2018, 06:07:00 AM
Does this translate to DEAD RESISTANCE ?? 8)
I had to toss out a pair of dead shorts yesterday.  They didn't resist.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Greekman on July 02, 2018, 02:02:55 AM
guys i need some help with this.

(https://brushbeater.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/longwire.gif?w=504&zoom=2)
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/06/22/an-improvised-directional-wire-antenna/

- Theory is that antennas radiate at 90degrees to their length. So what makes this antenna radiate along its axis?
the short donwslopping part of it?

-What is the theory behind the ground line connected to the antenna by the resistor?

Also... i cannot understand the terms cold and hot, I think he emans the driven and ground elements. Correct?
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: armymars on July 02, 2018, 09:25:11 AM
  It's sort of a terminated End Fed. This keeps the SWR low on all frequencies. The pattern will change with the frequency beaning used. Lower frequencies will be more broad ban then higher ones.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on July 02, 2018, 05:14:06 PM
The radio and technology came from the 1950's when often 50 MHZ and upper HF frequencies were common for military use...it is a loop antenna with a resistor to limit SWR loading to about 10 to one though radios did not have a specified 50 ohm output at the time as all radios had built in matching units (antenna tuners) as part of the power output circuits...yes a terminated loop is probably one correct ,and descriptive name,for this . A variant that has better directivity was the "V" BEAM where a dipole ,of sorts, formed a 30 to 45 degree "V" towards the intended target and each wire terminated to a resister to a ground stake. We have better ways of doing this now as the radio requires a 50 ohm or so output to remain stable and BALUNS have improved technology for impedance matching.

  I look to the past for antenna ideas and adapt them to current technology and radio needs. The loop that lays on the ground in the illustration causes almost HALF of the radio's power to simply be wasted in the soil...I would keep the entire loop at least 3 feet above soil and feed through a 4 to one balun with a 200 to 300 ohm NON-INDUCTIVE RESISTOR as a test of such a configuration and try to make it so the two vertical 'legs' were 1/4 wavelength on my primary or target frequency and the two horizontal segments should be about .45 (just under 1/2 wave) so the loop actually acts as two,slightly out of phase,1/4 wave verticals and have somewhat better gain with the lower noise reception of a partially closed loop.  I have done this as a horizontal configuration in years past

PS the NON-INDUCTIVE resistor needs to be capable of radios output power..
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Greekman on July 02, 2018, 11:43:55 PM
thanks... now that I know the term for it, i can have a further look when I find the time.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on July 03, 2018, 05:52:47 AM
thanks... now that I know the term for it, i can have a further look when I find the time.

At risk of opening a real big can of worms....here is a link to a few of my antenna articles and manuals,download all you wish:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5ZIZLZV4AwIdGhhUHpQejgxbHc
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: armymars on July 03, 2018, 09:21:30 AM
  Your right Carl, it's more a loop then a end fed with counter poise. B&W has something like it.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Greekman on July 04, 2018, 12:05:00 AM
At risk of opening a real big can of worms....here is a link to a few of my antenna articles and manuals,download all you wish:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5ZIZLZV4AwIdGhhUHpQejgxbHc

i will be startign with the ARR: Antenan book, the lopp antennas chapter
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Carl on July 04, 2018, 12:22:48 AM
  GREAT...and don't overlook any 'old' antenna books you may come across as many antennas I find effective were in use in the 1930's and are easily adapted to matching the current radio output impedence with simple components or use of an antenna tuner.

ABOUT ME  and antennas: I used to use only HF antennas that were matched for SWR and often spent DAY'S of my radio time getting things just right....though they were only right at one frequency and this was wrong as all my trimming efforts only introduced LOSS into the antenna system and made the SWR meter happy but caused losses to my over-all system. NOW ,I use an antenna tuner and the tuner can adapt the radio and antenna system to different ground moisture and also the antennas are predictable as to direction and gain as the length equations have always got this correct...I don't use antenna analyzers or SWR METERS as more than IDIOT lamp indicators of problems. I build an antenna as it is designed by myself or previous users and let my auto-antenna tuner adjust things to keep the radio safe and happy. I spend more time OPERATING MY RADIO rather than working on antennas and wasting time adjusting a unicorn SWR number .
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Smurf Hunter on July 06, 2018, 08:15:12 AM
Old antenna books are great.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on July 09, 2018, 07:23:28 PM

Another One for Your Library (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/07/09/another-one-for-your-library/): 1986 Radio Wave Propagation and Antennas manual & a mention of an upcoming course.

You already post this one to your google drive, Carl?  I think you did, but am too lazy to go dig through the downloads just now this evening.  Anyway, good useful stuff.
Title: Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
Post by: Alan Georges on July 24, 2018, 06:32:20 PM

Fresh up today: Developing and Exploiting Open Source Signals Intelligence (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/07/24/developing-and-exploiting-open-source-signals-intelligence/)
Note taking, communications mapping, observing others' gear... there's a lot there.

Also from a week or so ago: SIGINT Freeware (https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2018/07/18/sigint-freeware/)
Not sure I'm ready to download compiled freeware named SORCERER onto my laptop at the moment, but it's still an interesting read.