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Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Outdoors Activities => Hunting => Topic started by: ModernSurvival on September 20, 2008, 10:53:14 AM

Title: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: ModernSurvival on September 20, 2008, 10:53:14 AM
I have mentioned squirrel stew on the show a few times and have been asked in more then one email how to make it.  This is my own way to make squirrel stew and was an adaptation from my grandmaw's regular stew.  I did my best from memory and with some adaptation I came out with a heck of a good stew.
 
She died when I was 9 and I did not start hunting till 13, there were squirrels everywhere and we had tons in the freezer.  Mostly we roasted them in browing bags and that was good but I always wanted stew, none of the adults cared to bother so I just got out the stuff and this is what I came up with.  You can also do this with rabbit or hybrid your stew with half of each. 
 
Note you are not gonna see a lot of cups or this or teaspoons of that like most male self taught game cooks I just cook by eye and taste.
 
First I really recommend soaking your squirrels in salt water over night.  It helps tenderize them and if you used a shot gun really takes away the blood shot too.
 
Next I can't be bothered to bone squirrel meat.  What I do is quarter them, when stewed long the meat practically falls of the bone anyway.  I "quarter them"  cut off the front legs and shoulders as units, then the same with the back legs and then cut the back bone just behind the ribs.  You could do away with the ribs but I leave them on for flavor if nothing else.
 
I then roll the pieces in flour.  I use about 8 squirrels per pot but if I am making stew I am making a BIG pot.  4 would make a more typical pot of stew for many folks.
 
Then take your stew pot and add some oil, a chopped onion, some chopped garlic and 6-8 strips of bacon cut in large pieces.  (the bacon was my addition to add "fat" we used pork in deer sausage so this seemed to make sense).
 
Saute down the onions and garlic a bit then add the squirrel and brown it well.  Once that is done add about half water and half beef stock or broth to the pot and begin to simmer the squirrel.  I add a bottle of beer now too.  Add your seasonings here I use some organo, black pepper, salt and two bay leaves.  You can use what you like and expirment.  Simmer this way for about say 1.5-2 hours depending on how old the squirrels are. Old ones can be really tough.  By simmer I mean keep a lid on with some space to let off some steam and use just enough heat that you barely get some boil.  Keep an eye on things add water if you need to and don't let it burn.
 
Now add carrots and celery, I like big pieces about large enough to fill a spoon.  Simmer about an hour more.  Then add cubed potatoes about the same size as the carrots and celery and simmer about 30-45 minutes more.  Again add water if you get low. 
 
Now at the end mix up some flour and water in a glass, mix it real good so you don't have any lumps and then stir it into your stew to thicken it. 
 
I don't have any measurements again I just do it all to eye and to taste but heck if I could do it back at 13 anyone can.  I have had a ton of compliments on my stews (squirrel, beef, lamb or other wise) and this is basically what I do for all of them.
 
I have done some substitues that are really nice too.  Like I roast my deer bones in water to make stock and use that instead of beef stock, much richer and nicer.  I also have made this stew with deer meat and it is amazing though you can add your carrots and celery right away and don't have to cook the meat as long.
 
Hope you like it,
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: BigDanInTX on September 20, 2008, 03:44:00 PM
How does roadkill taste?  Is it extra tender?  =-P
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: SwampMonster on September 21, 2008, 08:39:05 PM
Tell you what, will make it better, a good Roux, the trinity, and rice. I have been working on a batch of Pheasant and deer gumbo. so far im 5 hours into it and its still not quite right.

Swamp
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: BigDanInTX on September 23, 2008, 05:49:58 AM
Mmmm...   Squirrel Étouffée...  Squirrel Gumbo...  Squirrel Jumbalaya...  (*drools*)
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: DeltaEchoVictor on September 23, 2008, 02:59:54 PM
How does roadkill taste?  Is it extra tender?  =-P

Ha, you laugh but I know people who don't discount fresh roadkill.  Yes, they're hillbillies & so am I, but if it's fresh what's the diff? I have never tried it yet but you never know...

Sorry for the derail, back on topic.

Sounds like a great recipe.  I mostly eat tree rats chicken fried, make some gravy with the drippings & serve with biscuits.  Hillbilly heaven ;D Srsly!

Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: ModernSurvival on September 23, 2008, 03:13:13 PM
I have never passed a deer killed on the highway that looked intact without checking to see if it could be salvaged.  Most times they are old and bloated but if fresh the go in the back of the truck.  Now I just don't see though how a squirrel or any small critter that got the splat could be very useful though.  I know people do it but then people eat head cheese, scrapple and tripe too. (gross)
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Joe on October 01, 2008, 07:50:56 PM
I think it should be noted that in a tough situation, roadkill could be a real Godsend.  I mean, no trouble hunting, no report from a gun, no cost, and no storage.  You just whip out the KABAR and cut off a chunk.  The family eats tonight!

Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: ColdHaven on October 01, 2008, 08:43:37 PM
This is interesting. Thanks for the info! Now I just need to learn how to clean animals after killing them. No one ever taught me. I have seen instruction manuals, but I tend to learn by doing.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: BigDanInTX on October 02, 2008, 08:24:13 AM
ColdHaven, I bet you could find an instructional video on YouTube.  I found a great series about rabbit snaring/cleaning.  =-]
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: BoatDriver on October 14, 2008, 12:38:05 AM
When it comes to skinning game there is none easier than a rabbit.  In fact it is the animal that most all of us that hunt first learned to clean.  Ask around around and see if you can go on a rabbit hunt or just watch someone clean a rabbit.  If not find a local rabbit farm that sells to the public and ask them to show you how.  Then take the rabbit home and cook it.  Rabbit is wonderful meat that does not have a strong taste and can be prepared in as many ways as chicken.  One of my favorite meals is still rabbit slow cooked with onions, bell pepper, celery and garlic served in a gravy over rice.  Squirrel has a simular taste, they may require a longer cook time however since they can be a little tough.  Roughly the same cleaning technique that is used on the rabbit will work on squirrel.  The younger they are the easier they are to clean.  Racoon, once you are taught how to clean them, taste very good as well.  Racoons have scent glands that must be removed before cooking to keep them from tasting strong.  The great thing about Rabbit, Squirrel and Racoons is that they are everywhere, they are easy to clean, they repopulate rapidly and they are legal to shoot in most states for a very long season.  They can also be harvest with the most basic of firearms, a .22 rimfire or shotgun is all that is needed to legally harvest them.  Brand new reliable shotguns and .22 rifles can be had for under $100.  If you were to look around in newpapers, garage sales etc., you could find a .22 rifle and a shotgun for under $100 for both.  Just make sure that if you don't know guns that someone that does checks out the weapon for safe function and also that you get trained on its safe and effective use.  Anyone that has any survival plans at all should at a minimum own a .22 rifle and a shotgun.  The bullets and the shells are relativley inexpensive and when stored in a cool dry place will last for decades.  I have a lot of guns, but when I hunt small game I don't even use my big 12 guage pump or autoloader anymore.  I use my 20 guage single shot shotgun, a gun I paid $50 for used but was brand new.  The gun is so simple that I could teach almost anyone to safely and effectively use one in 5 minutes.  When I'm not using a shotgun for small game I carry my Ruger 10/22 rifle.  It is probably the best made .22 for it's price that you can find.  When I practice shooting I don't launch 100 rounds of .300 Win Mag in a days time.  I probably couldn't move my shoulder for a week after that and it would cost at least $100 to do so.  I use my .22 to practice good shooting technique and I just verify function and scope settings with my large rifles using just a few rounds.  I can fire 100 rounds of .22 for about $2.  The economics and torture on the body from recoil just makes too much sense.

The recipe posted by ModernSurvival is making me hungry.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: ColdHaven on October 14, 2008, 07:47:53 AM
Thanks for the info. I will look up on youtube to see if there are any videos that could help. Its the kind of thing you wished your father had taught you, but he never did. I remember going on one hunt when I was younger than 10, but they only gave me a BB gun.  :-\ I don't remember how they cleaned them. I read some instructions on cleaning squirrels, and it seemed rather easy. I want to learn on smaller game first. No sense in wasting a deer. I am sure I could shoot and kill one, but what then?   :o I might ask around to see if anyone I know hunts. It is getting to be hunting season soon around here.

I will definitely use Jack's recipe when I finally learn how to clean them properly. Thanks again!
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: ModernSurvival on October 14, 2008, 08:38:24 AM
There are three may ways people skin squirrels.

1.  Make a cut across the back and just cut the skin from the meat with a sharp knife.  Once you work enough of it off you can just stand on the tail and pull the back side out then cut the tail (inside the skin), then stand on the head and do the reverse, you cut through the neck inside the skin as well.  This is the fastest way and if you head shoot with a 22 etc the way to go.

The problem is many times with a shot gun enough damage is done that the guts open up or you pull the critter in two with that technique, which sucks.  So you use the other two ways.

2.  Make a noose and hang the animal by its head and neck, cut around the neck and start working it down just like a mini deer.

3.  With two nooses hang by the back feet, cut around the ankles and down the legs and again just like a mini deer.

Stick to sniping with a 22 and method number one is much easier and much faster and will get a LOT less hair on the meat. 

Here is a video using sort of method one above  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjSKmDCy-8U but it will show the problems when a round opens up the belly. (warning quite graphic)

Here is another method I will try on the next peach thief that bites it in my back yard.  He just doesn't show the last part (the back legs) but it should be easy.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66AVwthXgMA

The thing about skinning a squirrel is everyone does it they way they were taught and there are many ways.



Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Beetle on October 14, 2008, 09:33:40 AM
I have never passed a deer killed on the highway that looked intact without checking to see if it could be salvaged.  Most times they are old and bloated but if fresh the go in the back of the truck.  Now I just don't see though how a squirrel or any small critter that got the splat could be very useful though.  I know people do it but then people eat head cheese, scrapple and tripe too. (gross)

Don't forget Haggis...
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: ColdHaven on October 14, 2008, 01:06:01 PM
Thanks for the links and the info. Any further questions I have I will ask in thread about hunting/cleaning/ect. Thank you!
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: RipTombstone on October 16, 2008, 10:05:06 PM
To skin a rabbit, I have found that if you just grab the skin on the back, and pull it in two directions, it will just peel off, no knives needed. Then slice into the abdomen, to get to the innards. Grab the back legs (could be front, it usually takes me a few rabbits to remember) and give a quick throw, holding onto the legs. The innards will mostly come out via inertia and gravity. Then you just have to do some finish work.
I usually can gut and skin them right after they are shot, and it only takes about a minute. Take a bag to put them in to keep them clean.
Rip
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Joe on October 16, 2008, 10:30:01 PM
Definately an interesting method RIP.  I can't wait to try it out.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: archer on October 17, 2008, 09:55:41 AM
I've watched videos of how to skin, but am looking for somewhere to get hands on experience. I saw a post on Craigslist selling rabbit meat so I will be contacting them and see if I can watch/learn from them. Thanks for the links Jack!
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: wcff3431 on October 17, 2008, 05:31:29 PM
squirrel oh boy oh boy wheres it at i want a bowl oh by the way do you have any rabbit gravy.
oh yeah by that way fresh road kill is great fresh RK deer i will not pass it up.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Beetle on October 19, 2008, 10:37:11 AM
I throw the meat after you skin them in a ziploc bag with water and salt in it, helps draw the blood out.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: kaiservontexas on October 19, 2008, 11:58:42 AM
I throw the meat after you skin them in a ziploc bag with water and salt in it, helps draw the blood out.

Any particular type of salt? What is the mixture? I like the sound of this idea.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Beetle on October 19, 2008, 09:04:19 PM
We would sit around the fire at Elk camp cleaning Rabbits shot around camp (usually more Rabbits taken than Elk lol). We cleaned them almost exactly in the manner Riptombstone describes, they peel apart like artichoke's. Then we cut them up, place them in a gallon size zip lock bag half full of water and a couple spoonfuls of salt. We then let them sit overnight in the cooler soaking in the brine, the next day just BBQ them up. We didn't have any special salt just the iodized used to season food. Works good. Jack eluded to the salt trick in his post above, maybe he has something to add. Never did eat squirrels just plinked them, but I'm sure it's the same concept.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: DeltaEchoVictor on October 19, 2008, 09:12:28 PM
I throw the meat after you skin them in a ziploc bag with water and salt in it, helps draw the blood out.

Any particular type of salt? What is the mixture? I like the sound of this idea.

Pretty much just like Bailey said.  Doesn't really have to be a certain amount of salt because you're going to wash them off again really well anyway before cooking them.  Squirrel is done the same way, cut 'em up, soak 'em & cook 'em.  I like to soak all my small game over night, but that's really a personal choice I think.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Joe on October 22, 2008, 04:37:02 PM
I really like this idea of kind of hunting for small game to eat while out on larger hunting expeditions. 
It reminds me to brush up on my wild herbs.  Maybe a person could gather some herbs and throw them in with the rabbit/squirrel/brine solution.  Might reall help the taste as well.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Beetle on October 22, 2008, 09:00:56 PM
That's a great idea Joe along with some mushrooms...
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Joe on October 22, 2008, 09:04:30 PM
Herbs, dude, not "herb".

 ;D
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Earth Monk on November 19, 2008, 01:33:37 PM
I have never passed a deer killed on the highway that looked intact without checking to see if it could be salvaged.  Most times they are old and bloated but if fresh the go in the back of the truck.  Now I just don't see though how a squirrel or any small critter that got the splat could be very useful though.  I know people do it but then people eat head cheese, scrapple and tripe too. (gross)

Don't forget Haggis...
Haggis is great when done right and its fresh! I had some in Scotland a few months back, oh and some black puddin' which is like a bloodclot sausage. Delicious! Its really not so bad if you think about it, i mean, really think about it...Its mind over matter. That is, if you don't mind...it don't matter!
Bon Apetit!
-Ras
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Debo on January 04, 2009, 06:34:07 AM
Quote
How does roadkill taste?

Like food.  Especially when you are really, really hungry.  One of the best meals I ever had at the time.  This isn't the thread for it but maybe I should post a recipe for un-fresh roadkill.  So you can do it right.  Don't want to stray from yummy squirrels subject here though. 


I grew up hunting squirrels with my grandfather in East Texas. Crockett to be specific.  We generally wrapped them in foil and cooked with lemon butter on the grill in their own juices.  Grandma would make squirrel dumplings too.  The 12 acre strip of hardwoods is still there today, spared as a "streamside management zone" on what is now my parents' tree farm.  I get to teach my twin sons to hunt there in the same place that I learned.


D.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: CFG on February 04, 2009, 01:32:40 PM
What's the news on fox squirrels now?  We don't even have grey squirrels where I live and I won't shoot the red ones b/c I heard they were endangered at one time and they are still relatively rare in AL.  But they are large and slow by comparison. 
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: ModernSurvival on February 04, 2009, 01:38:24 PM
Fox squirrels are wonderful for eating.  Reds ain't in danger of anything!  The only downside is they are quite small.  I don't think anyone could tell the difference in the taste of any of the three.  We have mostly foxes around my house in DFW and almost 100% grays and reds up in Arkansas.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Roswell on February 04, 2009, 09:08:12 PM
any other tips on hunting squirrels?  that recipe looks tasty
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: ModernSurvival on February 05, 2009, 06:15:12 AM
A shot gun or a 22 and simply sit in places where squirrels are.  Still hunting is good to but start out with some sitting.  They move mostly a few hours after sun up and a few hours before sundown.  One of the easiest animals to hunt honestly, just get out and do it and you start to figure things out. 

One more if a squirrel is up a tree hiding on you and you can't get a shot, toss your hat on the other side of the tree and be ready for a quick shot.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Roswell on February 05, 2009, 01:59:49 PM
A shot gun or a 22 and simply sit in places where squirrels are.  Still hunting is good to but start out with some sitting.  They move mostly a few hours after sun up and a few hours before sundown.  One of the easiest animals to hunt honestly, just get out and do it and you start to figure things out. 

One more if a squirrel is up a tree hiding on you and you can't get a shot, toss your hat on the other side of the tree and be ready for a quick shot.

Thanks!  I could see how that could work with the hat.
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: CFG on February 11, 2009, 10:14:29 PM
Thanks for clarification b/t fox and red.  Our fox squirrels here are red, I checked and they can be black or golden as well, it appears.

Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: DeltaEchoVictor on February 14, 2009, 07:50:37 PM
any other tips on hunting squirrels?  that recipe looks tasty

Here's what I've learned about squirrels & squirrel hunting.  I've been hunting squirrels longer than I've been hunting anything else, it's the first thing I ever hunted with my Dad.

1.  You'll see more squirrels while deer hunting than just about anything else.  You'll see more squirrels because you'll be carrying a large caliber rifle (usually) or a slug gun.  Both of which turn squirrels into gooey mush, thus you'll be less likely to shoot them....bastards, they just know when they're safe.

2.  Squirrels sound like monsters when you're a little kid & your Dad leaves you sitting against a tree & wanders off into the dark woods to find his own tree to lean against.  (Turkeys, deer, chipmunks, birds & just about everything else also sounds like monsters when you're a kid.)

3.  When you miss a squirrel that should have been an easy, close shot, even the squirrel thinks you're a poor shot.  Seriously, look at the look on his face the next time you miss one, you'll recognize it.  It's the same one your wife/girlfriend gives you when you do something stupid.

4.  Squirrels are loud when down on the ground scavenging (see #2).  One squirrel sounds like a dozen, a dozen squirrels sound like bigfoot...especially if their frolicking about happily just before the evil hunter opens fire on them.  Not that I've ever done that mind you....

5.  A Marlin .30-30 really will turn a squirrel into goo...bastard, that'll teach 'em.  (or so I've been told)

6.  Red Ozark squirrels are larger, dumber & slower moving than the ghosty little gray bastards that are only seen out of the corner of your eye.  Therefore, the Reds are more filling than the grays.

7.  Gray squirrels will run up the tree on your side, then just as you're about to shoot them they'll run around the trunk & ridicule you from the other side, for not being a quick enough shot.  Bastards...

8.  If you shoot at a gray squirrel with all 27 of your newly built wooden arrows, he'll dutifully wait for you to collect the 15 you can find before starting the whole cycle over again.  The sequence goes something like this...chase, shoot, get ridiculed from the back side of the tree...repeat until out of arrows...Find arrows & repeat until completely out of arrows....again.

7.  When you finally do shoot a gray squirrel you'll holler triumphantly, pretty much scaring everything in the woods into hiding.

Now for the serious stuff.

If it's your first time hunting squirrels take a shotgun if you have one.  It shortens the learning curve & it allows you to shoot into the thick tree tops to kill the squirrel where it likes to hide. 

The best time to hunt them is usually early in the morning.  Be in the woods at your spot before daylight.  You'll start hearing them on the ground about the time the sun starts coming up.  They really do sound like monsters when they're digging thru the leaves looking for nuts. 

If they're on the ground & not preoccupied looking for food, they'll be traveling quickly.  They typically like to travel along deadfall & don't spend a lot of time on the ground when not scavenging.  Use your peripheral vision as well as your primary vision, don't spend too much time looking in one place unless you know there is a squirrel where you're looking.

If you saw a squirrel head up a tree & you didn't see him leave the tree, but you can't see him, he's still in that tree, he's just a lot more patient than you are & better camouflaged too.  Be patient, get comfortable & be ready to shoot the second you see him again.

Animals don't stomp thru the woods, humans do.  Slow down, reset your human clock to "woods" time.  If you want to move thru the woods, do it like an animal would.  Take a couple of steps & stop, listen & look for a while.  Take a few steps & stop, listen & look for a while.  Take a step or two & stop, listen & look for a while.  Be soft, silent (as possible) & careful when walking thru the woods.  You're in the woods, enjoy it.  There's no need to hurry thru them, you'll miss a lot if you do.  Animals spend more time looking & listening than they do traveling, you should do the same.

Gray squirrels like thick stands of timber, especially where there are lots of nut trees.  Look for nut cuttings at the base of trees, these are nuts that look as if they've been chewed or half eaten by something.  You can also hear squirrels when they're cutting the nuts up in a tree.  It sounds somewhat like something hard being chewed or scraped.  It's hard to describe but easy to recognize if you hear it. 

Gray squirrels like to use hollowed trees for dens, these are great to hunt around.  Keep an eye out for old trees that may have trunk damage, been lightening struck or otherwise have structure damage to them that would allow critters to build dens in them.  Tree hollows are the "penthouse suites" of the critter kindgom.  That's about as good as it gets for a critter to build a den in.  Less desirable are the clumps of leaves & twigs often seen in tree tops and referred to as squirrels nests.  They probably are nests but odds are they won't be inhabited because these nests aren't permanent structures.  Never shoot blindly into these nests, it's unethical & if you do hit something, you may not kill it.  You won't be able to retrieve it either, shooting something & not retrieving it is about the worst thing a hunter can do.

Watch the tree tops.  Sit quietly, move very little & be patient while perusing the tops of trees & you'll see lots of life.

It's much easier to see squirrels after the leaves come down.  I love to hunt anytime, but when the leaves come down I usually hunt harder because the odds have increased in my favor.  Gray squirrels hide easily among the leaves.

Red (Fox) squirrels are found mainly in areas with sparse tree populations...I don't know why.  That's what they prefer I assume.  They can often be found in tree lined fence rows, areas without a lot of secondary growth where the tree population consists of large well spaced, older trees.  Our variety here in the Ozarks are typically much larger than our gray squirrels.  They're red, I mean really red colored here.  They aren't as ghosty as our grays & are slower to run away.  I've actually missed reds before & instead of them running away, they'll run toward me to see what all the commotion is about.  Red squirrel populations here are typically lower than the gray squirrel populations.  I probably see 6 or 8 grays to every red I see.

Squirrel hunting is a blast, especially while doing it with an old longbow.  If you've never been squirrel hunting before I urge you to give it a try.  Find someone near you that hunts & tell them you'd like to learn.  If you've got a good friend that hunts and you don't, ask them if you can go along.  It's a great way to burn a day with a friend.  Heck, if you're ever in S. Missouri give me a shout & I'll take you.
 
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: Roswell on February 16, 2009, 10:44:01 AM
Thanks so much for the advice DEV.  I am going to try my skills this weekend.  I have only gone dove and deer hunting. Both of which were a long tome ago.  So, I need all the help I can get.  Sadly, though I don't think Georgia has any red squirrels.  I found this link that has a map of their distribution in NA.  http://www.waza.org/virtualzoo/factsheet.php?id=110-002-036-002&view=Rodents%20and%20Hares (http://www.waza.org/virtualzoo/factsheet.php?id=110-002-036-002&view=Rodents%20and%20Hares) 
Title: Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
Post by: auroraesker on February 24, 2009, 06:20:59 AM
I've seen a bunch of recipes similar to this:  back in the Great depression it was called brunswick stew( sometimes the meat was rabbit, sometimes Partridge).  A terrific herb to add to it is sweet flag(Acorus canadensis).  The root has a sweet spicy flavor.