The Survival Podcast Forum

Finance and Economics => The Money Board => Topic started by: DarkEyes on September 21, 2008, 04:10:51 PM

Title: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: DarkEyes on September 21, 2008, 04:10:51 PM
In a survival situation, everybody has a list of things that they feel are necessities. What about the things that aren't really necessary that we take for granted everyday?  Does anybody have a "recipe" for shampoo or soap, or even something like fabric softener? 
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: DarkEyes on September 21, 2008, 04:18:03 PM
One of the things I have thought alot about lately is canning.  If you needed to can food and didn't have or couldn't get the seals to seal the jars you could use wax.  It will seal the jar and you can save it, melt it and reuse it.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: ModernSurvival on September 21, 2008, 04:29:58 PM
That will work my Grandmother used wax to seal jelly and jams.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: susan1957 on September 21, 2008, 06:34:34 PM
My sister and I have been cutting corners since fuel cost have gone so high.  We no longer purchase laundry detergent, instead we use this age old recipe.
I store it in a quart jar and you use only 1 or 2 tablespoons of detergent depending on how dirty the clothes are. 

1 bar of Fels Naptha soap (grated fine)
1/4 c Arm & Hammer washing soda
1/4 c 20 Mule Team Borax 
Mix & store.  1 quart of this cost us about 2.00 instead of costing 15.00.  This does about 50 loads depending on if you use 1 or 2 tablespoons.

It cleans very well. 
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: tinfoilhat on September 24, 2008, 12:44:56 AM
I've been making my own household cleaning products for a while now and can post some recipes later on when I can compile them.  Most of them involve basic ingredients like baking soda, vinegar, Borax, castile soap, and essential oils (tea tree, lemon oil, etc.).  Much healthier and cheaper to use than the expensive chemical-laden branded products from the store.  My mom has made me homemade beauty/personal care products with good success on several occasions, so I can try to hit her up for recipes as well.  She can make lotion, soap, nail cream, cuticle oil, and bath oil/salts that I can think of off the top of my head.

It's kind of funny seeing how the chemical companies have tried so hard for so long to get us to adopt their products by acting as if they are vastly superior to "basic" products like baking soda.  Yet now that we are in the midst of a "green revolution" you see companies touting the virtues of simple products like baking soda!  These things worked for our grandparents, I don't see why we should be led to believe they won't work for us, except the profits are not as fat from simple products. 

I figure the more we can return to natural, inexpensive, simple products now, the easier our transition will be when the other stuff isn't available for whatever reason in the future.  Even if we just don't have the money to spare for those things.  I'll try later on this week to get a list together of some recipes to use.  I'd be interested in knowing what other homemade products people have had good success with as well.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: susan1957 on September 24, 2008, 06:54:13 AM
Mineral Salt can be used for deodorant.  They now have large salt rocks you can purchase.  You wet them with water and apply under the arms.  No aluminum, no other chemicals, just the salt.  Now it's not a antiperspirant just deodorant.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Roknrandy on September 24, 2008, 07:43:30 AM
Mineral Salt can be used for deodorant.  They now have large salt rocks you can purchase.  You wet them with water and apply under the arms.  No aluminum, no other chemicals, just the salt.  Now it's not a antiperspirant just deodorant.

I use one of these Susan and they do work great. The minerals kill the bacteria that make your pits smell  ;D I have been using the same one for a year now and I've used only half a stick. They are more expensive then regular deodorant but it lasts much longer.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: derajer on September 24, 2008, 08:49:21 AM
One of the things I have thought alot about lately is canning.  If you needed to can food and didn't have or couldn't get the seals to seal the jars you could use wax.  It will seal the jar and you can save it, melt it and reuse it.

If I am to understand what you are saying, then wax is absoloutely not a substitude for the metal plates that you buy for canning. Canning requires that the food be boiled in the jar fully submerged then allowed to cool and create a vacuum seal. If this process does not take place, then it is not canning and the food in the jars will have a very short storage life. It could just be that I misunderstood what you said though...

As for soap, I have been working on this for a while without some limited success. To make soap from scratch you extract lye from the white ashes of hardwoods (softwoods contain too much resin) by one of several means (boil the ashes then skim the brown liquid OR strain water through the ashes and the resulting brown liquid is lye water). This lye water can be used as a cleaner like 409 or used to make soap, the lye water can be boiled down to increase its potency. The other half of the soap recipe is to mix this lye-water with clean fat while both substances are heated. This is the basics of soap, I won't go into precise how-to's in this thread.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: DarkEyes on September 24, 2008, 11:10:55 AM
On the canning, you boil the jars, put the hot food in them, leave about 1/4 of an inch of headway at the top, clean off any residue, melt the wax, pour about 1/8 th of an inch of wax on the top, wait for it to cool and then pour about 1/4 of an inch over that.  It seals.  When I was growing up, the lady next door to us did it with everything, we ate everything she cooked and never did get sick
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: derajer on September 24, 2008, 11:54:26 AM
I would be very hesitant about this method, and it certainly wouldn't work for pressure canning. I'm sure that it would work for acidic foods with a short storage time, but I don't know that I could trust my life (read botulism exposure) to this method.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: susan1957 on September 24, 2008, 06:30:41 PM
I think the safest measure for food preservation (if you have no jars, and there is no electricity) is to dehydrate or dry them.  You can use a water bath canner for acidic foods, then for those foods that are not you must use a pressure cooker canner.  Freezing is ok but there are problems when there is a loss of electricity. 
You can grow your own beans and dry them, there are seasonal foods, Root vegetables can be stored in a cool dark cellar.  Root cellars might be a great option for storage. 
Wax is only to be used on jams and jellies storage. 
Grow vegetables that can be stored through the winter.  My great grandfather used to wrap green tomatoes in newspaper, store them under his bed and they would turn red and he'd have tomatoes in December. These were tomatoes he picked at the end of the growing season.  Turnip greens you can pick the greens early but later in the fall there is turnips you can pull up to eat.  Rutabagers (waxed turnips) can be covered in paraffin then stored in a cool dark place most of the winter.  Hubbard squash, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, carrots, are all good to store during the winter for winter meals.

Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: DeltaEchoVictor on September 27, 2008, 01:37:40 AM
Nice topic DarkEyes.

I'm going to pin this one to the top.  Let's try & keep the responses to tried & true methods & we'll start a database of our own.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: spartan on September 29, 2008, 08:40:00 PM
On the canning, you boil the jars, put the hot food in them, leave about 1/4 of an inch of headway at the top, clean off any residue, melt the wax, pour about 1/8 th of an inch of wax on the top, wait for it to cool and then pour about 1/4 of an inch over that.  It seals.  When I was growing up, the lady next door to us did it with everything, we ate everything she cooked and never did get sick.

I have checked my references and cannot find this method for anything other than jellies.  PLEASE do not do this with your own foods.  Pickle, alcohol, or jelly: use one of these methods and not wax on hot pack or pressure canned foods.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: flagtag on September 30, 2008, 06:48:56 PM
Hair conditioner - mayonaise, or beer or egg whites
Baking soda - toothpaste
Body odor - shaving cream
Insect bites - salt or egg "skin" (the film on the outside of egg/inside shell)
Children's colds - Vicks on bottom of feet. (with socks, of course)

Also, keep used bar soap instead of throwing them away.  Double boiler - melt, cool, cut. (Add just a little water)
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Conductor71 on October 13, 2008, 05:24:51 AM
Years ago, my doctor explained women shouldn't use talcum powder because the dust can travel internally and cause major problems.  She suggested corn starch.  My husband and I have been using it for years.  it works great!  We just keep it in an old powder dispenser and refill it using a funnel when it runs low.  It's much cheaper than talc powder and isn't so hazardous to your health ;) 
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: susan1957 on October 16, 2008, 06:02:08 PM
Thanks for the tip on the soap.  I have millions of little pieces of soap due to 3 kids that break soap in half for some reason.  I will start melting it down and re shaping it this weekend.  I've been putting it in a jar and adding a little water to make liquid soap and putting it in dispensers for hand soap. 

If you have kids that wear black patient leather shoes...you can make them shine by rubbing them down with a biscuit. 


Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: ejsandstrom on October 21, 2008, 02:18:12 PM
Kind of related. Pepper poured in the radiator will stop leaks. I have done this with mixed results. I have also heard a raw eg dropped in the radiator will work too.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Larry on November 08, 2008, 06:52:09 AM
Hello, All -
I'm slow in posting, obviously.

Having just read the post en re: wax used in canning, I HAVE TO SAY THE FLAG WENT UP ON THIS ONE.  The only time we ever used wax in such a manner was when we made jellie.  Yes it tasted good, but jellie had no where near the amount of work or potential hazards as other foods. 

Probably just a happy memory on dark eye's part, but no, not part of the canning process.

I'm not any where close to an expert on canning, but I know that wax is not viable.

Regards,
Larry

DarkEyes
Survivor


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Posts: 147



    Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2008, 05:18:03 PM »   

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
One of the things I have thought alot about lately is canning.  If you needed to can food and didn't have or couldn't get the seals to seal the jars you could use wax.  It will seal the jar and you can save it, melt it and reuse it.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: susan1957 on November 10, 2008, 09:24:10 AM
A great alternative to Cascade or any dishwasher detergent and works great! 
1 cup borax
1 cup Washing soda
Mix and put into a covered container. 
I use 1 tablespoon for a load of dishes. 

A friend of mine also adds 1 cup of color bleach powder to the above recipe because she thinks it helps cut down on sharing germs.  I think it's not necessary
if dishes are washed in hot water but it don't hurt.   If you decide to use the bleach you still use 1 tablespoon per load.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: creuzerm on November 17, 2008, 01:02:14 AM
The wax canning is for jellys and jams. They have a very high amount of sugar. Sugar at that level retards spoilage.

If you notice, your jams and jellies will mold in the fridge before they spoil any other way. The wax prevents molding.

You can't feed honey to infants because it may have botulism spores in it that never 'hatch' due to the sugar content of the honey, and an infants digestive system is the perfect anaerobic environment for botulism.



Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Holzster on January 05, 2009, 06:04:34 AM
My wife & I make out own window cleaner

In a spray bottle, the 30-40 oz size,  (in this order so you do not get suds) fill it up 90% - 95% with water, add a cap full of ammonia, and 3 drops of liquid dish soap.  shake & you are done.

This is the same as the big guys make except they add blue coloring also.

And if you use old newspaper on the windows they look better than if you used paper towels.

Hope this helps

Holzster
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: djturnz on January 05, 2009, 07:30:20 AM
I was told by a guy with show cars that 1/2 vinigar and 1/2 water solution, applied with newspaper will make the glass look invisible.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: ebonearth on March 27, 2009, 09:57:02 PM
I was told by a guy with show cars that 1/2 vinigar and 1/2 water solution, applied with newspaper will make the glass look invisible.
It really does! I have used this for years. Although I have to say I got a little sick of the vinegar smell in the living room so I use biodegradable cleanser in there instead. If you want a laugh check out the organic glass and surface cleaner they sell at the big box hardware stores, it is that exact recipe except at $5 a liter.

I make my own toothpaste and dentifrice, body and foot powder, dry shampoo (for camping mostly) but have never attempted my own shampoo or body wash. I have made my own soap in the past but I am pretty sure I have forgotten the particulars.

Toothpaste Recipe:
3/4c Baking Soda
1/4c Non-Iodized Table Salt (I like to mill mine down a little to make smaller rock crystals but YMMV)
2.5tbsp Vegetable Glycerin (use 3 if needed, I like it a little gloppy)
10 drops Tea Tree EO
10 drops Thyme EO
20 drops Peppermint EO
Water as needed

Combine all dry ingredients in a glass bowl, combine all wet ingredients in a smaller bowl and slowly combine the wet into the dry, make sure the glycerin mixture is well incorporated before sprinkling water to moisten the batch into a paste. You can go through the trouble of refilling empty toothpaste tubes if you please but I just place it in a small glass jar with a secure lid right in the medicine cabinet. A batch will last you months and months since a little goes a long way. I have also added Stevia drops to some batches with some success but unless you get it cheap it is too costly to use in this recipe. When purchased in bulk this costs me about 35c a batch, which is just over a cup and right about what a large tube of toothpaste holds (8.5oz approx. for the batch to 8oz the average large commercial tube) although costs fluctuates with the essential oils (EO) you use. Also, if you like spicy toothpaste I do not recommend using cinnamon oil, use some clove oil and a touch of freshly grated nutmeg instead, the cinnamon will irritate your gums since you are literally brushing it in.

You can get creative with the flavoring so long as it is safe for human consumption. Lavender and chamomile, wintergreen and spearmint, ginger and lime, the possibilities are endless! Never apply or ingest EOs directly unless you know what you are doing. Oh and be sure to check OraMedia (http://mizar5.com/omedia2.htm) on Dental Self-Care and Sufficiency, that is where I got started.
 

Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: OJ on April 07, 2009, 08:56:05 PM
Here's a scary one:

Toilet paper.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Beetle on April 07, 2009, 11:02:22 PM
Here's a scary one:

Toilet paper.

Thats easy- The Cat.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: creuzerm on April 23, 2009, 12:06:32 AM
Thats easy- The Cat.
Brilliant Baily! The TP will clean itself!

I knew I kept feeding my cat and taught to to come when called for a reason...
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: archer on April 23, 2009, 09:06:09 AM
Thats easy- The Cat.
I don't want to get anything with claws that nasty near my derriere. Especially after the first wipe, the cat might have a different opinion about it.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: infobomber on April 23, 2009, 10:16:02 AM
tin foil crumpled up into a ball makes a good pot scraper, though If you want to save the foil you can use sand (if you can find some) . 

as far as soap goes, Ive been told lye is fairly simply to accumulate. 
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Beetle on April 23, 2009, 10:23:14 AM
I don't want to get anything with claws that nasty near my derriere. Especially after the first wipe, the cat might have a different opinion about it.

LMAO no pun intended
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: theaccidentalsurvivor on April 23, 2009, 12:33:17 PM
LMAO no pun intended

Plus can you imagine folding that thing in half for wipe number 2?
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: DDrew on April 23, 2009, 01:02:35 PM
Plus can you imagine folding that thing in half for wipe number 2?

Agreed, most cats don't like being folded in half...
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: A Pawn on April 23, 2009, 05:53:35 PM
Plus can you imagine folding that thing in half for wipe number 2?

LOLOLOL.....  Stop it!....I can hardly breath... Too Funny... I'll never be able to look at my cats the same again...  :D
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: archer on April 23, 2009, 06:10:19 PM
LOLOLOL.....  Stop it!....I can hardly breath... Too Funny... I'll never be able to look at my cats the same again...  :D
If you get the cats to work with you on this, imagine how useful the tail will be!!!
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on May 23, 2009, 09:15:13 PM
I'm no expert in canning but just to ring in here.
Using wax as a sealant in canning is THE traditional method. It goes back at least 2500 years and likely back to the Neolithic age.
Of course, be careful and do it right or you can die as is the case with all canning methods.
But YES wax has been used long before rubber was available for sealing.
In Appalachia, I have encountered many of the old folk that can using this method.
Latex and rubber may not always be available in North America, but if we guard our bees, wax is just as useful.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Beetle on May 23, 2009, 09:47:55 PM
I'm no expert in canning but just to ring in here.
Using wax as a sealant in canning is THE traditional method. It goes back at least 2500 years and likely back to the Neolithic age.
Of course, be careful and do it right or you can die as is the case with all canning methods.
But YES wax has been used long before rubber was available for sealing.
In Appalachia, I have encountered many of the old folk that can using this method.
Latex and rubber may not always be available in North America, but if we guard our bees, wax is just as useful.

My mom always used wax, especially on jelly.. Or is that the norm? not to knowledgeable on canning
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: sage0925 on June 02, 2009, 03:32:56 AM
Oh, do stop with the cat already...my husband can't see anymore...too may tears from laughing.

Sage
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: sage0925 on June 02, 2009, 03:46:12 AM
As for toilet paper...well, don't know how well ya'll are going to like this, especially for those messy whole grain poops, but it would be better than nothing...rectangles of cloth...but you'll have to figure out a way to wash and sanitize them afterwards...and everybody will have to clean their own...I sure as hell wouldn't wash out anybody's but my own, and even that would gross me out some... and everyone would have to have their own personal cloth pile.

Not a great alternative, but better than NO alternative...I've already thought this one out...after all. toilet paper takes up a LOT of space...and if the SHTF, you WILL run out eventually anyway. You have any idea how much toilet paper you'd have to buy a family of four? Even just for one year? How many people have that much storage space?

After a couple years, TP will be worth its weight in gold...lol

Sage
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Chemsoldier on June 02, 2009, 09:13:33 AM
This may seems mundane, but pork sausage and pork burger (sort of like sausage but no spices) can be a good substitute for ground beef.  I go hog hunting twice a year and I havent bought beef in ages (accept for steaks).

The boar meat is lean and I use it for Chilli, Spaghetti Sauce, Hamburger Helper, burgers and a wide range of other dishes.

Additionaly, I bought a 10 lbs bag of cheese sauce mix to make my own mac and cheese.  Its  a resteraunt size bag soyou will need to do sub bags to keep it from going bad/clumping from humidity.  But getting the cheese sauce and elbow mac seperate is a bit of savings over prepackaged.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LvsChant on June 05, 2009, 07:34:37 PM
Our electricity bills here are outrageous (particularly in the hot months, it seems). I thought I would go on a little cost-saving focus by

1) gradually turning the thermostat to a higher temp (so that we have time to acclimate). We are up to 81 degrees and it really isn't bad (don't try this cold-turkey).

2) buying a clothes drying rack and hanging much of the laundry to dry. I find I really like it a lot. The scent of the drying clothes is very pleasant in the house and this method also prevents some of the heat generation that comes from the dryer anyway (thus helping with item (1). I found a rack for $20 at target that will hold an entire load of laundry.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: soccer grannie on August 04, 2009, 10:40:32 AM
Use cheap coffee filters for TP -- don't flush them down the toilet. Cheap & takes little space to store.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: soccer grannie on August 04, 2009, 10:54:43 AM
Our electricity bills here are outrageous (particularly in the hot months, it seems). I thought I would go on a little cost-saving focus by

1) gradually turning the thermostat to a higher temp (so that we have time to acclimate). We are up to 81 degrees and it really isn't bad (don't try this cold-turkey).

2) buying a clothes drying rack and hanging much of the laundry to dry. I find I really like it a lot. The scent of the drying clothes is very pleasant in the house and this method also prevents some of the heat generation that comes from the dryer anyway (thus helping with item (1). I found a rack for $20 at target that will hold an entire load of laundry.

Kmart and Walmart sell drapery panels that block out the sunlight. The ones I've bought have ranged in price from $30/panel to $16/panel, depending on the measurements. They come in a good assortment of colors. I only have one more window to replace with these panels. After hanging the set in the living room (gets the afternoon sun), you could feel a drastic change in the temp in the house & less AC running.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: homesteader on August 11, 2009, 11:49:14 PM
Re: toilet paper

I've been using cloth diapers (all-in-ones) with my children and use washcloths for the messy ones.  if they are rinsed immediately in the toilet they will wash perfectly clean through the washer in hot water with soap.  If you we left without the option of a washer and had to wash the old fashioned way then make sure to boil your washcloths and could sanitize with bleach if you're really worried about the germ factor.


Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: mamabear on August 19, 2009, 11:56:00 AM
OP asked about fabric softener. You can use vinegar for this. I put in 1/2 cup for a normal size load in my washer at the start of the rinse cycle. I don't use fabric softener anymore, just the vinegar. I also clean with vinegar, hydrogen peroxide and water mixed. I fill a spray bottle with vinegar about a 1/4 of the way, 1/4 of a bottle of the hydrogen peroxide, and fill the rest of the way with water. Not too bad of a vinegar smell that way. I have also heard the idea of coffee filters for tp before as well. Coffee filter have lots of uses. I also have three cats, if I get someone to test that theory, I will let you know!  :P
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: pug-shadow on August 27, 2009, 07:50:34 PM
My wife made homemade soap , shampoo and such using old methods that use lye and oils and fats (like lard)
She always bought the lye, but I believe you can make it out of ashes.

Anyway also all of the ingredients would be things you could probably get or make in a true survival situation..

We haven't purchased fake commercial soap for a couple of years.

Sometime we do get anti bacterial soap during flu season and such, but generally just use homemade soap.

She used to make enough to sell the extras at farmer's markets, but there wasn't much profit so we just make it for ourselves.

it is a lot of work and lye is dangerous.
But it might be a good skill for both self sufficiency and if you like being a home chemist  :)
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LvsChant on August 28, 2009, 07:51:37 AM
Would you share your shampoo recipe? That is something I haven't seen here (unless it is somewhere I haven't found).
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: ClarkB on August 28, 2009, 08:54:50 AM
As I was told, my grandparents used outhouses, and the most common form of toilet paper used was old Sears catalogs.  It provided reading on the throne and was free.  If the SHTF then the phone book will be of little use; so it will go right next to the commode.  The it will be a case of the SHTPB.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: homesteader on August 29, 2009, 11:16:16 PM
Good point about the phone book idea...Lord knows I get more than I could ever use.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LvsChant on September 11, 2009, 08:14:48 AM
http://www.thesimpledollar.com/2009/09/10/12-clever-substitutions-that-save-money-nearly-effortlessly/ (http://www.thesimpledollar.com/2009/09/10/12-clever-substitutions-that-save-money-nearly-effortlessly/)

Found this article with many great ideas on The Simple Dollar today...
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Jason from PA on September 14, 2009, 03:37:05 PM
We've got a weird problem. We have friends who make their own detergent and soap.  But my wife is so damn good with coupons and the CVS system that she balks at paying $2.00 for such products. 

We have boxes full of soap and shampoo. My wife probably spent a few dollars on the entire box.  So it's tough to have the incentive when we're giving away soap at church cause we have so much. (Essentially we give away shampoo and non-foaming hand soap every few months).

*LOL*
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LvsChant on September 21, 2009, 07:08:05 AM
good problem to have, nugun... I like knowing how to make my own and substitute for basic ingredients. for the less-talented coupon-clippers, it is also a great money-saver.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LdMorgan on October 04, 2009, 11:40:32 PM
Mineral Salt can be used for deodorant.  They now have large salt rocks you can purchase.  You wet them with water and apply under the arms.  No aluminum, no other chemicals, just the salt.  Now it's not a antiperspirant just deodorant.


This is technically off-post, but I just gotta...

Thank you, Susan1957!

This is a very important thing. Every woman should know that the aluminum in underarm deodorants has been positively linked to breast cancer. It apparently accumulates in the lymph glands in the underarm area, and that's where the cancer starts.

Men don't get breast cancer as often as women, but that doesn't stop me from avoiding deodorants with aluminum in them.

There are alternatives out there, as Susan1957 and others have posted. Find them and use them. You won't be sorry you did.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: mamabear on October 14, 2009, 09:38:02 AM
LdMorgan, do you happen to have a link to that study?
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Nophix on November 03, 2009, 09:39:14 AM
Something else to consider as alternatives, is buying generic. Almost every generic product is a re-labeled premium product.

For instance, the company I work for hauls canned goods for Del Monte. On the same truck, for the same delivery, I could have half a truck of green beans labeled Del Monte, and half labeled Great Value. They came from the same line, and the only difference was the label they placed on them at the end of the line. The GV are a good bit cheaper.

This is the same with most products.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LdMorgan on November 08, 2009, 09:41:11 PM
I don't want to get anything with claws that nasty near my derriere. Especially after the first wipe, the cat might have a different opinion about it.

I think there is a reason bears use rabbits...
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: jgar on December 16, 2009, 05:34:58 AM
My wife & I make out own window cleaner

In a spray bottle, the 30-40 oz size,  (in this order so you do not get suds) fill it up 90% - 95% with water, add a cap full of ammonia, and 3 drops of liquid dish soap.  shake & you are done.

This is the same as the big guys make except they add blue coloring also.

And if you use old newspaper on the windows they look better than if you used paper towels.

Hope this helps

Holzster

Always use old newspaper on windows and mirrors.  It is life changing.  So much easier to get streak free.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Cave Dweller on December 17, 2009, 11:32:44 PM
Thanks for the tip on the soap.  I have millions of little pieces of soap due to 3 kids that break soap in half for some reason.  I will start melting it down and re shaping it this weekend.  I've been putting it in a jar and adding a little water to make liquid soap and putting it in dispensers for hand soap. 

If you have kids that wear black patient leather shoes...you can make them shine by rubbing them down with a biscuit. 




I can think of better uses for biscuits :P

Here's a scary one:

Toilet paper.

Take a 20 0z soda bottle (plastic)
remove the lid
poke/bore a sizable hole in the lid (you want a good squirt)
recap, fill with water and use as a bidet.

It takes practice, I've tried it, not partial to it, but It really saves ya when raw from diarrhea.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LvsChant on December 18, 2009, 08:51:44 AM

Take a 20 0z soda bottle (plastic)
remove the lid
poke/bore a sizable hole in the lid (you want a good squirt)
recap, fill with water and use as a bidet.

It takes practice, I've tried it, not partial to it, but It really saves ya when raw from diarrhea.

Good one, cave dweller... would never have thought of it!
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Conductor71 on January 10, 2010, 04:01:57 AM
I'm with CaveDweller -- don't waste those biscuits!  To shine patent leather, just use some Vaseline on a dry rag.  Apply, wait a few minutes then wipe off.  They'll be shiny as new.  :)
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: GunslingR on January 10, 2010, 10:14:29 PM
 A neat way to clean up your tarnished pre 64 coinage and silver rounds is toothpaste and an old toothbrush. It works great but dont use it on collectable coins as it removes the patina and can affect the collector value.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Cool Blue on January 16, 2010, 10:42:06 AM
Something else to consider as alternatives, is buying generic. Almost every generic product is a re-labeled premium product.

For instance, the company I work for hauls canned goods for Del Monte. On the same truck, for the same delivery, I could have half a truck of green beans labeled Del Monte, and half labeled Great Value. They came from the same line, and the only difference was the label they placed on them at the end of the line. The GV are a good bit cheaper.

This is the same with most products.

Yep, and that goes for other products too.

I used to work in a brake plant and the "premium name brand brake pads" were the same as the "Econo store brand pads".  Only difference was the box.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: muchpain on January 17, 2010, 04:13:37 PM
Re: Deodorant

For awhile now, I've been using rubbing alcohol (90%).  I put it in a cheap spray bottle that cost around $.50 and a litre of alcohol cost around $1.00.  I spray about 2 to 4 spirts under each arm and its good for the whole day - no smell at all (confirmed by my spouse).  I'm one of those few people that preferrs a spray over roll-on or stick.  The funny thing is, the alcohol works better than any deodorant I've ever used. 
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Cool Blue on January 17, 2010, 04:18:13 PM
If you trim your pit hair it helps with the smell as well.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LvsChant on January 17, 2010, 05:21:44 PM
very interesting, muchpain... welcome to the forum... if you haven't already... stop by the intro thread.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: ebonearth on January 20, 2010, 03:23:44 PM
If you trim your pit hair it helps with the smell as well.
A lot of the smell comes from the happy little bacteria supping upon your perspiration I believe. Less hair, less germy real estate. :)
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LvsChant on January 26, 2010, 08:39:09 AM
I have reverted to homemade pancake syrup...

In recent years, with the exception of real 100% maple syrup, all the pancake syrup you can buy is mostly high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). When I was growing up in a big family, we never bought that stuff because it was too expensive... probably better for us anyway, right?

You can make your own syrup from your food storage very easily:

Maple Syrup

2 cups sugar
1 cup water
1/2 teaspoon maple flavoring (I sometimes use a bit more... you decide)

Boil the water and sugar together until no more crystals... add flavoring... use hot on your pancakes or waffles. It will form crystals fairly quickly (within a few weeks) in the refrigerator, so don't make up a huge amount beyond what you will use in a reasonable amount of time. You can dissolve the crystals later, but it takes awhile...

We switched to real maple syrup a few years ago (concern about HFCS) and it was a bit of an adjustment for the kids since it didn't have that really thick consistency... Going from real maple syrup to homemade was no adjustment at all... they actually like the homemade stuff as well as the real maple syrup.

This is a great low-cost alternative and something you can easily make from your stored food if you just keep a bottle (or two) of maple extract in the house. I saved a couple of the nice maple syrup glass bottles for storage of leftover syrup... easy to use for reheating in the microwave (or in a pot of water on the stove). Who doesn't love hot syrup for pancakes?
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: ebonearth on January 26, 2010, 10:10:21 AM
Oh that note of maple syrup it should be added that it stores great dehydrated down to powder.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Cave Dweller on February 04, 2010, 10:38:33 PM
Oh that note of maple syrup it should be added that it stores great dehydrated down to powder.
Is that maple sugar?
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: ebonearth on February 05, 2010, 08:47:27 AM
Is that maple sugar?
Yes but in much smaller crystals, the manganese and other mineral content remains the same though.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Carl2 on February 15, 2010, 09:33:38 AM
I'll second the opinion on rubbing alcohol for deodorant; works great.

Save your old phone books/newspapers for emergency TP.  That's what they use in third-world countries.  In farm country, they used corn cobs.  A heavy downpour was called a "cob floater," i.e. floating up from the outhouse.

We wash all but greasy clothes using plain baking soda instead of detergent.  I don't like my clothes scented!  Baking soda works great for washing oneself, also.  Perhaps a bit rough-feeling at first, but it really gets the grime off.

We save a lot shopping at the "dented can" store. 
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Ditch on September 03, 2010, 07:30:37 PM
Uses for old clothes, socks, and rags, etc.:

1. An alternative to lined draperies for blocking out the sun and insulating a window area:
Use the cheap pull down shades and attach some remnant material on one side.  Glue and stitch the edges after you match the sides.  The blind will not have the snap back into a rolled up position, but you can place double draw strings on both ends to pull the covered blind up and down.  The cloth can be added to both sides for extra insulation, and even quilted.  Clean with hot soapy water and a hose.

2. Guys . . . save those old torn camo clothes and use these in your hunting lodge or cabin for quilt work chair covers, blankets, throw pillows, etc.

3. Gals . . . use a patchwork design with memories scraps of material from old clothes for the same purposes at home.

4. Save all old socks and cut in a spiral pattern; like peeling an apple around and around without tearing the apple skin.  Tie or stitch these strips/pieces end to end.  Get three very long pieces and start twisting each piece.  As you twist the three long pieces, braid them together.  After the braiding is complete, start roping one end in a circle or oval shape to form a rope rug.  Stitch the circle or oval as you go and make it as big as you need it.  It is very thick and warm under foot.  Use these in a dogs bed too.

5.When the old terry cloth towels start showing the frayed edges, make a patchwork robe from the pieces.  Nothing like a long terry cloth robe in the winter when getting out of a shower.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LdMorgan on September 07, 2010, 04:12:17 PM
LdMorgan, do you happen to have a link to that study?

Hey, Mamabear! Sorry to be gone for so long. (Took me a while to make bail.)

Info regarding the link between aluminum in deodorants & breast cancer can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deodorant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deodorant)

They have info footnoted both for and against, as well as comments on the Alzheimer's/aluminum link, and some others.

It's a controversial subject, but there are foreign studies to be found as well as American ones. Amalgamated UnderArmCo has funded a few schlock-science disinfo studies, just to keep things confused, so consider everything carefully.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: mamabear on October 15, 2010, 01:36:35 PM
Thanks LD. I checked that out. I have a lot of deoderant and antipersperants that I got for free using coupons and sales, but may try the salt or rubbing alcohol as an alternative.

If you have cats and get your cat litter in buckets, don't throw the buckets out. I use mine for storing anything not food related. Like home made laundry detergent, clothes, garbage bags, and things like lotion, soap etc. They obvioulsy come with lids and they stack really well. They are definitely sturdy since 20-30 pounds of litter came in them.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: archer on October 15, 2010, 02:35:52 PM
I use cat litter boxes (after being washed and dried) for storing medical supplies and kitchen/cooking equipment.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: chezrad on October 16, 2010, 05:34:49 AM
Kind of related. Pepper poured in the radiator will stop leaks. I have done this with mixed results. I have also heard a raw eg dropped in the radiator will work too.

Emergency use only!!! These work on the same principle as the "Stop Leak" that you can buy at the auto parts store. These items swell in hot water and then clog the leak. It will mess up your cooling system if you don't change the radiator and flush everything really well.

Use with extreme caution.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: TJx on November 06, 2010, 06:58:45 PM
For a good spot carpet cleaner I use about 1 part liquid laundry detergent to 5 parts water in a spray bottle, works great and smells a lot better than traditional carpet cleaner.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Maryetta on January 28, 2011, 07:48:24 AM
Here are some 'tips' that were emailed to me, not necessarily applicable when the SHTF, but maybe?

A sealed envelope - Put in the freezer for a few hours, then slide a
   knife under the flap. The envelope can then be resealed.

  ============================================
  Use Empty toilet paper roll to store appliance cords. It keeps them
  neat  and  you can write on the roll what appliance it belongs to.

  ============================================
  For icy door steps in freezing temperatures: get warm water and put
  Dawn dish washing liquid in it. Pour it all over the steps. They won't
  refreeze.    (wish I had known this for the last 40 years!)

============================================
  To remove old wax from a glass candle holder, put it in the freezer for
  a few hours. Then take the candle holder out and turn it upside down. The
  wax  will  fall out.

  =========================================
  Crayon marks on walls? This worked wonderfully! A damp rag, dipped
   in baking  soda. Comes off with little effort (elbow grease that is!).

  ===========================================
  Permanent marker on appliances/counter tops (like store receipt
  BLUE!) rubbing alcohol on paper towel, sometimes hairspray will do the job too,
  it really depends on the type of ink used.
  ========================================
  Whenever I purchase a box of S.O.S Pads, I immediately take a pair of
  scissors and cut each pad into halves. After years of having to throw
  away rusted and unused and smelly pads, I finally decided that this would
  be  much  more economical. Now a box of S.O.S  pads last me indefinitely!
  In fact, I  have noticed that the scissors get 'sharpened'' this way!

  =========================================
  Blood stains on clothes?  Not to worry!  Just pour a little hydrogen
  peroxide on a cloth and proceed to wipe off every drop of blood.   Works
  every time!  (Now, where to put the body?)    LOL

 ==================================
    Use vertical strokes when washing windows outside and horizontal
  for  inside  windows. This way you can tell which side has the streaks.
  Straight vinegar  will get outside windows really clean.  Don't wash windows
  on a sunny day.  They will dry t oo quickly and will probably streak.

  ============================================
  Spray a bit of perfume on the light bulb in any room to create a lovely
  light scent in each room when the light  is turned on.

  ============================================
  Place fabric softener sheets in dresser drawers and your clothes will
  smell freshly washed for weeks to come. You can also do this with towels
  and linen.

  =============================================
  Candles will last a lot longer if placed in the freezer for at least  3
  hours prior to burning.

  =============================================
  To clean artificial flowers, pour some salt into a paper bag and add the
  flowers. Shake vigorously as the salt will absorb all the dust and dirt
  and leave your artificial flowers looking like new! Works like a charm!
  (wonder where I can get the bag for my 6' silk fig trees...)
  =============================================
  To easily remove burnt on food from your skillet, simply add a drop or
  two of dish soap and enough water to cover bottom of pan, and bring to
  a boil on stove top.

  ==============================================
  Spray your TUPPERWARE with nonstick cooking spray before pouring
  in  tomato based sauces and there won't be any stains.

=============================================
  Wrap celery in aluminum foil when putting in the refrigerator and it will
  keep for weeks.

  =============================================
  When boiling corn on the cob, add a pinch of sugar to help bring out the
  corn's natural sweetness

 .=============================================
  Cure for headaches: Take a lime, cut it in half, and rub it on your
   forehead.   The throbbing will go away.

  =============================================
  Don't throw out all that leftover wine: Freeze into ice cubes for  future
    use  in casseroles and sauces ........  Left over wine? What's that? :)

  =============================================
  To get rid of itch from mosquito bites, try applying soap on the area
and  you will experience instant relief.

=============================================
  Ants, ants, ants everywhere ... Well, they are said to never cross a chalk  line. So,
get your chalk out and draw a line on the floor or wherever ants tend to march. See for yourself.

============================================
  Use air-freshener to clean mirrors. It does a good job and better still,
  leaves a lovely smell to the shine.

  ============================================
  When you get a splinter, reach for the scotch tape before resorting to
  tweezers or a needle. Simply put the scotch tape over the splinter, and
  then  pull it off. Scotch tape removes most splinters painlessly and easily.

  =====================================
  Now look what you can do with Alka Seltzer........
  Clean a toilet.
  Drop in two Alka Seltzer tablets, wait twenty minutes, brush and flush.
  The citric acid and effervescent action clean vitreous China ..

  ============================================
  Clean a vase.
  To remove a stain from the bottom of a glass vase or cruet, fill with water
  and drop in two Alka Seltzer tablets.

  ==================
  Polish jewelry.
  Drop two Alka Seltzer tablets into a glass of water and immerse the
   jewelry  for two minutes.

  =============================================
  Clean a thermos bottle.
   Fill the bottle with water, drop in four Alka Seltzer tablets, and let soak
   for an hour  (or longer, if necessary).

  ================================== ===========
   Unclog a drain.
   Clear the sink drain by dropping three Alka Seltzer tablets down the
   drain  followed by a cup of  Heinz White Vinegar. Wait a few minutes,
   and then run the hot water.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: GoingToDoIt! on February 09, 2011, 08:15:51 AM
Rubbing alcohol:

I once bought a used car with remote unlock. The battery in the little keychain device was dead, and it was very dirty so it didn't work with the new one. All you have to do to clean them is take them apart and soak overnight in rubbing alcohol. Dry off on a paper towel. I put it back together with a new battery and it was great!! My mechanic learned something new from me. (And I am the most mechanically challenged person on the planet lol)
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: sippinkoolaid on February 21, 2011, 08:01:36 PM
Save paper milk cartons and used panty hose. My grandmother from the Ukraine was like McGyver with those two items. I remember the pantyhose used for tying up tomato vines and other plants. Milk cartons for flower pots and bird feeders etc. It all up to your imagination I guess!
Thanks
Stay safe
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: krickie on May 14, 2011, 05:38:40 AM
We started making our own laundry and cleaning supplies a few years ago,.  The only thing we still buy is dishwasher detergent because I haven't found a replacement I like.  You can clean practically anything with baking soda, Borax, white vinegar, lemon juice, and salt!  The recipe variations are almost endless.   You have to play around a bit to find what you really like.  We started with the book "Clean Home, Clean Planet" by Karen Logan.

A few of our substitutions are:

Laundry soap: 
1 grated bar of Fels Naptha
1 cup of super washing soda
1 cup of Borax
Essential oil for fragrance

1 scoop (we use a medicine cup) for regular loads, 2 scoops for large or extra stinky loads

--We use white vinegar instead of fabric softener.  I just fill up a Downy ball with vinegar.  If I want fragrance, I put a few drops of essential oil on a damp washcloth and throw it in the dryer with the clothes.
--No more Swiffer cloths!  Microfiber cloths work better.  Bonus that they can just be washed and reused over and over so that's much less waste.
--Club soda works great as glass cleaner.   It's also a good stain remover for clothes or carpets. 
--Baking soda with a little liquid detergent mixed into a paste is a fantastic soft scrub.   It rinses pretty clean, but if there's any grit you can give a quick white vinegar rinse.
--Toilet cleaner is just baking soda to scrub with a white vinegar rinse. 
--Plain rubbing alcohol shines up faucets and fixtures.
--Instead of Febreeze, I fill up a spray bottle with some unscented fabric softener (totally optional, but I find it really does help with softness and cling) and white vinegar, add some essential oils for fragrance, and top off with distilled water.   Also, I save the peels from citrus fruits and they either go down the garbage disposal with some ice and salt, or they just get simmered in a stock pot for potpurri. 

Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: PorcupineKate on September 17, 2012, 06:29:17 AM
Jewelry cleaner  For gold, platinum, and diamonds.

Cup of hot water and a teaspoon of ammonia.  Soak jewelry and use an old tooth brush.
This is not for silver or soft stones like pearls and turquoise.

Best thing to use to get a ring off a stuck finger.....Windex.  I kid you not. The entire Jewelry industry sprays peoples hands to get stuck rings off.

The above jewelry cleaner with a few drops of dish soap works for homemade Windex.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Mystidawn on November 03, 2012, 08:18:36 AM
I have an easy to follow recipe for an all purpose spray cleaner.

We fill one quart sized mason jar with orange peels, and cover with vinegar. Let the mix sit for 2-3 weeks before straining the liquid into a spray bottle. This recipe will also work using lemon and lime peels.

Just to be clear... we do not peel an entire bag of oranges all at once. We just add our new peels to the jar of vinegar each day.

This spray works really well at cleaning hard water off facets. If you don't like the smell of vinegar, you may try adding some essential oils to enhance the smell of the oranges.

Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LibertyBelle on November 03, 2012, 09:03:28 PM
I became very sensitive to chems a few years ago (esp odors) and so had to find alternatives to common everyday products.
Here are a few of the things I use:

Deodorant - mix of organic coconut oil, arrowroot powder and baking soda in summer....crystal mineral salts in winter
Liquid Laundry Cleaner - Mule Team borax, washing soda, Fels naptha, water
Fabric Softener - vinegar
All purpose cleaner - vinegar and water
Bath soap - homemade lye soap
Shampoo and Conditioner - wash with a mix of baking soda and water, and do a finishing rinse with vinegar
Paper towels - reusable purple "rags in a bag" by FlyLady.  These are awesome!!!!!
Bath Tissue - "family cloth" ... for more info, check out http://www.mothering.com/community/t/389009/family-cloth-what-nobody-ever-told-you  and  for pictures http://etsyhcteam.blogspot.com/2010/03/what-is-family-cloth.html  (neither site is mine, but nice ones all the same)
Feminine Pads - homemade cloth pads aka "mama cloth"
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Mystidawn on November 03, 2012, 10:29:14 PM
I have a question. I am interested in making my own deodorant, using mineral salts. Where do I buy them? Will they specifically salt 'mineral' salt? I was looking for some today at whole foods, but all I saw was bath salts, and Epsom salt. I know I can buy the Crystal Brand deodorant, that looks like a rock of salt, but I was hoping to buy the mineral salts to make my own mix, thinking it would come out cheaper for me.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: LibertyBelle on November 03, 2012, 11:07:30 PM
I have a question. I am interested in making my own deodorant, using mineral salts. Where do I buy them? Will they specifically salt 'mineral' salt? I was looking for some today at whole foods, but all I saw was bath salts, and Epsom salt. I know I can buy the Crystal Brand deodorant, that looks like a rock of salt, but I was hoping to buy the mineral salts to make my own mix, thinking it would come out cheaper for me.

There are several places online that sell the dead sea mineral salts. I haven't tried making my own "Crystal" type deodorant...yet.   

Oh and another thing I do is make my own sugar wax for my legs, etc.  The only thing is, I have to keep the kids from eating it all before I get a chance to use it!  ;D    All it is, is just sugar, water, and lemon juice.:) 
Here is the sugar wax recipe I use (you've got to read the entire thing....the way she describes it all is a HOOT!)
http://www.instructables.com/id/how-to-sugar-wax-your-legs/
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: rikkrack on January 10, 2013, 11:14:41 AM
Wanted to revive this tread as good posts.

I save milk jugs and fill with water to keep in my freezer for power outages and energy efficiency. Full freezer works less.

I saw last night at my local farm supply store Xeroxed copies of how to make your own laundry detergent along with the borax, naphtha, and washing soda in the store. Someone just placed a stack on the shelves.

We feed our tilipia duckweed rather than fish food.

We turn toilet paper rolls, leaves and other scrap wood or wood pellets and candles into fire starters.

We use essential oils for vapor rub on kids when congested, as well as odor removal from old shoes etc. Wife mixes EO with baking powder as carpet deodorizer.

Bought bleach tablet for pool for bleach storage. Tablets take up less space than liquid. When we need, just add a tablet to bucket and refill bottles.

Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: d3nni5 on January 10, 2013, 11:44:34 AM

I need to read back through this thread, haven't seen it before.   

I take old vitamin bottles, any OTC bottle w/o a child proof cap, and reuse for all sorts of things.   They hold my firestarters, char cloth, tinder etc in my BOB.   They are good for nuts and bolts and any little fastener that comes in those annoying plastic bags.    Anything you want to keep dry and can fit into it, makes for a good reuse.

Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: rikkrack on January 10, 2013, 11:50:40 AM
rather than buy snare wire, I found I could get picture hanging wire to do the same think and was cheaper.

Then saw the same tip on Yukon men week later. wife rolled her eyes said yeah yeah yeah

Then caught raccoon that was after our chickens. It took all I had not to tell her "I TOLD YOU SO". but i didn't. She doesn't mock my ideas anymore...well not as much at least. 
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: AvenueQ on November 21, 2013, 07:06:56 PM
Facial Cleanser

I found this recipe online somewhere and was very skeptical at first. However, my favorite face wash has been discontinued so I decided to give this a shot. Combine in a small squeeze bottle:

1 part extra-virgin olive oil
1 part castor oil

Shake well to combine. To use, dampen your face. Squeeze a quarter-sized amount into hand and massage it in. Take a hot washcloth and place it over your face for 30 seconds. Wipe clean with cloth.

I usually just use it in the shower. I rub it in and then let the steam from the hot water do the work, then wipe it off. I definitely thought rubbing oil on your face was nuts, but it actually works pretty well. My skin is considered "normal to dry" so YMMV with this cleanser. If only I could find a recipe for moisturizer now...
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: Josh the Aspie on April 09, 2014, 03:52:08 PM
Quote
shampoo or soap, or even something like fabric softener?

Take oak ashes, run water through.  Filter from mixing container to new container to remove ash particulates.  Caution: The resulting lye is caustic, and hot.

Add naturally hot mixture to fat, mix.  If desired, add essential oils, or finely chopped bits of flowers/herbs.

Pour into large, heat resistant container such as a baking pan.

Wait for mixture to cool and harden.

Cut into bars.

I don't recall the exact proportions off hand.

This is both my soap and shampoo.  I don't use fabric softener, or starch.

I buy it made from others to save time. I have been considering making some of my own, but the people I buy it from buy their supplies in bulk, so it would almost definitely be more expensive to buy my own, not less.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: joe121 on November 10, 2015, 01:27:32 PM
My sister and I have been cutting corners since fuel cost have gone so high.  We no longer purchase laundry detergent, instead we use this age old recipe.
I store it in a quart jar and you use only 1 or 2 tablespoons of detergent depending on how dirty the clothes are. 

1 bar of Fels Naptha soap (grated fine)
1/4 c Arm & Hammer washing soda
1/4 c 20 Mule Team Borax 
Mix & store.  1 quart of this cost us about 2.00 instead of costing 15.00.  This does about 50 loads depending on if you use 1 or 2 tablespoons.

It cleans very well.

Wife makes the same stuff and it works very well. I think she also adds oxiclean powder but I could be wrong. Plus the extra washing soda is useful for electrolysis rust removal.
Title: Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
Post by: krispykreme on October 21, 2016, 02:50:25 AM
I remember the pantyhose used for tying up tomato vines and other plants.

panty hose can also be used for storing veggies like onions

wanna share a mayo recipe. discoverred it quite recently but it's just fantastic. can't say it's super healthy but al least it will not have any extra chemicals added. you just need a glass of oil (olive or any other to your taste) and a couple of eggs. add yolks to oil and mix it well untill it becomes whitish and cream like. and there goes bit of salt and pepper or mustard is great too. here you go :)