The Survival Podcast Forum

Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Homesteading and Self Reliant Living => Needles & Strings => Topic started by: soccer grannie on September 07, 2009, 07:48:33 PM

Title: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on September 07, 2009, 07:48:33 PM
Do we have any quilters or anybody that would like to learn the basics of quilting? I'm no expert but I can get you started and lead you to some great sites that have free online patterns and a buncha photos.
 
You can buy fabric or use damaged clothing, outgrown clothes, old jeans, etc. The basic tools can be as simple as cardboard pattern templates, pencil and scissors OR a cutting mat, rotary cutter and acrylic rulers. You can sew by hand or machine -- quilt by hand or machine. There's lap quilting which you can quilt in 18" squares, making it a take along project.
 
I'll be glad to help you get started and share what I know. And believe me, there's plenty I don't know, but we'll find the answers.
 

Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: Darkwinter on September 07, 2009, 08:18:08 PM
Thank you Grannie!  I am working on crochet right now, But I plan on purchasing a sewing machine next year!  My grandmother made some amazing quilts.  We actually have one section of a quilt that my great great great grandmother made.  It is in a frame, and I just love the history of it.  I look forward to reading your posts.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on September 07, 2009, 09:15:53 PM
Quilting is not difficult. I taught myself way back in 19__ . Anybody can operate a sewing machine, it's just like driving -- hit the gas and steer the fabric. My 1st quilt was a simple patchwork quilt, lots of 6 1/2" squares of different fabrics sewn together with an X stitched across each block. Check out www.quiltville.com (http://www.quiltville.com) I want to make a String Quilt next. NO it's not made out of strings, you'll find out that quilt patterns have some strange names, i.e. Log Cabin, Borrow from Peter to Pay Paul, Weed Whacker, Churn Dash, Spider Web, etc. Men make and design some of the best quilts.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: coffecat on October 28, 2009, 09:16:29 PM
I love quilting.  Am rotten at borders though.  Sometimes I have to see it done to understand. Just learning to applique - but cheat and use machine.  Would enjoy doing the fine stuff by hand but never time.  Maybe this winter.  Do you do your own Quilting ?  THAT I need to get into but don't know much about.  I would draw the pattern onto the quilt but then how would I get the drawings  off the fabric?  So far I have only done machine in the ditich or straight line quilting.  Do you have an embarrassing stache of material ??  Heh heh - had to ask that one. !  C
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on October 28, 2009, 09:25:24 PM
Do you have an embarrassing stache of material ??  Heh heh - had to ask that one. !  C

OH YEAH! I have so much fabric I could sew for the rest of my life without purchasing another yard. To let me in a fabric store is like taking a kid to a candy shop. I have a 10x10 room stacked full with my fabric stash. Haven't you heard "the one who dies with the most fabric wins" !  ;)
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: liftsboxes on October 29, 2009, 02:41:49 AM
My wife crochets and quilts ... she not a big frequenter of the forums however.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on October 29, 2009, 08:22:54 AM
Me too...

(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0417.jpg)

My current project, a twin-sized quilt... in the midst of handquilting it. The quilting hoop was passed on to me -- came from my paternal great-grandmother. I'm the only one in my family who still does this stuff :)
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: swoods on October 29, 2009, 10:59:51 AM
Me too...

(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0417.jpg)

My current project, a twin-sized quilt... in the midst of handquilting it. The quilting hoop was passed on to me -- came from my paternal great-grandmother. I'm the only one in my family who still does this stuff :)

That is very pretty. I have a quilt in the quilting stage as well. I have been working on knitting socks right now. There is just too much to do and not enough time to do it. Dang, if I just didn't have to work, I could get lots done, but then I would have no money to buy and add to my stash.  ;)

Again, that is really pretty.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: coffecat on October 29, 2009, 02:23:37 PM
Beautiful quilt !!!!!
I have a large shelving unit filled (stuffed) with materials.  Can't part with any.  I have met one serious quilter in Staunton VA and she moved to my neighborhood and I saw first hand what she moved of materials.  Was shocked !!  I think half the moving van was buckets of material !!!  There must be a name for material Hoarders !!c
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on October 29, 2009, 02:45:04 PM
My stash is actually fairly small. The cost of good quilting fabrics has really increased in the past few years. I am very sad to see that most Walmarts are also closing their fabric departments. The exact same fabrics they carry are invariably much more expensive at other stores. I try to buy what I need for each specific project.

This quilt is the second of the same basic pattern I will have made -- one for each of my boys. The other quilt is the same except that the colors are reversed. I started the quilt tops when my youngest was a toddler (and found it was just too hard to do when they are so little). I pulled out the project last summer and put them both together... finished the other quilt last fall... It takes me longer since I hand-quilt them. I do piece them together using a machine, but the hand-quilting really adds to the time required.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: coffecat on October 30, 2009, 06:52:44 AM
I am curious to know how others' final final finish of their quilt is.  After all the ironing and pinning and quilting, I usually end up putting the quilt in the dryer, even if it is only a pot holder, just to puff it up and get rid of the ironed look.  I guess I like the old quilt look.  I have bought quilts at yard sales and repaired them.  The grandchildren like to get ahold of these.   C
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: mamabear on October 30, 2009, 08:30:47 AM
I tried to learn to knit in high school, then forgot how. I recently tried to learn to crochet, but it does not seem to be my thing, although once I get my son home, I may try it again. But I do think that I would like to quilt. How does one start with using squares from old clothes or keepsake clothes? That way I could always point to the square and remember that was the baptism outfit, that was first birthday, etc.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: swoods on October 30, 2009, 09:05:20 AM
Well, ya goober, I can show you how to do that. The blue quilt I made for you was made from old sheets and some fabric I got at an estate sale.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on October 30, 2009, 09:48:28 AM
MamaBear, I was gonna answer your question but it looks like your Mom beat me to it!  :D

On the first quilt I made for my daughter, I had a 4 patch block in the corner. I drew an outline of her hand in one of the patches and embroidered that along with the year the quilt was made. In the other 3 patches of the block, I outlined my hand, her Dad's and her brother's and quilted along those outlines.

My daughter is saving her son's favorite t-shirts and all of his soccer jerseys. She has t-shirts from when he was a toddler to age 10. And with 2 jerseys a year, that's gonna be 2 quilts. To keep the knits from stretching, I'll put an interfacing on the back of the large pieces I cut out of those, showing the picture from the t-shirts and his number & team logo from the jerseys. All the blocks will be different sizes. I'll have to put sashing to even them up or have the blocks staggered. Not sure how it will be quilted, it may be bar tacked or tied. Not worrying about that now, since those quilts will be made later down the road.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on October 30, 2009, 10:45:19 AM
Has anyone made quillows?

Quillow folded into pillow pocket
(http://i632.photobucket.com/albums/uu48/sandra29803/quillowfoldedintopillow.jpg)

Quillow opened into a quilt
(http://i632.photobucket.com/albums/uu48/sandra29803/quillowopenedintoaquilt.jpg)

Folding Step 1
(http://i632.photobucket.com/albums/uu48/sandra29803/quillowfolding-1.jpg)

Folding Step 2
(http://i632.photobucket.com/albums/uu48/sandra29803/quillowfolding-2.jpg)

Folding Step 3
(http://i632.photobucket.com/albums/uu48/sandra29803/quillowfolding-3.jpg)

Folding Step 4
(http://i632.photobucket.com/albums/uu48/sandra29803/quillowfolding-4.jpg)

Folded back into pillow pocket
(http://i632.photobucket.com/albums/uu48/sandra29803/quillowbackintopillowpocket.jpg)
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: swoods on November 04, 2009, 03:25:22 PM
I have not made one of those, but I have one. My sis made dozens of them about 12-15 years ago and that's what we all got for Christmas. Our's are a little different though; there is a pocket that the whole thing folds up into. The pocket is a great place to stick your feet in to keep em warm.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on November 04, 2009, 03:49:46 PM
Hey swoods, glance at the photos again. The rectangle at the top of the 2nd photo is a pocket that the whole thing folds back into. I was just referring to it as a pillow pocket. The rectangle is two pieces of fabric sewn on three sides. If you look closely at the bottom of the last photo, you can see where the quilt was put back in the pocket. These are great for keeping in the car since they can be used as a pillow or a quilt.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: flashcard on November 04, 2009, 07:18:56 PM
Wow! Those quillows are fantastic! Not enough time left for this year, but next year, I'm stealing your sis's plan and making them for Christmas.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on November 04, 2009, 09:20:02 PM
A quillow is really easy to make and doesn't take a long time, maybe a couple of hours max. I use the high loft poly batting and machine bar tack the quilt section about every 8 to 10 inches. No hand sewing!

The one in the photos is my daughter's. She loves dolphins. Last Spring she went to Nassau and got to swim with the dolphins.

There are so many great fabrics with themes. I made one for a couple of the grandkids with a fabric that is a town fabric (roads, school, park, fire station, mall, airport, etc.). That design is sold by the panel. They not only used it as a quillow, they played with their little cars on it.

Last Christmas I made a few with fleece -- one layer of fleece, no batting, no bar tacking -- really quick project.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on March 20, 2010, 11:45:00 AM
I've been increasing my stash of quilting materials... every time I go to the Walmart that still has a fabric section, I buy a yard of every quilt fabric I like... maybe 10 yds each time I go or so. I have heard they plan to close down the fabric departments of all the Walmarts in the next couple of years.

Quilting fabrics (the exact same brands, even) are usually almost double the price at any of the other fabric stores. This is a great investment, in my opinion. I'm also stocking up on quilting thread, beeswax, backing fabrics...

Anyone else out there doing this, too?
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: OKGranny on March 21, 2010, 02:46:07 AM
I used to quilt all the time but got away from it for a bit when I got interested in making art dolls. I still really enjoy doing "out there" dolls but recently the quilting bug has struck again and I've been looking for a pattern that appeals to me. I much prefer to hand quilt although putting the tops together I do by machine. lvschant that is really pretty. I've got one of my grandmothers quilts that was made in the 1930's that I'm so proud of, it's definitely a prized possession.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: TxMom on May 03, 2010, 09:10:34 PM
My mom has made dozens of quilts, most hand quilted, she just didn't like the machine quilting.  Seemed like she always had one set up the family room, and if we wanted our space back, we had to help quilt.    Love quilts, just a lot of time to quilt by hand.   

Not as elegant looking, but still fluffy and warm, take a couple pieces of flannel, thick fluffing and instead of quilting, tie it with yarn.  Machine finish the edges.  Much, much faster.  Warm and snugly.  Has anyone else done this?

Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on May 03, 2010, 09:46:27 PM
Those flannel tied-quilts area very nice. A lady in my hometown makes them. We have one for each of my boys for their beds in winter. I haven't made that kind myself, but I'm thinking it would be a lot quicker.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on September 05, 2010, 11:41:59 PM
Me too...

(http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww249/lvschant/IMG_0417.jpg)

My current project, a twin-sized quilt... in the midst of handquilting it. The quilting hoop was passed on to me -- came from my paternal great-grandmother. I'm the only one in my family who still does this stuff :)

Got the dormant thread warning, but I'm new here and just found this section so I'm posting in spite of it.  :)

That quilt is beautifully pieced! I can't tell how much of the quilting is done from the picture above, would LOVE to see one of it finished and bound.

Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on September 07, 2010, 08:18:05 AM
Thank you! The other quilt was on the top bunk, so I took a photo of the quilt (just like it only opposite colors) from the bottom bunk :)

(http://castraponere.com/tsppix/ozquilt.jpg)
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on September 07, 2010, 10:55:09 AM
I was given a large piece of wool batting (larger than a king size!) from a 90 yo lady a few years ago.  It was her grandmother's and it is in perfect condition.

It is very, very thick.  I want to make a quilt with it.  I've been told by quilters in my area that tieing it or hand quilting will be the only way to get it into a quilt.

I am humbled by receiving such a gift and terrified that I will mess it up royally!!  So it sits, packed up in a huge rubbermaid container with cedar and lavender to keep the bugs away
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on September 07, 2010, 12:00:55 PM
Cyndi, wow, what a score!

A batt that old will almost certainly be unbonded, and because of that I would NOT use it in a tied quilt unless you never plan to launder it. If it were mine I would probably plan on hand quilting with an heirloom quality top. JMO

I suppose, depending on how stable it is, it could be done on a longarm, but if you go that route be dang good & sure your quilter is top-notch (get a ton of referrences) and willing to take the extra time and care needed. I occasionally get a customer who brings me a 'homemade' batting of wool or alpaca, etc., and so far I haven't seen one that could be used on a longarm, but the few I've seen were thin and spider-y and even with super-delicate handling would not hold up to being loaded on the machine.

LvsChant, thanks for the second picture. You're good! Wish more of my customers could piece that well - sigh.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on September 07, 2010, 12:29:54 PM
I'm posting some pics of the batt, trying to show you the thickness and the basting in it:

(http://www.mullerslanefarm.com/qbattinga.jpg)

(http://www.mullerslanefarm.com/qbattingc.jpg)

I don't know what 'bonding' is, nor a longarm.  I do know that any quilt using this batt will need to be hand washed, unless I hand-full it before I quilt it. I plan on quilting it myself (that's the way i roll).  I figure it is another extension of my fiber arts.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on September 07, 2010, 01:02:45 PM
Oh my, I'm feeling toasty just looking at that.  :D

Bonding is a process that binds the fibers together, be they poly, cotton, wool or some blend thereof, so the batting doesn't pull apart when being handled, quilted and washed. It can be done with heat or needle-punched to name two methods. The threads running through your batting would be serving the same purpose. I've never seen one like that, very cool! That one probably could be longarmed, but I'm with you on hand-quilting it in this case.

Now you've got me wanting to do research on batting history & methods, which I have no time to do, thanks a bunch.  ;D

To address your other comment, a longarm quilting machine is a specialized sewing machine with a super-long throat. It has wheels that run on a carriage, which in turn runs on tracks attached to a long table. The table has an arrangement of parallel bars on which you roll your backing, batting and top in order to quilt the quilt. Instead of moving the layers under the machine, as with a DSM (domestic sewing machine), you move the machine over the layers to quilt them together. Clear as mud? I have to run out the door in a few minutes, later today I'll see if I can post some pictures of my longarm - it's what I do for a living (longarm quilting, not picture-posting).

Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on September 07, 2010, 01:43:51 PM
Hmmm... I'm way faster at piecing tops than the quilting (I've always done them by hand, since I don't have a quilting machine). I love the piecing and creative color matching/blending  process. I would love to see some of your quilts, LJH. I've never looked into getting my quilts machine quilted, but it would certainly speed up my production process!
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on September 07, 2010, 03:19:20 PM
I'm familiar with needle felting and had thought about doing that with this batt (I'd rather not)..  I suppose I could also get a lot of fusing 'stuff' and iron it on to fuse it together (I'd rather not).  I think hand fulling this (lay the batting on a large plastic tarp, adding hot water and soap and stepping on it to full or felt it).  The batt will get even more dense and shrink up.  I still would have to hand wash it (I.e. soaking it in a tub)
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on September 07, 2010, 04:26:38 PM
I'll see if I can post some pictures of my longarm - it's what I do for a living (longarm quilting ...
LJH: Do you have a website or price chart for your longarm quilting? I may be interested in having some of my quilt tops finished.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on September 08, 2010, 09:49:17 PM
All righty then, running way behind, as per usual.  ::) I dug out a few pics, could only find one that shows my longarm machine to show Cyndi, the rest are some recent customer quilts.

Soccer Grannie, I don't have a website. Too much of a digital idiot to build or maintain one myself and too much of a cheapskate to pay someone else to do it. I am majorly blessed to be super busy via word-of-mouth - right now I'm booked up into early December. My pricing starts at .015 per sq. in. for an over-all pattern (freehand or simple pantograph) and up to .07 or higher for heirloom or show quilting. Those are rare, most jobs end up in the .015 to .0275 range. For instance, I just finished a 62" x 62" lap quilt, light custom, and the quilting charge was $92.10. This particular customer had me supply the backing and batting too so that bumped her bill up to around $120.

I'd love to quilt for you but I really don't want this to come across as advertising or soliciting, just informational. I may even know a longarmer in your area, we're a pretty tight group and have friends & connections all over the country. We can take this to a PM if you'd like more specifics, 'K?

For some reason, I can't add any more to this message without the text jumping up & down like some crazed cricket. Prolly operator error - see prior mention of digital idiocy. Will add the pictues in additional posts -
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on September 08, 2010, 10:05:31 PM
Oh crap, this forum doesn't take files from our own computers. I've tried a couple of photo hosting sites in the past and couldn't figure them out. Have they gotten any less confusing? Any suggestions?

Note: the entire left side of my brain was left out at the factory. We're talking digital ZERO here, no pun intended.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on September 09, 2010, 12:30:05 AM
(Joe Pesci voice) Okay, okay, okay! (/Joe Pesci voice)

I grabbed a beer & signed up at Photobucket. Much confusion insued but I think I've got it. Here goes:

Example of an over-all pattern. This one's a pantograph, done by using an onboard laser light to follow a roll pattern. Pantos are generally the most economical treatment with a longarm quilting machine. They result in a nice, consistent texture and are perfect for utility quilts.

(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b390/hhomestd/P1020761.jpg)

Example of high-end custom. A small hanging for one of my favorite customers who lives in FL.

(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b390/hhomestd/P1030065.jpg)

This is my longarm machine, Elsie May. Draped over the rollers is a quilt that was a gift for the customer's son's graduation from Air Force boot camp. The second is a close-up of a corner on that quilt, also high-end custom.

(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b390/hhomestd/P1030151.jpg)

(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b390/hhomestd/P1030143.jpg)
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: soccer grannie on September 09, 2010, 04:59:49 AM
Your work is absolutely beautiful. The close up of the corner block looks like trapunto. Give yourself a big pat on the back!  :)
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on September 09, 2010, 07:32:28 AM
Those are absoultely beautiful!!!

Your prices are very, very, very reasonable. No wonder you are booked until December.  I'd expect to pay a few hundred dollars for any of those quilts.

Thanks so much for showing me what a longarm is. 
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: Zookeeper on September 09, 2010, 12:55:40 PM
Wow! Beautiful. How long does it take to do one from start to finish?
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on September 09, 2010, 01:22:28 PM
absolutely gorgeous! Thanks for sharing the pictures.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on November 09, 2010, 05:20:34 PM
Wow! Beautiful. How long does it take to do one from start to finish?

So, I read this question back in September when the thread was active and made a mental note to answer. 'Mental note' - there's our problem, folks.  ::)

Sorry, Zookeeper. Start to finish can take anywhere from a few hours to a few weeks.

It takes me around an hour to load something like a queen on the machine, fussing and futzing to make sure it's all perfectly square & plumb. Then, if it's a simple pantograph maybe another 6 to 8 hours to finish. If it's custom, maybe a couple of days, if heirloom, a week or more.

My machine is completely hand-guided. Those with computerized machines are faster but even then it takes a lot of skill and attention to get an excellent result.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: mamabear on November 12, 2010, 04:51:05 PM
Ok. So I obviously don't live near enough for my mom to come and teach me to quilt now. So if I want to get started, what will I need? Material? I would like to start with scrap material from old clothes so if I screw it up royally, I'm not out the cost of material. I do not have a sewing machine or access to one, so I would need to do it all by hand. What would my first step be?
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on November 12, 2010, 09:30:12 PM
Really, you don't need much more than a pile of old clothes (preferably 100% cotton), a good sharp pair of sissors, a ruler and needle & thread for the top. Batting can be anything from store-bought to an old wool blanket and backing can be a past-it's-prime sheet. With that you could make a nice, cozy quilt that would be charming and every bit as warm as a high-end custom job. Take it a step up by adding a rotary cutter & mat with specialty rulers & templates to make the cutting more accurate.

Making a quilt top is all about accuracy in both cutting and piecing (stitching the little pieces together to make big pieces). If you're off a tiny fraction of an inch on one block it's no biggie, but small discrepancies will mushroom over the length & width of the top and can result in the dreaded 'wonk factor'. Wonk doesn't hurt the function any, but it's good to aim for straight & plumb just because. 

Hand quilting done to show standards is an art form. Hand quilting done for utility is a simple skill that anyone can learn, YouTube is your friend for the technique. You can baste the layers together with thread or pins and then you'll need some kind of frame or hoop, quilting needles (John James is a good brand & widely available), quilting thread and a good-fitting thimble. Or simply tie the three layers together with yarn or embroidery floss. Then bind the edges & it's a quilt! Lots of great binding tutorials online too. 

Don't be intimidated by the fancy stuff we're posting here, that'll come in time. Go for it & put together a small lap quilt or even a doll's quilt to get started - simple 4" squares is a great starting place. Mark your seam allowances (wash-out pen or quilter's pencil) to keep them accurate and use a small, consistent running stitch. Before long you'll be hopelessly addicted and surrounded by beautiful, warm quilts. 

Hope some of our other quilters will weigh in here too and fill in any gaps.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on November 13, 2010, 01:24:28 PM
Mamabear, you might check at the local fabric stores to see if they have any quilting classes scheduled... that would be a great way to get some hands-on learning to speed up the process. I am not patient enough to hand-piece my quilts, so I would probably find it daunting without a sewing machine. I'd keep an eye out for an inexpensive sewing machine, too. All you really need for quilting is a straight stitch... not even zigzag is a must, so you could use anything from an old treadle machine on up.

My other suggestion would be to start on some small projects to begin with... that way you get the feeling of accomplishment and success sooner. Maybe a simple lap quilt? Or a cozy kids' quilt for your boy to cuddle in on cold evenings?
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on December 03, 2010, 10:23:03 AM
I'm in the process of hand quilting a pieced top that I was given in a barter.  I went with a 80/20 (cotton/polyester) batting and found some coordinating fabric in my husband's fabric stash.

As a beginner, the best piece of advice I was given (and I didn't see it posted here) was to pin/baste your quilt together from the center out towards the edges.  Same with hand quilting it, From the center to the edges.

It might not be the standard way to do it, or maybe it is one of those things that experienced quilter just 'know' and forget to tell beginners.  It sure helped me a lot!

Her is the back of the quilt I'm doing (I'm just 'stitchin in the ditch')

(http://www.mullerslanefarm.com/100_1557.jpg)
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LvsChant on December 03, 2010, 10:40:43 AM
Great work, MLF! It looks like it is really coming along well. I have not usually quilted starting in the middle. I can see the logic in it, but tend to start at a corner and work out from there. Perhaps I'll give the middle thing a try next time out to see if I like it better.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: TxMom on December 03, 2010, 11:39:00 AM
Growing up my mom had us help quilt a lot of quilts by hand. 

She'd set up the quilt on a frame, usually in the same room as the TV.  Took up much space.  So when ever we watched TV, we helped quilt.  She straightened, tightened, pinned, marked for stitching, on the frame.  We started from the ends, not the middle.  And as we finished what we could reach, it'd be unclamped, rolled up (like a scroll), reclamped, so we could reach the next area.   Frames were like 2 x 4's cut for up to queen size quilts, maybe king.  Covered with cloth to which we pinned the quilts, set up on chairs, clamps on the 4 corners.

We'd groan whenever she got the quilting frame out.  Later she gave the frames to me, as I'd borrow them from her.  She got a smaller hoop shaped frame for baby quilts and such which she loved.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: OKGranny on December 05, 2010, 01:03:44 AM
I still hand quilt on 2x4's clamped together. All I did was add some ceiling hooks in my workroom so I can pull it up out of the way when I don't want it in the middle of the room. For any beginner if you are going with pieced blocks, strive for accuaracy and learn 1/4" seams. If a block isn't to your own personal specifications re-do it. If you're going to use new 100% cotton fabric; wash, dry, and iron it first so you don't get unequal shrinkage the first time the quilt is washed. Mostly I love quilting and find it very relaxing but I'm fighting a mariners compass at the moment or it's fighting me, one or the other. I may be hauled away to a padded room soon if I don't figure out where I'm off.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: LJH on December 05, 2010, 09:15:03 PM
For any beginner if you are going with pieced blocks, strive for accuaracy and learn 1/4" seams. If a block isn't to your own personal specifications re-do it. If you're going to use new 100% cotton fabric; wash, dry, and iron it first so you don't get unequal shrinkage the first time the quilt is washed. Mostly I love quilting and find it very relaxing but I'm fighting a mariners compass at the moment or it's fighting me, one or the other. I may be hauled away to a padded room soon if I don't figure out where I'm off.

Mariner's Compass = only one of the most complicated patterns there is! Remember to take it along to the padded room, you'll want handiwork to pass the time.  :rofl:

Everything else above is dead on too. Fabric NEVER comes into my studio except by way of the laundry room with the excepton of batiks - those have been washed and abused multiple times in the process of becoming batik, no further punishment needed.

Cyndi, your quilting looks great! And you're right about the basting and centering tip, I didn't even think to mention it. Basting with safety pins, starting in the center, is the way I've always done for hand quilting. If the piece is to be quilted on a large frame and is either attached to the frame edges or to rollers you can start your quilting anywhere. But if using a small lap frame or hoop it's best to start in the center for the same reason you baste it that-a-way, less chance of shifting or distortion. That said, whatever works for YOU is the right way.
Title: Re: Quilters and those that would like to learn
Post by: Mullers Lane Farm on December 06, 2010, 08:35:17 AM
I just looked up mariners compass quilts .... OMG Wow!  Best of luck with that.  They are beautiful!

I don't know if I mentioned it on this thread, but the reason I am learning to quilt is I was given a wonderful basted wool batting that is HUGE!  I'm talking larger than a king sized.  It was given to me by a woman in her 90's ... and it was her grandmother's batt. I'm figuring it had to be from the late 1800's.  It is a very thick batting and is in wonderful condition. A bit thin on the edges, but nary a hole in it.  It had been stored in a cedar chest all these years.  I have it stored in a huge rubbermaid tote with various herbs soaked in essential oils to keep the bugs at bay.

I want to do a quilt pattern from the underground railroad.  I'll piece it by machine but will hand quilt it.