The Survival Podcast Forum

Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Medical Needs and First Aid => Topic started by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:41:13 PM

Title: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:41:13 PM
The following posts are something I put together over the last few months in my (rare) spare time.

I am often asked:
What medicines should I have on hand at my house?
Which medicines should I have for TEOTWAWKI? 
What medicines should I have that I can purchase without a prescription?
What medicines should I have if I had access to any prescription medication?

What I wanted to do was assemble a list of medications that are important in everyday life for me as a Family Medicine physician.  Some are common.  Some are not so common.  Some are used to treat common problems.  Some would only be used to treat rare problems.

At this point all medicines listed are for adults.  I will try and get to pediatric dosing next.

I do not talk about life expectancy for any medication.  The U.S. Military is currently conducting extensive testing with the FDA to examine the shelf life of medications.  None of that data is public information.  I have tried to gain access to the database for my own knowledge being in the military… I was denied.  I think it is safe to say that most medications can be safely used after the expiration date.  There are some notable exceptions that can be deadly.  I do not know what all of these deadly exceptions are, so I will not elaborate.  If in doubt, throw it out (or at least weigh the risks vs. benefits of using expired medications).

This list is long but not exhaustive.  I tried to be selective so as to not overwhelm someone trying to assemble a home pharmacy, but I also wanted to include commonly used (or commonly heard of) medications.

Depending on where you live (in the USA or not), some medications may or may not be available or may be sold under a different trade name.

I have medications listed by Major Category in each post. 
The medicines are listed by their generic name followed by the trade name if available or examples.
The next line is the indication for the medicine (what it is supposed to be used for). 
Under this is the regular dosing of the medication and, if available, the maximum dose.

**If you notice an error, please let me know so that I can check it and correct it if needed.  If you notice a glaring absence of an important medication, please let me know so I can add it as well.

KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS
I tried to avoid using abbreviations as much as possible, but a few are so easy to use…
PO = Per Oral (this means by mouth)
OTC = Over The Counter (this means you can buy this without a prescription)

OBLIGATORY COVER MY BUTT COMMENT:  I have gone to school for many years and have trained for many years to prescribe medications.  You most likely have not.  This is not meant to insult, but to show the importance and potentially dangerous effects of using any and all medications.  This list is only a list.  This is not a prescription.  This is not a diagnosis.  I may have some errors in this list, although I have tried to be as accurate as possible.  I am in no way responsible for the use or misuse of this list.  This list should not be used in place of utilizing a properly trained healthcare practitioner.  That would be foolish and potentially life-threatening.  Use at your own risk.  I do not knowingly own any stock or have any financial ties to any pharmaceutical or medication producing company that is or is not mentioned in this list. 

As always…
Hope this helps,
Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:41:50 PM
PAIN MEDICATIONS
You should have the OTC meds at a minimum.  
If you have prescription strength pain meds, caution should always be used.  Overdose is easy.
I have included Migraine medications in this section as well.  There are many Migraine meds out there; this is just a sampling.

OVER THE COUNTER

Acetominophen (Tylenol)
Pain, Fever
500 mg - 1,000 mg PO every 3-6 hrs (max 4,000mg in 24 hrs)

Ibuprofen (Motrin)
Pain, Fever
400 mg - 800 mg PO every 4-8 hrs (max 3,200 mg in 24 hrs)

Aspirin
Pain, Fever
325 mg - 650 mg PO every 2-4 hrs (max 4,000 mg in 24 hrs); Heart attack: 325 mg chewed

(edit: archer: added this from later in thread)
Naproxen sodium (Aleve)
Pain
200 mg PO every 8-12 hrs (max 600 mg per 24 hrs)

PRESCRIPTION

Naproxen (Naprosyn)
Pain
500 mg PO initially, then 250 mg every 6-8 hrs (max 1250 mg per 24 hrs)

Tramadol (Ultram)
Pain
50 mg - 100 mg PO every 4-6 hrs (max 400 mg per 24 hrs; may need to titrate up)

Tylenol-3 (acetaminophen 300 mg / codeine 30 mg)
Pain
1-2 tabs PO every 4-6 hrs; with food (max 4,000 mg acetaminophen in 24 hrs)

Percocet
Pain
Dosing varies

Lortab
Pain
Dosing varies

Darvocet N 100 (acetaminophen 650 mg / propoxyphene napsylate 100 mg)
Pain
1 tab PO every 4 hrs (max 6 tabs per 24 hrs)

Fentanyl
Pain
50 mcg - 100 mcg IV/IM every 1-2 hrs

Morphine sulfate
Pain
2.5 mg - 10 mg SC/IM/IV every 2-6 hrs

Ketorolac (Toradol)
Pain
30-60 mg IM (max 120 mg per 24 hrs)

Sumatriptan (Imitrex) - Oral
Migraines
Oral: 25-50 mg (with fluids); May repeat in 2 hours (max dose 200 mg in 24 hrs)

Sumatriptan (Imitrex) - Intranasal
Migraines
Intranasal: 5-20 mg in one nostril; May repeat in 2 hours (max dose 40 mg in 24 hrs)

Sumatriptan (Imitrex) - Sub Cutaneous
Migraines
SubQ: Up to 6 mg; May repeat in 1 hour (max dose 2 injections in 24 hrs)

Rizatriptan (Maxalt) - Oral Tablet or Oral Dissolving Tablet
Migraines
5-10 mg PO; May repeat in 2 hours (max dose 30 mg in 24 hrs)

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:42:30 PM
GI MEDICATIONS
Lots of stuff in here from dehydration to heartburn to motion sickness.
Note: Constipation is not a joke.  It can make your life miserable and could lead to serious medical problems.  If we ever have a TEOTWAWKI scenario, many people will get constipated from the drastic changes in everyday life.  Be proactive and eat some fiber.  1-3 bowel movements a day is normal.  25-30 grams of fiber a day is your goal.  Try to get there now… slowly.

OVER THE COUNTER

Oral Re-Hydration Salts (electrolyte replacement mix: Gatorade, etc.)
Dehydration
Use as directed on packaging

Loperimide (Imodium)
Diarrhea
4 mg PO x 1 dose; then 2 mg PO after each loose stool (max 16 mg in 24 hrs)

Pepto Bismol
Diarrhea
CHEWABLE TABS: 2 tabs PO every 30-60 minutes (max 16 tabs in 24 hrs)

Simethicone (Gas-X)
Gas
1-2 tabs PO (max 6 tabs in 24 hrs)

Calcium Carbonate (Tums, Rolaids, Maalox)
Heartburn
Tums: 2-4 tabs PO (Tums: Max 15 tabs per 24 hrs);  Rolaids: 1-2 tabs PO  (may repeat hourly if symptoms return)

Ranitidine (Zantac)
Heartburn/Reflux, Allergic Reactions
150 mg PO every 12-24 hrs (max 300 mg in 24 hrs)

Famotidine (Pepcid AC)
Heartburn/Reflux, Allergic Reactions
20-40 mg PO twice a day (max 80 mg in 24 hrs)

Magnesium Hydroxide (Milk of Magnesia 400mg/5ml)
Heartburn/Constipation
LIQUID: Heartburn - 5-15 mL as needed up to 4 times/day; Constipation - 30-60 mL at bedtime

Magnesium Hydroxide (Milk of Magnesia 311mg Tabs)
Heartburn/Constipation
TABLETS: Heartburn - 2-4 tablets needed up to 4 times/day; Constipation - 8 tablets at bedtime

Docusate (Colace)
Constipation
100 mg PO twice a day

Polyethylene Glycol 3350 (Miralex)
Constipation
17 g of powder (~1 heaping tablespoon) dissolved in 4-8 ounces of beverage, once daily; do not use for >2 weeks

Bisacodyl (Dulcolax)
Constipation
ORAL: 5-15 mg PO at bedtime (max 30 mg per 24 hrs); RECTAL: 10 mg rectally one time

Enema kit
Constipation
Use as directed on packaging

Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine)
Nausea, Motion Sickness
50-100 mg PO every 4-6 hours (max: 400 mg in 24 hrs)

Meclizine (Bonine)
Nausea, Motion Sickness
25-50 mg PO (max 100 mg per 24 hrs)

Prochlorperazine (Compazine) suppositories
Nausea, Vomiting
25 mg rectally twice daily

Promethazine (Phenergan) suppositories
Nausea, Vomiting, Allergic reaction
12.5-25 mg rectally twice daily

Activated charcoal
Poisoning
25-100 g PO as a single dose

Preparation H
Hemorrhoids
Use as directed on packaging


PRESCRIPTION

Esomeprazole (Nexium)
Heartburn/Reflux  
20 mg - 40 mg PO every 12-24 hrs; take 1 hr before meal (max 80 mg per 24 hrs)

Ondansetron Oral dissolving tablet (Zofran ODT)
Nausea
4-8 mg PO every 8 hrs (max 24 mg per 24 hrs)

Scopolamine Patch (Transderm Scop)
Motion Sickness
Apply 1 patch behind the ear at least 4 hours prior to exposure and every 3 days as needed

Dicyclomine (Bentyl)
Abdominal Cramping / Irritable Bowel Syndrome
20-40 mg by mouth every 6 hours as needed for cramping (max 160 mg per 24 hours)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:43:00 PM
ALLERGY MEDICATIONS
Allergies can range from annoying to life threatening.  There have been other posts about alternatives to an Epi-Pen.  I include Asthma medications in the Repiratory section.  Also note that some of these medications are used for other purposes.  Keep this in mind when stocking your pharmacy.  If one drug can do more than one job, consider it strongly.

OVER THE COUNTER

Sinus Rinse (Neil Med)
Allergies
Use as directed on box (1-2 rinses per day)

Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Allergic Reactions, Motion Sickness, Insomnia
25 mg - 50 mg PO every 4-6 hrs (max 100 mg per dose; max 400 mg per 24 hrs)

Loratidine (Claritin)
Allergies, Allergic Reaction
10 mg PO every 24 hrs (max 20 mg per 24 hrs for a few days)

Ceterizine (Zyrtec)
Allergies, Allergic Reaction
5-10 mg PO every 24 hrs (max 10 mg per 24 hrs)

Ranitidine (Zantac)
Heartburn/Reflux, Allergic Reactions
150 mg PO every 12-24 hrs (max 300 mg in 24 hrs)

Epinephrine Inhaled (Primatene Mist)
Allergic Reaction, Asthma
One inhalation, may repeat after one minute; wait 3 hours before using again


PRESCRIPTION

Epi-Pen
Anaphylactic Reaction (respiratory compromise)
0.3 mg IM x 1 dose; May repeat

Epi-Pen Jr
Anaphylactic Reaction (respiratory compromise)
0.15 mg IM x 1 dose; May repeat

Epinephrine vials with needles
Anaphylactic Reaction
0.1-0.5 mg (1:1000 soln) SC/IM every 5-15 minutes (Max 1 mg per dose)

Epinephrine vials with needles
Severe Asthma Attack
0.1-0.5 mg (1:1000 soln) SC/IM every 20 minutes - 4 hrs (Max 1 mg per dose)

Prednisone
Severe Asthma Attack; Many other reasons
40-80 mg PO every 12-24 hrs (max 80 mg per 24 hrs)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:43:29 PM
RESPIRATORY MEDICATIONS
The OTC meds are mainly for common cold issues.  The prescription meds are Asthma medications.  Antibiotics are addressed below.

OVER THE COUNTER

Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed)
Nasal congestion
30-60 mg every 4-6 hours (max 240 mg/24 hours)

Phenylephrine (Sudafed PE)
Nasal congestion
10-20 mg every 4 hours

Oxymetazoline (Afrin) - Decongestant nasal spray
Nasal congestion
2-3 sprays into each nostril twice daily (not to exceed 3 days)

Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Allergic Reactions, rhinorrhea
25 mg - 50 mg PO every 4-6 hrs (max 100 mg per dose; max 400 mg per 24 hrs)

Loratidine (Claritin)
Allergies, rhinorrhea
10 mg PO every 24 hrs (max 20 mg per 24 hrs for a few days)

Guaifenesin (Mucinex)
Cough, phlegm
600 mg tablets: 1-2 tabs PO every 12 hrs (Max 4 tabs per 24 hrs)

Dextromethorphan (Robitussin)
Cough
10-20 mg every 4 hours or 30 mg every 6-8 hours (max 120 mg/day)

Cough Drops
Cough
varies

Sore throat spray (Chloraseptic)
Sore throat
Use as directed on packaging

Dayquil
Cold/flu - combo of above meds
Use as directed on packaging

Nyquil
Cold/flu/sleep  - combo of above meds
Use as directed on packaging


PRESCRIPTION

Albuterol Inhaled (Proventil HFA)
Asthma wheezing (bronchospasm)
2 puffs inhaled every 4-6 hrs (max 12 puffs per day)

Levalbuterol Inhaled (Xopenex)
Asthma wheezing (bronchospasm)
2 puffs inhaled every 4-6 hrs (max 12 puffs per day)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:44:01 PM
SLEEP MEDICATIONS
I debated for some time about including sleep medications in this topic.
However, I decided to put them in after all, because sleep is so important.
Between simple things like travel and time zone changes, a person can easily lose focus and emotional stability without proper sleep.  If you are not sleeping well, nothing seems right, and hope is low.
So I included these medications.

OVER THE COUNTER

Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Insomnia - great place to start for insomnia
25 mg - 50 mg PO every 4-6 hrs (max 100 mg per dose; max 400 mg per 24 hrs)


PRESCRIPTION

Zolpidem (Ambien)
Insomnia - best for sleep initiation problems
5-10 mg PO at bedtime (max 10 mg per 24 hrs)

Zolpidem Continuous Release (Ambien CR)
Insomnia - best for sleep maintenance problems
12.5 mg PO at bedtime (max 12.5 mg per 24 hrs)

Eszopiclone (Lunesta)
Insomnia - alternative to Ambien CR
2 mg PO at bedtime (max 3 mg per 24 hrs)

Trazodone
Insomnia
25-50 mg PO at bedtime (may gradually work up to max of 200 mg at bedtime)

Tamazepam (Restoril)
Insomnia - can be used with Ambien if needed
15-30 mg PO at bedtime

Modafinil (Provigil)
Fatigue / Narcolepsy
200-400 mg by mouth one time per day (max 400 mg per 24 hrs)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:44:28 PM
TOPICAL SKIN MEDICATIONS
There are a ton of medications for the skin.  I only included ones that I commonly use or recommend.  That doesn’t mean that others are not just as good.  Specifically, I do want to mention the multiple antibiotic ointments (Polysporin, Neosporin).  Recent research has shown that these are not as good as single antibiotic ointments (like Bacitracin).  Also, Neosporin has a high rate of causing allergic-type skin reactions.


OVER THE COUNTER

Diaper Cream (Balmex, Desitin)
Heat Rashes, Chaffing
Apply topically to affected area 1-3 times per day

Aloe Vera
Burns, Sunburns
Apply topically to affected area in thin layer 3-4 times per day

Topical Benzocaine (Anbisol, Orajel)
Cold sores, Stings, Burns, Sunburns
Apply topically to affected area in thin layer 3-4 times per day

Topical Lidocaine Sting/Burn Relief Sprays (Safetec, Solarcaine, etc.)
Burns, Bites
Use as directed on packaging

Topical Antihistamines (Benadryl Cream)
Itching
Apply topically to affected area up to 3-4 times per day

Hydrocortisone Topical Steroid 1% (Cortaid, Cortizone)
Rash
Apply topically to affected area 2-4 times per day

Topical Antifungals (Tinactin, Lamisil, Lotrimin, Micotin)
Ringworm, Athletes foot, Jock itch, etc.
Apply topically to affected area 1-2 times per day

Bacitracin (topical antibiotic)
Topical antiseptic
Apply topically to affected area 1-5 times per day

Silver sulfadiazine 1% cream (Silvadene)
Topical antiseptic, Burns
Apply topically to affected area 1-2 times per day

Zanfel
Poison Ivy, Oak, Sumac
Scrub onto affected area for 15 seconds, rinse with water; May repeat until no itching remains


PRESCRIPTION

Mupirocin (Bactroban)
Topical skin infections (e.g. Impetigo)
Apply topically to affected area 3 times per day - watch closely for worsening

Topical Steroid (Multiple Higher Potency Meds Available)
Rash
Apply topically to affected area 2-4 times per day
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:44:49 PM
MISCELLANEOUS MEDICATIONS
Just a couple of things that didn’t fit easily into any other category.


Ammonia Smelling Salts
Passing out
Use as directed on packaging

Clotting Agents (QuikClot Combat Gauze)
Massive hemorrhage (bleeding)
Unroll gauze and pack in wound; hold with pressure - GET TO HIGHER LEVEL OF CARE ASAP!

Acetazolamide (Diamox)
Acute Mountain Sickness Prevention
250 mg PO twice a day (24-48 hrs before ascent, 48 hours after arrival at altitude)

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:45:48 PM
ENDOCRINE MEDICATIONS
I included the thyroid protection medication here for the almost impossibly needed use after radiation exposure.
If you have Diabetes or Thyroid problems, make sure you have plenty of medications on hand.  A short term disaster (e.g. a hurricane) can cause a city to shut down for a week.  This can lead to death if a person is not prepared.


OVER THE COUNTER

Potassium Iodide (ThyroSafe = 65 mg Tabs, ThyroShield=65 mg per mL)
Thyroid protection after radiation event
Adults
130 mg (2 tabs) PO per day until significant radiation exposure has passed;
Childrens Dosing: 
<1 month: 16.5 mg PO every 24 hrs (1/4 tab)
1mo-3yrs: 32.5 mg PO every 24 hrs (1/2 tab)
3-12 yrs: 65 mg PO every 24 hrs (1 tab)


PRESCRIPTION

Levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid)
Thyroid hormone replacement
Use as directed for Hypothyroidism

Glucose tabs (many brands out there)
Hypoglycemia
3-4 tablets PO as needed (Use as directed on packaging)

Glucose paste (Glutose paste)
Hypoglycemia
Use as directed on packaging

Insulin
Diabetes glucose control
Use as directed for Diabetes
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:46:12 PM
EYE MEDICATIONS
Eye injuries and infections need to be evaluated quickly.  If you are able, seek expert help.

OVER THE COUNTER

Rewetting Eye Drops
Dry eyes, Eye irritation
Use as directed on packaging


PRESCRIPTION

Erythromycin Ophthalmic 0.5% Ointment
Bacterial eye infections
Apply 1 cm ribbon of ointment to affected eye(s) 4-6x per day for 7-10 days

Ciprofloxacin Ophthalmic Ointment
Bacterial eye infections
Apply 1 cm ribbon of ointment to affected eye(s) 3x per day for 2 days then twice a day for 5 days

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:46:40 PM
DENTAL MEDICATIONS
Dental pain after a chipped tooth, cavity, or lost filling/cap can be very painful.  These are great items to have on hand in a bug out bag as well as at home.


OVER THE COUNTER

Temporary Filling Material (Cavit)
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Clean tooth, dry tooth, pack with temporary filling as directed, seek higher level of care ASAP

Temporary Filling Material (Intermediate Restorative Material)
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Clean tooth, dry tooth, pack with temporary filling as directed, seek higher level of care ASAP

Temporary Filling Material (Express Putty)
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Clean tooth, dry tooth, pack with temporary filling as directed, seek higher level of care ASAP

Zinc oxide powder
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Can mix with oil of cloves to make a paste to temporarily fill

Paraffin (dental wax) stick
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Can muse to temporarily fill

Oil of Cloves (Eugenol)
Tooth pain from loss of filling, crown, or cavity
Apply one drop of oil of cloves to affected tooth; cover with wax or temporary filling;  Alternatively, soak a cotton ball with mixture of a few drops Oil of Cloves and cooking oil and place on tooth - Either one provides temporary tooth pain relief

Kenalog in Orabase
Oral ulcer or painful oral lesion
Press a small dab (about 1/4 inch) to the lesion until a thin film develops - use only enough to coat the lesion with a thin film.

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:47:10 PM
ANTIVIRAL MEDICATION
If there is going to be one huge worldwide event that leads to TEOTWAWKI, the most likely is a viral pandemic.  There is not a lot you can do to treat a virus, but Elderberry has shown some promising results in recent research.  I included treatment and prophylactic doses of the most common prescription anti-flu medications we have currently available.

OVER THE COUNTER

Elderberry Extract (Sambucol)
Influenza prevention/treatment
Use as directed on packaging


PRESCRIPTION

Zanamivir (Relenza) - TREATMENT
Influenza Treatment
Two inhalations (10 mg total) twice daily for 5 days. Doses should be spaced by ~12 hours. Begin within 48 hrs of signs or symptoms.

Zanamivir (Relenza) - PROPHYLAXIS
Influenza Prophylaxis
Two inhalations (10 mg) once daily for 10 days. Begin within 36 hrs following onset of symptoms in index case; Community outbreak: Two inhalations (10 mg) once daily for 28 days. Begin within 5 days of outbreak.

Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) - TREATMENT
Influenza Treatment
75 mg PO twice daily initiated within 2 days of onset of symptoms; duration of treatment: 5 days

Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) - PROPHYLAXIS
Influenza Prophylaxis
75 mg PO once daily; initiate treatment within 2 days of contact with an infected individual; duration of treatment: 10 days.  Community outbreaks, dosing is 75 mg once daily. May be used for up to 6 weeks

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:47:41 PM
ANTIFUNGAL MEDICATIONS
“There is a fungus among us!”  
Keeping the area clean and dry goes a long way in prevention.


OVER THE COUNTER

Miconazole (Monistat)
Vaginal yeast infections
Suppository or Creams (Use as directed on packaging)

Topical Antifungals (Tinactin, Lamisil, Lotrimin, Micotin)
Ringworm, Athletes foot, Jock itch, etc.
Apply topically to affected area 1-2 times per day


PRESCRIPTION

Nystatin (swish and swallow, cream, or powder)
Thrush, Topical skin infections
Oral Swish and Swallow formulation - 4 x per day; Cream - Apply topically to affected area 2-3 times per day; Use powder for moist areas

Oral Antifungals
Nail fungal infections, Severe fungal infections
Use as directed (based on the medication); Should only be used if proper lab work is available
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:48:18 PM
ANTIBIOTIC MEDICATIONS
I debated about putting this section in here.  There are so many antibiotics on the market.  Some are extremely expensive.  All ones designed for humans are prescription only.  I will not go into the use of antibiotics sold for animals… because I just don’t know enough about that to talk about it.

I first list common infections and the antibiotics that can be used.  The antibiotics are basically placed in order of preference/usefulness for that infection.  Yes, you can treat many of these infections with other antibiotics.  I tried to keep it simple, and I tried to keep it with oral antibiotics only.  If you need IV antibiotics, you should be in a hospital or under the care of a professional.

Following the list of infections, I have the actual antibiotics listed with the dosages following (for each specific infection type).  Again, not all indications and dosages are listed.  But this will give you a good start.


INFECTIONS

Strep Throat
Penicillin V, Amoxicillin, Cephalexin, Azithromycin

Pneumonia (mild to moderate, uncomplicated)
Azithromycin, Amoxicillin, Augmentiin, Doxycycline, Levofloxacin

Pneumonia (severe, complicated)
IV medication is needed

Mild Skin Infections
Cephalexin, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin

Moderate Skin Infections
EITHER Clindamycin or Penicillin V potassium AND Doxycycline or Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole

Severe Skin Infections
If it is an extensive infection or very rapidly spreading, IV medication is needed

Erysipelas (Skin Infection)
Mild: Penicillin V potassium or Amoxicillin;  Severe: IV medication is needed

Bite Wounds (Mild): Animal Bites
Augmentin; Doxycyline or Trimeth.-sulfameth. or Penicillin VK PLUS Metronidazole or Clindamycin

Bite Wounds (Mild): Human Bites
Augmentin;  Doxycyline or Trimeth.-sulfameth. or Penicillin VK or Cipro. PLUS Metronidazole or Clindamycin

Bite Wounds:  Infected
IV medication is needed; Surgery is likely needed

Bacterial Inner Ear Infections
Amoxicillin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Augmentin

Bacterial Outer Ear Infections
Cipro HC Otic (ear), Cortisporin Otic Suspension/Solution (ear)

Bacterial Eye Infections
Erythromycin Ophthalmic, Ciprofloxacin Ophthalmic Ointment

Urinary Tract Infections
Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin, Cephalexin, Doxycycline

Kidney Infections
Levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole PLUS Amoxicillin

Travelers Diarrhea
Ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, Azithromycin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole

Cholera
Oral rehydration therapy and/or IV rehydration is first line; Doxycycline, Ciprofloxacin

Giardia
Metronidazole

Serious GI Infections
Many of these infections will need IV medications;  Milder cases may benefit w/ Augmentin, Ciprofloxacin, Metronidazole

Tick-Borne Diseases
Doxycycline

Anthrax
Doxycycline, Levofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Clindamycin

Plague
Doxycycline, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Tetracycline
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 06:48:41 PM
ANTIBIOTICS

Amoxicillin (Amoxil)
Community Acquired Pneumonia:  500-1,000 mg PO three times daily for 7-10 days
Bacterial Inner Ear Infection:  Mild-Mod: 500 mg PO twice daily or 250 mg PO three times daily;  Severe: 875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily


Amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium (Augmentin)
Bacterial Inner Ear Infection:  875 mg PO twice daily
Acute bacterial sinus infection:  Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for 10 days
Community Acquired Pneumonia:  Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for 7-10 days
Skin abscess:  875 mg PO twice daily
Bite Wounds (Human/animal):  875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily
Kidney Infection (uncomplicated):  875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily
Diverticulitis, Perirectal abscess:  Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for 7-10 days


Azithromycin (Zithromax)
Mild-to-mod respiratory tract, skin, soft tissue infxns:  500 mg PO in a single loading dose on day 1 followed by 250 mg PO daily on days 2-5
Community Acquired Pneumonia:  500 mg IV daily for at least 2 days, then 500 mg PO daily to complete a 7- to 10-day course of therapy
Bacterial Sinus Infection:  500 mg PO daily for 3 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Traveler's Diarrhea:  500 mg PO daily for 1-3 days or 1 gram PO in a single dose
STD Infections (Chlamydia, Chancroid, Gonorrhea):  Chlamydia, Chancroid: 1 gram PO one time;   Gonorrhea 2 grams PO one time


Cephalexin (Keflex)
Mild skin infection (small abscess, boils, etc.):  250 mg PO four times daily (max 4,000 mg in 24 hrs)
Moderate skin infection (mastitis, cellulitis, etc.):  500 mg PO four times daily (max 4,000 mg in 24 hrs)
Acute bacterial pharyngitis ("Strep throat"):  500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Uncomplicated Urinary Tract (Bladder) Infections:  500 mg PO twice daily for 7-14 days


Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
Anthrax (inhalational - prophylaxis):  500 mg PO twice daily for 60 days or 400 mg IV twice daily for 60 days
Anthrax (inhalational, GI, skin - treatment):  400 mg IV twice daily initially then transition to 500 mg PO twice daily for total of 60 days
Bone/Joint Infection:  Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400 mg IV twice daily for 4-6 weeks; Severe: 400 mg IV three times daily for 4-6 weeks
Skin Infections:  Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days; Severe: 400 mg IV three times daily for 7-14 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Travelers Diarrhea:  Mild: 750 mg PO x 1 dose; Severe: 500 mg PO twice daily for 3 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Shigella or Salmonella:  500 mg PO twice daily for 3-7 days
Infectious Diarrhea – Cholera:  1 gram PO x one dose
Abdominal Infections (Diverticulitis, Abscess, etc.):  500 mg PO twice daily or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days
Lung Infections:  Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400  mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days; Severe: 400 mg IV three times daily for 7-14 days
Typhoid Fever:  500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Bacterial Sinus Infection:  500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Urinary Tract (Bladder) / Kidney Infection:  Mild: 250 mg PO or 200  mg IV twice daily for 3 days; Severe: 500 mg PO twice daily or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days


Clindamycin (Cleosin)
Anthrax:  900 mg IV every 8 hours with ciprofloxacin or doxycycline
Bite wounds (canine):  300 mg PO four times daily; take with a fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin)
Skin infections:  150-300 mg PO four times daily; Use with Doxycycline or Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra)
Severe nose/throat infections:  150-450 mg PO four times daily for at least 7 days (max 1,800 mg per 24 hrs)


Doxycycline
Tick borne diseases:  100 mg PO twice daily for 14-21 days
Infectious Diarrhea – Cholera:  300 mg PO as a single dose
STD, Urinary Infections:  100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 7-28 days
Lung infections:  100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 7-14 days
Anthrax (inhalational - prophylaxis):  100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 60 days (PO preferred)
Anthrax (inhalational, GI, skin - treatment):  100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 60 days (IV for initial treatment, then switch to PO)


Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
Skin Infections:  Uncomplicated: 500 mg PO daily for 7-10 days; Complicated: 750 mg PO daily for 7-14 days
Lung Infections (community acquired pneumonia):  500 mg PO/IV daily for 7-14 days or 750 mg PO/IV daily for 5 days
Lung Infections (serious lung infections/pneumonia):  750 mg PO/IV daily for 7-14 days
Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections:  250 mg PO/IV daily for 3 days
Complicated: Urinary Tract /Kidney Infections:  250 mg PO/IV daily for 10 days or 750 PO/IV daily for 5 days
Anthrax (inhalational):  500 mg PO daily for 60 days beginning ASAP after exposure


Metronidazole (Flagyl)
Bacterial Vaginosis:  500 mg PO twice daily for 7 days
Trichomonas Infection:  250 mg PO three times daily for 7 days or 2 grams PO as a single dose
Anaerobic GI Infection (Diverticulitis, Abscess, etc.):  500 mg PO/IV every 6-8 hrs (max dose 4 grams daily)
Giardia Infection:  500 mg PO twice daily for 5-7 days
Amoeba Infection:  500-750 mg PO three times daily for 5-10 days


Penicillin VK (Penicillin V potassium)
Acute bacterial pharyngitis ("Strep throat"):  500 mg PO 3-4 times daily for 10 days
Skin infections (Erysipelas):  500 mg PO four times daily  


Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra)
DOSING
Single Strength (SS) Tablet: Sulfamethoxazole 400 mg and trimethoprim 80 mg
Double Strength (DS) Tablet is 2 SS tabs in one tablet
USE
Urinary Tract /Kidney Infections:  1 DS Tablet PO twice a day for 3-5 days (Mild); for 7-10 days (complicated); for 14 days (Kidney Infection)
Infectious Diarrhea - Travelers Diarrhea/Shigella:  1 DS Tablet PO twice a day for 5 days
Skin Infections (including MRSA):  1-2 DS Tablets PO twice a day
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Heavy G on March 19, 2010, 07:03:44 PM
+1, Doc.  Actually, +2.  Outstanding.  This is why this forum is so awesome.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: antsyaunt on March 19, 2010, 07:26:09 PM
Unbelievable!  What a treasure.  wow.  Thanks so much.  Now it's time to try to find some of these products. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Docwatmo on March 19, 2010, 07:37:00 PM
Amazing!  That is a 1000% better than anything I've found online or in books to date.  I've been compiling a list of "must have" stuff for my kits and didnt' even scratch the surface.

+1 x infinity squared. :)

Thank you for this.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: CGFxColoneill on March 19, 2010, 07:44:07 PM
awesome thread...very useful information

thanks for putting all this work into it +1
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: LvsChant on March 19, 2010, 07:52:03 PM
+1... really wish I could give you +100! This is great information.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Orionblade on March 19, 2010, 08:45:07 PM
Awesome listing.

Quick question - Any more info on alternate therapies for tick bites would be appreciated, since this was several years ago that I was treated, but I'm allergic to Doxycycline! (o noez!)

I found out the hard way. Woke up unable to move after a tick bite, nurse practitioner prescribed doxy, woke up the next morning feeling 100% better, but had bumps everywhere. IIRC, the alternate treatment was penicillin for something ridiculous like 6 or 8 weeks, but again, it was a couple years ago, and not the most pleasant few weeks of recovering from epithelial bumpies (did I mention they were everywhere?)

Thanks!!!!


+1x10^10


Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: kiteflyer on March 19, 2010, 08:49:49 PM
  Thanks Doc! One thing a nurse recommended was a hot water bottle with an edema attachment for dehydration when too ill to drink. A salt solution if I remember right right up the &*^$% and the colon will absorb the solution and save your life.

          kiteflyer
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 19, 2010, 08:55:10 PM
 Thanks Doc! One thing a nurse recommended was a hot water bottle with an edema attachment for dehydration when too ill to drink. A salt solution if I remember right right up the &*^$% and the colon will absorb the solution and save your life.

          kiteflyer

Yep!  Transrectal rehydration.  If you don't have the ability (or knowledge) to give an IV, you can give an enema (without purging) to rehydrate.  There was an article on this last year in Wilderness and Environmental Medicine.  I'll see if I can find it...
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Schmidt on March 19, 2010, 09:48:35 PM

OVER THE COUNTER

...

Ibuprofen (Motrin)
Pain, Fever
400 mg - 800 mg PO every 4-8 hrs (max 3,200 mg in 24 hrs)

...

PRESCRIPTION

...

Naproxen (Naprosyn)
Pain
500 mg PO initially, then 250 mg every 6-8 hrs (max 1250 mg per 24 hrs)

...



Thanks for writing this out.

I have a few of medicine related questions:

I have seen both ibuprofen and naproxen sold both over the counter and with prescription. I assumed it had something to do with health insurance paying for the prescription and not the over the counter. But Claritin used to be prescription but is now over the counter and not available as a prescription. So why is ibuprofen and naproxen sold with prescription if Claritin isn't?

Second, I was prescribed codeine after a wisdom tooth extraction, took as recommended, and it didn't abate the pain at all. Also, a time when I was having my arm sew shut a nurse told me I could have double the max dosage recommended on the over the counter ibuprofen bottle. I am roughly twice the size of a normal person. Can I double the amount of most medications? Is that dangerous or ineffectual? Of if self medicating start at the recommended and increase till it's effective.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Rorschach on March 19, 2010, 10:01:08 PM
Some of the medications in the list can be purchase generically for $4 for a treatment quantity or for a months worth at Wal-mart (http://i.walmart.com/i/if/hmp/fusion/genericdruglist.pdf (http://i.walmart.com/i/if/hmp/fusion/genericdruglist.pdf)).  For instance in antibiotics are penicillin, amoxicillin, cephalexin (Keflex), ciprofloxin, doxycyline, erythromycin, metronidzole(Flagyl), SMZ-TMP(Bactrim), and Tetracycline.  Some of the medicines, such as the antibiotics are listed in both pills and liquids, so they can be dosed for kids also.  If you are going to get an extra prescription in liquid they are often powder that is reconstituted.  If you would like to store them long term, except tetracycline, when you get to the pharmacy you will need to ask them not to mix it for you.  Having a Sanford Antibiotic Guide (www.sanfordguide.com/ (http://www.sanfordguide.com/)) and a Portable book or electronic dosing resource (http://www.tarascon.com/products/ (http://www.tarascon.com/products/)) would be helpful for your BOB.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: archer on March 19, 2010, 10:36:12 PM
+1(00)! Doc! This is a great list! Good job! Thanks!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Asclepius on March 19, 2010, 11:33:19 PM
Thank you Doc K =)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Orionblade on March 20, 2010, 05:17:07 AM
Yep!  Transrectal rehydration.  If you don't have the ability (or knowledge) to give an IV, you can give an enema (without purging) to rehydrate.  There was an article on this last year in Wilderness and Environmental Medicine.  I'll see if I can find it...

That sounds like it's got to be at least the second or third most comfortable thing to do in all the Galaxy.

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 20, 2010, 07:27:31 AM
I have seen both ibuprofen and naproxen sold both over the counter and with prescription.... So why is ibuprofen and naproxen sold with prescription if Claritin isn't?

Ibuprofen is sold OTC in 200 mg doses.  Ibuprofen 400 mg , 600 mg , and 800 mg dose tablets are usually "prescription" strength and therefore requires a prescription.  There are some places (like military pharmacies) that will prescribe the 200 mg tablets (and other OTC meds, like Tylenol) so that the retiree can get them for free.

I did have an accidental ommission in the OTC Pain meds.  Naproxen sodium (Aleve) is sold over the counter:

Naproxen sodium (Aleve)
Pain
200 mg PO every 8-12 hrs (max 600 mg per 24 hrs)

Napoxen sodium (Aleve) is OTC and Naproxen (Naprosyn) is prescription strength.

The other reason some meds are sold by prescription and some are not are the potential for harm that the average sheeple could do to themselves.
I also would not discount a capitalistic and/or bureaucrat component to the whole thing.  ;)



I was prescribed codeine...and it didn't abate the pain at all. Also, a time when I was having my arm sew shut a nurse told me I could have double the max dosage recommended on the over the counter ibuprofen bottle. I am roughly twice the size of a normal person. Can I double the amount of most medications? Is that dangerous or ineffectual? Of if self medicating start at the recommended and increase till it's effective.

I, too am larger than the average person.  Certain medications are weight based, but many are not.  When it comes to pain medicine, these usually have a weight based component for effect but not always with side effects.  Meaning:  It may take more pain meds to get the pain-relieving effects, but that dose could cause liver or kidney damage.  Next time you see your doc, ask about the appropriate dosing "for future reference" if you ever need it.



Quick question - Any more info on alternate therapies for tick bites would be appreciated, since this was several years ago that I was treated, but I'm allergic to Doxycycline! (o noez!)

Doxycyline really is the drug of choice for a lot of the Tick Borne Diseases (e.g. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever).  Chloamphenicol 20 mg/kg IV every 6 hrs (max 4 grams in 24 hrs) is the only other verified medication.  However, the modern flouroquinolones (like Ciprofloxacin and Levofloxacin) show some likely coverage in vitro (test tube) testing only.  My thoughts are to get the IV meds while you can, but use flouroquinolones if you can't get Chloamphenicol.


Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: TwoBluesMama on March 20, 2010, 11:02:33 AM
Thanks Doc K - this is incredibly helpful. +1 for a great post.  I've been working on our first aid kit (which is huge and we take it on every trip farther than just around our local area) and I will now go through it again and add what is not there from your list.  One question (and maybe I already missed your answer to this?) how does one acquire some of these meds that are prescription?  My Doc is great in that he gives me prescriptions for a couple of different antibotics to keep on hand (with Lupus something minor can turn major in just a day or two) but beyond that I am stumped.  I've talked to him a little about survivalism and prepping - he gets some of it but I fear he is afraid to prescribe anything more than my regular meds and antibotics so as not to get in any trouble. Thanks again for absolutely great post.  TBM
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: rjselzler on March 20, 2010, 12:39:44 PM
Awesome list! What about melatonin as a sleep aid?
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: phargolf on March 20, 2010, 12:57:50 PM
Great list Doc K. Again you impress me with your knowledge of drugs, no offense intended but most physicians(or pharmacists) do not have your extensive knowledge of drugs. I looked over your list twice and couldn't think of a thing you left out (except maybe some lidocaine or septocaine inj. for dental work, but again i am not a dentist).
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 20, 2010, 01:03:31 PM
One question (and maybe I already missed your answer to this?) how does one acquire some of these meds that are prescription?  ... I fear he is afraid to prescribe anything more than my regular meds and antibotics so as not to get in any trouble.

This is a very common question in "prepper" communities.  Unfortunately, there is no easy answer.  I won't get into the constitutionality of this, but this is a real issue for those who want to be prepared.

I think the main prescription medicines that people would like access to are pain meds, epinepherine injectables, and antibiotics.

Pain meds - This is almost impossible for a person to get a prescription for if you do not need it immediately.  This is the type of medicine that physicians WILL get in to trouble for prescribing without an active diagnosis.  If you ask for some when you don't need it, you will be labelled a drug seeker, and the physician will be very concerned about what illegal activity you are involved.  To be honest, even when a person does need it, if they ask for a presciption-only pain med, physicians will be skeptical.  I'm not saying that is right.  I'm just saying how it is.  
My advice: Unfortunately, just don't ask for it.  If you have a medical condition that requires some of it, try not to use it all and save the rest.  Nothing illegal about that.  It is your medicine prescribed to you.  But you also have to remember that these medicines are prescription only for a reason... real harm, addiction, and death can, has, and does occur because of these medicines.  Be wise as a serpent and innocent as a dove.

Epinepherine Injectable Medicine (e.g. Epi-Pens) - You will have a wide range of physicians' opinions on this medicine, but I am very quick to prescribe this type of medicine.  There is always a risk in using any medicine, but this one has low risk for negative effects.   It has a very high chance of being the one medicine that can save a life when nothing else will do.  I have prescribed this to bee-keepers (even if they have never had a reaction), to people with known allergic reactions that caused neck/airway swelling in the past, to people who have had mild, but worsening reactions to a substance (like shrimp for example) to have on hand if it does become severe, and I even prescribed it to a fire-fighter who was very allergic to poison-ivy and was doing a field burn (he was concerned, and it is true, that poison-ivy smoke will cause a reaction if he breathed it in).  
My advice: Come up with a good, and legitimate, reason to have one on hand and ask for it.  Don't make something up (as has been said by another one of the physicians on this board - Physicians have a good BS-meter.  We have to use it way too much unfortunately.  Don't push it, and be polite.  You never know.

Antibiotics - Very tough one.  There is way too much overprescription when it is not needed, and then physicians won't prescribe some for a person to use when it is needed (but just not yet).  The big problem with having antibiotics on hand to use when...  is that most of you did not train for years and years and have seen hundreds or thousands of patients to determine the difference between a condition that needs no antibiotics, oral antibiotics, IV antibiotics, or IV antibiotics and surgical intervention.  If you make the wrong choice because you thought wrong, someone could die.  I am not trying to be over dramatic, or to say that physicians are never wrong (Lord knows that is not true).  That is why we call it the practice of medicine.  But we have a lot more practice.  Heck, even Michael Jordan still practiced basketball, but I would want him on my team.
My advice: I think it is very legitimate to ask for an antibiotic prescription to treat Travelers Diarrhea before a trip - just in case.  If you don't need it, save it in an airtight, dark, cool, dry place.  Most other antibiotics will be harder to ask for legitimately.  


Sorry for not being able to give a great method to acquire some of these medicines.  But I think the knowledge of what to use is still very important.  In a TEOTWAWKI situation, no prescription will be needed.  But you will have to know what to barter/scrounge for effectively.  This information may help.

Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 20, 2010, 01:07:44 PM
Awesome list! What about melatonin as a sleep aid?

I think it can and does work for some people (is it just placebo... ???  I don't think we know that yet). 
But it is basically a pretty safe substance to take (but, as always, any thing you put into you body to change/alter/treat one thing, may do something else to another part of your body.  There is no such thing as a safe anything.  Even water can kill.)

Not a bad thing to add to your kit if it works for you.

Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 20, 2010, 01:09:10 PM
I looked over your list twice and couldn't think of a thing you left out (except maybe some lidocaine or septocaine inj. for dental work, but again i am not a dentist).

I am actually saving those meds for another post on minor surgery.  It may take a while to get it finished, but I'm working on it! :)

Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: The Wilderness on March 20, 2010, 01:21:47 PM
Doc K

What a valuable resource! Thank you so much for taking the time to do this.

I am in awe of this post, WOW!

TW
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Riverman on March 20, 2010, 01:49:37 PM
Doc K thanks so much for this info...it is very useful. I do have a question for you. If we are able to get excess antibiotics....what is the best method to prolong their shelf life?

Riverman
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: OKGranny on March 20, 2010, 02:08:58 PM
Thanks, this is great. I'm pretty well covered on the antibiotics, I have cipro and a amoxicillin and doxycycline with refills as my doctor has been my doctor forever and knows I know when to take what and I have Epinepherine in the form of epi-pens but there are a few things I still need to add.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: SaltyHobbit on March 20, 2010, 03:26:40 PM
+1 great extensive post. Good info for all
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Dainty on March 20, 2010, 05:13:22 PM
Doc K, I registered just so I could reply to this post. Feel special. ;D

I wanted to know, what natural remedies would you recommend as sufficient substitutes for some of these medications? Two possibilities that immediately came to my mind was willow bark instead of Aspirin and caprylic acid as an antifungal. I'd be interested to hear your take on these and any others you care to share about.

I've read your post here (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=8782.0) about your thoughts on herbal medicine and found it very balanced and helpful. I was wondering if you might be willing to elaborate on the specifics if which herbs you think generally "work".
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: TwoBluesMama on March 20, 2010, 05:17:41 PM
This is a very common question in "prepper" communities.  Unfortunately, there is no easy answer.  I won't get into the constitutionality of this, but this is a real issue for those who want to be prepared.

I think the main prescription medicines that people would like access to are pain meds, epinepherine injectables, and antibiotics.

Pain meds - This is almost impossible for a person to get a prescription for if you do not need it immediately.  This is the type of medicine that physicians WILL get in to trouble for prescribing without an active diagnosis.  If you ask for some when you don't need it, you will be labelled a drug seeker, and the physician will be very concerned about what illegal activity you are involved.  To be honest, even when a person does need it, if they ask for a presciption-only pain med, physicians will be skeptical.  I'm not saying that is right.  I'm just saying how it is. 
My advice: Unfortunately, just don't ask for it.  If you have a medical condition that requires some of it, try not to use it all and save the rest.  Nothing illegal about that.  It is your medicine prescribed to you.  But you also have to remember that these medicines are prescription only for a reason... real harm, addiction, and death can, has, and does occur because of these medicines.  Be wise as a serpent and innocent as a dove.

Epinepherine Injectable Medicine (e.g. Epi-Pens) - You will have a wide range of physicians' opinions on this medicine, but I am very quick to prescribe this type of medicine.  There is always a risk in using any medicine, but this one has low risk for negative effects.   It has a very high chance of being the one medicine that can save a life when nothing else will do.  I have prescribed this to bee-keepers (even if they have never had a reaction), to people with known allergic reactions that caused neck/airway swelling in the past, to people who have had mild, but worsening reactions to a substance (like shrimp for example) to have on hand if it does become severe, and I even prescribed it to a fire-fighter who was very allergic to poison-ivy and was doing a field burn (he was concerned, and it is true, that poison-ivy smoke will cause a reaction if he breathed it in). 
My advice: Come up with a good, and legitimate, reason to have one on hand and ask for it.  Don't make something up (as has been said by another one of the physicians on this board - Physicians have a good BS-meter.  We have to use it way too much unfortunately.  Don't push it, and be polite.  You never know.

Antibiotics - Very tough one.  There is way too much overprescription when it is not needed, and then physicians won't prescribe some for a person to use when it is needed (but just not yet).  The big problem with having antibiotics on hand to use when...  is that most of you did not train for years and years and have seen hundreds or thousands of patients to determine the difference between a condition that needs no antibiotics, oral antibiotics, IV antibiotics, or IV antibiotics and surgical intervention.  If you make the wrong choice because you thought wrong, someone could die.  I am not trying to be over dramatic, or to say that physicians are never wrong (Lord knows that is not true).  That is why we call it the practice of medicine.  But we have a lot more practice.  Heck, even Michael Jordan still practiced basketball, but I would want him on my team.
My advice: I think it is very legitimate to ask for an antibiotic prescription to treat Travelers Diarrhea before a trip - just in case.  If you don't need it, save it in an airtight, dark, cool, dry place.  Most other antibiotics will be harder to ask for legitimately. 


Sorry for not being able to give a great method to acquire some of these medicines.  But I think the knowledge of what to use is still very important.  In a TEOTWAWKI situation, no prescription will be needed.  But you will have to know what to barter/scrounge for effectively.  This information may help.

Doc K

Thank you so much!  This is the best advice I've gotten on this subject - I appreciate what you did here for all of us.  Blessings, TBM
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: tman61 on March 20, 2010, 05:29:09 PM
Fantastic list!  Thank you!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Dainty on March 20, 2010, 05:33:25 PM
Yikes, I meant for my last post to include a big thank you but I somehow forgot it! Thank you, Doc K, for taking the time and effort to write all that information out for us.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 20, 2010, 06:59:05 PM
If we are able to get excess antibiotics....what is the best method to prolong their shelf life?

Riverman

If you have medicine that you are not going to use for some time, you want to store it in a cool, dry, dark, airtight location.
Air, moisture, heat, and light are the enemies.

Vacuum seal with an oxygen absorber and dessicant (silica) packet followed by storing in an opaque (doesn't allow light in) box in the basement or refrigerator would be the ideal location for most medications, and will give the longest shelf life. 
This isn't practical for a lot of people, but it is the best.  The closest you can get to these conditions will allow the medicine to last as long as possible.

Most pharmacies will put an expiration date of one year from the filling date of the prescription on the bottle.  This is not the same date as the original, airtight packaging. 

As I said earlier, we do not know how long most medicines will last and still work.  It is likely much longer (3-10+ years??) than the original expiration date if kept in ideal conditions, maybe longer.  But if it is kept in the big bottle from the pharmacy in your car for 3 months... I wouldn't trust it to work for too long.

Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 20, 2010, 07:12:18 PM
Doc K, I registered just so I could reply to this post. Feel special. ;D

Thanks!  I really do!   :D


I wanted to know, what natural remedies would you recommend as sufficient substitutes for some of these medications? Two possibilities that immediately came to my mind was willow bark instead of Aspirin and caprylic acid as an antifungal. I'd be interested to hear your take on these and any others you care to share about.

I've read your post here (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=8782.0) about your thoughts on herbal medicine and found it very balanced and helpful. I was wondering if you might be willing to elaborate on the specifics if which herbs you think generally "work".

That is another one of my projects.  I hope to provide a thorough review of the most useful, reliable, and readily available herbal and alternative/complimentary medicines out there.  As I said in the above post, I think there is a place for herbal medicine in the "modern" world.  If the modern world stops being so modern (like after a solar flare EMP or other calamity), all we may have are plant based medicines.  I feel that physicians need to understand what works and doesn't and why, as well as what is safe.

I hope in the near future to have the time to devote a post to these medicines.  Stay tuned!  ;D

Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: archer on March 21, 2010, 09:04:58 AM
I did have an accidental ommission in the OTC Pain meds.  Naproxen sodium (Aleve) is sold over the counter:

Naproxen sodium (Aleve)
Pain
200 mg PO every 8-12 hrs (max 600 mg per 24 hrs)
I added this to the appropriate area.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: asbestos on March 22, 2010, 02:32:01 PM
I didn't see Modafinil (Provigil/Alertec et al.) in the list. For those who have never heard of it, it's a drug which is used in the treatment of fatigue and narcolepsy. The military uses it to help pilots who need to fly 30hr+ missions maintain alertness, forgo sleep, and still function at near peak capacity.

It would be an extremely valuable post-disaster aid (e.g. you have to spend 18-24 hours in your car driving), and is safe for most people to use. It has vague enough indications for use that it shouldn't be a problem to obtain; especially if, like me, you have a job which requires you to work extremely long and irregular hours for weeks at a time. It's not an amphetamine, and has low potential for addiction.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Fishingphoul on March 25, 2010, 10:01:15 PM
I will like I'm beating a dead horse but . Thank you Doc great work . Now can you add to it some. or put a pamphlet together ?
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: swoods on March 26, 2010, 08:40:28 AM
Wow, what an effort you put into this. Thanks so much. I love this forum and the amount of info that is available.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Lara on March 26, 2010, 07:39:49 PM
Thank you so much for this wonderful resource.  We seem to have MANY of the same meds in our must-have lists.  ;)

I have one med to add to the GI section, and forgive me if I overlooked it on your list:

Dicyclomine 20 mg po four times daily as needed for GI cramping.  Since many wilderness ailments include diarrhea/cramping, this can be very useful.  I've seen many people faint from severe cramping, and this can make them more able to self-rescue and walk to a higher level of care.

And...one thing to add to the discussion about Doxycycline and prolonged storage, since it's so handy to keep around for tickborne rickettsial diseases.  As tempting as it is to hang onto Doxycycline, it can degrade with prolonged storage, and can cause acute renal failure (laypeople read as: general kidney BADness) if it is used too long after the expiration date.

My two cents...thanks again for a wonderful series of posts.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: ozarked on March 26, 2010, 09:59:09 PM
Thanks, Doc.  Hope to buy you a beer someday.  This list is (ahem) just what the doctor ordered when trying to put together my TEOTWAWKI medicine chest.

One quick question.  The major problem faced by diabetics is their inability to store sufficient quantities of insulin long term.  Would reverting to oral meds such as Metformin (because they are easier to store) be of any benefit?  In other words, would they lower BS at all?
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: antsyaunt on March 27, 2010, 01:36:41 PM
Thanks Doc K - this is incredibly helpful. +1 for a great post.  I've been working on our first aid kit (which is huge and we take it on every trip farther than just around our local area) and I will now go through it again and add what is not there from your list.  One question (and maybe I already missed your answer to this?) how does one acquire some of these meds that are prescription?  My Doc is great in that he gives me prescriptions for a couple of different antibotics to keep on hand (with Lupus something minor can turn major in just a day or two) but beyond that I am stumped.  I've talked to him a little about survivalism and prepping - he gets some of it but I fear he is afraid to prescribe anything more than my regular meds and antibotics so as not to get in any trouble. Thanks again for absolutely great post.  TBM

Doc K, what do you think of people storing/using antibiotics that are made for animals?  I have seen links posted to veterinary supplies such as antibiotic capsules to use for fish.  Would this be worth pursuing IF correct dosing information for humans (such as that provided by epocrates) would be referenced before administration of the antibiotic?  I'd be interested in your thoughts and those of other health care providers and pharmacists. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 28, 2010, 03:31:10 PM
I didn't see Modafinil (Provigil/Alertec et al.) in the list. For those who have never heard of it, it's a drug which is used in the treatment of fatigue and narcolepsy. The military uses it to help pilots who need to fly 30hr+ missions maintain alertness, forgo sleep, and still function at near peak capacity.

It would be an extremely valuable post-disaster aid (e.g. you have to spend 18-24 hours in your car driving), and is safe for most people to use. It has vague enough indications for use that it shouldn't be a problem to obtain; especially if, like me, you have a job which requires you to work extremely long and irregular hours for weeks at a time. It's not an amphetamine, and has low potential for addiction.

Good thoughts.

Indeed this one is used in the military.  While it is not addictive, there is potential for abuse (as is the case with many medications).  With that said, if you are a person who would need to stay awake, this one may not be a bad one to add to your pharmaceutical arsenal.  For a general survival concept though, it is best to travel in numbers.  It is best to let your body sleep when it is tired.  Lack of sleep will lead to bad decisions and a poor outlook when you need a positive attitude the most.

Modafinil (Provigil)
Fatigue / Narcolepsy
200-400 mg by mouth one time per day (max 400 mg per 24 hrs)
(Maybe Archer can work his magic and add this to the sleep section???  ;))


I have one med to add to the GI section, and forgive me if I overlooked it on your list: Dicyclomine 20 mg po four times daily as needed for GI cramping.  Since many wilderness ailments include diarrhea/cramping, this can be very useful.  I've seen many people faint from severe cramping, and this can make them more able to self-rescue and walk to a higher level of care.

Great addition!

Dicyclomine (Bentyl)
Abdominal Cramping / Irritable Bowel Syndrome
20-40 mg by mouth every 6 hours as needed for cramping (max 160 mg per 24 hours)
(Maybe Archer can work his magic AGAIN and add this to the GI section!)

And...one thing to add to the discussion about Doxycycline and prolonged storage, since it's so handy to keep around for tickborne rickettsial diseases.  As tempting as it is to hang onto Doxycycline, it can degrade with prolonged storage, and can cause acute renal failure (laypeople read as: general kidney BADness) if it is used too long after the expiration date.

Really important point here.  As I said in earlier posts, some medicines can last well for years, and other medicines won’t be safe long term.  We don’t know which is which unfortunately, as that information is not made public.

However, we do know that any medicine that ends with “–cyline” will be UNSAFE for long term storage.


Doc K, what do you think of people storing/using antibiotics that are made for animals?

I'll be real honest and say I don't know.  The two sides of the issue are 1) if these are the exact same medicines, it should be no problem (the dosing may be different based on concentrations however) and 2) since these are not "made for human use" are there preservatives or other ingredients that would be harmful to humans?

I may try to make a few phone calls and track this one down a bit more...


Thanks, Doc.  Hope to buy you a beer someday. 

One quick question.  The major problem faced by diabetics is their inability to store sufficient quantities of insulin long term.  Would reverting to oral meds such as Metformin (because they are easier to store) be of any benefit?  In other words, would they lower BS at all?

Forget the karma points… I’ll take the beer!   ;D

Good question.  Insulin does not store well long term. 
Unfortunately, Metformin (Glucophage) does have the potential to cause a deadly lactic acidosis.  I left this one off the list on purpose, because without a lab to watch for kidney function this medicine would potentially be very unsafe.  But if the alternative is death from diabetic ketoacidosis, then I may risk it.  Metformin also has the unfortunate side effect of causing severe GI upset, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea in some people when they first start taking it.  When I prescribe this medicine, I always start at a low dose and work up to the treatment dose needed.

If you had a lab (or no other options) here is the dosing:
Metformin (Glucophage) - Immediate Release Form
Start with 500 mg by mouth daily for a week;
Then increase to 500 mg by mouth twice daily for a week;
Then increase to 500 mg by mouth in the a.m. and 1,000 mg by mouth in the p.m.
You can work your way up to 850-1,000 mg by mouth twice a day (I wouldn’t go any higher without a laboratory available).

Metformin (Glucophage) – Extended Release (ER) Form
Start with 500 mg ER by mouth one time daily for a week;
Increase by 500 mg ER daily every week to an final dose of 1,000-2,000 mg total ER daily.

Check out this link to another thread where homemade insulin is talked about quite a bit. (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=11034.0)

Hope this helps,
Doc K


Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: LvsChant on March 28, 2010, 05:03:04 PM
Original GI and Sleep threads modified... Thanks again, Doc (Free Beer available for you in Ft. Worth anytime, too!).

LvsChant
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: antsyaunt on March 28, 2010, 05:49:15 PM

I'll be real honest and say I don't know.  The two sides of the issue are 1) if these are the exact same medicines, it should be no problem (the dosing may be different based on concentrations however) and 2) since these are not "made for human use" are there preservatives or other ingredients that would be harmful to humans?

I may try to make a few phone calls and track this one down a bit more...


Thanks!  Sometimes I think along the line of #1 above, but then other times I think of the second possibility, which creeps me out.  I appreciate your thoughtful replies to all of us. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: phargolf on March 28, 2010, 08:07:28 PM
Thanks!  Sometimes I think along the line of #1 above, but then other times I think of the second possibility, which creeps me out.  I appreciate your thoughtful replies to all of us. 
Most solid dosage forms will be o.k. Where you will run into trouble is with the injectables- for ex. penicillin in vet stuff is o.k. for human use (but a different concentration so you will have to know the dosage you need and extrapolate from there), but some of the antiinflamatory drugs use an oil base that could be harmful to humans. I guess if it is all you can get then it is better than nothing in a SHTF scenario but you really need human meds to be completely safe. Just an old geezers .02 ;)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: ozarked on March 28, 2010, 08:18:20 PM
Once more, Doc, thanks for a very through answer.  Please allow me to rephrase:  is there any oral, easily stored diabetes med worth considering for TEOTWAWKI preps?

Forget the karma points… I’ll take the beer!  

Good question.  Insulin does not store well long term.  
Unfortunately, Metformin (Glucophage) does have the potential to cause a deadly lactic acidosis.  I left this one off the list on purpose, because without a lab to watch for kidney function this medicine would potentially be very unsafe.  But if the alternative is death from diabetic ketoacidosis, then I may risk it.  Metformin also has the unfortunate side effect of causing severe GI upset, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea in some people when they first start taking it.  When I prescribe this medicine, I always start at a low dose and work up to the treatment dose needed.

If you had a lab (or no other options) here is the dosing:
Metformin (Glucophage) - Immediate Release Form
Start with 500 mg by mouth daily for a week;
Then increase to 500 mg by mouth twice daily for a week;
Then increase to 500 mg by mouth in the a.m. and 1,000 mg by mouth in the p.m.
You can work your way up to 850-1,000 mg by mouth twice a day (I wouldn’t go any higher without a laboratory available).

Metformin (Glucophage) – Extended Release (ER) Form
Start with 500 mg ER by mouth one time daily for a week;
Increase by 500 mg ER daily every week to an final dose of 1,000-2,000 mg total ER daily.

Check out this link to another thread where homemade insulin is talked about quite a bit. (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=11034.0)

Hope this helps,
Doc K



[/quote]
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Docwatmo on March 29, 2010, 07:02:12 AM
Doc K,  I think you have free beer in every state in the Union about now :)  Thanks again for this. 



Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: archer on March 29, 2010, 07:14:30 AM
Original GI and Sleep threads modified... Thanks again, Doc (Free Beer available for you in Ft. Worth anytime, too!).

LvsChant
Thanks lvschant. Beat me to it.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: TwoBluesMama on March 29, 2010, 02:02:40 PM
I just wanted to share that I took and printed all of Doc's list and then put the pages in plastic sleeves in my SHTF binder.  I started this notebook a while back with info that I get from the forum or other websites or the internet that I might need in a bad situation and the computer is down or electricity's out. I think this list is something to keep and refer to if needed later.

Thanks again Doc for invaluable info.  I have taken the suggestion from others to save a few pills each month and add them to SHTF bag of meds.  Blessings TBM 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: archer on March 29, 2010, 03:03:54 PM
Hmm, I"ll PDF it (if Doc does not mind) and make the PDF available for people. Chime in if you want it.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on March 29, 2010, 04:42:48 PM
Hmm, I"ll PDF it (if Doc does not mind) and make the PDF available for people. Chime in if you want it.

Great idea!  Go for it.  Can I get a copy?   ;D
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: LvsChant on March 29, 2010, 05:26:06 PM
I'd love a copy, too... thanks Archer!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: archer on March 29, 2010, 05:48:46 PM
PDF is at: http://aedra.com/~tsp/tsp-hosted/DOC_KS_MEDICINE_LIST.pdf (http://aedra.com/~tsp/tsp-hosted/DOC_KS_MEDICINE_LIST.pdf)
It's just the first 20 (wheh! 20 pages!! Good job Doc K!) w/o the comments.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: antsyaunt on March 29, 2010, 06:12:24 PM
Most solid dosage forms will be o.k. Where you will run into trouble is with the injectables- for ex. penicillin in vet stuff is o.k. for human use (but a different concentration so you will have to know the dosage you need and extrapolate from there), but some of the antiinflamatory drugs use an oil base that could be harmful to humans. I guess if it is all you can get then it is better than nothing in a SHTF scenario but you really need human meds to be completely safe. Just an old geezers .02 ;)

Thanks so much, Phargolf; I was hoping you would offer an opinion!  I saw a post on another thread that linked to sources for fish antibiotics in capsule form, and I wondered about those products. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: antsyaunt on March 29, 2010, 06:15:19 PM
PDF is at: http://aedra.com/~tsp/tsp-hosted/DOC_KS_MEDICINE_LIST.pdf (http://aedra.com/~tsp/tsp-hosted/DOC_KS_MEDICINE_LIST.pdf)
It's just the first 20 (wheh! 20 pages!! Good job Doc K!) w/o the comments.


Thanks, Archer.  I had cut and pasted the original post, but this is much better. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: archer on March 29, 2010, 08:27:33 PM
Thanks, Archer.  I had cut and pasted the original post, but this is much better. 
No problem..
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: phargolf on March 29, 2010, 09:02:15 PM
Once more, Doc, thanks for a very through answer.  Please allow me to rephrase:  is there any oral, easily stored diabetes med worth considering for TEOTWAWKI preps?

Forget the karma points… I’ll take the beer!  

Good question.  Insulin does not store well long term.  
Unfortunately, Metformin (Glucophage) does have the potential to cause a deadly lactic acidosis.  I left this one off the list on purpose, because without a lab to watch for kidney function this medicine would potentially be very unsafe.  But if the alternative is death from diabetic ketoacidosis, then I may risk it.  Metformin also has the unfortunate side effect of causing severe GI upset, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea in some people when they first start taking it.  When I prescribe this medicine, I always start at a low dose and work up to the treatment dose needed.

If you had a lab (or no other options) here is the dosing:
Metformin (Glucophage) - Immediate Release Form
Start with 500 mg by mouth daily for a week;
Then increase to 500 mg by mouth twice daily for a week;
Then increase to 500 mg by mouth in the a.m. and 1,000 mg by mouth in the p.m.
You can work your way up to 850-1,000 mg by mouth twice a day (I wouldn’t go any higher without a laboratory available).

Metformin (Glucophage) – Extended Release (ER) Form
Start with 500 mg ER by mouth one time daily for a week;
Increase by 500 mg ER daily every week to an final dose of 1,000-2,000 mg total ER daily.

Check out this link to another thread where homemade insulin is talked about quite a bit. (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=11034.0)

Hope this helps,
Doc K




here's a couple more to consider. Assuming you need something reasonably priced(therefore generic available), you can also use glyburide, glipizide or chlorpropamide(the old diabinese but it isn't available much anymore).Hope this helps
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Oregun89 on May 01, 2010, 01:02:23 AM
A great list Doc, something i'll keep on hand, thanks to Archer.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Koontzy on June 06, 2010, 01:53:12 PM
thanks for the info...I was just asking a few people about this same subject the other day...


thanks!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: SaltyHobbit on June 06, 2010, 08:16:07 PM
Been a minute since I've checked out this thread thanks a ton for the info
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Asclepius on June 09, 2010, 12:19:50 AM
Here is the most reliable source I could find about the efficacy of elderberry as an antiviral. The abstract indicates it works by increasing inflammatory cytokine production to stimulate the immune system, and has the potential to reduce flu symptoms by 3-4 days. Another unreliable source that I found stated that the cytokine increase produced by elderberry has not been linked to cytokine storm, which is one of the ways swine flu kills you.

Does anyone know how to download the entire study from pubmed.gov? All I can ever get are abstracts from this site.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11399518 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11399518)

Abstract
Sambucus nigra L. products - Sambucol - are based on a standardized black elderberry extract. They are natural remedies with antiviral properties, especially against different strains of influenza virus. Sambucol was shown to be effective in vitro against 10 strains of influenza virus. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study, Sambucol reduced the duration of flu symptoms to 3-4 days. Convalescent phase serum showed a higher antibody level to influenza virus in the Sambucol group, than in the control group. The present study aimed to assess the effect of Sambucol products on the healthy immune system - namely, its effect on cytokine production. The production of inflammatory cytokines was tested using blood - derived monocytes from 12 healthy human donors. Adherent monocytes were separated from PBL and incubated with different Sambucol preparations i.e., Sambucol Elderberry Extract, Sambucol Black Elderberry Syrup, Sambucol Immune System and Sambucol for Kids. Production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8) was significantly increased, mostly by the Sambucol Black Elderberry Extract (2-45 fold), as compared to LPS, a known monocyte activator (3.6-10.7 fold). The most striking increase was noted in TNF-alpha production (44.9 fold). We conclude from this study that, in addition to its antiviral properties, Sambucol Elderberry Extract and its formulations activate the healthy immune system by increasing inflammatory cytokine production. Sambucol might therefore be beneficial to the immune system activation and in the inflammatory process in healthy individuals or in patients with various diseases. Sambucol could also have an immunoprotective or immunostimulatory effect when administered to cancer or AIDS patients, in conjunction with chemotherapeutic or other treatments. In view of the increasing popularity of botanical supplements, such studies and investigations in vitro, in vivo and in clinical trials need to be developed.

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Nadir_E on June 17, 2010, 10:52:02 AM
Many thanks for this extremely valuable resource, Doc K (and thanks Archer for consolidating it all).

Doc K - would you see value in having IV solutions of various stripes among ones supplies? (with giving sets, obviously).  Whether used to fight shock or administer intravenous medications, they seem valuable today, presumably they would be in a SHTF situation as well (whether short term or long).

Dinner and adult beverages on me should you find yourself in Southern California, Doc K!
-N
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Heavy G on June 17, 2010, 11:04:56 AM
Doc K is a little busy right now.  I doubt he'll be able to reply to you.  I know he will if he can.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on June 22, 2010, 01:36:41 PM
Doc K is a little busy right now.  I doubt he'll be able to reply to you.  I know he will if he can.

I'll be in and out for the next month or so.  'Tis the life of a military family. :)


Does anyone know how to download the entire study from pubmed.gov? All I can ever get are abstracts from this site.

You have to have an account that has permissions to the journal that is referenced.  This journal, European Cytokine Network, is not a mainstream journal, so most accounts will not have access to it.  You could try visiting your closest university or medical school library and talking to the reference librarian.  Sometimes they will get you copies for no charge, sometimes not.




Doc K - would you see value in having IV solutions of various stripes among ones supplies? (with giving sets, obviously).  Whether used to fight shock or administer intravenous medications, they seem valuable today, presumably they would be in a SHTF situation as well (whether short term or long).

If you know how to administer IV's, then I would definitely keep the supplies on hand.  But be warned, once you start obtaining medical supplies, you won't know where to stop - Am I stocking for one big bleed?  For multiple bleeds?  For severe dehydration?  For temporary measure or for many years of use?  Will I attempt minor surgery if things become that desperate?  What supplies do I need for that?  ...and on and on it goes... Next thing you know, you have a bunch of rubbermaid bins full of medical supplies "just in case" and maybe or maybe not the skills to use them.  This is why I pray things don't ever collapse to a level that I ever need to use my supplies.

For those of you who do not have the knowledge or ability to place an IV, here is a link for some more ideas about rehydration (http://www.mcw.edu/fastFact/ff_134.htm).  Note, if there is a trauma, and you are attempting to give fluids for fast resuscitation and not for slow rehydration, IV fluids are really the only way to go.

Hope this helps,
Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: crice118 on September 26, 2010, 08:15:32 AM
question - some of my relatives/friends are on methodone (various reasons - they just are) what medications OTC to be used for DT's and other problems if people can't get their methodone (or maintenance meds (mom's been on darvocets for over 25 years or other addictions to ease - I know not much but any could help)  cause of a shtf
hopefully something would be better than nothing to help the suffering
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: BatonRouge Bill on September 26, 2010, 08:56:31 AM
Great Posts Doc K and thanks Archer for the PDF!
So does elderberry wine have those same antiviral properties....to be used for medicinal purposes of course ;)
Also I wonder if cooking would effect the antiviral properties
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Nate on September 26, 2010, 09:53:24 AM
Thanks Doc and Archer.  I have added this to "Nates Survival Library" folder that I keep on all my external HD's, pc's and flash drives.  Great resource!  Thanks again!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: ncjeeper on September 26, 2010, 01:00:12 PM
I printed the list out and laminated each sheet.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Asclepius on September 26, 2010, 09:57:52 PM
question - some of my relatives/friends are on methodone (various reasons - they just are) what medications OTC to be used for DT's and other problems if people can't get their methodone (or maintenance meds (mom's been on darvocets for over 25 years or other addictions to ease - I know not much but any could help)  cause of a shtf
hopefully something would be better than nothing to help the suffering

There are lots of online resources on how to wean people off of methadone. It would be the same process as for weaning people off of methadone after heroin addiction treatment. I imagine that would be the best way to use your dwindling supply, rather than taking the full dose up until the end.

On the ambulance we give benzodiazepine sedatives for people in DT's. But you wouldn't have that either. That's where my knowledge of the subject ends. I suspect you could just keep them calm and hope they survive the event.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: archer on October 26, 2010, 04:43:59 PM
Honey discussion split off to http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=22009.msg235282#msg235282 (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=22009.msg235282#msg235282)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: reefmarker on January 08, 2011, 09:24:24 PM
Great list Doc K. Again you impress me with your knowledge of drugs, no offense intended but most physicians(or pharmacists) do not have your extensive knowledge of drugs. I looked over your list twice and couldn't think of a thing you left out (except maybe some lidocaine or septocaine inj. for dental work, but again i am not a dentist).

Doc, another question...  Any advice about adding some epinephrine to lidocaine to help control bleeding?  I didn't realize how often the two are used together.  My doctor showed me how much I bled with just lidocaine (not sure how this came up, but it turned into a science experiment on me!), and then did the lidocaine and epi and while it still bled it was much less.  This was for some non-elective surgery that I was awake for.  It was neat to see how the epi caused pretty immediate vasoconstriction.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: conservative01 on January 08, 2011, 09:42:43 PM
@ reefmarker
Here is and old saying about where not to use lido w/ epi. Never use it on "fingers, toes, nose, earlobes or your hose ;)" the blood vessel constriction it causes could turn into a major problem worse than the laceration that needs sutures.  :)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: rjselzler on January 12, 2011, 05:21:45 PM
Forgive me if this has already been mentioned (I did a search for "Silvasorb" forum-wide and got no hits). I know that this stuff  (http://www.amazon.com/Silvasorb-Medline-SilvaSorb-Gel-Tube/dp/B0014ZW6UW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1294877548&sr=8-1)is amazing in the context of long term care wound-care. It is expensive, but man does it work. Just a thought.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Leonidas on January 17, 2011, 07:09:48 PM
Hey Doc K, Thanks for this list a BIG +1

I Didn't see Paracetamol 500mg on your list (Its the first thing most of us Brits reach for when we have a headache etc..)
Just wondered, why its not there?
Is it because its pretty useless compared to others?

Much Respect Leo
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: NWBowhunter on January 17, 2011, 07:58:03 PM
Thanks this a great resource. An area that I am etremely unprepared. Thankfully we have a couple of nurses in the family.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on January 18, 2011, 04:08:56 AM
Hey Doc K, Thanks for this list a BIG +1

I Didn't see Paracetamol 500mg on your list (Its the first thing most of us Brits reach for when we have a headache etc..)
Just wondered, why its not there?
Is it because its pretty useless compared to others?

Much Respect Leo

Good question. 
Paracetamol is the same as Acetaminophen (a.k.a. Tylenol) in the U.S.  And it is very useful.
Same drug, different name.  The Colonies always have to be different! :)

Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Leonidas on January 18, 2011, 03:27:14 PM
Thanks for the Reply Doc K.  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;   
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: LvsChant on January 21, 2011, 09:12:26 AM
This is also very good information for U.S. travelers to the U.K. Thanks, Doc.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Veritas on June 02, 2011, 10:18:34 AM
FYI,
I know jack has interviewed her in the past but in case you need it here is the you tube site for the patriot nurse. She is, obviously, not a doc, but lots of good info as well.

http://www.youtube.com/user/ThePatriotNurse
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: 2mommas on June 04, 2011, 01:51:11 AM
My youngest son spent 2 tours in Iraq as a Seabee/  He was working nights , because he  helped to  protect the supply convoy. It was almost impossible to sleep during the day, with the temp over 100 degrees.  He relied on Ambien.    After he came home, he managed to get off Ambien by using  Melatonin.  He tells me it works great for him.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on June 04, 2011, 05:51:50 AM
My youngest son spent 2 tours in Iraq as a Seabee/  He was working nights , because he  helped to  protect the supply convoy. It was almost impossible to sleep during the day, with the temp over 100 degrees.  He relied on Ambien.    After he came home, he managed to get off Ambien by using  Melatonin.  He tells me it works great for him.

Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the Pineal Gland.  It is what regulates our circadian rhythm (our day-night sleep cycles).  It can get out of whack when a person is working night shifts.  It can be useful for people that are transitioning from day to night, night to day, or significant time zone changes.

It is likely not very effective in people that do not have day-night sleep disorders, since it does not cause drowsiness.  It helps to shift the circadian rhythm forward.  When combined with exposure to light (like seeing the sun) it can help re-adjust a person to a normal sleep pattern.

In people that take it "just to get to sleep", i.e. those without day-night sleep disorders, then it is probably working through the placebo effect.  That is not to discount it, since the placebo effect is very significant.

Just some stuff to think about.

Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: welshman on June 20, 2011, 11:06:20 AM
How about potassium  permangate and glycerine and acidolphis tables
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: moprep4life on August 10, 2011, 03:54:05 PM
I'm not finished reading the entire thread yet but just had to stop &  add my Thank You! to the rest. This is great information for all of us. Seems we just forget some of it unless it's on a list. And the dosages are wonderful too.
Thank You so much for this!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Leonidas on September 03, 2011, 07:29:41 AM
Hey Doc K,

if possible could you let us know the dosages for kids....

Having that info with what you have already given us, will be Very useful to many families.

Regards Leo.....
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: NerdyEMT on November 03, 2011, 11:15:08 PM
I do a lot of volunteer work and use stuff from my medical bag constantly as such, so thanks for posting such a comprehensive list. I'll definitely be updating what I carry!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: chickchoc on January 19, 2012, 06:45:38 PM
Re: "Does anyone know how to download the entire study from pubmed.gov? All I can ever get are abstracts from this site.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11399518"

Although getting the original publication may not be possible for non-medical folks, try Google Scholar instead.  I had no trouble getting the full article there.

To get to Google Scholar, click on Search in the Google toolbar, then More, then go down the list to Google Scholar.  Easy-peasy.


Doc K -- THANK YOU for this immensely helpful series of lists. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Mars24 on January 21, 2012, 10:17:09 AM
Wow! Awesome list!  Thanks, Doc!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: cheryl1 on September 16, 2012, 07:36:14 AM
I didn't see anything for parasitic infections. Did I miss it? Or are those meds not recommended for storage?
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Doc K on September 17, 2012, 03:24:04 PM
I didn't see anything for parasitic infections. Did I miss it? Or are those meds not recommended for storage?

Fantastic question! I totally skipped that section. I think if there were ever a total breakdown, then anti-parasitics will be much more important than they are in "modern" locations. Spending time in very rural Africa and in Brazil and the Middle East, I have seen some un-fun parasitic infections. I'll get some information together and post it here in a few days.

Thanks for the comment!
Doc K
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: cheryl1 on September 17, 2012, 03:51:08 PM
Thanks! Looking forward to the info. I though of it because my middle child was sick off/on for 18 months. No doc figured it out until I finally took her to a small town country doc. He said lets deworm her. His dad (also a doc) wormed his kids once a year whether they needed it or not:)
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Grannywhiskers on September 17, 2012, 07:23:16 PM
Thank you so much Doc K and Archer.  I, too have printed the PDF and put in my book.  It is awesome information for someone that does not take much medication...so totally clueless about meds and dosages.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: BBK76858 on October 23, 2012, 01:56:14 PM
Thanks for posting this and I am sure my family will use it but what about a more natural way to treat some of these aliments.  I have started to use Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils to aid my family when the ailment is minor.  Do you have much experience with these?  I have found since I started to do this that my kids get over their symptoms much faster than if I use OTC.  Here are just a few that I have in my reference at this time:
Condition    Essential Oil    Application
Allergies     Wintergreen, Lavender, Chamomile   Inhalation, Topical
(Asthmatics should not inhale - put on soles of feet.)
 Bronchitis   RC, Thieves, Myrtle, Pine, Eucalyptus, Idaho Balsam Fir   Topical, Inhalation
Burns   Lavender   Topical
Colds   Thieves, Eucalyptus Radiata, RC, Raven, Peppermint   Topical, Inhalation, Ingestion
Cough   RC, Raven, Peppermint, Eucalyptus Globulus   Inhalation, Topical
Constipation   Peppermint, Di-Gize, Fennel   Ingestion
Cramps (Stomach)   Di-Gize, Ginger, Peppermint, Rosemary   Ingestion, Topical
Headache   Peppermint, Wintergreen, PanAway, Deep Relief   Inhalation, Topical, Oral (tongue against roof of mouth)
Infection   Thieves, Oregano, Thyme, Mountain Savory, Lemongrass   Inhalation, Topical, Ingestion
Indigestion   Peppermint, Ginger, Di-Gize, Fennel, Ginger   Ingestion, Topical
Inflammation   Lavender, Peppermint   Topical, Ingestion
Influenza   Thieves, Ravensara, Oregano, Mountain Savory   Ingestion (except Ravensara), Inhalation, Topical
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: defib on November 17, 2012, 09:14:32 AM
Thanks Doc, just a couple of possible rabbit trails we might benefit from...Health issues that are specific to Women and also a recommended resource to help us identify when illnesses should be considered "complicated".  Women no doubt suffer from some very difficult disorders that we guys don't, and while our women may not say much about it right now, I know they are going to really need some help when the SHTF.  Seems prudent to be ready with Diflucan when using antibiotics for example. And what about a Merck Manual?  For someone with some medical training already (former Paramedic) would that be a good resource?  Are there others?  I don't have any of my old books, and I may only buy one in my preps.  There is so much to buy, I may only buy one good book and not really get around to buying others. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Twibble on November 17, 2012, 10:38:00 AM
Just in case someone hasn't seen them...

For those looking for medical guides and things specific to women, check out Hesperian: http://hesperian.org/books-and-resources/

The PDFs are free and have tons of information.  They're designed for someone who may not have access to the medical profession as we know it.  They have some on sanitation, some specifically for women, midwifery, dentistry, etc.

Note that you do NOT have to register to get them.  Just click No Thanks when it asks for your information.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Heavy G on November 18, 2012, 10:37:57 AM
This is one of the best prepper threads on the internet.  Wow.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: kevo on November 18, 2012, 02:22:45 PM
If one is allergic to bactrim or sulpha drugs, is there an alternative for MRSA?

ANTIBIOTICS

Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra)
DOSING
Single Strength (SS) Tablet: Sulfamethoxazole 400 mg and trimethoprim 80 mg
Double Strength (DS) Tablet is 2 SS tabs in one tablet
USE
Urinary Tract /Kidney Infections:  1 DS Tablet PO twice a day for 3-5 days (Mild); for 7-10 days (complicated); for 14 days (Kidney Infection)
Infectious Diarrhea - Travelers Diarrhea/Shigella:  1 DS Tablet PO twice a day for 5 days
Skin Infections (including MRSA):  1-2 DS Tablets PO twice a day
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: microdevil45 on November 18, 2012, 09:13:10 PM
Great info!  Looking forward to the parasitic info. +1
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Dainty on January 08, 2013, 09:44:08 AM
Quick question...the "glucose paste" is listed as prescription, but I'm seeing glucose gel (http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?item=01045&source=nextopia) and other (http://www.amazon.com/GLUTOSE-15-TUBE-GRAPE-Size/dp/B0019CXRRG/ref=pd_sbs_hpc_3) products (http://www.amazon.com/Dex-Glucose-Tablets-Orange-10s/dp/B001J13AJM/ref=pd_sim_hpc_9) marketed for hypoglycemia that appear to be OTC. Are these basically the same as glucose paste, or is there something fancier about the prescription stuff?

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: ryerle23 on January 08, 2013, 10:18:54 AM
If one is allergic to bactrim or sulpha drugs, is there an alternative for MRSA?
MRSA: TMP/SMX and tetracyclines most likely susceptible.
Clindamycin 300-450mg PO three times a day
TMP/SMX 1-2 DS tabs PO twice daily
Doxycycline 100mg PO twice daily
Minocycline 100mg PO twice daily
Linezolid 600mg PO twice daily
Duration of therapy: depends on extent of disease, typical range 5-10 days.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: ryerle23 on January 08, 2013, 10:20:14 AM
Quick question...the "glucose paste" is listed as prescription, but I'm seeing glucose gel (http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?item=01045&source=nextopia) and other (http://www.amazon.com/GLUTOSE-15-TUBE-GRAPE-Size/dp/B0019CXRRG/ref=pd_sbs_hpc_3) products (http://www.amazon.com/Dex-Glucose-Tablets-Orange-10s/dp/B001J13AJM/ref=pd_sim_hpc_9) marketed for hypoglycemia that appear to be OTC. Are these basically the same as glucose paste, or is there something fancier about the prescription stuff?
same stuff we use at the hospital
http://www.amazon.com/Glutose-Oral-Glucose-LEMON-Flavour/dp/B000OWK7RU

NOT prescription
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: d3nni5 on January 08, 2013, 10:39:16 AM
If one is allergic to bactrim or sulpha drugs, is there an alternative for MRSA?

I was first prescribed bactrim when I dealt with a nasty MRSA infection about 5 years ago.  I was allergic to it as well, broke out in a rash all over my torso (not a serious rash, but it looked bad).  MRSA reoccured two other times, I was given clindamycin and cephalexin in each of those subsequent infections.

I've been free of a MRSA infection for over 4 years, but still inform doctors I see because you never know how long you will be colonized.  For that very reason, I have obtained, and stock all three of these as well as doxycylcine in my medical preps.   I wouldn't hesitate to use sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim in an emergency situation.  Even though I get a rash, it is better than MRSA.   If side affects worsen, I would discontinue and switch to another.   
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: rikkrack on January 08, 2013, 11:07:17 AM
such a great source of info.

Archer, makes me think some of the other great posts could be put to PDF and add as part of MSB? Consolidated "books"
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: ryerle23 on January 08, 2013, 12:26:33 PM
I was first prescribed bactrim when I dealt with a nasty MRSA infection about 5 years ago.  I was allergic to it as well, broke out in a rash all over my torso (not a serious rash, but it looked bad).  MRSA reoccured two other times, I was given clindamycin and cephalexin in each of those subsequent infections.

I've been free of a MRSA infection for over 4 years, but still inform doctors I see because you never know how long you will be colonized.  For that very reason, I have obtained, and stock all three of these as well as doxycylcine in my medical preps.   I wouldn't hesitate to use sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim in an emergency situation.  Even though I get a rash, it is better than MRSA.   If side affects worsen, I would discontinue and switch to another.
FYI I review adverse drug reactions at my hospital and I would say Sulfa allergies are the most common culprit. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Dainty on January 08, 2013, 07:51:24 PM
same stuff we use at the hospital
http://www.amazon.com/Glutose-Oral-Glucose-LEMON-Flavour/dp/B000OWK7RU

NOT prescription

Thanks for clearing that up, ryerle. :)

To anyone up there ready to edit Doc K's med list for accuracy, another change is that Primatene Mist is no longer available (http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm247196.htm) as of December 31, 2011.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: d3nni5 on January 09, 2013, 04:26:50 AM
Thanks for clearing that up, ryerle. :)

To anyone up there ready to edit Doc K's med list for accuracy, another change is that Primatene Mist is no longer available (http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm247196.htm) as of December 31, 2011.

Dainty,
Primatene folks say they are finalizing a CFC free version, available "soon", however long that is.

http://www.primatene.com/doc/PrimateneMistCFCInformation-01-04-2012.pdf

As an asthma sufferer, I can't wait.   I got my scripts for other inhalers, but Primatine seemed to work better for me albeit not as long lasting as albuterol.  Now that I think about it, when I saw it coming, I bought a bunch of it...I guess you could consider it my first prep :).   I still have several in my medicine cabinet.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: bridgewaterjones on January 20, 2013, 07:12:00 PM
Excellent post. It was my first stop in the forum and I hit pay dirt. Thank you.
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: rikkrack on January 21, 2013, 05:36:04 AM
bridgewaterjones glad you found it useful. Head on over to the intro thread and introduce yourself. Welcome, and glad you are here!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Gale Dacalio on February 01, 2013, 07:45:52 PM
I am a critical care nurse but have a little different outlook for myself.  My plan is to grow my own herbs for most health problems.  I am learning to make herbal medicine at present.  it is safer and very effective.  I take some medicines myself at present, but am working on replacing those with herbs or discontinuing those with better health.  I have already gotton off several medicines with the  paleo diet and a little exercise





1
1
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Aussie-SPG on February 09, 2013, 07:01:46 PM
I just thought I would take the time to thank you for a comprehensive and detailed thread on how to stock an FAK, I have always thought my kit was fairly stout however I have picked up some great tips to add to my own FAK. I have recently made a great contact through work who is a pharmacist and he is happy to help me stock some of my FAK preps @ a reduced cost. Cheers Doc I appreciate the reference to build off. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST - Excel Spreadsheet format
Post by: snakelips on February 19, 2013, 10:57:58 PM
Great post!  Thank you for sharing your knowledge. 
Per review and approval, I'd like to share a spreadsheet I put together with the info gleaned from this post.  I appreciate the PDF format, but I wanted a more concise list of meds, uses, doses, etc. to work from, so I put it in a spreadsheet.
If this has already been done and posted somewhere, wonderful!  If nothing else, I've put it in a format I find more useful.

-snakelips
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: archer on February 27, 2013, 07:47:38 AM
Thanks To SnakeLips, we now have an Excel document of Doc K's great list. You can get it at:
http://aedra.com/~tsp/tsp-hosted/Medications.xls

The PDF is at:
http://aedra.com/~tsp/tsp-hosted/DOC_KS_MEDICINE_LIST.pdf

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: cheryl1 on March 02, 2013, 11:06:15 AM
The PDF is awesome! Thank you!
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: kimdvm on May 01, 2013, 08:21:23 AM
Thanks for the info.  I do want to reinforce what DOC says about the overuse of antibiotics.  I can tell you that when someone or something is sick, it is VERY tempting to prescribe antibiotics "just in case".   A few things that I try to remember to keep myself from doing this:

Almost every documented case of MRSA in pets is from a pet owned by a healthcare professional.  That should tell you what happens when antibiotics are used often.
One of my most-remembered lines from vet school is "the time you have the most severe reactions to a medication will often be the time you really didn't need to use it."
Third:  Levaquin particularly concerns me.  There is evidence the side effects are under-reported.  Every single person I know who has taken it has had long-term or life-threatening side effects.  I wouldn't personally use that antibiotic unless I felt it was likely my friend or patient would die otherwise.    (It is of course possible that I have a bias from a coincidental mix of anecdoctal information and perhaps I in turn sought out the research that reaffirmed my concerns, so don't quote me as a reliable source that no one should ever take it, but rather that I feel very uncomfortable with a person using it without having some evidence it is needed in a particular case.)

If you want to keep them around, just don't be in a hurry to use them.  Yes, antibiotics are life-saving sometimes but if the need isn't obvious keep them in the bottle until you can get a diagnosis. 




Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: DallasDentist on May 30, 2014, 05:12:30 AM
an excellent list indeed.   there needs to be more focus in this area of prepping for most people.   
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: doublehelix on June 29, 2014, 10:06:30 AM
One thing to add on the dental side to the list:

Instead of the temporary OTC filling kits, on advice of my Dentist I bought some glass ionomer filling material for semi-perm SHTF tooth repairs.

Good track record in Africa in daily use, and it was <$100 on Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Vitremer-Ionomer-Restorative-Buildup-Triple-Cure/dp/B0058ITK5K/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1404057803&sr=8-13&keywords=glass+ionomer

Combined with some dental tools, it's a good expedient repair method.

Background info is here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_ionomer_cement

This set is also relatively cheap for temporary crowns. Good to have on hand in case you run across a dentist:
http://www.amazon.com/Dental-Polycarbonate-Temporary-Crowns-Kit/dp/B009KT13IA/ref=pd_sim_indust_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=1FJVV90M1AG45X87K0YK


Caution: I am not a dentist and I don't play one on TV

Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Snowpiercer on November 02, 2014, 07:54:28 AM
Man Doc, this list is awesome.  I know it's old, but THANK YOU for taking the time to put it together. 
Title: Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
Post by: Freedom Forged on November 06, 2014, 02:05:26 PM
So much good information here!  Thanks Doc for taking the time to educate us!
David