The Survival Podcast Forum

Armory, Self Defense, And EDC => Firearms (Including Long Guns, Pistols) => Firearms Legislation And News => Topic started by: Mr. Bill on May 03, 2013, 06:06:06 PM

Title: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Mr. Bill on May 03, 2013, 06:06:06 PM
Forbes: This Is The World's First Entirely 3D-Printed Gun (http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/05/03/this-is-the-worlds-first-entirely-3d-printed-gun-photos/)

Quote
...All sixteen pieces of the Liberator prototype were printed in ABS plastic with a Dimension SST printer from 3D printing company Stratasys, with the exception of a single nail that’s used as a firing pin. The gun is designed to fire standard handgun rounds, using interchangeable barrels for different calibers of ammunition.

Technically, Defense Distributed’s gun has one other non-printed component: the group added a six ounce chunk of steel into the body to make it detectable by metal detectors in order to comply with the Undetectable Firearms Act. ...

Designed by: Defense Distributed (http://defdist.org/).  Plans not available yet, but coming soon.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: cmxterra on May 03, 2013, 09:59:59 PM
I think I just heard Feinsteins head explode.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: r_w on May 03, 2013, 10:13:04 PM
I think I just heard Feinsteins head explode.

Oh how I wish.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Absit on May 03, 2013, 10:51:37 PM
I'm a little confused about something.  The whole metal detector thing..I understand it's a law, and that's dumb enough.  But the fact that people, legislators, are concerned about a plastic gun making it through a metal detector..

Unless, wait, did we invent plastic bullets and casings too?
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Oil Lady on May 04, 2013, 04:31:32 AM
Not to derail, but here's a brief video of the plastic gun from the Clint Eastwood film In the Line of Fire, the gun John Malkovich made to kill the President. 

It seems like the guy who made this homemade video was either able to get his hands on the actual movie prop from the film (not hard to do, the studios auction this stuff off all the time) or else someone online is selling knockoffs of the film prop, or else he made it himself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oH2UqXZ6yOk

Don't know if it actually works. The shaft isn't even rifled.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Nicodemus on May 04, 2013, 08:50:47 AM
I think the only real difference here between what has come before is an advance in materials. Inventive types have been building "zip guns" for quite some time.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Jakevf on May 05, 2013, 08:18:46 AM
I've done hundreds of parts via 3D printers and have been using the various technologies for the past 10 years. Not 20 feet from my desk at work sits a 8 year old stratasys FDM machine which is an ancestor of the machine I imagine was used for the model shown.

I'm skeptical that a were at the point where a 100% "printed" gun could be made safe and effective, and EXTREMELY doubtful that a gun printed on an FDM machine would be workable.

Consider this, these prototype technologies are trying to reach a point where parts created by them are as strong as a part made in similar material by conventional processes. They're not there, not even particularly close. Consider an example from Stratasys website.This is the strongest material available and where I would start if I were designing a firearm printed in an FDM (actually I'd probably start by writing a will, but putting the danger aside).


http://www.stratasys.com/materials/fdm/~/media/Main/Secure/Material%20Specs%20MS/Fortus-Material-Specs/Fortus-MS-ULTEM9085-01-13-web.ashx

This is a PEI or "Ultem" plastic for use in an FDM machine, Ultem is high end stuff and unless I've overlooked something this is the strongest stuff currently used in an FDM machine. This material is only about 1/2 as strong as a part molded or machined out of a basic grade of ultem.

Why does it matter? Because if you can't make a gun out of plastic via old-fashioned methods (as far as I know you cannot) you definitely can't make a plastic gun in a 3d printer. In terms of performance plastic is just no where near the strength needed to handle the pressure and heat associated with a firearm. The STRONGEST (and most expensive) plastic generally available is PEEK, it's used in high temperature applications and medical applications and in some cases can be used to replace metal parts. Even taking this plastic, reinforcing it with a 30% carbon fiber fill, you wind up with a material that has 1/3rd the yield strength of mild steel, probably about 1/6-1/10 the strength of a treated alloy steel such as typically used in the barrel and receiver of a firearm. Plus the plastic won't dissipate heat well, resulting a plastic gun being HOTTER on the inside than a steel one, and even PEEK (which is the king of plastics) will weaken significantly before steel's even getting worried. Even basic PEEK runs something like $15-$30 /lb in bulk, much more in small amounts. I hate to consider what a carbon fiber filled grade costs!

Now, there are 3D printing technologies that use metal (google DMLS, or direct metal laser sintering). These MIGHT could be used to make a firearm. They're really a non-issue for the near future however as the "printers" are extremely expensive and the technology far less easy to implement on a DIY basis than FDM (which is what most people in the DIY community call a 3D printer, FDM is actually only one of probably dozens of technologies). DMLS parts are still extremely expensive, anything the size of a handgun would cost thousands of dollars and I doubt DMLS machines exist that could print a rifle or even a carbine. More likely one would print all your gun parts in an FDM machine and then use those parts as patterns to investment cast metal parts, that could probably be done by anyone with some know-how and a furnace. I'd still stand very far away when they started shooting such a weapon.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Sonny on May 06, 2013, 10:03:38 PM
They just released the plans.  Better get them before they take them down.


http://defcad.org/liberator/ (http://defcad.org/liberator/)



Title: Print all the 3-D guns you want, 'cuz if you ain't got bullets, they're useless
Post by: Oil Lady on May 07, 2013, 05:19:44 AM
I only just realized this about 5 minutes ago.

The government knew that the age of the 3-D printed gun would soon be upon us. They knew there was no way to stop 3-D printed guns from happening. Soooooo .... go to the other end of the problem and restrict access to bullets.

The result will be (5 years from now) millions of people who bought 3-D printers, printed out guns, and then wound up with over-priced Hollywood movie props on their hands. No bullets and those printed guns are just a lot of expensive plastic.




Thoughts???


Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Nicodemus on May 07, 2013, 06:12:14 AM
You're missing the concept behind 3D printed plastic guns and what they're capable of at this point.

I didn't want to bring this up before, but the "Liberator" was probably given the name to conceptually connect it to WWII's FP-45 Liberator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FP-45_Liberator). Its intent is not to hold off an army with the ability to fire as many rounds as you can put through it, but rather as a one or two shot ambush/insurgency pistol used to acquire a better firearm.

So, conceptually one need only keep a round or two for it, ever. A person doesn't practice with it, just uses it in the only situation it was made for.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: ADKwarrior on May 07, 2013, 06:57:09 AM
+1  I would bet your exactally right.

You're missing the concept behind 3D printed plastic guns and what they're capable of at this point.

I didn't want to bring this up before, but the "Liberator" was probably given the name to conceptually connect it to WWII's FP-45 Liberator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FP-45_Liberator). Its intent is not to hold off an army with the ability to fire as many rounds as you can put through it, but rather as a one or two shot ambush/insurgency pistol used to acquire a better firearm.

So, conceptually one need only keep a round or two for it, ever. A person doesn't practice with it, just uses it in the only situation it was made for.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: David in MN on May 07, 2013, 07:24:44 AM
I've heard Cody interviewed before on the Anarchy Gumbo podcast. If you'd like to learn more, it's a good place to start. The concept of a 3D printed gun is interesting not in that it works perfectly right away but once the proof of concept works, a "gun" could be computer code available anywhere in the world. Anyone, anywhere could print a workable gun. This means that guns cannot be banned. Or it means the code is a gun. Cody is breaking down barriers and ushering us into an era where we see the folly of regulation. He even joked recently that magazine restrictions are silly because anyone dedicated could 3D print a magazine as big as the printer would allow and use that. Technology is replacing the government and I love the idea that people like Cody are pushing the limit.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: theBINKYhunter on May 07, 2013, 07:57:48 AM
that's pretty cool. i saw the video of their AR lower that fired several hundred rounds. i can't find the link now of course... but this is pretty cool stuff.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Nicodemus on May 09, 2013, 04:18:01 PM
Wow! I wish there was more information than this.

DEFCAD files are being removed from public access at the request of the US Department of Defense Trade Controls.
Until further notice, the United States government claims control of the information.


DEFCAD (http://defcad.org/)

Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Nicodemus on May 09, 2013, 04:27:01 PM
On the "we don't get this interweb" front. The files had already been downloaded more than 100,000 times. So, the move by the government seems a tad silly.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Mr. Bill on May 09, 2013, 04:28:32 PM
Forbes: State Department Demands Takedown Of 3D-Printable Gun Files For Possible Export Control Violations (http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/05/09/state-department-demands-takedown-of-3d-printable-gun-for-possible-export-control-violation/)

Includes text of the State Dept letter.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Nicodemus on May 09, 2013, 04:36:45 PM
Thanks, Mr. Bill!

According to that article, he had to remove all files that could be used to produce any part of a firearm.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: David in MN on May 09, 2013, 05:01:00 PM
Hey everybody, Cody just combined the first and second amendments. They now want to ban a "gun" that is a string of ones and zeros on the interwebs. Who would think that in an era of tech the first amendment would buttress the second?
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Jakevf on May 09, 2013, 07:42:55 PM


Until further notice, the United States government claims control of the information.



That's funny.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: iam4liberty on May 09, 2013, 08:11:52 PM
I'm a little confused about something.  The whole metal detector thing..I understand it's a law, and that's dumb enough.  But the fact that people, legislators, are concerned about a plastic gun making it through a metal detector..

Unless, wait, did we invent plastic bullets and casings too?

Yes.  They already exist.

In fact there was a person at the range a couple weeks back shooting wax bullets in his black powder revolver.  Never saw that before.  Would be interesting to shoot into ballistic geletin.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: joeinwv on May 09, 2013, 08:44:41 PM
Have any of you seen the video of a guy making an AK receiver from an old garden shovel?

Did you see the Myth Busters where they made a cannon out of a log?

Ever go to a gun show and see a copy of the improvised munitions manual?

Any of you take mechanical drawing in high school?

Just because it's plastic and a "printer" people get all excited.

If a guy on TV can make spiderweb motorcycle rims from a solid block of aluminum, do you really think it would take more than about 4 minutes to mill out a lower?
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Waiting in the Weeds on May 10, 2013, 06:24:41 AM
Have any of you seen the video of a guy making an AK receiver from an old garden shovel?

Did you see the Myth Busters where they made a cannon out of a log?

Ever go to a gun show and see a copy of the improvised munitions manual?

Any of you take mechanical drawing in high school?

Just because it's plastic and a "printer" people get all excited.

If a guy on TV can make spiderweb motorcycle rims from a solid block of aluminum, do you really think it would take more than about 4 minutes to mill out a lower?

I agree. Big deal its printed out. Does DHS have every machinist on a watch list so their skills can be monitored? As to plans, ever heard of a thumb drive you politician geezers?
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: MTUCache on May 10, 2013, 07:03:38 AM
Lol, the State Department is beyond hilarious at this point... to the point where they're just downright pathetic.

"Remove" the plans from the internet? What is this? North Korea in 1994? The piss is in the pool, you're not getting it back out! It's been downloaded hundreds of thousands of times and it's being actively hosted on sites that aren't within your jurisdiction. WTF are you going to do about it? What is the original publisher going to do about it?

So he needs to "prove" he didn't do anything wrong or dangerous before he's allowed to let this information out? How does that work with the first amendment again?

And the reason this same argument shouldn't be applied to Monsanto GMO seeds is....... ?

Anyway, Cody Wilson actually seems happy to have this out in the media and open for discussion, and I agree. I really hope for his sake he doesn't end up with a black bag over his head on a plane ride to Gitmo, but the more attention this gets the more ridiculous this will look. There's been plans for "homemade" guns on the internet since there was an internet. Many of them are "undetectable", so what makes this one any different? Just because technology has moved far enough that people will be able to make these very easily without specialized equipment or materials? You can bet the government will be ALL over the at-home 3D printer market now, watching every purchase.

People can make deadly weapons out of rocks... there are plenty of people out there who can kill with their bare hands. What kind of moron thinks they're going to be able to completely control and monitor and catalog everyone who is capable of murder. That's the definition of a totalitarian government.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: David in MN on May 10, 2013, 07:43:29 AM
Right on, right on! I saw a Youtube video about how to improve my left hook. That information should be taken down. A left hook can only hurt people, it has no value for society...

I have completely given up on the feds but this could be a really cool first amendment case. I can imagine going to the bookstore and buying a book of just ones and zeros that contains the code to build a gun. I have heard from people in the industry discuss the moment when metal becomes a "gun" (apparently on a 1911 it's the slide rails) and it's a very odd concept. I can buy a manual on how to machine a gun but a computer code to build one is criminal? Once again the first amendment will guard the second in a very unusual twist.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: dep190 on May 10, 2013, 08:08:30 AM
This information is now disappearing and links are being disabled!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JK55GSbSWQ0


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvEHu0O-5nw

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2322150/Blueprints-3D-plastic-gun-downloaded-100-000-times-2-days-State-Department-orders-site-weapon-designs.html

http://defcad.org/liberator/

Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: MTUCache on May 10, 2013, 08:14:21 AM
This information is now disappearing and links are being disabled!
Zero Hedge has your back (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-05-09/us-state-department-halts-3-d-gun-production-demands-removal-all-online-blueprints).

(Note: That link is to a news article about what we're discussing. In that article there are links to Pirate Bay, which appear to let you download this information. I'm not brave enough to click on them myself right now. :p )
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: theBINKYhunter on May 10, 2013, 08:18:44 AM
it'll pop up again somewhere. once it's on the net, it's always available.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: ag2 on May 10, 2013, 08:43:55 AM
Why does everyone call these things "3D printers"?  To me, it seems these are just CNC machines on three axis (x,y and z).  These have been around for years.  What's all the comotion about 3D printers?  Am I missing something?
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: liftsboxes on May 10, 2013, 09:17:01 AM
... and now the plans are available on most torrent sites.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Nicodemus on May 10, 2013, 09:17:42 AM
Why does everyone call these things "3D printers"?  To me, it seems these are just CNC machines on three axis (x,y and z).  These have been around for years.  What's all the comotion about 3D printers?  Am I missing something?

It could be grouped in CNC machines, but it's a 3D printer in the way that a Milling Machine isn't an Engine Lathe.   ;D

But the name is understandable as the machine is printing, layer by layer, an object whereas a lot of other CNC machines cut away or use force in some fashion on a material to form an object.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: David in MN on May 10, 2013, 09:47:48 AM
It's called a printer because it works like an old inkjet. CNC and the like remove material. 3D printers melt plastic (or something like it) and draw material on a plane until that plane is done and the object lowers to let the next plane be produced. It's hard to describe in words but pretty hypnotic. It's the first tech that allows an object to be "built" rather than removing material to reveal something. They are fun to play with, I had an experience where some friends and I built a model airplane and "printed" the ideal wing for a competition. Crashed, of course.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: ag2 on May 10, 2013, 10:06:26 AM
Quote
But the name is understandable as the machine is printing, layer by layer.........

Ah, that's the part that I was missing.  So I take it you feed in the raw material, (ink) and through heat or force it applies a layer at a time.  This reminds me of laminate plywood in a way.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: cheryl1 on May 10, 2013, 10:20:12 AM
I heard the guy sharing the plans was shut down by gov, but over 100,000 downloads have already been shared.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Jakevf on May 10, 2013, 10:50:13 AM
Ah, that's the part that I was missing.  So I take it you feed in the raw material, (ink) and through heat or force it applies a layer at a time.  This reminds me of laminate plywood in a way.

Very much so,

The tech used for this gun is called FDM (fused deposition modeling) and the easiest way to think of it is to picture a hot glue gun mounted on a 3-axis CNC system. The head extrudes plastic along a programmed path, tracing the outline of that "layer" and then filling the interior before moving up to the next layer. The reasons for using this technology are that the "printers" can be built surprisingly cheaply and it produces relatively robust parts from easily acquired material. There are better 3D printing technologies, but none that can be so easily acquired or fabricated and run on a budget that's believable for your average individual. The printer used was probably 20-30k new, but I believe he purchased used for 8k, there are lots of models intended for home/hobby use that are pushing the $1000 threshold. It is probably only a matter of time before the price and quality improves to the point where these low-end machines can easily duplicate his results.

That said, anyone with basic shop tools could build the equivalent out of scrap found in any junkyard, and that's been true for decades. (first thought I'm thinking a drill press, bits/reamers, a band saw, some files, and maybe a welder, I'm NOT saying you'd need CNC mills or lathes or such). This is just a new technique for doing the same thing, making a straight-bore, single-shot, firearm with zero traceability. Even it's being made out of plastic isn't anything revolutionary, since you can machine a piece of plastic just like you can a piece of steel. (Though I'm still not sure how this thing is handling the pressures created even by something like a 22lr.)
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Mr. Bill on September 22, 2016, 07:39:35 PM
Forbes: State Department Demands Takedown Of 3D-Printable Gun Files For Possible Export Control Violations (http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/05/09/state-department-demands-takedown-of-3d-printable-gun-for-possible-export-control-violation/)

Three-judge panel of the 5th Circuit Court sides with State Department in 2-to-1 decision:

Court: With 3D printer gun files, national security interest trumps free speech (http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/09/court-groups-3d-printer-gun-files-must-stay-offline-for-now/)

From the majority opinion:
Quote
Ordinarily, of course, the protection of constitutional rights would be the highest public interest at issue in a case. That is not necessarily true here, however, because the State Department has asserted a very strong public interest in national defense and national security. Indeed, the State Department’s stated interest in preventing foreign nationals—including all manner of enemies of this country—from obtaining technical data on how to produce weapons and weapon parts is not merely tangentially related to national defense and national security; it lies squarely within that interest.

 :P
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Alan Georges on September 22, 2016, 07:59:26 PM
Three-judge panel of the 5th Circuit Court sides with State Department in 2-to-1 decision:

Court: With 3D printer gun files, national security interest trumps free speech (http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/09/court-groups-3d-printer-gun-files-must-stay-offline-for-now/)

From the majority opinion:
 :P

Asshats.  Meanwhile, down on the $5 flash drive aisle at Wal-Mart, liberty marches onward.  Can't stop the signal. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVF9lZ-i_ss)
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Ms. Albatross on September 22, 2016, 08:15:52 PM
Can't stop the signal. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVF9lZ-i_ss)

 :rofl:
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Skunkeye on September 25, 2016, 09:06:18 PM
Quote
Indeed, the State Department’s stated interest in preventing foreign nationals—including all manner of enemies of this country—from obtaining technical data on how to produce weapons and weapon parts...

Would those be the same foreign nationals who have been making AKs with hand tools in primitive machine shops for the past fifty years or so?  Maybe someone at the State Department ought to google the phrase "Khyber Pass" before they get their panties all twisted up about foreigners being able to make a barely-useful plastic single-shot .380...
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: jerseyboy on September 26, 2016, 01:55:51 AM
Would those be the same foreign nationals who have been making AKs with hand tools in primitive machine shops for the past fifty years or so?  Maybe someone at the State Department ought to google the phrase "Khyber Pass" before they get their panties all twisted up about foreigners being able to make a barely-useful plastic single-shot .380...

I had to look this up. Fascinating. Here is the wiki link to the gun manufacturing.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khyber_Pass_Copy

Here is a YouTube video on 1911s made in the Philippines

https://youtu.be/pq1TXEE_QK4

Jerseyboy
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Smurf Hunter on September 26, 2016, 10:49:59 AM
This issue reminds me of "music piracy".  I'm just old enough to have experienced the tail end of vinyl records and the early adoption of music CDs.
In the early 1990s, there was no way to "rip" a CD into mp3s, or even burn a CD image at home.

Cassette tapes were king,  Every teenager I knew had "mix tapes" of their favorite songs.  Making these were a labor of love.  You had to understand the available length of tape on each side, and plan your playlist accordingly.  Further you had to record in real time.  A 90 minute (45min per side) tape took that long plus time to pause, flip the record, advance the track, etc. etc.

The reason I brought up that was not for nostalgia, but that behavior was ubiquitous with American youth 25-30 years ago.  We never heard of any legal consequences of doing this.  Fast forward to the mid-late 1990s, where MP3s came out.  Suddenly any moron could click their mouse and get any song imaginable in perfect quality.

That's when the music industry and regulators lost their stuff.  I admit, it's still difficult for me to morally reconcile how borrowing my friend's Van Halen album and dubbing it onto cassette was ok in 1989, but downloading the same album in mp3 format was a soft form of organized crime in 1999.


Back to DIY guns.  For the cost of a decent sandwich, a slam-fire shotgun can be manufactured from parts in the plumbing aisle at Home Depot.  As it's been said, many hobby machinists could make "real" gun parts that work better than 3D printed ones.

This is all emotional reaction.  Nothing is materially different.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Mr. Bill on July 18, 2018, 08:58:23 PM
Forbes: State Department Demands Takedown Of 3D-Printable Gun Files For Possible Export Control Violations (http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/05/09/state-department-demands-takedown-of-3d-printable-gun-for-possible-export-control-violation/)

Settled in the manufacturer's favor:

ArsTechnica, 7/17/18: 3D-printed gun lawsuit ends after 3+ years—in gun publisher’s favor (https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/07/3d-printed-gun-lawsuit-ends-after-3-years-in-gun-publishers-favor/)

Quote
Defense Distributed, the 3D-printing gun activist group, has secured a settlement with the Department of State that will enable it to legally distribute its CAD files of firearms on its DEFCAD website, putting an end to a years-long lawsuit. ...

The settlement, which was signed in April but only took effect in late June, says that the DEFCAD files in question are "approved for public release (unlimited distribution) in any form and are exempt from the export licensing requirements of the [International Traffic in Arms Regulations]."

The State Department has also agreed to pay Defense Distributed's legal fees, which total nearly $40,000.

The federal civil suit began more than five years ago when Cody Wilson and his group, Defense Distributed, published designs for the "Liberator," the world’s first 3D-printed handgun.

Within months, Defense Distributed received a letter from the United States Department of State's Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance stating that 10 files, including the designs of the Liberator, were in violation of the ITAR. ...
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Mr. Bill on July 31, 2018, 10:12:47 PM
NPR, 7/31/18: Judge Issues Temporary Restraining Order Blocking 3D-Printer Guns (https://www.npr.org/2018/07/31/634442458/judge-issues-temporary-restraining-order-blocking-3d-printer-guns)

Quote
A federal judge in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order on Tuesday that prevents the publication of online 3D blueprints for plastic yet deadly guns.

U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik said the untraceable weapons – which bear no serial numbers and can be printed from directions downloaded from the Internet – could end up in the wrong hands...

But it is is unclear how effective the temporary restraining order is since the schematics for one of its guns — The Liberator — were posted on the company's website on Friday — five days ahead of the company's announced release date. ...

...Wilson said he had suspended downloads of the 3D-printer gun "until he reviews the order."

"We're disappointed," Wilson told The New York Times. "The law is clear. These plaintiffs just don't have standing to challenge the settlement. You can't unclose a federally closed matter. And I consider the matter to be closed."

The judge has scheduled a hearing on Aug. 10.
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: David in MN on August 03, 2018, 07:47:30 AM
NPR, 7/31/18: Judge Issues Temporary Restraining Order Blocking 3D-Printer Guns (https://www.npr.org/2018/07/31/634442458/judge-issues-temporary-restraining-order-blocking-3d-printer-guns)

So they think they can literally ban a string of 1s and 0s? Beyond freedom of speech issues it's just plain nuts. I do love how people like Wilson make idiots show their hand. Sure, I can download plans for a nuclear weapon but what we really need to worry about is a single use single shot pistol capable of only point blank accuracy. Just wait until these judges discover a revolver. Just imagine the horror of 6 liberators in one package...
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: Mr. Bill on August 28, 2018, 02:46:17 PM
Courthouse News, 8/28/18: Against Court Order, Texan Begins Selling 3D-Gun Prints (https://www.courthousenews.com/against-court-order-texan-begins-selling-3d-gun-prints/)

Quote
Blueprints for 3D-printed guns are now available to anybody who wants them, the owner of a Texas company said Tuesday, claiming a federal judge’s order the day before applied only to free online instructions.

Consumers in the United States can name their own price for the controversial files that began shipping on USB drives Tuesday morning by Austin-based Defense Distributed...

“This judge’s order stopping us from simply giving things away was only an authorization that we can sell it, that we can mail it, that we can e-mail it, that we can provide it by secure transfer,” Wilson said.

“I am doing all of those things,” he added. ...

[Judge] Lasnik’s order barred the company from posting the 3D-gun plans online, but did not address whether they could be sold. ...
Title: Re: An entirely 3D-printed gun (except for firing pin and gov't-mandated metal blob)
Post by: armymars on August 28, 2018, 05:04:32 PM
  Does this mean they'll come for my exploded diagram of my Endfield.