The Survival Podcast Forum

Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Food Preps => Food Storage => Topic started by: The Spamburglar on September 20, 2009, 02:29:51 AM

Title: Ramen Noodles
Post by: The Spamburglar on September 20, 2009, 02:29:51 AM
havent really seen anything about ramen in the forums but decided to buy and store some because it can make any combination of common foods taste so much better. There are some great websites too with many ramen recipes like http://www.ramenlicious.com/ (http://www.ramenlicious.com/) ......i would pry stay away from the ramen desserts......

For storage i vacuum sealed them in packs of 8. I also punched a small hole in each bag to help remove excess air from the bags. they seem to seal great.

I realize ramen isnt the healthiest food out there but you cant tell me they dont taste great, and if you dont add the flavor packets its basically just really cheap noodles.

cant go wrong at 10 cents a pack!
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: daveinmichigan on September 20, 2009, 07:17:49 AM
Did you have any trouble with crushing them with the vac sealer?
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Mom of 7 on September 20, 2009, 07:36:42 AM
I bought some Ramen noodles thinking they would be great survival food, especially for my children.  However I decided to do some trial runs with them, going along with the "store what you eat, eat what you store" mentality.  My children would not eat them.  I made them a bunch of ways, as directed, then with cheese.  Nothing would make them eat them.  I think that knowing ahead of time what your kids will eat, is important. I'll continue to store them however, because my husband and I and my 18 y/o son will eat them and they are so easy to prepare.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Darkwinter on September 20, 2009, 07:57:34 AM
I love Ramen.  Best time to stock up on them is now, as the kids are going back to school.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: bubtech on September 20, 2009, 08:42:50 AM
Ramen.... so yummy.... must have more.
B
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Darkwinter on September 20, 2009, 09:49:21 AM
When I was in college I lived on Generic Mac&Cheese and Ramen and PB&J . . . little did I now it would have been the best life lesson I could learn at school!! :) 
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Taylor3006 on September 20, 2009, 10:33:15 AM
I wanna say right off the bat, I have the culinary talent of a drunken spider monkey and the taste buds of yer average stray dog. I can eat Ramen, they are ok but to make them tasty I generally add meat or drop it all in a pot of soup and to add some carbs. Not sure if picky kids will eat it but it works for me.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Mom of 7 on September 20, 2009, 11:30:26 AM
I haven't tried using them as an add on with soups, but that is a good idea. I married into a family that doesn't eat off paper plates and if it takes less than 2 hours to cook, it's considered "making do".  I might have to experiment with them as an add-in.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Taylor3006 on September 20, 2009, 11:38:09 AM
Sorry I forgot to add that when I add them to soup, I generally break up the block of noodles instead of having the really large strings of noodles. Hope that makes sense.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: The Spamburglar on September 20, 2009, 03:57:55 PM
nope, no problems cracking the noodles. You hear a few snap crackle pops during vacuuming but the brick holds up well on the whole. You may have to stop the sealer early in some cases cause its trying to remove every bit of air from in between each noodle, but when mine was done the package was as hard as a brick and still in good shape.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: The Spamburglar on September 20, 2009, 04:03:03 PM
(http://www.ramenlicious.com/images/recipes/full/doritos-ramen-salad.JPG)

/drool
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Citizen Zero on September 20, 2009, 08:31:40 PM
Unless your storage conditions are adverse, I would not go through the expense and effort of vacuum packing them.

Ramen is a staple in our pantry, there are many times that we use it and just throw the seasoning packets in a jar for later use if we need them. Just the other day I thought of the forums when I cooked up a couple of packages that had best by dates in early 2004. Still tasted the same and the seasoning packets were still powder and not a solid chunk.

In our experience we just buy multiple cases, when the stuff is on sale insanely cheap, and throw the full cases in the pantry after marking the month and year that they were bought. To date the oldest package that I have opened and consumed was more than eight years old, tasted fine.

Storage conditions are the key, if you have problems with humidity and the like, then some kind of sealed storage will prolong their shelf life. Our pantry stays pretty much at a constant 65F, and the humidity is usually only around 15% at the highest.

As always, YMMV  ;)
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: ColdHaven on September 20, 2009, 09:08:10 PM
Ramen. I can't believe we haven't discussed ramen yet! Ramen has carbs that you definitely need if you are going over a long distance. However, they are big and bulky, but they are also lightweight. Heck, with a sterno pack and a cheap cooking kit you could have several meals with a few of them in your INCH or BOB. I  have thought of storing these in my INCH bag. Having something to fill your stomach is great, and it has a lot of carbs that you will need to keep up for a distance if need be on foot. I would suggest taking a daily supplement with them, and drinking the water that they are cooked in. Those spice packs have herbs that are good for you too. The salt content in it though....not so healthy, and it could dehydrate you if you eat too many of them. It is a toss up I guess. Overall, I say they are good to have in a survival pack.

I have many ramen noodle packs stored at home. They are inexpensive, and easy to cook. If you are close with some neighbors, and you are in a SHTF scenario, they are easy to hand out and say you have only those. To me they are good to have on hand and in quantity. Especially if your family likes them like mine does.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: OJ on September 20, 2009, 10:37:00 PM
I almost always eat the pork-flavored ramen, and add an egg and some shredded cheddar cheese.

Good eats!
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: HelenWheels on September 21, 2009, 09:47:51 AM
I add extra water and toss in dehydrated mixed veggies - start with re-hydrating/cooking the veggies first, then when they're ready, toss in the ramen. I'm always adding something more - toasted sesame oil, wasabe powder... whatever freaky combo that seems to be interesting to me at the time.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: mxitman on September 22, 2009, 09:34:27 AM
Quote
add extra water and toss in dehydrated mixed veggies - start with re-hydrating/cooking the veggies first, then when they're ready, toss in the ramen. I'm always adding something more - toasted sesame oil, wasabe powder... whatever freaky combo that seems to be interesting to me at the time.

I always take a pack or 2 with me when I'm out hiking/camping. I usually crush mine before I go, it packs better and is easier for me to eat since I only carry a spork. I also bring along dried mixed veggies of corn,peas,carrot's. You do want to boil them first for about 5 mins then add the ramen to it. Breakfast ramen is great with an egg mixed in it or peanut butter added, makes it taste like a poor mans pad Thai. I buy my ramen from Costco and we are currently eating our stock from 2005 and i can't tell the difference. I think this stuff would last longer than me if the package doesn't get compromised.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: ColdHaven on September 22, 2009, 09:51:47 AM
I was thinking, also, that if you have a dehydrator then you can dehydrate your own veggies to go into the meal. Heck, you could even dehydrate meat. This way you can make your own packet of mix in case you wanted to save the packets that come along with it as some kind of beef broth for later.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: HelenWheels on September 22, 2009, 10:18:55 AM
I was thinking, also, that if you have a dehydrator then you can dehydrate your own veggies to go into the meal. Heck, you could even dehydrate meat. This way you can make your own packet of mix in case you wanted to save the packets that come along with it as some kind of beef broth for later.

I do use the veggies I dehydrate myself. It's great. I've used mixed veggies, asparagus, sweet peas. I'd like to try snow peas, water chestnuts and bamboo shoots. Maybe I'll pick up a can or two and throw those in the dehydrator.

I haven't dehydrated any meat yet - that's a future project.

I'm actually working on some "recipes" for using with the things I dehydrate and ramen noodles.  Has anyone tried fruit in the ramen, like pork and pineapple or chicken and raisins? Any combos that sound interesting to anyone?
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: sarahluker on September 22, 2009, 10:22:55 AM
I'll have to show this thread to my daughter's best friend.  She has dreams of opening a Ramen Restaurant when she gets out of school.  I always laughed about it but wow you can do alot with the stuff!
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: ColdHaven on September 22, 2009, 10:36:13 AM
In Japan there are restaraunts that specialize in Ramen noodles and various other noodles as well.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: sarahluker on September 22, 2009, 10:45:14 AM
That cracks me up!   I never realized that ramen had such potential.  But I can learn.  I know it's cheap and I have alot of it for preps.  Thanks for the ideas.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: ColdHaven on September 22, 2009, 12:55:31 PM
Hmmm. With all this talk of ramen noodles I think I am going to change my stance on them as far as BOBs go. They might be one of the more diversified foods you could carry with you. If you dehydrate some veggies and such you could make several days worth of food that would be semi-nutrious. I think I may re-evaluate my pack to see if I can not put a few in there.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: HelenWheels on September 22, 2009, 03:31:34 PM
Hmmm...

Shrimp Ramen noodles, a foil packet of tuna, dehydrated peas and mushrooms - Ramen Tuna casserole

Pork Ramen noodles, real bacon bits (from a package), dehydrated pineapple, packet of soy sauce - Hawaiian Luau Pork Ramen

Chicken Ramen noodles, small can of chicken meat, dehydrated mixed veggies, dehydrated mushrooms, dry milk - Chicken Pot Pie Ramen

Beef Ramen noodles, dried beef or beef jerky, dehydrated chili beans, onions, peppers, tomatoes, packets of salsa - Chili Mac Ramen

Cheesy Ramen noodles, foil packet of Spam, dehydrated peas - Ham & Cheese Casserole

Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: The Spamburglar on September 22, 2009, 04:14:55 PM
Hmmm...

Shrimp Ramen noodles, a foil packet of tuna, dehydrated peas and mushrooms - Ramen Tuna casserole

Pork Ramen noodles, real bacon bits (from a package), dehydrated pineapple, packet of soy sauce - Hawaiian Luau Pork Ramen

Chicken Ramen noodles, small can of chicken meat, dehydrated mixed veggies, dehydrated mushrooms, dry milk - Chicken Pot Pie Ramen

Beef Ramen noodles, dried beef or beef jerky, dehydrated chili beans, onions, peppers, tomatoes, packets of salsa - Chili Mac Ramen

Cheesy Ramen noodles, foil packet of Spam, dehydrated peas - Ham & Cheese Casserole



A post has never made me more hungry in my life
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Pukwudji on October 08, 2009, 12:29:42 AM
For 'just plain' ramen I make up a batch (usually chicken or oriental flavor) add some black pepper, ginger, and red pepper flakes.  When it's about done I drop in an egg or two for protein and scramble it slightly in the soup.

Another thing I do is make them in a skillet with about 1/2 an inch of water in it and cook them until the water is gone.  I pan fry the noodles for a minute or two then scramble a couple eggs in it.  If I have some frozen veggies I might throw a handful in.  A little Heinz 57 and serve.

One thing I've seen a lot of lately with kids and the grandkids is they sprinkle the powder on the noodle brick and just eat it dry.  Sometimes I guess you just want a salty and crunchy snack...

-Brian
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Call on October 10, 2009, 02:22:08 PM
Even back in university I used ramen noodles as a base for a larger "meal". Toss in some potato, frozen veggies, and some flavoring (sauce, teriyaki) and it almost becomes a full dinner. Today it is deydrated vegetables, soy chips, and dried mushrooms.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: steeltownknight on October 10, 2009, 05:23:07 PM
In most asian markets/stores they also sell big cases or packs of medium sized squares or puck sized ramen most don't have the salt pack with them but any good bouillion cube/powder will do. and they are even cheaper than the individual pack type.   I have seen a few posts by people with whiney kids who wont eat them?  a good method you can try is
"You're gonna sit there till YOU finish it !"
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: ColdHaven on October 12, 2009, 08:40:34 AM
My philosophy about kids not eating in SHTF is about like Jack's. By day 20 or so they will about eat anything including you so... I never say committally that I will never eat something because if I have to eat Raccoon I rather not be eating crow along with it.

Seriously though, I used my sterno kit the other day when I was hunting. I made a nice little food kit that I will post soon that has 3 days of food and fits in a rather small space. Some of the foods in it include 3 packets of ramen noodles.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: daemonpi on October 12, 2009, 01:43:52 PM
My philosophy on kids not eating is: No problem, but don't expect to be fed until the next meal time.  Once or twice is all it takes.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Pukwudji on October 12, 2009, 02:05:38 PM
I was just talking to my friend about this.  If worst came to worse and you had to live on spaghetti for a month, it might get boring but you'd be fed.  And if the kids decide they don't want to eat spaghetti that's their choice.  I bet they'll eat it tomorrow, though.

This is, however, a little tongue in cheek.  Kids at a certain age can get amazingly stubborn and will just decide not to eat.  You have to be a bit careful with those kind.  Also remember that even if they eat it when forced to, it can cause life-long eating issues.  Best case is they might never want to eat spaghetti again.  Worst case is you end up with obesity issues.  Some research has shown that people who go through periods of starvation or malnutrition are more likely to become obese later in life.  I know research can conclude anything the researchers were trying to prove so take that as you will, but it is something to keep in mind.

-Brian

Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: bsmith_shoot on October 12, 2009, 05:39:52 PM
I was thinking, also, that if you have a dehydrator then you can dehydrate your own veggies to go into the meal. Heck, you could even dehydrate meat. This way you can make your own packet of mix in case you wanted to save the packets that come along with it as some kind of beef broth for later.
This works insanely good. I always kill a beef every year, and usually make about 35 pounds of jerky. Just throw the noodles into re-hydrated and cooked meats and veggies, and theyre awesome.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Surfcruiser on October 13, 2009, 08:53:03 AM
I work outside in the winter, few hours outside, a couple inside at the day goes on. Ramen will rehydrate in 3 minutes really well with the water from the hot side of a water cooler. I allways have a stock at work and in my car (60 mile commute if I get stranded I have a reliable food). Regardless its is super easy to try out these ramen recipes and if anyone asks it a good segway to preparedness. Plus it warms the bones fast when you come in from the cold.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: MD3C on November 23, 2009, 03:15:06 PM
I just spotted a case buried at the bottom of my pantry. I'll have to dig them out, and give a few a try.
Also wondering if the rodent got to them. They do love Ramen.
Thanks for the informative posts.
M
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: inthego on November 23, 2009, 10:36:51 PM
When my kids were 5 and 6 they spilled some Ramen juice on the carpet we cleaned it up as well as we could but it stained the carpet. A few months latter we hired Chem-dry to clean the carpets in the house (great offer at the time) well the prier owners of the house had parked a bike inside the house and it leaked oil on the carpet - got it out the guy worked on the Ramen stain for 20 min.. finally asked what was this stain?!
Well I do still eat it and use it in our preps but man what the heck is in that stuff?   ;D
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: minimalist on November 27, 2009, 11:59:01 AM
On the topic of eating old ramen... Some of you may not know it but the ramen noodles are actually fried. I believe most of the grams of fat in ramen comes from the noodles. I saw someone mentioned eating ramen that was past its use by date; I wonder if there is any problem with the fats in the noodles going rancid after a while.  I'm not saying if SHTF I wouldn't eat old ramen noodles, but you might not want to make a practice of it.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: bartsdad on November 28, 2009, 12:18:33 AM
When my kids were 5 and 6 they spilled some Ramen juice on the carpet we cleaned it up as well as we could but it stained the carpet. A few months latter we hired Chem-dry to clean the carpets in the house (great offer at the time) well the prier owners of the house had parked a bike inside the house and it leaked oil on the carpet - got it out the guy worked on the Ramen stain for 20 min.. finally asked what was this stain?!
Well I do still eat it and use it in our preps but man what the heck is in that stuff?   ;D

I had a big coffee stain created by our toddler that the local carpet cleaner and pretty much all the available spot cleaners couldn't remove, did a little homework and found that baby wipes took the stain out right away.Go figure. Does kinda make me wonder exactly we were using on his bum.hmmmmm?
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: MD3C on November 30, 2009, 12:32:37 AM
Got to mine today. I bought them in 2005, and they're still in the case, and I'm not sure of the expiration date?
No rodent damage. I don't plan on tossing them. :-[
M
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: LdMorgan on January 28, 2010, 09:42:54 PM
Raman has another advantage that not a lot of people seem to know about.

Aside from being an infinitely variable foodstuff, ramen noodles can be cooked cold, without using a stove of any kind.

Seriously. 

Raman noodles cook in hot water in about three minutes.

In warm water, they take about twenty minutes, MOL.

In colder water, they rehydrate in anywhere from an hour to several, depending on the temperature.

If you're bugging out and can't risk a fire, or can't stop to cook, throw your ramen into a gallon ziplock with some water and strap it on top of your pack.

Just like making sun tea--when you're ready to bed down, supper will be ready.

Or, if you're already holed up somewhere, just toss them into some water and let them sit til they're soft. Add the flavor pack, and dinner is pre-payured...!

Ramen, BTW, is the original and only essential ingredient for Stone Soup.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: inthego on January 28, 2010, 09:52:35 PM

Ramen, BTW, is the original and only essential ingredient for Stone Soup.


Stone Soup?  The story or a real soup?
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Docwatmo on January 28, 2010, 09:55:36 PM
You can also just chew them up and swallow em dry.  Drink lots of water with them and the warmth of your belly will do the rest.  Not the best way to do it, but it can be done.  (i have only eaten dry ramen once, I would do it if there was no other way but it does work)  

If you put them in a zip lock bag inside your shirt or coat next to your skin (or inside your sleeping bag with you), they will soften to warm in about the same time as luke warm water (20 to 30 minutes)  One way to get a little midnight snack on :)  

Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: LdMorgan on January 28, 2010, 10:35:55 PM
Stone Soup?  The story or a real soup?

Well, both, kinda-sorta. But only semi-seriously.

The Stone Soup from the story would have come out much better if they had started with Ramen and just used the stones (hot) to boil the water.

In real life, Raman is the ultimate base for a "Stone Soup" to die for--and no recipe is required. You just keep adding whatever you have until the pot is as full as it can get.

It doesn't seem to matter what you put in, it always turns out yummy...

(Dang! Now you got me hungry again!)

Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Comsec on February 11, 2010, 01:34:13 PM
I use to stock up on Ramon, but found it took up to much space, I moved over to buying spaghetti in bulk and breaking it in half and storing half of it in 2 serving vac bags, I store and carry bullion cubes and condiment packets or my BOB, NOTE: I also have ALOT of spaghetti Sauce, my wife loves the stuff LOL
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Morgan96 on February 11, 2010, 05:50:41 PM
Ramen and cut-up summer sausage, warmed up in an old coffe can on a hobo stove. It works.
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Comsec on February 11, 2010, 11:04:37 PM
I had a Brownie pan and no meat at one time, but it works
Title: Re: Ramen Noodles
Post by: Stwood on January 29, 2019, 10:33:30 PM
.