Author Topic: Cedar's Garden 2014  (Read 127323 times)

Offline Cedar

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Cedar's Garden 2014
« on: December 16, 2013, 07:35:24 PM »
I start my garden this time of the year as I sort through seeds. Plan what I am rotating this year, etc. Last years garden was in two months late and we had a mostly cold wet summer, except when it went from super cold, to scorching hot for a few days and back to stupidly cold and wet. So it was en experiment in plant abuse and see what actually would go to seed.

So today I went through and cataloged since I did not get a chance to go through all the seeds last late winter. It took 6 hours just to go through the vegetables. I am tackling the herbs, grains, flowers, etc another day. All of them are over 50 year open pollinated heirlooms, some of which are almost extinct. I may have the only Melting Sugar Tall, they consider it extinct. When I grow some out this coming summer, I may offer it out to SSE or someone.

505 varieties in just vegetables, a few I have dropped or lost, or handed out as they did not do well in my climate:
Artichoke -1
"Green Globe Improved"

Asparagus Pea -1

Beans - 45 (Silly for someone who hates beans right? But they are PRETTY!)
"Anasazi"
"Aquadulce Claudia"
"Barlotto Lingua di Fuoco 2" (Endangered)
"Black Turtle"
"Blue Lake Bush"
"Burpee Stringless" (Rare)
"Brockton Horticulture"
"Cherokee Trail of Tears"
"Climbing French"
"Christmas Lima" pre-1840
"Contender" pre-1949
"Dragon's Tongue"
"Earliserve"
"Empress" (almost extinct)
"Fin de Bagnol"
"Gold of Bacau"
"Golden Cresent Bean"
"Good Mother Stallard" (Endangered)
"Henderson Bush" pre-1800's
"Hidatsa Shield Figure"
"Ideal Market"
"Ireland Creek Annie" 1930’s
"Kentucky Wonder Pole"
"Lazy Housewife" pre-1810
"Mayflower" - 1600's
"Orca" (was endangered)
"Oregon Blue Lake" (endangered)
"Pencil Pod Golden Wax" (endangered)
"Prizewinner"
"Provider"
"Purple Podded Pole" 1930's
"Rattlesnake"
"Refugee"  pre 1878
"Royal Burgandy" pre 1957
"Scarlett Runner"
"Space Navy Beans"
"Speckled Cranberry" pre-1825
"Sultan's Golden Cresent" (almost extinct)
"Tendergreen Stringless"
"Tiger Eye"
"The Prince" (endangered)
"Tobacco Patch"
"Tom Barrow's Purple flower, Purple Streaked Pole Beans"
"Tom Barrow's Scarlett Runner, Select Light Pink"
"Top Crop"
"True Red Cranberry"
"Turkey Craw"

Beets - 11
"Albino"
"Bull's Blood"
"Burpee's Golden"
"Chioggia"
"Cylinda"
"Detroit Dark Red"
"Early Blood Turnip"
"Extra Early Flat Egyptian"
"Golden"
"Red Mangel"
"Winter Keeper"

Broccoli - 6
"Calabrese"
"De Cicco"
"Green Sprouting"
"Purple Sprouting"
"White Sprouting"
"Zamboni"

Brussels Sprouts - 4
"Evesham Special"
"Long Island"
"Long Island Improved"
"Rubine"

Cabbage - 16
"Baby Choy"
"Brunswick"
"Chinese"
"Copenhagen"
"Copenhagen Market"
"Early Jersey Wakefield"
"Flat Dutch"
"Late Flat Dutch"
"Mammoth Red Rock"
"Pak Choy"
"Perfection Savoy"
"Premium Late Flat Dutch"
"Raab Rapini"
"Red Acre"
"Red Drumhead"
"Wheeler's Imperial"

Carrot - 19
"Chantenay"
"Chantenay Red Core"
"Danver's"
"Danver's 126"
"Danver's Half Long"
"Dragon"
"Horn Red Apple"
"Kuttiger"
"Little Finger"
"Lunar White"
"Nantes Coreless"
"Obtuse of Flakee (aka Red Giant)"
"Oxheart"
"Paris Market"
"Royal Chantenay"
"St. Valery"
"Touchon"
"Yellow Belgian"
"White Belgian"

Cauliflower - 2
"All the Year Around"
"Early Snowball"

Celeriac - 1
"Giant Prauge"

Celery- 2
"Golden Self Blanching"
"Utah Green"

Corn - 14
"Bloody Butcher"
"Country Gentleman"
"Golden Bantam Improved"
"Hickory King"
"Hopi Blue"
"Howling Mob"
"Mandan Bride"
"Mixed Colors Broomcorn"
"Oaxaca Verde"
"Painted Mountain"
"Roy's Calais"
"Stowell's Evergreen"
"Supai"
"Yukon Supreme"

Popcorn - 4
"Calico"
"Dakota Black"
"Two Inch Strawberry"
"Thankgiving Bouquet"

Cucumber - 23
"Armenian"
"Ashley"
"Boothsby's Blonde"
"Crystal Apple"
"Crystal Lemon"
"Edmonson"
"Hmong Red"
"Japanese Climbing"
"Japanese Long"
"Jelly Melon"
"Long de Chine"
"Mexican Sour Gherkin"
"Miniature White"
"Muncher"
"National Pickling"
"Parade"
"Pasisian Pickling"
"Poona Kheera"
"Solly Beiler"
"Suyo Long"
"Straight Eight"
"Telegraph Improved"
"True Lemon"

Eggplant - 15 (I hate eggplant too, except when I was pregnant)
"Applegreen"
"Black Beauty"
"Black Long Early"
"Casper"
"Cote d'Ivoire"
"Kazakhstan"
"Korean Red"
"Lao Purple Stripe"
"Listada de Gandia"
"Little Fingers"
"Pingtung Long"
"Rosa Bianca"
"Rosita"
"Thai Green"
"Tonda di Manfredonia"

Fennel -1
"Finocchio"

Garden Huckleberry -1

Good King Henry-1

Kale - 6
"Dwarf Blue Curled Scotch"
"Konserva"
"Lacinato"
"Red Russian (Ragged Jack)"
"Siberian"
"White Russian"

Kohl Rabi -1
"White"

Leek -2
"Blue Solaise"
"Musselburgh"

Lentils -1
"Israel"

Lettuce - 34
"Amish Deer Tongue"
"Baby Oakleaf"
"Black Seeded Simpson"
"Big Boston"
"Bronze Arrowhead"
"Buttercrunch"
"Forellenschluss"
"d'Hiver de Sante Marthe"
"Greek Maroulli Cos"
"Green Towers Romaine"
"Hanson"
"Hungarian Winter Pink"
"Iceberg"
"May Queen"
"Monstrueux De Viroflay"
"Pandero"
"Parris Island"
"Pinot"
"Pirat Butterhead"
"Romaine"
"Red Coach"
"Red Flamingo"
"Red Lakes"
"Red Romaine"
"Red Sails"
"Reine Des Glaces"
"Rouge d'Hiver"
"Rouge du Midi"
"Sanguine Ameliore"
"Sea of Red"
"Summertime"
"Tango"
"Tennis Ball'
"Yugoslavian Red Butterhead"

Melons - 23
"Amish"
"Ananas"
"Boule d'Or"
"Charentais"
"Chaentais de Bellegarde"
"Eden's Gem"
"Edisto 47"
"Emerald Gem"
"Green Nutmeg"
"Hales Best"
"Hales Best Jumbo"
"Hearts of Gold"
"Honeydew"
"Honey Rock"
"Jenny Lind"
"Minnesota Midget"
"Noir des Carmes"
"Prescott a Fond Blanc"
"Pride of Wisconsin"
"Petit Gris de Rennes"
"Sakata's Sweet"
"Schoons Hardshell"

Mustard -2
"Mizuna"
"Southern Giant Curled"

Okra -4
"Clemson Spineless"
"Emerald"
"Hill Country Red"
"Red"

Onion -4
"Long Red Florence"
"Texas Grande 1015Y"
"Tokyo Long White Bunching"
"Wethersfield Red"

Parsnip -4
"Cobham Improved Marrow"
"Guardsman"
"Hollow Crown"
"White Bunching"

Peas - 18
"Amish Snap"
"Big Boy Butter Pea"
"Blue Podded Shelling (Blauwschokkers)"
"British Wonder"
"Caroubt de Maussane"
"Champion of England"
"Dwarf Gray Sugar"
"Feltham First"
"Golden Sweet"
"Green Arrow"
"Melting Sugar"
"Opal Creek"
"Oregon Sugar Pod II"
"Pony Pole"
"Prussian Blue"
"Sugar Snap"
"Sugaree"
"Tom Thumb"

Peppers - 48
"Aji Cristal" (5/5)
"Anaheim" (4/5)
"Aurora" (5/5)
"Black Hungarian" (3/5)
"Bulgarian  Carrot" (5/5)
"Bull Nose Bell"
"Californian Wonder"
"Cayenne Long Red"
"Cayenne Long Thin"
"Cow Horn"
"Cyklon"(5/5)
"Fatalii" (5/5)
"Feher Ozon Paprika" (0/5)
"Fish" (3/5)
"Early Jalapeno" (3/5)
"Georgia Flame" (5/5)
"Goat Horn"
"Golden California Wonder"
"Hinkelhatz" (4/5)
"Habanero"
"Healthy"
"Hot Portugal" (3/5)
"Hungarian Yellow Wax" (3/5)
"Jalapeno" (3/5)
"Jimmy Nardello"
"Joe's Round" (4/5)
"King of the North"
"Lemon Drop" (4/5)
"Medusa"
"Melrose" (frying Pepper)
"Miniature Yellow Bell"
"Mustard Habanero" (Stupidly Hot)
"Nepalese Bell" (4/5)
"Napoleon Sweet"
"Nosegay" (4/5)
"Orange Bell"
"Pasilla Bajio"(3/5)
Quadrato d'Asti Asti Giallo"
"Quadrato d'Asti Asti Rossa"
"Red Cap Mushroom" (4/5)
"Serrano" (4/5)
"Sweet Chocolate"
"Taltos"
"Tequila Sunrise"
"Thai Hot" (4/5)
"Tobago Seasoning" (3/5)
"Red Marconi"
"Sante Fe Grande" (3/5)

Pumpkins - 10
"Big Max"
"Cheyenne Bush"
"Connecticut Field"
"Cornfield Pumpkin"
"Jack Be Little"
"Jack O'Lantern"
"Mammoth"
"Naked Seed"
"New England Pie"
"Ole Zeb's Pumpkin"

Radish - 19
"Black Spanish Round"
"Cherry Belle"
"Chinese Red Meat (aka Watermelon)"
"Chinese Rose Winter"
"Early Scarlett  Globe"
"French Breakfast"
"German Giant"
"Giant of Sicily"
"Hailstone"
"Helios"
"Long Scarlett Cincinnati"
"Minowase"
"Purple Plum"
"Rat's Tail"
"Saxa II"
"Sparkler White Tip"
"Watermelon"
"White Hailstone"
"White Icicle"

Rutabaga -1
"American Purple Top"

Salsify -1
"Belstar Super"

Soybeans -3
"Envy
"Shirofumi"
"Shorimeyutaka"

Spinach - 7
"America"
"Bloomsdale"
"Bloomsdale Long Standing"
"Giant Noble"
"King of Denmark"
"New Zealand"
"Red Malabar"

Summer Squash - 8
"Early Prolific Straightneck"
"Early White Bush Scallop"
"Lemon"
"Patisson Panache', Verte Et Blanc"
"Saffron Prolific Straightneck"
"Summer Crookneck"
"Yellow Crookneck"
"Yugoslavian Finger Fruit"

Winter Squash - 33 (I used to hate squash and then I found out Acorn cooked mom's way is not THE way to have squash)
"Amish Pie"
"Boston Marrow"
"Buttercup (Burgess Strain)"
"Butternut"
"Bush Buttercup"
"Canada Crookneck"
"Chicago Warted Hubbard"
"Chirimen"
"Crown"
"Delicata"
"Galeux d'Eysines"
"Gila Cliff Dwelling"
"Golden Hubbard"
"Hubbard"
"Hubbard Baby Blue"
"Indian Pumpkin"
"Kikuza"
"Kabocha"
"Long Island Cheese"
"Mammoth Table Queen"
"Oregon Homestead Sweet Meat"
"Pennsylvania Dutch Crookneck"
"Potimarron"
"Potimarron Red Kury (Uchiki Kuri)"
"Shishigtana or Toonas Makino"
"Sucrine Du Berry" Baker creek
"Swan White"
"Table Queen"
"Tours"
"Turk's Turban"
"Waltham Butternut"
"White Bush Marrow"
"Vegetable Spaghetti"

Swiss Chard - 2
"Five Colored Silverbeet"
"Fordhook Giant"

Tomatillo - 7
"Aunt Molly's"
"Green"
"Green Husk"
"Ground Cherry"
"Purple de Milpa"
"Saint Timothy"
"Toma Verde"

Tomato - 69
"Ailsa Craig"
"Amber"
"Amish Paste"
"Aunt Ruby German Green"
"Austin's Red Pear"
"Babywine"
"Beefsteak"
"Big Rainbow"
"Black Krim"
"Boxcar Willie"
"Brandywine"
"Brandywine Red"
"Cherokee Purple"
"Cherry Roma"
"Chocolate Cherry"
"Dr. Wyche's Yellow"
"Egg from Phucket"
"Evergreeen"
"Garden Peach"
"Gemini"
"German Gold"
"Green Sausage"
"Green Zebra"
"Homestead"
"Isis Candy Cherry"
"Hillbilly Potato Leaf"
"Hungarian Heart"
"Italian Heirloom"
"Jaunne Flamme"
"jon's Yellow Cherokee"
"Kentuky Beefsteak"
"Large Red Cherry"
"Lemon Drop"
"Marmande"
"Martino's Roma"
"Manitoba"
"Mexico Midget"
"Missouri Pink Love Apple"
"Moonglow"
"Morning Sun"
"Mule Team"
"Nebraska Wedding"
"Old German"
"Opalka"
"Omar's Lebanese"
"Ozark Pink"
"Pantano Romanesco"
"Peron Sprayless"
"Persimmon Type" PI 326170 69AI
"Purple Prince"
"Rainbow Beefsteak"
"Red Rock"
"Rio"
"Roma"
"Rutger's"
"Rutger's Select"
"San Marzano"
"Silvery Fir Tree"
"Sophie's Choice"
"Speckled Roman"
"Stupice"
"Summer Cherry"
"Sweet Pea Current"
"Thessaloniki"
"Tommy Toe"
"Tonnelet L.F."
"Tula"
"Uncle Mark Bagby"
"Yellow Russian"

Turnip - 4
"American Purple Top"
"Golden Globe"
"Purple Top White Globe"
"Snowball"

Watermelon - 14
"Black Diamond"
"Blacktail Mountain"
"Charleston Gray"
"Crimson Sweet"
"Hopi Yellow"
"Kleckley's Sweet"
"Klondike Blue Ribbon Striped"
"Melitopolski"
"Navajo"
"Osh Kirgizia"
"Moon & Stars"
"Moon & Stars (Van Doren strain)"
"Small Shining Light"
"Sweet Siberian"

Zucchini - 6
"Black Beauty"
"Cocozelle"
"Costara Romanesco"
"Dark Green"
"Golden"
"Tondo Chiaro di Nizza"

After I got done with sorting seeds, I told Z how many hot pepper varieties I had.. and he asked if I knew about this event coming up.. so then after I said I had not.. today Z signed me up for the 7th Annual Organic Seed Alliance (OSA), which is the Nation’s Largest Organic Seed Conference and the pre-conference Willamette Valley tours of the seed houses, . You have NO idea how excited I am about this. *Does the Happy Snoopy Dance!!!* http://seedalliance.org/events/organic_seed_growers_conference/sessions-and-speakers

My brother said he wanted gardening seeds for a Christmas gift, which is why I pulled the seeds out of the Lodge today, so I am making a personalized box with about 50-80 kinds in it which he will never be able to get off the seed racks. I hope he will like it. I will post a pic when the box is done.

Cedar
« Last Edit: December 16, 2013, 07:42:07 PM by Cedar »

Offline LibertyBelle

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2013, 07:58:21 PM »
Awesome seed list you have there!  I see a good many familiar names. :) 
The other day I found a sheet of paper from many years back that listed all of my heirloom seeds at that time on it.  Everything I had at the time barely took up the page.  Compare that to the beginning of 2013, where I had over 10 pages of just heirloom veg alone and that doesn't include any descriptions, just the variety name only.  I've added a good 50 or more to that list since the beginning of the year, and that's not counting the order I just received in the post today.  And I'm getting ready order even more. It's a sickness, I tell you. A sickness!  ;D 

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2013, 08:12:15 PM »
It's a sickness, I tell you. A sickness!  ;D

I will try to post up my little 10-12 vials I have with my dad's pepper and tomato seeds in it before he died. I just leave them in their little jars. I am sure they are not viable anymore. But it is what started the whole thing, even if dad doesn't know it. I was holding them in my hand today and thinking I ought to show you guys.

It is an addiction, but there are worse things to have for an addiction. I was surprised when I had 100 varieties. I was going to stop at 200 250 300 500.... and I know I have well over 800 varieties now with all the flowers, grains, herbs (I think I have 14 basils alone), tobacco, etc. And I justify having so many due varieties to sharing out the seeds by holding my Seedy Saturdays each year. I do not want to lose our agricultural heritage and every little bit of seed I can pass out to as many gardeners as I can, will slow or turn that trend around. I have put my seeds in my will actually. They are not *my*seeds, but our future generations seeds. I hope one day SP will appreciate them. But I want most of the bulk of them to go to a certain seed house. I have at least three varieties I know only about 3 people in North American are raising. And no.. I do not raise them all out every year. I select about 190-200 of all of them types. I also farm some out to places I know they can pull off a certain variety, like 120+ day corn when I know I am going to have a cold wet year and not be able to pull off seed.

My family is not too excited about my seeds. They know I seed save, but I do not think they understand many of them are endangered, even mom just buys from the rack at the store. She never asks for seeds. I always wonder what dad would say if he could see my collection. I know he would be amazed. I know he would want to raid my stash. He only saved tomatoes, peppers and lettuce from what I remember, but he planted an even bigger seed when he got me thinking about keeping seeds, starting my addiction around 1985. Thanks dad!

Cedar


Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2013, 08:23:10 AM »
Cedar

I am looking to start saving most of my own seed.   Can you recommend some good resources on learning to save seed.  I am also wondering how one would go about saving seed without cross pollinating when you have a small garden. 
Thanks

Offline ericksonrs

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2013, 09:19:01 AM »
That's an extensive list!! Can you recommend two or three varieties from each category that you would suggest to someone with a much smaller garden?  Maybe it's too hard to pick favorites?  Thanks!

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2013, 09:58:52 AM »
I am looking to start saving most of my own seed.   Can you recommend some good resources on learning to save seed.  I am also wondering how one would go about saving seed without cross pollinating when you have a small garden. 

Start with the Easy Five...

Saving the "Easy 5"

Beans - Beans are actually kinda difficult to crossbreed. They are perfect pollinators and pollinate before their flowers open. It is generally a good idea to separate them by 15-20 feet. I never do and never had a problem.
HARVEST: Allow pods to dry brown before harvesting, about six weeks after eating stage. If frost threatens, pull entire plant, root first, and hang in cool, dry location until pods are brown.

PROCESS: Small amounts of pods can be opened by hand. Flail larger amounts. Remove large chaff by hand or fork. Winnow remaining particles.
 

Lettuce
HARVEST: Lettuce is difficult to crossbreed. They are perfect pollinators and pollinate before their flowers open. It is generally a good idea to separate them by 15-20 feet. I never do and never had a problem. Some outside leaves can be harvested for eating without harming seed production. Allow seed heads to dry 2-3 weeks after flowering. Individual heads will ripen at different times making the harvest of large amounts of seed at one time nearly impossible. Wait until half the flowers on each plant has gone to seed. You can cut entire top of plant and allow to dry upside down in an open paper bag. I usually go by with a 5 gallon bucket, lean over the lettuce flowers and tap them to make the seed fall into the bucket. I kinda squish the flowers with my hands to break the seed off the 'dandelion fuzz' and then blow into the bucket to get the fuzz to blow out, leaving the seed behind. If I want to clean from there, I kinda use 'gold panning' methods without the water.

PROCESS: Small amounts of seed can be shaken daily from individual flowering heads. Rub with hands to remove remaining seeds. If necessary, separate seeds from chaff with screens.
 

Peas
HARVEST: Peas are perfect pollinators and pollinate before their flowers open. It is generally a good idea to separate them by 15-20 feet. I never do and never had a problem. Allow pods to dry brown before harvesting, about four weeks after eating stage. If frost threatens, pull entire plant, root first, and hang in cool, dry location until pods are brown.

PROCESS: Small amounts of pods can be opened by hand. Flail larger amounts. Remove large chaff by hand or fork. Winnow remaining particles.

 

Pepper
HARVEST: Harvest mature, fully-ripe peppers for seed. (Most bell peppers turn red when fully mature.) If frost threatens before peppers mature, pull entire plant and hang in cool, dry location until peppers mature.

PROCESS: There are two methods, dry and wet, to process pepper seeds. The dry method is adequate for small amounts. Cut the bottom off the fruit and carefully reach in to strip the seeds surrounding central cone. In many cases, seeds need no further cleaning. To process the seed from large amounts of peppers, cut off the tops just under the stem, fill a blender with peppers and water and carefully blend until good seeds are separated and sink to bottom. Pepper debris and immature seeds will float to the top where they can be rinsed away. Spread clean seeds on paper towel and dry in cool location until seed is dry enough to break when folded.


Tomato
HARVEST: If possible, allow tomatoes to completely ripen before harvesting for seed production. Unripe fruits, saved from the first frost, will ripen slowly if kept in a cool, dry location. Seeds from green, unripe fruits will be most viable if extracted after allowing the fruits to turn color.

PROCESS: Cut the tomato into halves at its equator, opening the vertical cavities that contain the seeds. Gently squeeze out from the cavities the jelly-like substance that contains the seeds. If done carefully, the tomato itself can still be eaten or saved for canning, sun-drying or dehydrating.

Place the jelly and seeds into a small jar or glass. (Add a little water if you are processing only one or two small tomatoes.) Loosely cover the container and place in a warm location, 60-75° F. for about three days. Stir once a day.

A layer of fungus will begin to appear on the top of the mixture after a couple of days. This fungus not only eats the gelatinous coat that surrounds each seed and prevents germination, it also produces antibiotics that help to control seed-borne diseases like bacterial spot, canker and speck.

After three days fill the seed container with warm water. Let the contents settle and begin pouring out the water along with pieces of tomato pulp and immature seeds floating on top. Note: Viable seeds are heavier and settle to the bottom of the jar. Repeat this process until water being poured out is almost clear and clean seeds line the bottom of the container. Pour these clean seeds into a strainer that has holes smaller than the seeds. Let the excess water drip out and invert the strainer onto paper towel or piece of newspaper. Allow the seeds to dry completely (usually a day or two). Break up the clumps into individual seeds, label and store in a packet or plastic bag.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And then when you are getting 'wild and crazy', use this, use this, use this.

Seed to Seed - Ashworth, Suzanne/ Whealy, Kent
ISBN-10   1882424581
ISBN-13   9781882424580
THIS is the Bible for seed saving. You will need no other.


Me, with not even a dent of my seed varieties. This was for an article for the grange. Anything in a jar, I saved seed, the packets are some donations for event. I think I gave away 1,200 packets that year. Maybe 15-20 pounds of my own stock.

Cedar - who loves spreading the addition

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2013, 10:27:44 AM »
That's an extensive list!! Can you recommend two or three varieties from each category that you would suggest to someone with a much smaller garden?  Maybe it's too hard to pick favorites?  Thanks!

Yes, no, maybe. What gardening zone are you in? Do you have a short wet season or a long long dry one? Do you have a Day Long or a Day Neutral piece of land? Some of them are pretty much impossible to get from a seed rack at the store. Some of them are pretty much impossible to get out of a seed catalog and mailed to you.

If I had to blindly guess and say some of my favorites, which are easier to get and will be easier for a newer gardener:

Beans:
"Dragon's Tongue" (green)
"Ireland Creek Annie" (green or dry)
"Royal Burgandy" (green)

Beets:
"Bull's Blood"

Broccoli:
"Green Sprouting"

Cabbage:
"Early Jersey Wakefield" (fresh eating)
"Late Flat Dutch" (kraut)

Carrots:
"Chantenay"
"Danver's"

Corn:
"Golden Bantam Improved"

Cucumber:
"Mexican Sour Gherkin"
"National Pickling"
"True Lemon"

Kale:
"Dwarf Blue Curled Scotch" (if you can find it)

Lettuce:
Choose what appeals to you. There is like 7,200 varieties of heirloom lettuce out there. My personal favorite is "Yugoslavian Red Butterhead". I think you can still get it at Seed Savers Exchange.

Melon:
"Minnesota Midget" is probably the most forgiving in most climates

Okra:
"Hill Country Red" if you can find it. Try SSE again.

Onions:
If you are south of the Mason-Dixon line, get Day Neutral onions. If you are north, you can get Day Long onions. If you don't, they will do funny things growing and you will hate growing onions.

Peas:
Most of the ones I have no one has heard of before. If I had to pick one which was easy to grow pretty much anywhere and easier to find, I would probably pick "Green Arrow". I have had it grow for me at 20F and live to tell the tale. Was still doing good in hot weather.
For Snow Peas, "Carouby de Maussane". There is no other snow pea for me (actually there is, I grow like 5 kinds, but this is my favorite).

Peppers:
I grow stupidly hot ones, but I do this for conservation and in memory of my father who was a 'pepperhead'. I do grow them as houseplants which live for years and years if I can get my cat from stopping eating them. My favorite houseplant ones are "Thai Hot", which is getting easier to find sources for. "Aurora" which you can get at SSE for its purple leaves and pods which look like Christmas tre lights.. all different colours.

Bell/Sweets.... "Sweet Chocolate", "Tequila Sunrise", "Californian Wonder", "Jimmy Nardello". "Jimmy Nardello" is one of my new favs.

Pumpkins:
One of my new favorites is "Cheyenne Bush". Space saving and moderately large fruit. I had a horrible year and they are the only ones I could harvest.

Spinach:
"King of Denmark" if you can find it. I did find my original source off the rack, 4-5 years ago. Huge and tender. Slower to bolt.

Summer Squash:
"Yellow Crookneck"
"Yugoslavian Finger Fruit"
If you can find them. I am still seeing them on racks as of last year. But they are in catalogs.

Winter Squash:
What kind of squash do you like? I hate Acorn types. I love the meaty nutty tasting ones.
Crooknecks are awesome. My fav is "Canada Crookneck", but it is almost extinct. Try "Pennsylvania Dutch Crookneck".
"Oregon Homestead Sweet Meat" is exceptional, but huge
"Table Queen" is kinda the standard in Acorns.
"Tours" - naked seed production
"Turk's Turban" - easy grower and keeper
"Waltham Butternut" - easy grower and keeper

Swiss Chard:
"Five Colored Silverbeet"

Tomato:
You are on your own. Too many to choose from, but my and Nic's (the mod here) fav's are "Black Krim"

Turnip:
"Snowball" if you can find it. All white and very mild, good keeper

Watermelon:
"Blacktail Mountain", especially if you are in a short season climate

Zucchini:
"Black Beauty"
"Cocozelle" -if you can find it, it is my new favorite for stuffing or stirfrying.

Cedar


Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2013, 12:59:24 PM »
Cedar

Thank you for info.  I will be adding a few more seeds to try and I will pick up a copy of the Seed to Seed book.

Offline tyananomura

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2013, 03:52:53 AM »
I'm hoping to get to see your garden this year.  Also hoping that mine gets off the ground better than the last two years.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2013, 06:32:11 AM »
Nice list... I'm a little envious. The fertility of those guilds must be off the charts.

Adding any perennials? I'm getting lazier as I age and am looking for the "set it and forget it" growing.

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2013, 08:42:58 AM »
I'm hoping to get to see your garden this year.  Also hoping that mine gets off the ground better than the last two years.

Glad to see you come up for air from your work girl!! You can come over anytime. Sorry we missed you for Thanksgiving. I am having a Seedy Saturday soon, you should come get seeds for yours. If it makes you feel any better, I got my garden in 2 months late last year due to having to get the elk fence up first and then you know what a weird summer we had.. so my garden was not going to make the cover of Sunset Magazine in 2013 at all. I will try to aspire to that in 2014 though  ;D

Cedar

Offline tyananomura

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2013, 08:52:40 AM »
I'm sorry we missed Thanksgiving as well.  I was looking forward to the visit.  Let me know when you are doing Seedy Saturday I'll try to make it down.  Last years weather was very wacky.  Hoping for better this coming year.  I'll have to make a list of my seeds see what I have. 

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2013, 09:01:31 AM »
Nice list... I'm a little envious. The fertility of those guilds must be off the charts.
Adding any perennials? I'm getting lazier as I age and am looking for the "set it and forget it" growing.

Don't feel envious in many ways. You get that many and it is a huge responsibility. It is a HUGE chore to go through them each year and see what needs to be planted out and what is almost out, and what fails to grow in your area and just to catalog them. If anyone wants seeds anymore, I make them come help me as it literally takes 5+ hours to go through all of them.

Then storage is an issue. Got to be cold, dark, dry, mouse and other vermin proof. I had them stored up in the Lodge where there has been no heat and I had a mouse get in and eat most of the "Blue Speckled Teppary" beans. I am sooooo lucky there was no other damage. I also had a water jug leak and got some peas wet last year, so I just planted them out, but still... it could have ruined all my seeds, a collection started in 1986, which got super serious in 2000. I even have them mentioned in my will.

We have 100 acres here, so lots of room to play with. So this is just the veggie list. I have alot of perennials herbs, small fruits, large fruits, I just started some pineapples again, I asked for Highbush Cranberry bushes on my Christmas list, I am going to hit up a guy about medlars, quince. I am moving the blueberries again (poor blues) inside the 'compound' and adding about 10 more varieties. In the spring I will put about 8-10 varieties of grape in.. and we have 2 kinds of raspberry I brought in from Z's house and it should have multiplied enough next year to get the two 50' rows. We have thirteen or fourteen 40-100 year old apple and pear trees here, but we are adding in about another 12 heritage and ancient apple varieties on the hillside. Our forest has native food producing plants in it, of Salal, thimbleberry, salmonberry, wintergreen (If I can ID it), mint, lemon balm, St.Johns Wart and other herbs, blackberries (4 varieties), blue elderberries, wild strawberries (I need to replant the domestic strawberries as mine were transplanted/cooked/deer eaten and then drowned), ect..

The land will show us what it wants in time. We just have to listen, so I am listening and seeing what it needs and wants. I have not quite been here a year now, although we bought it a year ago tomorrow. I showed up on this land at the end of February and Z did not get to live here until the end of April I believe. It will get there.

Cedar


Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2013, 11:29:07 AM »
Thsi thiem the search pointed to the lettuce variety "Greek Marouli Cos"

Now Cos is a name of a Greek island so i googled it to find what kind a variety it was.
and this popped up.

http://www.kosvoice.gr/%CE%BF%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%BF%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%AF%CE%B1-%CE%BA%CE%BF%CE%B9%CE%BD%CF%89%CE%BD%CE%AF%CE%B1/item/13333-%CE%B1%CF%81%CF%87%CE%B1%CE%AF%CE%BF-%CF%83%CF%8D%CE%BC%CE%B2%CE%BF%CE%BB%CE%BF-%CF%84%CE%BF%CF%85-%CF%83%CE%B5%CE%BE-%CF%84%CE%BF-%CE%BC%CE%B1%CF%81%CE%BF%CF%8D%CE%BB%CE%B9-%CF%83%CF%84%CE%B7%CE%BD-%CE%BA%CF%89-%CF%86%CF%89%CF%84%CE%BF

The second link does not work for me, so I used Google Translate.. does it really say, "Ancient sex symbol lettuce Kos" as the title?

If no one else can get that link to work either,  the first paragraph says:
"The unknown history of the plant and the strange properties that were assigned by the Egyptians , Romans and Koans 2,500 years ago ! The lettuce grown for thousands of years , while the ancient Egyptians in paintings depicting tombs from 2700 BC . The two newer forms of lettuce is Rome or romaine, as it is called , and what first appeared on the island of Kos. 2,000 BC But the lettuce was seen more as an aphrodisiac , rather than as a food . The reason was that the lettuce was the favorite food of the god of male fertility , the Minh . According to Egyptian writings , God , that very often depicted in paintings that hour erection , consume this plant to have sex without getting tired . As Professor and Egyptology , Salima Ikram, the connection Minh with lettuce was standing .

The first illustrations appeared around 1970 BC White Church Senousret First , although there may have been before. In relief from the tomb of Ramses III , crop images appear celebrations , where behind the statue Minh , priests keep lettuce . In other depictions , the Minh wearing a long, red ribbon symbolizing sexual energy ."


Actually this is really cool info.. thanks for looking this up GreekMan.

Cedar

Offline David in MN

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2013, 11:48:46 AM »
I'm always eager to hear other folks' efforts in home food production. I get what you say about having people come and take their own seeds. I'll give away raspberry plants to anyone but gone are the days of digging them up and transplanting myself.

Vermin free is easy. When it starts getting cold out, grandma tells 10 year old me to "go fetch a rat snake and toss it in the cellar". Grandpa was more pragmatic and left a dish of anti-freeze out. God I miss the old farmers.

Very cool list, the diversity is awesome. Inspirational.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2013, 11:52:45 AM »
Very cool list, the diversity is awesome. Inspirational.

Wait until you see the REST of the list. That was just the veggies and is not including the grains, herbs, dyeplants, flowers... I have to do those next. Maybe I will get to them tomorrow? Yeah.. I am rather proud of my collection. Mostly for all the history and stories that is there.

Cedar

Offline tyananomura

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2013, 04:36:52 PM »
I am looking forward to the grain list.  That is where I am lacking in my seeds. 

Offline Greekman

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2013, 05:23:07 AM »
yes..although the title is not that accurate

more properly it was considered as an aphrodisiac

Offline Theswerd

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2014, 02:01:39 PM »
Wait... so.. romaine lettuace is supposed to help with ... um... stamina?


Hrm....

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2014, 09:41:33 PM »
I think I have settled on what I am looking for apples at the scion exchange and a couple alternatives:

Apples -
Ashmead's Kernel – Gold, fresh, juice, cider, storage. Russet Variety.  Britain pre-1700
Flowering group: 4 AGM (pollinators Braeburn, Golden Delicious, Grimes Golden)

Arkansas Black – Red/Black, fresh, juice, cider, storage. USA 1840
Flowering group: 3 Tripoliod (pollinators Braeburn, Golden Delicious, Grimes Golden)

Baldwin – Red/Green. fresh, juice, cider, Good keeper in storage. 1740-1750
Flowering group: 4 (pollinators Braeburn, Golden Delicious, Grimes Golden)

Bramley's Seedling  - Green  fresh, juice, cider, storage. Britian 1837
Flowering group: 3 AGM (Triploid, partial tip bearing) (pollinators Bramley's Seedling, Grimes Golden, Margil)

Braeburn -  Yellow. Fresh, cooking, storage 1850. New Zealand 1950
Flowering group: 4 Self fertile, but better crossed. Tripoloid - not a pollinator for others (pollinators Braeburn, Calville, Golden Delicious, Grimes Golden)

Calville Blanc d'Hiver pale yellow green. Cooking. Limited storage France 1500's
Flowering group: 4 Self Sterile (pollinators Golden Delicious, Grimes Golden)

D'Arcy Spice - Green, Russeting. Cooking, Fresh, Juice. Storage. 1785's Essex, Britain.
Flowering group: 4 Partially self-fertile (pollinators Grimes Golden)

Dyer - Greenish-yellow with a blush of red and some veins of russet. The creamy flesh is very crisp, tender and fine-grained with a spicy flavor. It is a high-flavored but subacid dessert variety. Tree growth is vigorous but it does not mature as a large tree. Fruiting begins early and there is a tendency to biennial production, but productiveness seems to vary. Ripening takes place over an extended period in late August and early September.Brought to America by Huguenot settlers, who fled France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. France pre-1600.

Grimes Golden (aka Grimes Golden Pippin, Bellflower) - Yellow/Green. Fresh, cooking, juice, cider. USA West Virginia 1930's.
Flowering group 3. Self Fertile. (pollinators Braeburn)

Margil- Fresh. France 1750's. Size medium, yellowish orange, deep red streaks, some russet. Firm, sweet, rich. One of the best flavored dessert apples. Very small tree. Pick Oct., Nov. to Jan.
Flowering Group 3 (others say 2) (pollinators Braeburn, Grimes Golden)

Smokehouse - Flesh crisp, yellowish, moderately fine-grained. Fresh cider flavor. Very good quality cooking, eating, and baking apple. Keeps well through March.

White Pearmain England 1200 A.D.
Oldest known English apple. Fresh eating/ dessert, cooking (puree, applesauce, apple butter), baking, juice/hard ciderThe fruit is medium in size, uniform in shape, and possesses light green skin, usually flushed red on one side. The mildly sweet and pleasantly aromatic flesh is firm, fine-grained and crisp; an excellent dessert apple. A vigorous, self-fertile variety that also serves as a great pollinzer for other apple trees. White Pearmain is a vigorous tree well adapted to coastal districts out west.

Cedar - who is now working on pear varieties

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2014, 09:58:10 PM »
Basically this is a note to me so I can find it again, come March:

Grapes:
"Canadice" New York 1962. Seedless red grape with a bit of a spicy flavor. It is a late season cultivar ripening about mid-September into October and is hardy up to -20 degrees Fahrenheit. It is used as a table grape

"Sulfolk Red" New York. The vine has a good upright growth habit that makes it easy to train to cordons with spurs, but production is too low.  Ripens three weeks to a month before Concord, but is only hardy to about -10ºF.

"Concord" Developed in 1849 by Ephraim Wales Bull in Concord, Massachusetts. Bull planted seeds from wild Vitis labrusca and evaluated over 22,000 seedlings before finding what he considered the perfect grape, the original vine of which still grows at his former home.

"Himrod" A cross between Ontario and Thompson Seedless, is the most successful table grape released from the Cornell University grape breeding program (1952). It produces large bunches of white seedless grapes with excellent, honeylike flavor and melting, juicy texture. The clusters are loosely filled, but cane girdling, gibberellic acid treatments, or thinning may be used to increase cluster compactness and improve berry size. The brittle rachis may break when handled, and the berries may shell in storage. The rachis is also subject to bunch stem necrosis, a poorly understood disorder that causes a shriveling of the cluster stem, often just before harvest. Despite these cultural defects, Himrod is currently the most commercially important of the seedless grapes grown in New York.

"Glenora" Glenora was selected in 1952 from the cross Ontario x Russian Seedless. Russian Seedless is probably a sy
nonym for the variety Black Monukka, a blue colored grape that, except for color, is similar in most respects to Thompson Seedless. Vines of Glenora are productive and appear to be resistant to the grape root louse, phylloxera, so that they do not
need to be grafted to a resistant rootstock.

"Einset Seedless" Is a winter-hardy, red seedless grape with a unique, strawberrylike flavor. The medium-sized clusters produce bright red, ovoid berries that have good storage potential until the end of November.

Cedar

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2014, 10:38:12 PM »
This is me thinking... but before I make my final selections, I need to talk to a guy I know........who is awesome with pears.

Pears:
"Bon Chretien d'Hiver" - Italy 1485
A dessert pear; ripe from December to March.  In France this was for centuries considered the finest of all winter pears.    

"Winter Nellis" - Belgium pre 1800
Medium fruit, yellow-green to green with russet. Vigorous and heavy cropping tree. Small sized tree. Ripens late September to mid-October. (Late/needs pollinizer).
Reistant to blight    

"Pound" (aka Belle Angevine) England, 1690
Most weigh two or more pounds and gigantic four-pound pears are fairly common. In olde England, Pound pears were baked whole, wrapped in pastry crusts. The keyword is baked; these tough, coarse pears aren’t meant to be eaten out of hand. However, cooking makes their firm, red flesh yummy and smooth. Pound pears keep in storage until spring, making them top-of-the-line winter fare.    

"Rousselet de Reims" - Goes back to the 1st Century

There is already 4 pear trees on the property, 2 are Bartlett and 2 are some kind of winter pear. It is more for conservation purposes than seriously needing them, but I will talk to someone I know who is a pear expert and see what he has to say for which ones need the most conservation. And I would like a red pear I think.

Cedar


 

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2014, 12:21:51 AM »
I love the Glenora grapes, we eat alot fresh and I sun dry alot and put some of the raisons into my oatmeal most mornings. I originally also had a candice grape, it had started dying and we found the cuplrit last summer, it was this huge bug that came out to mate after it has spent its grub time eating grape and cherry roots.  I have been a bit out of it and just realized I missed our local scion exchange - it was last weekend !! And, I wanted to get some apricot and persimmon to graft and some fig cuttings --

Offline prepgal

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2014, 05:43:58 AM »
I ordered a few seeds off your list.  Thanks Cedar

Offline David in MN

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2014, 06:58:41 AM »
Yeah, I'm gonna rob your wisdom as well. I might owe you one...

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2014, 10:30:38 AM »
And I would like a red pear I think.

I personally like Red Clapp's Pear (aka Kalle Pear).  It's a good canning pear, and decent for eating out of hand as well.
Red Clapp's is one of the older red pears, being a sport of Clapp's Favorite that was discovered in the 1930's. 

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2014, 10:33:32 AM »
I recently attended the 7th Organic Seed Growers Conference which is only held every other year. Even though, this is a 'show us your garden' thread, this event will have a huge impact on our farm in the future.

I was privileged to have been able to attend the Organic Seed Alliance biennial held in the last few days. When I signed up, I thought it would be a local Pacific Northwest event. I was very wrong. When I walked through the doors into the event, I quickly found out that I was not in Kansas anymore.. This was a worldwide event and had alot of the 'bigwigs' from the organic seed world at it. There were speakers like  Edith Lammerts van Bueren, Wageningen University, Netherlands; Amadeus Zschunke from the Netherlands; Eric Mader, The Xerces Society; Yiching Song, Centre for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Science; many US universities with seed production programs were represented there, UC Davis, University of Washington, University of Wisconin, etc.

Some of the classes I took were like:
Fundamentals of Seed Production. Topics of instruction include the biology of seed production, seed harvesting and cleaning, choosing appropriate seed crops for your system and climate, maintaining the genetic integrity of varieties with appropriate population sizes and isolation distances, conducting variety trials, and basic on-farm breeding techniques
GE Contamination Avoidance and Testing Protocols. Educating seed producers and industry members on how to avoid and test for contamination by genetically engineered (GE) traits in organic and other non-GE seed. Learn about existing testing methodologies being used by the organic seed industry and the facilities and costs involved.

Seed Cleaning Equipment. Understanding seed cleaning, and accessing appropriate equipment, can be a barrier for seed producers who wish to start, or scale up, an operation. In this session seasoned growers will discuss how to refine your seed cleaning skills. Break out discussions will cover the basics of small-scale, hands-on, and low-tech seed cleaning, in addition to large-scale seed cleaning.

Germplasm Collection and Conservation: A vibrant organic seed system relies on strong regional germplasm collections. These efforts ensure access to diverse genetic material. Hear from leaders who have made great strides in collecting and conserving germplasm.

Developing Regionally Adapted Varieties: The backbone of a thriving organic seed system is the availability of robust organic varieties adapted to regional needs. Hear from breeders about regional organic variety research happening today in the Northwest, Northeast, and Midwest.
International Panel on Developing Seed Networks and Movements. Learn about organic seed movements happening across the globe. This panel includes organizers and seed stewards from China, Nepal, and Mexico who are working on innovative ways to strengthen organic seed systems in their regions.

And one of my favorite ones was, Pollinator Conservation Strategies for Organic Seed Producers. It was about supporting organic seed producers with the latest science-based information on maximizing crop yields through the conservation of native pollinators, while at the same time helping them to reduce the risk of outcrossing with non-organic crop varieties. Specific topics include the ecology of specialty seed crop pollinating insects, foraging behaviors and flight range of key native bee groups (and the impact of those foraging ranges on crop isolation), bee-friendly farming practices, development of pollinator habitat on working farms, accessing USDA technical and financial resources for pollinator conservation, and more.
I also was able to help in a variety trial tastings for cabbage and chicories sponsored by Organic Farming Research Foundation. I learned how to conduct a trial on my own and hope I never have to do 'bite tests' on 300 ears of corn out of the field in a single day. I heard the horror stories about that and how potato chips after every 5-6 bites were the way to go.

I was starting to get intimidated a wee bit, as I am small fry compared to these people. Many who are academics who have known each other for 10-30 years. They were talking about hybidnizing Open Pollinated (OP) seeds and selecting from them to make better varieties, but then how to turn the hybrids back from hybrids to a pure line of OP seed. The name of the game for me is conservation of our heritage breeds and to acclimate them to my area and needs. Soon, I realized I did have a place at this event too. If it were not for people like me who keep the older lines, they would not have rich genetic material to work with. I realized this even more after our Seed Swap last night. I have some of my rare 45 day sweet corn going back to the place of its orginal, in Alaska at an experimental station. I have 4 kinds of corn which is probably on a plane right now to China and some more on its way to Taiwan. I have tobacco seed I brought down from Canada, which is now on its way to Texas. Celery seed is on its way to UC Davis with Glenn. Some of them are growing it for itself, some of them are using them to crossbreed with to bring up different traits in their strains of vegetables. All of them said they would send me reports on how it is doing and what they are doing with it.

In going to this conference, it has made me brave enough to start ripping up a section of our valuable pasture to plant into seed production. I have discovered that alot of us cannot grow 'it all' and have a seed house, so many of us seed farmers are banding together to make a co-op company to sell our seeds. Or Farmer A grows "Corn A" and I grow "Corn B", both of us to organic standards and we trade half for half.. One day our whole 'river pasture' could turn into seed crops. But in the beginning I will only take 5 acres or so. That is what it sounds like the majority of growers are doing. 2-10 acres.

If you want to 'take' some of these classes, in about two weeks it will be available online. The webinar series is free and open to the public. So that means you do not have to pay the $300, but you also do not get the full ambience or the vast amounts of good organic food they provided.
http://www.extension.org/pages/70186/organic-seed-growers-conference-2014-selected-live-broadcasts

I networked alot, met alot of awesome people, had my photo taken with my corn seed and a scientist lady from China to be published.. it was a wonderful event I highly recommend anyone who grows a garden to take in 2 years when they have it again. I also met alot of 'local' growers that I can mentor and be mentored from.

Cedar

Offline TexasGirl

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2014, 11:55:15 AM »
It's awesome you got to go, even if you felt intimidated at times.  Who knows, you may have planted a seed thought in some expert's mind that wouldn't have occurred if you had not attended.

Besides, now you have a new seed project, how great is that!

~TG

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #29 on: February 02, 2014, 03:32:43 PM »
That's really cool, Cedar.

And I'd put your experience up against Academic types any day.  ;D