Author Topic: Cedar's Garden 2014  (Read 127327 times)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #30 on: February 04, 2014, 12:49:21 PM »
Yesterday we had to go to town to do some banking stuff and Z decided to stop at a couple stores since we made the rare trip to town. He says he is not taking me to stores again...

We already have two varieties of raspberries ("Cascade Delight" summer red and "Annie" quasi-everbearing gold), but I picked up 3 more varieties yesterday:
  • "Latham Red" -- Summer-bearer adapts well to a range of soil types. Fruit is outstanding for fresh-eating, freezing, and canning. Cold-hardy. Ripens in mid July. Self-pollinating.

  • "Fall Gold" -- Everbearing yellow-gold raspberry is extremely sweet and excellent for fresh eating, canning and preserves. Similar to red raspberries in all respects but color. They are vigorous and extremely hardy.

  • "Brandywine" -- Another Everbearing raspberry.  Insect resistant, hardy, and very adaptable. Plant 30" apart; will not fill in. Propagate like blacks; will not sucker.


As well as the raspberries, I am pretty sure the heat last summer (when we finally got it) and the deer have totally destroyed my 100+ plants of Hoods and the other June Bearing I had which was there when I moved into my last house. The 'backyard' is mostly already fenced from the previous owner, but we are expanding it about 2 more acres to fully enclose the new orchard and small fruits from deer, elk and the livestock which we tend to free range. I picked up two new varieties of strawberries yesterday..
  • "Sequoia" Junebearing. Behaves like an everbearer, but is actually an extremely long season Spring-Bearer
  • "Quinault" Everbearing. Apparently it is the most popular variety of everbearing strawberry.
I did some other damage to the pocketbook with some landscaping plants too, like Hostas and other shade loving plants.

I figured I needed some more trays to go under my 72 pack cells to keep water off the floor, so grabbed a dozen more of them. Later today I hope to start putting seeds into trays.

Cedar

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #31 on: February 04, 2014, 09:24:46 PM »
I am looking forward to the grain list.  That is where I am lacking in my seeds.

Ok... here is the grain line up for the year..

Amaranth, "Giant Chinese Orange"

Leaves edible, green with orange ribs. Amaranth seed is light colored, edible, high protein, and delicious when cooked.

Quinoa, "Dave 407"
Unique history & excellent performance here on the Willamette Valley floor. Golden orange seeds. 4-5' tall plants with seed heads that turn vivid orange when ripe. High yielding when compared to other quinoa grown here in low elevations. Short season & open seed heads resist late season damp weather. Collected in southern Chile. Named after quinoa collector & advocate David Cusack, who was murdered in Bolivia in 1984. There is anecdotal evidence that he was murdered by "business interests" that felt threatened by the solidarity amongst quinoa-growing campesinos. Others believe he was murdered due to his activism & research surrounding the CIA's role in the overthrow of Chilean president Salvador Allende. All very mysterious.

Barley, "Streaker"
This is a naked seed good for food, feed or drink. It was grown here in the Willamette Valley and is very adaptive. I am trialing this in 2014.

Barley, "Alba"
Awned barley. This is a naked seed good for food, feed or drink. It was grown here in the Willamette Valley and is very adaptive. I am trialing this in 2014 in a separate location.

Sesame, "Rio"
Seasamum indicum PI 599440 01 SD Heirloom

Wheat, "Turkey Red" which is being sent to me from a gentleman I met from OSA. Hard Red Winter Wheat. Originally brought to Kansas in the 1870s by Mennonite immigrants from Crimea, this unique and complexly flavored variety became the primary wheat produced in the Central Plains. But today it is almost extinct, having been replaced by modern, higher-yielding varieties. A small group of farmers in Kansas started a wheat revival project to bring this delicious wheat back to the marketplace.

I am looking for someone to raise "Half Pint" barley for me this year...

Cedar

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2014, 06:32:12 PM »
+1 for Cedar

:)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2014, 06:46:25 PM »
+1 for Cedar
:)

Thanks cohutt.. want to raise a new release from Oregon State University? "Half Pint" Barley. It will likely plant a 20'x20' area? I was given three varieties, but I only have space for 2 isolations.

I have someone's J. Artichokes to get out into the mail too.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2014, 07:48:51 PM »
Thanks cohutt.. want to raise a new release from Oregon State University? "Half Pint" Barley. It will likely plant a 20'x20' area? I was given three varieties, but I only have space for 2 isolations.

I have someone's J. Artichokes to get out into the mail too.

Cedar

Thanks, would be up for it, except 20x20 is too big a block for my urbanesque lot.

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #35 on: February 11, 2014, 06:14:55 AM »
Quote
Peppers:
I grow stupidly hot ones, but I do this for conservation and in memory of my father who was a 'pepperhead'. I do grow them as houseplants which live for years and years if I can get my cat from stopping eating them. My favorite houseplant ones are "Thai Hot", which is getting easier to find sources for. "Aurora" which you can get at SSE for its purple leaves and pods which look like Christmas tre lights.. all different colours.

I have a dozen or so peppadew seed I will send you way pronto if you want to add this to your pepper list.

This post has a bit of the odd and contentious recent history of this one if you are not familiar (fat chance of that, haha).
http://gardenofeaden.blogspot.com/2009/08/how-to-grow-peppadew-peppers-from-seed.html

Offline toni

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #36 on: February 12, 2014, 12:42:00 PM »
If you want to 'take' some of these classes, in about two weeks it will be available online. The webinar series is free and open to the public. So that means you do not have to pay the $300, but you also do not get the full ambience or the vast amounts of good organic food they provided.
http://www.extension.org/pages/70186/organic-seed-growers-conference-2014-selected-live-broadcasts

Hi Cedar ~ I am Toni and have belonged to the TSP since the beginning but don’t navigate forums very well. I did however stumble upon this wonderful thread it looks like you started. I can’t thank you enough for these posts, your seed saving effort and also for posting the link to the online version of the Organic Seed Growers Conference. I live here in Oregon and somehow didn’t even hear about it. I would have LOVED to go! But it is almost as good listening to some of the speakers online ~ thanks to YOU   :D
I have been saving my seed for a few years. I have the book mentioned in this thread and it has helped me tons. The seed I am having the most trouble with is carrot. I have a LOT of Queen Ann Lace so it is difficult to keep my carrot pure. I sure hope you keep doing what you are doing. And I will try and get better at the forum because of your posts   ;)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #37 on: February 12, 2014, 01:34:58 PM »
You are welcome. If you live close enough, come to my Seedy Saturday on March 1st. (which I ought to work on today  :-\ )

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #38 on: February 21, 2014, 08:10:06 PM »
Today I was honored to be invited to go to the United States Department of Agriculture's World Plant Collection for pears. I picked up a bunch of scionwood today for grafting for trees for myself, friends and to give out at my soon Seedy Saturday event. I am not sure how many acres are there, but I asked "G" my partner for the day and guide and he said there are about 2,500 varieties of pears in that collection. Each tree is numbered and labeled. It is so awesome to walk through the orchard and read about the name and where it originated and when.

Aurora = PI 541119 (CPYR 25.001)
Pyrus communis
A delicious and attractive fall pear.
Originated in Geneva, N.Y., by New York State Agriculture
Experiment Station. Named and introduced in 1964. Marguerite Marillat x Bartlett
Skin bright yellow, slightly russeted, sometimes blushed, very attractive; flesh melting, smooth, juicy, sweet, aromatic, high quality for dessert purposes; longer storage and shelf life than Bartlett; ripens with or just after Bartlett; very well suited for the home gardener and fresh fruit market; keeps well in cold storage until December.

Ayers = PI 541722 (CPYR 1059.005)
Pyrus hybrid
Small but beautiful, high quality, early season. Gorgeous red blush and very juicy.
Originated in Knoxville, Tennessee, by Brooks D. Drain, Tennessee Agriculture Experiment Station. Introduced in 1954.
Garber x Anjou
Skin golden russet with a rose tint flesh juicy, sweet; good for eating fresh and average for canning; first picking in mid -August.
Resistant to fire blight, pollen sterile.

Bartlett - Nye Russet = PI 541236 (CPYR 423.001)
Pyrus communis
Fully russeted fruit is attractive, less prone to blemishes than green Bartlett with slightly more intense flavor.
Originated in Talent, Oregon, by Stephen G. Nye of Medford. Bud mutation of Bartlett discovered in 1924 and introduced in 1937. Skin deep yellow overlaid with a very attractive smooth light golden russet; resembles Bartlett, but ripens 1 week later, firmer, somewhat more spicy.

Golden Russet Bosc (USPP #5243)
A beautiful Bosc pear that has a very smooth russeted finish. Fruit quality and tree characteristics are the same as a regular Bosc pear. Recommended for best cross pollination with Bartlett. The fruit is long and symmetrical with a uniform, golden russet overlaying yellowish-white flesh. It matures about the same time as Anjou. The trees are large and vigorous and require cross pollination.

Butirra Rosata Morettini = PI 282935 (CPYR 119.001)
Pyrus communis
A gorgeous early fall pear. Originated in Florence, Italy, by Alessandro Morettini. Selected in 1940. Introduced in the U.S. in 1960. Coscia x Beurre Clairgeau.
Large; skin yellow with bright red blush; flesh white, juicy, flavor excellent; ripens 6 to 7 days before Bartlett.

Devoe = PI 541172 (CPYR 173.001)
Pyrus communis
Pretty enough to pose for a still life, creamy flavor with a hint of vanilla.
Originated in Marlboro, New York, by Charles A. Greiner in 1947. Thought to be a seedling of Clapp
Elongated shape similar to Bosc, coloring similar to Clapp Favorite; attractive bright red spotted blush. Flesh soft, fine, buttery, tender, melting, white to yellow, subacid; stone cells absent. Harvest in mid-September, about 2 weeks after Bartlett.
Tolerant to fire blight and pear psylla, susceptible to scab.

Doyenne du Comice = PI 271658 (CPYR 148.001)
Pyrus communis
A large, juicy, ripe Comice is best eaten with a spoon. Regarded by many as the standard of dessert quality among pears. Originated as a seedling in the fruit garden of Comice Horticole, Angers, France. First fruited in 1849 and introduced into America in 1850.
Medium to large, sometimes very large. Skin fairly thick, granular, susceptible to blemishes, sometimes russeted, greenish
-yellow, often blushed. Flesh very fine, melting, extremely juicy, quite free of grit. Sweet, rich, aromatic, vinous flavor. Midseason. Fruit inclined to bruise easily in the ripe stage.


Hosui = PI 541931 (CPYR 2149.002)
Pyrus pyrifolia
Curator's favorite Asian pear, sweet, crisp and juicy. The russeted skin resists blemishes. Originated at the National Horti culture Research Station, Tsukuba, Japan. Cross of Ri-14 (Kikusui x Yakumo) x Yakumo introduced in 1972.
Fruit large, globose to oblate; skin russeted, golden to gold-brown, enlarged lenticels; flesh off white, sweet, mild, crisp, juicy; ripe with Chojuro, mid August to September in Oregon; stores 4weeks.


Johantorp = PI 285530 (CPYR 304.001)
Pyrus communis
A very late ripening and cold hardy pear widely grown in Sweden for winter storage. Like Granny Smith or Goldrush apples, the Johantorp ear will hang on the tree late into the winter. In a mild Corvallis winter (where they were grown) we can enjoy them directly off the tree in late December.

Leopardo Morettini = PI 318867 (CPYR 347.001)
Pyrus communis
Flavor is an important characteristic of any pear released in Italy, and this is no exception. Originated in Florence, by Alessandro Morettini. Released in 1967
Coscia x Decana d'Inverno (Doyenne d'Hiver).
Medium size, interesting net like russet, fine, buttery texture, flavor similar to Beurré Superfin.

Comice Rousselet de Reims = PI 541256 (CPYR 496.002)
Pyrus communis
Said to have been the favorite pear of France’s King Louis XIV. An ancient variety believed to date
back to the beginning of the Christian era. Grown in the vicinity of Rheims, France, for many centuries.
Fruit small, roundish, turbinate, somewhat irregular. Skin greenish-yellow, blushed with dull red on sunny side, sprinkled with gray russet dots. Flesh white, semi-fine, buttery but not melting, moderately juicy. Extremely sweet, aromatic, spicy flavor. Also known as the Musk or Spice Pear. A little later than Bartlettin season. Susceptible to core breakdown.

Rousselet of Stuttgart x Dr. Jules Guyot No. VII = PI 337446 (CPYR 499.001)
Pyrus communis
Attractive rainbow-trout colored, crunchy pear that ripens nicely on the tree. Five selections of the cross Rousselet Shtutgartskii x Dr. J. Gujo were received in 1968 from the USSR Vavilov Institute in Leningrad. All five selections have crunchy, attractive, pyriform shaped fruit that ripen in August and September. Selection VII is the most attractive, with red blushed and speckled fruit similar in coloring toForelle. Tree is disease resistant and cold hardy.

Seckel = PI 541262 (CPYR 519.001)
Pyrus communis
One of the best pears born in America and the most requested variety at the USDA genebank. A chance seedling found in the outskirts of Philadelphia by Dutch Jacobs, about 1760.
Fruit small, obovate pyriform in shape, usually symmetrical.  Flesh somewhat granular, buttery and very juicy. Noted for sweet, aromatic, spicy flavor. Rates among the best in dessert quality. Early midseason. Susceptible to core breakdown if held on the treetoo long and does not ripen properly if harvested prematurely. Tree has a tendency to overbear, somewhat resistant to fire blight. Though self-fertile, it benefits from cross-pollination.


Ubileen
Ubileen produces baskets full of large, very early ripening, delicious and juicy fruit. This unique variety from former Yugoslavia is very disease resistant and ripens in late July, fully one month before most other European Pear varieties.


Wilder Early = PI 541283 (CPYR 605.002)
Pyrus communis
An attractive early pear, ripe nearly a month before Bartlett. Originated as a chance seedling in Chautauqua County, New York, about 1884. Fruit medium in size, oblong pyriform. Skin pale green, red blushed on sunny side. Flesh buttery but not melting, moderately juicy. Aromatic, pleasing flavor but second rate in dessert quality. Holds up better than most early pears. Tree productive, moderately susceptible to fire blight. Once grown commercially in California.


Cedar

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #39 on: February 26, 2014, 11:40:41 AM »
Yesterday from Point A to Point B, I picked up the apple scionwood from the USDA guy's house, that he left me on his front porch so I would not contaminate him with my virus. I believe these came off his own personal trees at his farm.

So I just got done cataloging them and then putting them back outside to stay cold. These are for Seedy Saturday this coming weekend, but I will graft one of each variety and plant them here as well.

Apples:
Winter Banana
Originates from: Indiana, United State. Introduced: 1870s. It looks hearty and tastes that way too. Crisp and benefitting from an outstanding balance of sugar and acid, this is the sort of apple your grandparents loved. In addition to its other great attributes, Winter Banana is a tree that starts producing fruit young and then does so consistently year-in and year-out. It produces lots of large apples that keep very well - a good four months anyway - once they're harvested.Equally good cooked as eaten fresh, Winter Banana is also a good tree for the orchard, as it produces plenty of excellent pollen to ensure a good haul of fruit on all the other tree


Fameuse (Snow apple)
A very hardy apple variety. Also known as the Snow Apple of Quebec in 1739, from plantings in early French settlements in Quebec. One of the oldest and most desirable dessert apples, a parent of the aromatic McIntosh. Flesh is tender, spicy, distinctive in flavor, and snow white in color with occasional crimson stains near the skin. Very hardy, heavy bearing tree that is excellent for home orchards. Delicious fresh off the tree, in cider, or in culinary creations.


Cox's Orange Pippin
England 1830 (seed of Ribston Pippin). Highly esteemed in England as a dessert apple; produces excellent fruit in cooler summer climates. Medium sized apple, red and yellow, usually striped. The flesh is yellow, firm, crisp, very juicy, richly aromatic and some say almost spicy. Flavor is enhanced when fruit ripens off the tree. A heavy bearer and one of the best apples for espalier. Fresh eating/ dessert, cooking (puree, applesauce, apple butter), baking, juice/hard cider.


Twenty Ounce
Discovered in New York or Connecticut, USA, sometime before 1844. An all purpose variety that was first exhibited by George Howland of New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1843 at the Mass Horticultural Society. Evidently it was Howland who found the original seedling on his farm in Cayuga County, New York and then brought it with him to Massachusetts. As the name implies, this apple can reach enormous proportions. Attractive, very large, striped red flush over a greenish background. Flesh white and semi- firm with high quality; said to be the premier cooking apple for more than 100 years. Also great for dessert. Medium sized tree comes into bearing young. Fresh eating/ dessert, cooking (puree, applesauce, apple butter)


Tompkins King
Brought from New Jersey to New York in 1804 by Jacob Wycoff. Grown in Tompkins County, New York, and called the King of apples, for size and flavor.Fourth most popular New York apple in early 1900's.Fruit large to very large. Skin smooth, golden washed with orange red, Flesh yellow, coarse, crisp, tender, flavor subacid. Good for cooking when green and excellent for eating when handsomely striped. Water core (translucent flesh) sweetens some fruit. Consider Grimes Golden, Liberty and/or Newtown Pippin for pollination

I suspect this is the main historical apple tree here at the farm, but I will plant another anyway.

Newton
Newtown Pippin is the oldest commercially grown variety to have been bred in the U.S. The variety sprang from a seed in Newtown,Long Island around 1750. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were two noted admirers of this fine fruit. Skin is green to yellow, often russeted, with white dots. Flesh is yellowish or tinged with green, firm, crisp, moderately fine grained, and sprightly aromatic with refreshing piney tartness. Some find a light tangerine scent. Does best in warm summer locations. The fruit develops full sugar and rich flavor after a few months of cold storage. A self-fertile variety that also serves as a pollinizer for other apple trees.


And I added the full description of this one, so you can sorta see what new varieties are trialed like before release.
Geneva Early
The new 'Geneva Early' apple originated from a 'Quinte' x 'Julyred' cross made in 1964. Initially identified as N.Y. 444, 'Geneva Early' was selected in July 1973 from a population of 173 seedlings grown from this cross. After the original first-test seedling tree had demonstrated good fruiting performance for three years, 1971-1973, N.Y. 444 was selected for further testing. In April 1974, scions were cut from the original tree and topgrafted onto an established 8-year-old tree growing in a second-test evaluation orchard. Later, in July 1974, two irees were budded onto Malling-Merton 106 rootstocks in the nursery. These two were orchard planted in the spring of 1976. Orchard performance over a 7-year period was very good and the selection was deemed worthy of introduction. Nursery trees of N.Y. 444 were sold by the New York State Fruit Testing Association for 4 years, 1978-1981. CHOOSING A NAME A group of 10 pomology faculty and staff members made the decision that the variety should be named 'Geneva Early'.
FRUIT
'Geneva Early' is one of the very earliest ripening apples. It is large, and has good eating quality, and is a very marketable type of apple. Its special feature is its very early ripening season, usually about August 1 at Geneva, NY but sometimes as early as July 13. It is one of the earliest ripening of all varieties and is one of the most acceptable of all the very earliest kinds. Like all early ripening apple varieties, 'Geneva Early ripens unevenly and requires two or three pickings. This uneven opening is an advantage to the home orchardist who wishes to harvest a few ripe apples daily over a period of 2 weeks. But uneven ripening is a disadvantage to the commercial grower for whom it is most profitable to harvest the entire crop at one picking. Birds will sometimes peck intovery early ripening apples before they are ready to harvest. Also, 'Geneva Early' fruits will sometimes drop from the tree as they are ripening. Fruit size is mostly 2 3/4 to 3 inches in diameter. Skin color is 60-100 per cent red. Color pattern is mostly a solid blush, but sometimes with some striping. Fruit shape is round-oblate. The flesh is cream colored but overripe fruits sometimes have a tinge of pink in the flesh. Flesh texture is semi-firm to soft and careful handling during harvesting and marketing is essential. Although storage life at 31 F. is probably less than a week, very early apples are usually marketed immediately after harvest and not stored for long periods. Flavor is subacid and aromatic. Eating quality is good to excellent.


Cedar

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #40 on: February 26, 2014, 11:49:01 AM »
So now I have to order at least 20 apple rootstock.. and at least 5 pear rootstock. I really like the look of "Ubileen"

Cedar

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #41 on: February 26, 2014, 12:13:13 PM »
Down here the fruit people are mostly using m111 for apples and pruning to size, mariana for plums, but I dont know much about pear rootstocks, I only have 2 pear trees and they came with what they came with Im afraid.

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #42 on: February 26, 2014, 12:30:01 PM »
Down here the fruit people are mostly using m111 for apples and pruning to size, mariana for plums, but I dont know much about pear rootstocks, I only have 2 pear trees and they came with what they came with Im afraid.

I am probably going to go with M-7 Rootstock apple rootstock for here as I can buy as many or little as I want. I would consider M-111, but they will not split bundles. I emailed another orchardist just a second ago to see if he is buying from Willamette Nursery and I can buy some off him, as I don't want to graft 100+ trees to get a better price on bottomstock.

For the pears, I generally use OHxF 513 Rootstock, but "G", the guy I was with at the USDA facility last Friday, was telling me of another variety he gets at Willamette Nursery and I think he said he uses Pyrus Old Home x Farmingdale 87, which I am not familiar with.

Very likely I am putting in 2-4 Almond trees as well, so I will be using St. Julien rootstock on them.

With having learned to graft back in AG class in the 1980's, I have an issue of paying $30-45 for a tree I can make myself for under $3. And the ones you guy I cannot usually find in the varieties I want.

Cedar - who has NO idea where her grafting knife is from the move  :-\

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #43 on: February 26, 2014, 12:37:29 PM »
And if you all are confused on numbers and such of rootstock, here is a handy dandy chart from WN. The green tree shows what size that rootstock will make the 'finished tree'.. and the grey shadow behind it, shows a full sized standard tree. If you click on the name of the rootstock, it will tell you "Approximately XX-XX% of standard".

http://www.willamettenurseries.com/clonal_fruit_tree

Cedar




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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #44 on: February 26, 2014, 02:51:05 PM »
I get into too much trouble when I am sick on the couch.. I just ordered.

Strawberries
"Catskill" Fragaria x ananassa  Introduced in 1934
"Badgerbelle" Fragaria x ananassa Introduced 1967
"Benton" Fragaria x ananassa Introduced 1975
"Ozark Beauty" Fragaria x ananassa Introduced 1955
"Honeoye"   Fragaria x ananassa Introduced 1979
"Red Giant" Fragaria x ananassa Introduced 1985
"Beaver Belle" Fragaria x ananassa Introduced 1988 Canada
   
Caucasian whortleberry
"Turkey"    Vaccinium arctostaphylos Wild stock from Turkey

Blueberries
"Ivanhoe"    Vaccinium corymbosum Introduced 1952
"Bluetta"    Vaccinium corymbosum Introduced 1968
"Spartan"    Vaccinium corymbosum Introduced 1978
"Duke"    Vaccinium corymbosum Introduced 1987
"Chanticleer" Vaccinium corymbosum Introduced 1997

Almonds
"Dessertniy" Prunus dulcis Introduced from the Ukraine in 2001
"Foros" Prunus dulcis Introduced from the Ukraine in 2001
"Primorskiy" Prunus dulcis    Introduced the Ukraine in 2001

Cedar
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 03:05:20 PM by Cedar »

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #45 on: February 26, 2014, 03:27:34 PM »
OK, so I figure you are a collector of strawberry varieties, working out which variety performs in your new location, and/or they all ripen successively ?

And, do you have to make sure to meet the truck when the order comes to hide the evidence ? ( I bring the boxes straight in to the garage and plant when no one else is at home...)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #46 on: February 26, 2014, 03:53:42 PM »
OK, so I figure you are a collector of strawberry varieties, working out which variety performs in your new location, and/or they all ripen successively ?

The reason I picked these is I am familiar with most of them over the years of working on my friends's U-Pick farm. But they are also varieties which are fading away. Most of them are heirloom or working on being heirloom varieties. I picked varieties which overlap each other so we have a larger harvest season. It is still likely I will have a farm stand or do the small local farmer's markets, so prolonging the harvest is a good thing.

"Beaver Belle" - Early
"Honeoye" - Early-Midseason
"Catskill" - Early-Midseason
"Red Giant" - Midseason. Huge and disease resistant (new one for me, but I like getting new kinds too)
"Badgerbelle" - Late
"Benton" - Late. Does cold winters well
"Ozark Beauty" - Everbearing

I am pretty sure I did the same with the Blueberries. Make sure they are pretty staggered. That should give me 11-12 varieties of Blues. I will likely propagate them when they come in. It would not hurt my feelings any to have 100 plants here. Lots of edible fruits will be incorporated into the landscaping. Such as the blueberries will likely make a living fence to keep people from falling over the slope down to the lower river pasture from the backyard when we have our pig roast/bluegrass jam, instead of the tacky hot pink surveyors tape. In the fall they turn nice fall colours. The bushes, not the tape.

And, do you have to make sure to meet the truck when the order comes to hide the evidence ? ( I bring the boxes straight in to the garage and plant when no one else is at home...)

Umm... no? The neighbor's cannot see our place, the UPS man will not care, but I do usually hand him eggs or veggies or apples (anyone on TSP who has been here, knows they do not go home empty-handed leaving here), Z lets me pick everything and SP might sneak some out from under me when they are ripe through, but she usually asks all the time instead of just taking.

Other plants which will make it here as landscaping one day are Aronia, Highbush cranberries, Oregon wintergreen and a few other odds and ends. Something which will produce food, good for wildlife and be pretty in at least 3 seasons.

Cedar
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 04:16:00 PM by Cedar »

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #47 on: February 26, 2014, 03:58:38 PM »
you have a more understanding family than me  : ) I get the, "  ... Mom... what did you order....? ..." So, I sometimes just sneak it in.  Hard to do my poor excuse of humor over the internet....

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #48 on: February 26, 2014, 04:13:30 PM »
Ok.. now you made me question myself on blueberries mountainmoma.'

These are the ones I just ordered to 'fill a hole'...
"Chanticleer" - Very Early
"Bluetta" - Early. Frost and winter hardy
"Spartan" - Early
"Duke" - Early
"Ivanhoe"  - Midseason

I was lacking early and mid-season varieties of Blueberries, between Z and I, we had these that we transplanted in the list below.

"Toro" - Midseason. The deep green summer foliage turns to the brightest of reds in fall.
"Chandler"- Mid to Late Season.
"Darrow" -Late Season.
"Herbert Late #2" - It is a late season variety, very winter hardy and productive.
"Jersey" – Late Season. One of the oldest and most widely grown of all varieties

So I guess we have 10 varieties here and I may propagate 10 bushes of each.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #49 on: March 10, 2014, 03:58:26 PM »
Ok.. since I went to the Organic Seed Alliance Symposium, we are now ripping up 2-3 acres and growing hardcore to see what happens. I am mostly growing for seed production, but we are considering doing the two small Farmer's Markets which are nearby with extra veggies, eggs, USDA meat, flowers, honey etc. Which has changed up my entire list for 2014. More room, two gardens..

I now have over 100 varieties of tomatoes with the seed swaps over the last many years, so today I was going through the lineup to see what I actually could grow with more gardening space and the hoophouse going back up. Since I have to think of my customers needs, as well as what I want, it was really difficult and I just spend the last three hours doing my selections for tomatoes. Some are my 'tried and true's' and others are ones I am trialing to see how well they do here.

Reds:
Siletz - I put up several hundred pounds of this variety last year and it grew well for me in Canada
Forest Fire - new one I am trialing
Cyril's Choice  - new one I am trialing
Rose  - new one I am trialing
Hungarian Heart - one I have not grown in many years
Italian Heirloom -  - new one I am trialing
Silvery Fir Tree - one of the varieties which has done very well for me in really crummy years, here and Canada
Stupice - another variety which has done very well for me in really crummy years, here and Canada

Red Paste:
Comstock Slice and Sauce
Ropreco

Cherry Type:
Tommy Toe
Sweet Pea Current

Purple:
Chocolate
Mardo

Black:
Black Krim

Greens:
Green Sausage
Emerald Evergreen - one of the varieties which has done very well for me in really crummy years, here and Canada
Green Zebra

Pinks:
Bread and Salt
Dester - A friend sent me this one to trial this year
German Pink
Gregory's Altai

Oranges:
Nebraska Wedding  - one of my favs and grows in crummy weather
Dr. Wyches' Yellow
Moonglow - which did pretty well in the year that all tomatoes in the PNW sucked
Orange King - a new one I am trialing

Yellows:
Garden Peach - one of the ones I have been growing a long time a net friend gave me
Amber
Lemon Drop
Plum Lemon
Yellow Pear

Bi-Colour:
Speckled Roman
Nature's Riddle
Red Zebra

Cedar - working on peppers now, which will not be as large of a chore

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #50 on: March 10, 2014, 04:14:17 PM »
Peppers List for 2014:(40)

Sweet - 0/5
Red Marconi
King of the North
Jimmy Nardello's
Quadrato d' Asti Rossa
Quadrato d' Asti Giallo
Melrose
Tequila Sunrise - my favorite
Healthy
Sweet Chocolate
Napoleon Sweet
Bull Nose Bell
Feher Ozon Paprika
Italian Marconi Golden
Miniature Yellow Bell
Orange Bell
Purple Beauty
Taltos

Warmer - 1/5
Pepperconcini - the ones that are pickled next to your sandwich at restaurants
Hungarian Yellow Wax - good for pickling too

Medium Hot- 2/5
Pasilla Bajio
Nosegay
Fish

Getting spicier - 3/5
Sante Fe Grande
Black Hungarian
Tobago Seasoning

Hot - 4/5
Joe's Round
Red Cap Mushroom
Nepalese Bell
Hot Portugal
Hinkelhatz
Lemon Drop

Really Hot - 5/5
Aji Cristal
Bulgarian Carrot
Fatalii
Cyklon
Mustard Hababero
Goat Horn
Thai Hot - which is my favorite houseplant, when the cat doesn't kill it
Georgia Flame
Serrano

Cedar - who has a bit of planting to do now

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #51 on: March 10, 2014, 06:06:48 PM »
 >:( Ran out of flats. Will pick some more up tomorrow. I was thinking varieties, not 272 + individual tomato plants. 320 pepper plants. I must be nuts!

Cedar - who SP is driving crazy today!!!!!!! And yesterday. It needs to quit raining so she can run, run, run, run.... outside!!!

Offline christphrmurray

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #52 on: March 10, 2014, 07:28:21 PM »
Would you like some purple calabash tomato seeds there a heirloom tomato. With cool story on how they got from Thomas Jefferson's Monticello to me. It is my first try on seed saving so I got cared away and more than I can use. Taste good looks odd  cool to cut up and get seeds out of couse of the shape.

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #53 on: March 11, 2014, 11:23:53 PM »
Pm'd you.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #54 on: March 11, 2014, 11:32:19 PM »
This morning started out at 35F when I woke up. It could have gotten cooler than that overnight, but it did not freeze.
Today in my quest of finding more flats to plant in, I stopped at a second store which I thought would carry them and they did indeed. But I also bought two kinds of artichoke seeds and four kinds of potatoes to replace the ones I left at my old house.
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I am racing Mother Nature to get fruit trees pruned, as I am a month late due to being sick and poor weather. Today I got four apple trees done and part of multiple pear trees. I need someone to told the ladder for me, so I do not break my neck. The Seckle pears are looking like that will start to blossom any moment. Thankfully on the apples, it looks like I have a bit more time, not much however. Tomorrow if it is nice, I am taking down the apple tree by the driveway to half it's height. It has not been pruned for a few years (I did 13 last year and did not get to this one by blossom time, so I left it) and it is well over 40 feet high. And ugly from when it was pruned a few years ago.

Cedar

Offline bigbear

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #55 on: March 12, 2014, 10:10:18 AM »
Thankfully on the apples, it looks like I have a bit more time, not much however. Tomorrow if it is nice, I am taking down the apple tree by the driveway to half it's height. It has not been pruned for a few years (I did 13 last year and did not get to this one by blossom time, so I left it) and it is well over 40 feet high. And ugly from when it was pruned a few years ago.


What impact does pruning when the trees are in bloom have?  I get that it would/could impact that years crop, but does it have a longer term impact too? 

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #56 on: March 12, 2014, 10:33:38 AM »
What impact does pruning when the trees are in bloom have?  I get that it would/could impact that years crop, but does it have a longer term impact too?

I THINK I have Spur-bearers and Tip-bearers here. Spur-bearers produce fruit buds on two-year-old wood, and as spurs (short, branched shoots) on the older wood. Tip-bearers produce very few spurs. Fruit buds are found at the tips of long shoots produced the previous year. So I want to make sure I am not cutting that off!

I also don't want to interfere with flowers and production, as I am moving the trees about, crashing stuff down (like last year I severely took down half the tree on 13-15 trees as they were so overgrown, chainsaws were involved -- ugh).

When the trees flower, it is also harder for me to see the 'lines' of the tree as well. I prune for arches, kinda like this one (but I hate how they did this tree). See how it arches and then has an arch off of that? It acts like a spring to hold the weight of the fruit. If the branch is too low set, the weight of the fruit will often rip it right off the tree.
[/img]

I also am in Bee Central. We have 5 hives, all the neighbors are commercial bee keepers. I am sensitive to bees, so I don't want to be up a tree with lots of them, because if I get stung, I have to take a Benedril and I am passed out for three days. :(

Cedar - where it was 34F this morning, but it is going to be a gorgeous day for pruning!

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #57 on: March 12, 2014, 03:10:39 PM »
Ok, it is a garden, but a non-edible one. I took an hour to get all these bulbs and roots planted so I can liberate my kitchen table, since we have eaten in the living room the last two nights due to seeds, seed potatoes, bulbs, etc on the table. I wanted to put these here before I forgot what they are and lost the tags. The front yard is bare due to construction devastation, mud, firewood and chickens...Something had to be done to beautify the place. You have to have beauty too!!

Around the fish barrel with "Goldie" the 4-5 year old goldfish in it, next to Z's office', where it is shady most of the day.
  • "Wide Brim" Hosta
  • "Pink" Bleeding Heart
  • "Gradiflorum" Trilliums

And in front of the front porch (North side of the house), which only gets morning sun...
  • "Cinnamon" ferns
  • "Pink" Bleeding Heart
  • "Yellow" Calla Lilly
  • "Heather Gem" Calla Lily
  • "Bressingham Blue" Hosta
  • "Albo Marginata" Hosta
  • "Stella de Oro" Daylilly

Cinnamon Fern


"Albo Marginata" Hosta


"Heather Gem" Calla Lily


"Pink" Bleeding Heart - In Canada, the hummingbirds loved it.


Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #58 on: March 13, 2014, 11:53:02 AM »
Still going through seeds. I have alot of flower seeds which need to get planted before the seed goes bad. Usually they are only good for 1-2 years, and some of these are going on four. I have two huge hillsides which are mostly bare from the 'push out' from the construction which need something. These are also good 'bee plants' as well as beneficial insect attracters. I will save seed back from some of these and put into "Seedy Saturday" next year.

SP and I dumped alot of packets into a bucket, mixed well and spread. I have found I need to feed the free ranging chickens before I do this, or they follow me and start pecking seeds before I even have them all sowed out.

  • "Kiss-Me-Over-The-Garden-Gate"
  • Honey Scented Alyssum "Summer Romance"
  • Salvia - Annual Clary "Blue Demin"
  • Star of the Veld
  • Mammoth Grey Stripe
  • Sweet Allysum "Tiny Tim"
  • Sunflower "Cinnamon Sun"
  • Shirley Poppy "Mother of Pearl"
  • Zinnia "Summer Solstice"
  • Alyssum "Carpet of Snow"
  • Aster "Giant Perfection"
  • Sweet William "Holborn Glory"
  • Rose Campion
  • Gloriosa Daisy "Cappuccino"
  • Sweet Pea "Villa Roma Cerise"
  • Cornflower "Emperor William"
  • Old Fashioned Hollyhocks "Black Watchman"
  • Amish Cockscomb
  • Maltese Cross
  • Rainbow Loveliness
  • Sweet Pea "Little Sweetheart"
  • Sweet Pea "Regal Robe"
  • Cosmos "Sensation Mixed Colors"
  • Radio Calendula

Sunflower "Cinnamon Sun"


Rose Campion


Rainbow Lovliness


Sweet William "Holborn Glory"


Update : Onto Round 2. Five cups of seeds apparently would only get 3/4's of the upper slope. Might have to plant Crimson clover on the bottom part?

Cedar
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 12:07:42 PM by Cedar »

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #59 on: March 15, 2014, 05:30:05 AM »
I am a fan of those cinnamon ferns- My sister gave me a nice clump of a couple years ago which is happily established now on the wet edge of the amphibian pond.   Unlike the other ferns (Unknown variety I brought home from a bog @ bol mountain property) they are of interest all winter as the spike fronds (no idea of what to call the "flowers") and a lot of the regular fronds just go brown/gold and remain for the season.