Author Topic: Cedar's Garden 2014  (Read 122904 times)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #60 on: March 15, 2014, 08:04:53 AM »
I am a fan of those cinnamon ferns- My sister gave me a nice clump of a couple years ago which is happily established now on the wet edge of the amphibian pond.   Unlike the other ferns (Unknown variety I brought home from a bog @ bol mountain property) they are of interest all winter as the spike fronds (no idea of what to call the "flowers") and a lot of the regular fronds just go brown/gold and remain for the season.

I have only wanted one for like 20 years. Now I have 2. Thanks for letting me know what they do for the winter months. I want to see pics of your pond again. It has been a year or two since I saw it last.

Cedar

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #61 on: March 15, 2014, 08:40:22 PM »
I have only wanted one for like 20 years. Now I have 2. Thanks for letting me know what they do for the winter months. I want to see pics of your pond again. It has been a year or two since I saw it last.

Cedar

I'll post updates in a month or so once the fiddleheads and hosta start rising

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #62 on: March 18, 2014, 08:44:31 PM »
Tonight I took the stored garlic which overwintered in the pantry, and graded it out to how well it fared (ie not sprouting, getting soft, molding etc) separated it all into individual cloves for planting, hopefully tomorrow. I culled a bunch out for Z who is eating garlic like popcorn recently.

The two I stored this year are 'Killarney Red', which I think I talked about in "Cedar's Garden 2013", ...


... and 'Red Chesnok'. The 'Red Chesnok' fared much better, stayed firm, no rot, is larger cloved and has 9-14 cloves in the bulb. So far I am much happier with it than the 'Killarney Red', but I will see what I can do with the 'Killarney Red' in three years time.


When I went up to the Lodge to feed the main flock of birds and male alpacas, it was finally dry enough to get out to my garden up there. A week ago, I was up to my 'knee' in mud when I attempted it.

My Jerusalem Artichokes lived through the freezes, the 'St. Valery' carrots, the "Siberian" Kale, the 'Burpee's Golden' beets... and my 'West Virginia Sawmill Holler' garlic, as well as the "Bray Italian' garlic. The last two garlics mentioned are family heirlooms, original variety name probably lost decades ago. The 'Sawmill Holler' I know goes back at least 50 years in the same family. I grew it from seed last year, so it is small this year, but I have about 40 of them, which is good as mom had some topset and I had lost mine. The "Bray Italian" came from the Bray family who had gone to Italy and bought it from a small country marketplace long ago, then they brought it back to Oregon. I was lucky to get some, and I had 3-4 which overwintered.

I hope to knock a 12'x4' raised bed together, fill it and plant tomorrow.

In looking at the Lodge Garden and seeing the weeds are nearly as bad as last year, from being neglected for years, I am thinking on black plastic sheeting the whole of it, except where I want to plant the popcorn, and planting the peppers and tomatoes up there. All 500-something of them.

Cedar

Offline trinharder

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #63 on: March 19, 2014, 08:47:32 AM »
You're in a totally different climate than me here in New Mexico but I've had real good luck with Chesnock Reds. Have a couple hundred in the ground now planted last fall.

Offline Terroir Seeds

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #64 on: March 19, 2014, 10:20:24 AM »
It sounds like you've Dr. Kallio's corn that he was working on at U of Fairbanks in the 50s and early 60s, before he retired and went back to MN. We've got his tomato that he developed there, sent seeds back to U of Fairbanks for them to trial and compare with what they still have.

Thanks for sharing your viewpoint on this conference, we've looked at it a couple of times but haven't gone, mainly because we didn't think that we would fit in. Glad to see that it looks like a valuable resource!

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #65 on: March 19, 2014, 10:33:07 AM »
It sounds like you've Dr. Kallio's corn that he was working on at U of Fairbanks in the 50s and early 60s, before he retired and went back to MN. We've got his tomato that he developed there, sent seeds back to U of Fairbanks for them to trial and compare with what they still have.

OH, OH, OH.. .... !!!! Do you have more information on Dr. Kallio? This is the first info I have possibly attached to "Yukon Supreme"!!!!

And YES!!!! Do go to the OSA. They will not have it in 2015, but they will in 2016. If they do have it in 'my neck of the woods' again, and you come up, crash here and save yourself hotel fees.

Cedar

Offline Terroir Seeds

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #66 on: March 20, 2014, 02:16:19 PM »
We have some info on him and his plant breeding at U of Fairbanks, I'll pass it along. He had tomatoes, corn and strawberries growing in the commons area and were upset that the students would eat all of his "research".

We're headed out to set up at PrepperFest AZ and will be back on Sunday evening. If I don't contact you before next Tues or Wed, shoot me an email and I'll send you what we have.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #67 on: March 28, 2014, 07:55:47 PM »
Last weekend my order of fruit tree rootstock came in and I should have grafted them the same day, but it was impossible. There was no way it was going to happen with my ribs still feeling like I was beaten with baseball bats. The rootstock has sat on the back porch in the shade and humidity for a week now. But I got to them today. So they should survive.



In the picture above, the bucket to the left is the M-7 apple rootstock and the bucket to the right is the OHxF 513 pear rootstock. In reality I hate working with pear rootstock, which is actually Quince. It is not nice and sleek like the apple stock. It is lumpy, bumpy, multiple branches and half the time, I am like, "Uh.. where am I going to cut on this?" It also tends to be thicker than my scionwood (top part I am grafting on) and my grafts are just not as pretty with them. But it works.



With it raining up to 5" of rain today, and with having a respiratory infection which has lasted 64 days now, I deemed it unwise to graft outside in the cold damp. So I chose the rug at the back door in the livingroom and hoped Z would stay in his office until I got done and cleaned up. Did I mention I love my vacuum cleaner? Other then the vacuum cleaner, it doesn't really take more than a really sharp knife and tape for grafting (as well as the rootstock and scionwood). I had made the metal tags the other day between naps, had them all ready to go, and the tools are really at a minimum for grafting.



I then got out some of my apple scionwood (and no, this is a little pile of them from HOC.... I cannot get both hands around the scionwood I have left from Seedy Saturday, so if you live close, I am more than happy to hand the rest off to you -- it will make about 150 trees or so) that I picked up from the HOC Scion Fair & Exchange. When I select it from the hundreds of varieties there, I make sure to stop and label them with blue painter's tape before I move another step. This is really important to me to NOT mix up the variety names. I hope that the trees will be around well after I am gone after all, and I hope someone down the road cares what these varieties are.

I got the apples done and labeled with the metal tags (apples are really my thing for orchards) and then I was going to slack and do the pears tomorrow, but I did not want to clean up the same mess twice, since it was in the house. So onward I went.

There were not as many pears to do, so it went pretty easy.. for pears. Grafting pears always just feel more awkward for me than apples.

Then I realized that I somehow had four more apple rootstock than I had ordered. I checked the other lady in the community who wanted some (but she is currently overseas) and nope... I had four extra. So now I have the decision to make (between a nap in a minute and sometime tomorrow) out of the huge leftover pile of scionwood from Seedy Saturday, another huge bag full of scions, what to graft on. I have some interesting choices, which were not anywhere on the list of what I have spent two years compliling for what our needs are. But that is ok too. I suspect that "Winter Banana", "Twenty Ounce" and "Fameuse" might be three of the four candidates.

Apple scionwood left over from Seedy Saturday:
Winter Banana

Originates from: Indiana, United State. Introduced: 1870s. It looks hearty and tastes that way too. Crisp and benefitting from an outstanding balance of sugar and acid, this is the sort of apple your grandparents loved. In addition to its other great attributes, Winter Banana is a tree that starts producing fruit young and then does so consistently year-in and year-out. It produces lots of large apples that keep very well - a good four months anyway - once they're harvested.Equally good cooked as eaten fresh, Winter Banana is also a good tree for the orchard, as it produces plenty of excellent pollen to ensure a good haul of fruit on all the other tree.

Fameuse (Snow apple)
A very hardy apple variety. Also known as the Snow Apple of Quebec in 1739, from plantings in early French settlements in Quebec. One of the oldest and most desirable dessert apples, a parent of the aromatic McIntosh. Flesh is tender, spicy, distinctive in flavor, and snow white in color with occasional crimson stains near the skin. Very hardy, heavy bearing tree that is excellent for home orchards. Delicious fresh off the tree, in cider, or in culinary creations.

Cox's Orange Pippin

England 1830 (seed of Ribston Pippin). Highly esteemed in England as a dessert apple; produces excellent fruit in cooler summer climates. Medium sized apple, red and yellow, usually striped. The flesh is yellow, firm, crisp, very juicy, richly aromatic and some say almost spicy. Flavor is enhanced when fruit ripens off the tree. A heavy bearer and one of the best apples for espalier. Fresh eating/ dessert, cooking (puree, applesauce, apple butter), baking, juice/hard cider.

Twenty Ounce
Discovered in New York or Connecticut, USA, sometime before 1844. An all purpose variety that was first exhibited by George Howland of New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1843 at the Mass Horticultural Society. Evidently it was Howland who found the original seedling on his farm in Cayuga County, New York and then brought it with him to Massachusetts. As the name implies, this apple can reach enormous proportions. Attractive, very large, striped red flush over a greenish background. Flesh white and semi- firm with high quality; said to be the premier cooking apple for more than 100 years. Also great for dessert. Medium sized tree comes into bearing young. Fresh eating/ dessert, cooking (puree, applesauce, apple butter)

Tompkins King
Brought from New Jersey to New York in 1804 by Jacob Wycoff. Grown in Tompkins County, New York, and called the King of apples, for size and flavor.Fourth most popular New York apple in early 1900's.Fruit large to very large. Skin smooth, golden washed with orange red, Flesh yellow, coarse, crisp, tender, flavor subacid. Good for cooking when green and excellent for eating when handsomely striped. Water core (translucent flesh) sweetens some fruit. Consider Grimes Golden, Liberty and/or Newtown Pippin for pollination

Newton
Newtown Pippin is the oldest commercially grown variety to have been bred in the U.S. The variety sprang from a seed in Newtown,Long Island around 1750. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were two noted admirers of this fine fruit. Skin is green to yellow, often russeted, with white dots. Flesh is yellowish or tinged with green, firm, crisp, moderately fine grained, and sprightly aromatic with refreshing piney tartness. Some find a light tangerine scent. Does best in warm summer locations. The fruit develops full sugar and rich flavor after a few months of cold storage. A self-fertile variety that also serves as a pollinizer for other apple trees.

Geneva Early
'Geneva Early' is one of the very earliest ripening apples. It is large, and has good eating quality, and is a very marketable type of apple. Its special feature is its very early ripening season, usually about August 1 at Geneva, NY but sometimes as early as July 13. It is one of the earliest ripening of all varieties and is one of the most acceptable of all the very earliest kinds. Like all early ripening apple varieties, 'Geneva Early ripens unevenly and requires two or three pickings. This uneven opening is an advantage to the home orchardist who wishes to harvest a few ripe apples daily over a period of 2 weeks. But uneven ripening is a disadvantage to the commercial grower for whom it is most profitable to harvest the entire crop at one picking.


Some of the finished grafted apple trees, sitting in a bucket waiting to go back outside

Cedar

Offline David in MN

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #68 on: March 29, 2014, 06:28:11 AM »
Great stuff. If nothing else, you're inspiring a little gardener up in Minneapolis. I've always wanted to do grafting and hope to in the food forest/hunting plot my brother in law intends to build.

Feel better. Were you close I'd bring the last of my dried German Chamomile. Or a pint of raspberry infused vodka... It's been a tough winter for those of us with full strength. May spring renew you.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #69 on: March 29, 2014, 08:07:42 AM »
I've always wanted to do grafting

Go get a knife and some twigs. Practice now on 'junk wood' that you won't do anything with, to learn the art so when you get to the 'good stuff', you don't have to think about it and it is just automatic.

If you look in my last pic, the clear grafting tape I used, I loathe. For a newbie, get sticky grafting tape or use a good electrical tape. The only reason I put up with the clear stuff, is 1. I had it.. and 2. I like to see how my grafts are healing without removing the tape. But for a newbie this kind of tape will be frustrating. I had to rip it off the roll/tree with my teeth as I am holding the tree and the tape with my two hands. Then you can see the long tails on it, that is because I have to tie it to itself around the tree and if you do not have long tails, it sucks it way back through the knot of tape. Functional, but not as pretty with the tails hanging out.

In the bottom photo, I also notice that some of the trees look crooked between the topwork and the bottomstock. Only one is actually. The rest are pretty straight and without the tape, you might not notice there was anything done to them.

Feel better. Were you close I'd bring the last of my dried German Chamomile. Or a pint of raspberry infused vodka... It's been a tough winter for those of us with full strength. May spring renew you.

I don't drink alcohol, but I bet that pint would do something for my cough *S* And German Chamomile tea with honey sounds lovely. Thank you for your kind thought. Mentally I am feeling better and less zombized. I am really glad it is still pouring mass amounts of rain outside, as it is lessening my desire of needing to be out there due to being so far behind.

I need a WWOOFer.. like last week.  :'(

Cedar

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #70 on: March 29, 2014, 09:14:12 AM »
Ahhh..... Felco pruners..... As soon as I am grown up enough to not lose them in my small backyard I'm going to invest in some of those.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #71 on: March 29, 2014, 10:18:19 AM »
Ahhh..... Felco pruners..... As soon as I am grown up enough to not lose them in my small backyard I'm going to invest in some of those.

Felco #2's.  Growing up on the vineyard, there really is no other brand to have.. (except this new Japanese one maybe). In 30 years I have had three pairs of Felco's. ONLY as I lost them.. bought a new pair, as nothing else will do, and then found the missing pair. Z just bought me a new one last month or so, even though I said I only needed a new blade after 20 years of pruning and it was finally getting dull. So he got me a new pair and a new blade. The pair in the pic is my old pair with the new blade. If you do a lots of pruning, do yourself a favor and get a pair even though they are expensive. They will save your hands and your pocketbook over time.

Cedar

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #72 on: March 29, 2014, 10:57:08 AM »
Second that on the Felcos ! AND  the practice, practice practice on waste twigs. I just went to a grafting class last month at our grange, it was review for me, but nice to sit there and get all that practice in (and have access then to some great scion wood) Everyone after being shown how, sits there and practices for 1/2 or more on waste wood. SO, you can watch on you tube, or have someone show you at the gardening store, and practice at home till you get it. Also, you do not need to have a specific grafting knife, Cedar, looks like you have a razor knife or something as your knife of choice, what are you using for the actual cuts on the scion wood ? But, it does need to be straight, not serrated, ideally with beveling only on one side, we used to use a few cheap paring knifes we picked up at the grocery store that worked pretty darn well and fit that description, a lucky find.

My friend the rare fruit grower orchardist, who also sells trees he's made every year, he swears by masking tape. Just regular masking tape, easy to rip , cheap to buy. (but, decent regular masking tape, absolutely NOT the stuff at dollar store he says) They all seem to have their preferences. He likes that it is easy to work with, and he just goes around with the roll as a bracelet around his wrist. He does nice tight wraps with it, it's what he teaches so it is common all over this county now, and he says it holds well for as long as you will need it to, and if you forget to go and take it off, you wont have killed the graft, the growth and weather will break it off if you dont get to it. He has probably gone this way as, in addition to bench grafts, he also does top work, where it's easier to forget to get back to the grafts, and where you are walking around your orchard and needing to carry your tape and stuff with you. The expense of the special tape would also probably realy add up since he sells grafted trees for a living.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #73 on: March 29, 2014, 11:37:44 AM »
Cedar, looks like you have a razor knife or something as your knife of choice, what are you using for the actual cuts on the scion wood ?

This is my preferred grafting knife, which is packed in a box somewhere in one of four outbuildings.


http://www.amleo.com/product.aspx?p=2475E&kc=AMLSHOP14&crcat=pla+tools-hoes-cultivators-weeders~2475E&crsource=adwords&crkw=Victorinox+Folding+Florist+and+Grafting+Knife&gclid=COe8goaiuL0CFc1cfgodzbQAxQ

So with not wanting to look through 4 outbuildings, I grabbed a Home Depot folding boxknife thing to trial as it was the first cutting utensil I grabbed out of the tool drawer, and it actually worked out well. I don't think I would recommend it as a new-to-grafting-person's knife however.



And other than the Felco's for freshing edges of the scions and rootstock, yeppers, I used the boxknife.

you wont have killed the graft, the growth and weather will break it off if you dont get to it.

This clear grafting tape falls off within months too.. but I do check mine as I generally only graft 20-40 a year when I am getting serious about grafting. And generally they live in pots for the first year somewhere close by. Like my last grafting ones are in pots on the front porch right now.

Cedar

Offline Ms. Albatross

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #74 on: March 29, 2014, 01:00:02 PM »

I need a WWOOFer.. like last week.  :'(

Cedar

Do you have a listing on the wwoof website?  How many are you looking for?  Are you just not getting applicants? 

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #75 on: March 29, 2014, 02:50:15 PM »
Do you have a listing on the wwoof website?  How many are you looking for?  Are you just not getting applicants?

Over the years I have had 12-14 'WWOOFers" who have come to my places and I have never advertised for one. I figure it is a cross between Karma/Serendipity with whom shows up. I have had them from Ireland, Georgia, Washington State and in between... When the time is right, one will come. That said, I may have to put in a WWOOFer ad before that....

Unfortunately the only WWOOFer we have had here, was the first time Z has ever experienced one. This last particular one was not a good match for our needs or for the WWOOFer's mental/physical ability, and so this WWOOFer was 12x the work than if I had gone it alone (but we are still friends) ... so Z is suspicious about having another WWOOFer. But I suspect the right one/s will come along.

We would like 2 at a time, so they can keep each other company and I do not feel like I have to entertain them all the time. But we have fun too. Sometimes I have a lazy slack day, or it is too rainy, or too hot and it is like. "Hey, lets go do this!!!!". So it is not all hardcore work either. But whomever shows up, they learn alot and alot of diversity in farming, homesteading, etc.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #76 on: March 30, 2014, 10:18:56 AM »
Grafted up 4 more apple trees. I went with:

"Winter Banana"
"Fameuse (Snow apple)"
"Twenty Ounce" and
"Geneva Early"

So that should give us a range of fresh apples from end-July to December on the tree. Most of the varieties I picked will store until March in the root cellar.

Cedar

Offline David in MN

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #77 on: March 30, 2014, 12:42:00 PM »
Very cool. I like the storage idea. I (a brewer) am trying to get the surplus apples from the neighborhood to ferment. Jackasses up here will let them freeze on the trees when I could blend them to make a good cider. They don't even throw the rotten apples at each other. Ah, the farm days...

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #78 on: March 31, 2014, 01:34:28 PM »
If I wanted a pair of pruners just for cutting off my comfrey near the ground and other abusive rough work, what would you recommend.  I tend to destroy a pair every year and the current pair I have from last year sticks closed so often I'm about to chuck them in the bin.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #79 on: March 31, 2014, 02:01:53 PM »
If I wanted a pair of pruners just for cutting off my comfrey near the ground and other abusive rough work, what would you recommend.  I tend to destroy a pair every year and the current pair I have from last year sticks closed so often I'm about to chuck them in the bin.

This is why I buy Felco #2's. Cry once and have them sharp for 20-30 years. It will save the wear and tear on your hands too from the ease of cutting.. BUT... Be careful though. They will send you into ER for sutures if you get body parts in the way.

I am not sure they make lopers (they probably do) and I would probably recommend them as well. It is amazing what size of branches I can cut with the hand pruners. Over the years I was pruning 1,100 grape vines, 30+ full standard sized apple trees which tended to be overgrown (I did other people's trees too), 1000+ blueberry bushes, regular yard landscaping pruning (Spirarea was what I cut my wrist and probably needed sutures for), used them for SAR for making my survival shelters each summer during training, trimming sheep and goat hooves and who knows what else... and I only had to replace the blade 20+ years later. I know I had this pair in 1985.

Currently they are about $50-60 for a pair.

Felco makes other styles of pruners, but my choice is #2 and most orchardists/vineyard guys who have Felco's, usually have #2's as well.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #80 on: March 31, 2014, 02:36:35 PM »
Alright, I'll bite the bullet.  Thanks.

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #81 on: March 31, 2014, 08:18:28 PM »
Dang it now I gotta have some now :)


Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #82 on: March 31, 2014, 08:42:59 PM »
Man.. I ought to get a kickback from Felco!!

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #83 on: April 01, 2014, 10:25:24 PM »
nelson came over today for me to graft up some apple and pears trees for him. He gave me a couple rootstocks in trade. On the way back from us picking up SP from school, I stopped by a historic place which has old old antique apple orchards, that no one knows who planted there, from about the late 1880's. I was bad... but I took out my pocket knife and cut 3 scions off the overgrown & falling trees.

One apple I selected for me was "Mother". Originated in 1800's Massachusetts, United States. "Mother" is a rather large dessert apple that was once very popular.  It has a distinct, spicy, balsamic, sweet-acid, aromatic  flavor.  Its flesh is creamy yellow and juicy.  It ripens in mid-season, but doesn't store particularly well.  Some scab-resistance, but susceptible to fire blight.  Slow growing, but bears well from an early age.

The trees which will pollinate "Mother" that I also grafted this year are: Braeburn, Calville Blanc d'Hiver, Golden Delicious (which was already planted before we got here), Grimes Golden, Red Delicious (which was already planted before we got here), and Winter Banana.



I think I have rootstock for 2 more apples and 3 more pears, so NOW I gotta look through my options again.. and get those grafted up tomorrow, when I do a neighbor's trees. She got back from Singapore last night.

"Cox's Orange Pippin" (England 1830 dessert apple) and "Newtown Pippin" apple (1750) which is the oldest commercially grown variety to have been bred in the U.S. A self-fertile variety that also serves as a pollinizer for other apple tree are my likely candidates for tomorrow.

For pears, I am leaning towards (if I have 3 rootstocks for them):
Aurora = PI 541119 (CPYR 25.001)
Pyrus communis
A delicious and attractive fall pear.
Originated in Geneva, N.Y., by New York State Agriculture
Experiment Station. Named and introduced in 1964. Marguerite Marillat x Bartlett
Skin bright yellow, slightly russeted, sometimes blushed, very attractive; flesh melting, smooth, juicy, sweet, aromatic, high quality for dessert purposes; longer storage and shelf life than Bartlett; ripens with or just after Bartlett; very well suited for the home gardener and fresh fruit market; keeps well in cold storage until December.

Johantorp = PI 285530 (CPYR 304.001)
Pyrus communis
A very late ripening and cold hardy pear widely grown in Sweden for winter storage. Like Granny Smith or Goldrush apples, the Johantorp ear will hang on the tree late into the winter,  we can enjoy them directly off the tree in late December.

Rousselet of Stuttgart x Dr. Jules Guyot No. VII = PI 337446 (CPYR 499.001)
Pyrus communis
Attractive rainbow-trout colored, crunchy pear that ripens nicely on the tree. Five selections of the cross Rousselet Shtutgartskii x Dr. J. Gujo were received in 1968 from the USSR Vavilov Institute in Leningrad. All five selections have crunchy, attractive, pyriform shaped fruit that ripen in August and September. Selection VII is the most attractive, with red blushed and speckled fruit similar in coloring toForelle. Tree is disease resistant and cold hardy.

Cedar
« Last Edit: April 01, 2014, 10:42:48 PM by ZombieGal »

Offline BadgerAngel

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #84 on: April 01, 2014, 10:57:43 PM »
Cedar.

Is it possible to mail any of those heirloom apple graftlings?  Not this year, I don't think, but next.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #85 on: April 01, 2014, 11:08:38 PM »
Is it possible to mail any of those heirloom apple graftlings?  Not this year, I don't think, but next.

Oh yeah.. probably pretty easy. Everything comes from certified rootstock and scionwood (other than the "Mother" I grabbed today), so I think other than Washington State and New York it would be fine... and maybe even them.

And LAST call if anyone local wants scionwood or me to graft any up. After tomorrow they are g-o-n-e. (which means I might just stick some sticks in the hedgerow).

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #86 on: April 06, 2014, 05:15:02 PM »
Yesterday we tore down two commercial greenhouses (well one and a half, we have to go back and get the rest of the other one). A 20 year old man just bought a house and it had these greenhouses on it that he did not want, so I got them at a extremely good price. He knew I was injured/ill, so he had a crew of 8 people there (10 including us) to help tear them down, which I did not know about until we got there. THANK YOU!!! None of us knew what a PITA and how long it would take.

IF you ever do this, have wrestler/football playing boys come help you. And have them wear jock cups. Three of them got nailed in the privates and one in the jaw, so maybe football helmets along with the jock cups are in order. It took about 90 man hours to get just the large one down. So if it was just Z and I, it would have taken us a week and probable severe injuries if we had done it alone.  Have 5 gallon pails with lids for the screws and other parts. And a paint marker to mark the arches, as each set is slightly different than the next. The 96' greenhouse has 17 spans. We also borrowed the man's next door neighbor's logging backhoe to help pull the very base which was set up into concrete. We abandoned this section as we could not rotohammer the concrete off, so I will have to just order the 'sleeves?' from the company. We are just going to sawzall them off at the concrete level on the smaller one. Thankfully on the large one, they just lift up and out after they are unbolted, but this is where the guys got slightly injured (but then it turned into a game with them) as the arches act like they are spring loaded. And the very top will twist and the two sections go different ways, which can launch two teenage football players at a time through the air (which also turned into a game with them -- have parents sign liability waivers!!). IF you can keep them straight until you get them where you want them to come apart, this actually works to your advantage other than the flying teeenagers. Make sure you have FOUR people on each arch, two on each side. The arches are not overly heavy, but they are tall, the center of gravity is whacked and they are awkward being that tall.

Have a generator, so you can use power tools. Have multiple types of tools, as the larger one had at least 5 kinds of screws and screw head types involved. And this was put up by a professional well known greenhouse company.

Have a large trailer. Thankfully this one was not bent on site, which some of them are.

Have multiple ladders of various heights.

The smaller 45' greenhouse we need to go back for on a different day. But it will be the first one to go up on the farm here, since I cannot afford new skin for the larger one which could cost me $2,000-3,000 dollars by the time I buy more 'tracks', "springs", lumber and skin. The smaller 45' one is complete, minus the new 'footings'.

We may have two WWOOFers coming up this coming week and this will be one of the jobs I need them to help me do, in putting up the smaller greenhouse, since Z will be working most of the time. After the small one is set up and put into working order with plants growing, we may set up the larger one, although not put a skin on it yet. And as tall as it is, I may have to have that done professionally.





The photos above is of the smaller 25'x45' greenhouse. I can envision greenery in there already. I think peppers, tomatoes, melons in this one for this year.

I am setting both of them up near the North Barn in the bottom of the river pasture, but above flood zone. This will make easy access to clean out the barns and dump manure in there with the tractor or wheelbarrow.

My plan is to have this littler one set up before the middle of May.

Cedar

PS Keep your eyes and ears open if you want one too. I probably saved myself $7,000 in doing so, other than time.

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #87 on: April 06, 2014, 06:03:51 PM »
I am jealous

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #88 on: April 06, 2014, 07:06:17 PM »
Wow, what a score.  I have a long range plan for a greenhouse, but it keeps getting pushed further and further off as other expenses come up.

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2014
« Reply #89 on: April 07, 2014, 10:49:13 PM »
I need a WWOOFer.. like last week.  :'(

Do you have a listing on the wwoof website?  How many are you looking for?  Are you just not getting applicants? 

I figure it is a cross between Karma/Serendipity with whom shows up.... When the time is right, one will come. That said, I may have to put in a WWOOFer ad before that.... But I suspect the right one/s will come along.  We would like 2 at a time..

And today, two WWOOFers have arrived to stay at the farm for awhile. Karma/Serendipity..... it came through again Ms. Albatross.  ;D

Cedar