Author Topic: article on early ham and the 1913 floods  (Read 1588 times)

Offline Alan Georges

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article on early ham and the 1913 floods
« on: April 02, 2014, 05:29:09 PM »
http://nationalcalamityeaster1913flood.blogspot.com/

Pretty interesting stuff.  It shows how ham radio was previously considered to be largely a nuisance, and how it gained some degree of respect – and more importantly, legal breathing room – as a result of helping so much during a widespread disaster.

Offline redeyeprep

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Re: article on early ham and the 1913 floods
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2014, 08:25:13 PM »
Interesting article, especially for me, coming from my old home town. I grew up with grandparents who still remembered that flood quite vividly. Actually, that incident probably played at least some role in resurrecting the Amateur service after the later shut down in WWI.

Yeah, quite the little joke the legislators in Washington played on the Amateurs of the day, granting them privileges in the 'worthless' wavelengths below 200 meters. Oh no...please don't throw us in the brier patch!    ;)

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: article on early ham and the 1913 floods
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2014, 06:19:40 AM »
Yeah, quite the little joke the legislators in Washington played on the Amateurs of the day, granting them privileges in the 'worthless' wavelengths below 200 meters. Oh no...please don't throw us in the brier patch!    ;)
Sometimes these things just work out in everyone's favor. 8)   Handing amateurs those 'worthless short waves' spurred a bunch of spare-time R&D.  It's hard to imagine any other group of people trying so much whacky stuff – stuff that mostly turned out to work!