Author Topic: Food for Camping  (Read 17931 times)

Offline InquiringMind

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Food for Camping
« on: October 24, 2014, 07:48:28 PM »
I did a search on 'food' in the camping section, and it looks like no one's talked about it for quite some time.

So…what are your favorite things to pack for:

1) Car camping?

2) Backpacking 1-2 nights?

3) Backpacking 3+ nights?

Offline goofyshooter

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2014, 12:00:23 PM »
For the first night of car camping we usually bring seasoned ground beef patties and what ever veggies we want all wrapped up in heavy duty foil in single servings. Once we get to the campsite in the afternoon or evening start a camp fire, and set up camp, by the time your ready you throw the packets on the coals and 30-40 mins later your good to eat and no clean up. Weve also done this on a charcoal grill.

Favorite for backpacking is dehydrated chili. Make a pot of chili, once your done eating put the left overs in the fridge. The next morning scoop all the solidified fat off the top (some one told me it could spoil). Put it in the dehydrator, I measure it in a bowl first so I know how much a "serving" is. Once dehydrated vacuum seal or ziplock bag if your not storing it too long. Then all you do is add a little boiling water in a bowl and your eating in a few minutes.

Offline AvenueQ

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2014, 02:18:59 PM »
Jerky and kale chips are great camping snacks (though not necessarily together). I also like scottish eggs for the first night: Wrap a hard-boiled egg in ground sausage, then wrap each in foil and stash in a cooler before leaving. When you get there just throw it on the edge of the fire, turning every few minutes so it doesn't burn on one side.

For dessert, banana boats are a good alternative to s'mores. Cut a small groove in the banana, saving the cut part of the peel. Dig out a small hollow and fill it with chocolate chips/peanut butter chips/mini marshmallows and cover with the saved peel. Wrap in foil and put it around the edge of the fire, just until everything gets all warm and gooey. This is best enjoyed with a spoon (and napkins ;) ).

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2014, 02:28:49 PM »
Chilli is a favorite of mine.

One technique is to add most of the components together (I usually combine onion, beans, garlic and spices) in a tupperware and just brown meat and combine with the tupperware and add any tomato products.  I recommend low balling spices, I once accidentally overidd the spices in my mix and made a batch of inedibly spicy chili.

Also, pre-beating eggs if you are doing scrambled eggs.

Offline Nate

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2014, 02:49:59 PM »
Quesadillas for car, canoe, and backpacking.  Shred cheese at home.  We add summer sausage, cheese, ketchup and sometimes veggies.  Sounds weird but just a little ketchup makes it better.  On a recent trip we made pizza quesadillas.  Cheese, spagetti sauce, and meat.  Turned out good.

Offline desmond11

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2014, 05:43:26 PM »
It's not really food ,more of a snack. Put a star burst on a hot dog stick and roast it like a marshmallow, omg it is crazy good.not something I i try to eat often.but it's the little things in life.

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2014, 06:19:27 PM »
One of many choices that's a hit at camp and easy to make and store. . . .  Individual bags of Dorito's nacho cheese chips, smash chips while in bag, open bag (leave chips in bag), add hamburger cooked with taco seasoning (pre-cooked before you go camping), add lettuce (pre-cut and bagged before you go camping), add grated cheddar cheese (pre-grated and bagged before you go camping), add chopped olives (pre-chopped and bagged before you go camping), add chopped tomatoes (pre-chopped and bagged before you go camping), pour over that some French dressing.

Eat contents from bag.

The only thing you need to heat is the meat.  The only thing you need to clean is the skillet you heat the meat in.

.

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2014, 06:30:25 PM »
All our camping is with our camper. We have the bells and whistles, but most of it is without hookups so we don't get to use those gadgets.

But our first night is almost always our home canned beef stew.  Just open the jars and heat it up.  Works great after a day of traveling.

We also do a lot of dutch oven meals.  Check out Byron's Dutch Oven page for a bunch of great recipes.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2014, 09:54:28 PM »
One of many choices that's a hit at camp and easy to make and store. . . .  Individual bags of Dorito's nacho cheese chips, smash chips while in bag, open bag (leave chips in bag), add hamburger cooked with taco seasoning (pre-cooked before you go camping), add lettuce (pre-cut and bagged before you go camping), add grated cheddar cheese (pre-grated and bagged before you go camping), add chopped olives (pre-chopped and bagged before you go camping), add chopped tomatoes (pre-chopped and bagged before you go camping), pour over that some French dressing.

Eat contents from bag.

The only thing you need to heat is the meat.  The only thing you need to clean is the skillet you heat the meat in.

.

Boyscouts call those "walking tacos". 

Offline InquiringMind

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2014, 09:40:27 PM »
Just got back from camping (hence the post a couple days ago).

Tried this for the first time: halved a pepper and filled it with pepperoni and mozzarella. Cooked covered until the cheese melted and the pepper started to roast. Turned out quite well. Future improvements will probably include minced garlic and substitute in cheddar.


Offline riverbend_rich

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2014, 10:35:22 PM »
I'm old school. We just like hot dogs and hobo dinners. For hunting camp we have the wives make up different heat and eat meals like hodgepodge, stew, etc..

Offline ericksonrs

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #11 on: October 27, 2014, 03:22:43 PM »
Boyscouts call those "walking tacos".

GIRL Scouts call those walking tacos....boy scouts use the dutch oven and make a real meal  ;)

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2014, 04:06:28 PM »
For backpacking I'm a big fan of the just add boiling water meals from Lipton and Rice-a-roni.  I usually add a little freeze-dried hamburger crumbles and olive oil.  They're very light to carry, taste good, and satisfy your hunger, and much cheaper than the pre-made freeze-dried meals from Mountain House and others.  I buy #10 cans of hamburger and one can is enough for dozens of meals.

My favorite is the Rice-a-roni angel hair pasta with herbs and Parmesan cheese angel hair pasta.  Both are ready to eat within 5-7 minutes of adding the hot water, although I always give the hamburger an extra five minutes to rehydrate before I add water to the pasta.

Offline trekker111

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #13 on: October 28, 2014, 10:28:36 AM »
GIRL Scouts call those walking tacos....boy scouts use the dutch oven and make a real meal  ;)

Yip, just got back from a 3ish day boy scout backpacking trip.

Day one: arrived having had breakfast, lunch was lunch meat wraps, choice of roast beef, ham, turkey, or pastrami. Dinner was beef stew and pita bread.

Day 2: breakfast- scrambled eggs and ham, lunch - same as day 1, dinner - chicken quesadillas with pico de gallo, homemade guacamole, salsa.

Day 3: breakfast - sausage, scrambled eggs, and oatmeal. Lunch (late) - made it to camp and fired up the dutch ovens for pork roast, green beans, potatoes, salad, banana pudding.

For snacks we had trail mix, venison summer sausage, ghost pepper cheese, dehydrated apple and pineapple. For drinks we had those crystal light flavor things you add to water, and tang (my standby)

Our troops signature meals while truck camping are biscuits in the dutch ovens and sausage gravy for breakfast, and hamburgers with fresh cut fench fries and deep fried corn for a dinner, with whatever cake the boys bake in a dutch oven.

Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #14 on: October 28, 2014, 11:12:01 AM »
Whether hiking or camping, breakfast is usually instant oatmeal and coffee/hot cocoa, maybe some eggs if taking a little more time.  And lunch is usually a PBJ or cheese sandwich, nuts/dried fruit, cookies.  We are usually doing something during the day (hiking, fishing, swimming, boating) so breakfast and lunch are simple and quick meals to fuel up and go.  Dinner has to have foil wrapped and fire roasted potatoes and veggies like carrots, onions and peppers, plus s'mores for dessert. Plus some pasta dish like Pasta Roni, or if hiking a Mountain House freeze dried meal. If camping probably some wine and beer.

When we are not in camp EVERYTHING is stored in the cooler or vehicle.  At Mt Rainier we once left a large tupperware bin of cookies on the picnic table while we went hiking.  When we came back it was all chewed up and strewn about about several very porky chipmunks licking their lips. Heavy plastic containers are no barrier to rodents!

Offline Josh the Aspie

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2014, 11:30:08 AM »
Tuna, cheese, and tortillas gives you a good, portable mix of protine, fat, and carbs.  In fact, some people recommend doubling up the tortillas, or just eating them strait.
I recommend some kind of spiced cheese for added flavor.  Pepper jack is a good one.  It still might be a bit bland, depending on your tastes, but I find the salt of the tuna to be just wondrous when you've been sweating from the hiking.

Bacon tastes extra good when you cook it over a fire, and a lot of it is designed so that it doesn't outright need the cold storage... but be aware that you WILL produce a lot of grease, and it takes a while to cook and clean up... so it depends on how quickly you need to pack up in the morning.  Also, if you have anything that needs oil to cook in for that meal, don't bother bringing any if you are bringing bacon.

A fair number of folks like some of the really thinly chopped oatmeal for morning breakfasts, since you can cook it relatively fast, and it gives you a good healthy carb load to start your hike.

And while you can cook an amazing teriayki chicken over a camp fire, it takes quite a while, and after a day of backpacking, you may not find the effort worth it.

It also depends on if you're getting water at/near your camp sites, or if you're going to have to pack it in / will have a limited provided supply.  In the second case, using anything dried, or that needs water will rob you of valuable ounces of liquid your body will need.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2014, 11:52:26 AM »
When car camping I always bring some cast iron pieces.  Mainly a dutch oven and skillet. 

Last May I had my kids up at Deception Pass in NW WA state (due east of Victoria, BC).
Dinner the first night was baked potatoes, fried chicken and for dessert those banana/smore things you wrap in foil.
Breakfast was scrambled eggs bacon and pancakes.
Then after clam digging we made clam linguine the next night.

Other meals were sandwiches and dry stuff.

I can cook nearly anything with a couple good cast iron pieces.

Offline keebler

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2015, 08:24:35 AM »
if camping all I want to do is Relax--NO exotic meals- no standing over a fire for a hr. "Heat & Eat" junkfood junkie,for sure. Wise Brand stuff very easy too.
keeb.

Offline Carl

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2015, 09:11:44 AM »
My protein always came from fried ,then frozen,chicken....depending on the temps, frozen fried chicken was good for up to 3 days and could be eaten hot or cold(pretty much had to be done HOT the first day) I could combine hot water with minute rice/instant mashed potatoes/Ramen and found or carried vegetables also from a zip bag. And flat bread (tortillas)was always close at hand.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2015, 09:48:28 AM »
I sit at computer for a living, so I don't at all mind a little honest work in my spare time - especially if it results in a tasty meal for my family to enjoy.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2015, 09:57:24 AM »
The things I cook while camping, I guess are pretty much the foods I cook at home, but less salads. I utilize a Dutch oven alot, the last time I can recall, I made llama burger over an open fire on a cast iron pan.

Eggs, canned bacon. I do take alot of canned meats like rabbit/chicken/bacon so I do not have to worry about meat getting warm in the cooler. Oatmeal. Soft tacos..

I don't recall it as work cooking while camping.

The only time I take processed foods, is when I am packing.

I eat raw alot, or sausage/cheese at 'room temp' when I am on roadtrips.

Cedar

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2015, 11:53:43 AM »
     When we use a cooler, like at a Fur Trade Rendezvous, we seal anything raw that might leak in those "vacuum bags". Meat is the worst when it comes to leakage. Zip-Locs are practically worthless, they always seem to leak meat juices all over everything. They are fine for lettuce, cheese or sandwich fixings, but for anything juicey, we use Seal-a-Meal or similar. I just found a neat idea on Pinterest to help keep things dry in a cooler. First stand up a couple of pop cans to act as supports for baker's "cooling racks" that will fit in the cooler. Then put in the ice to the level of the top of the cans. Lay the racks on top of the pop cans, then put your food and addition beverages on the racks. Even when the ice melts, your food will be above the wet and will stay dry. Over a long weekend we usually use one cooler for food and another for beverages. 

Offline TrailandTrade

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2015, 09:56:29 AM »
I don't like doing much prep or clean up so we typically eat Pemmican bars ( Epic & Tanka are good brands - or you can make your own) and LÄRABARs for quick meals or snacks. Ramen Noodles (check out Koyo brand for better quality noodles & flavor packet) with whatever veggies or meat you want to add are good too. Breakfast burritos are Mountain House Breakfast Skillet in some tortillas with a good hot sauce.

This is mostly backpacking food but it can work for car camping too - again, I've never enjoyed doing a lot of cleanup after a meal.

It's also hard to beat a quality dog or sausage in a potato bun. I lean towards German style foods a lot so a good fire-charred Brat with some sauerkraut and potato salad will go a long way.

Don't forget good beer and coffee!




Offline em ty

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2015, 10:45:43 AM »
I'm old and I'm fat, and while I'm working on getting less fat, I haven't yet figured out a way to get less old.  One of the things I love most in this world is canoeing and, to a slightly lesser extent, backpacking.  I'll go for 2-3 days when I can, but I much prefer 7-14 day canoe trips.  At the upper end, space is the main issue I have, not weight, especially when canoeing, though I always try to get a 2-4 mile portage under my belt as early as possible to separate myself from the great unwashed.

I buy a lot of freeze-dried foods like Mountain House or Backpacker's Pantry, but my favourite is Harvest Foodworks (http://www.harvestfoodworks.com/), for a couple of reasons.  The meals taste great, the portions are generous, even after putting in 35-50 km days, they have the best calorie to weight ratios (that's a big factor in any meal I buy) and they're Canadian.  They're available to the US, though not their real meat products. 

The HF meals really taste the best and are the most efficient to carry, but they take much longer to cook.  The freeze-dried pouches take 5-8 minutes to boil the water and about 15 minutes in the bag.  The HF meals usually require simmering, so I only make them when I can cook over a fire.  This also lowers my pack weight because I don't bring as many fuel cans.  They tend to take about 30-40 minutes to cook, more for the pancakes.  I recently bought a dehydrator, so I'd like to start making my own meals, but I'm not there yet.

My daughter has been tripping with me for years now, and I think a big reason she loves it is the good quality food I bring.  It's not cheap, but it's definitely worth it to me.  I've tripped with WASA bread (looks and tastes like corrugated cardboard) with cheese squeeze and salami, but I won't do that anymore.  We plan days off, which allows us to have better breakfasts, but on travel days we eat instant oatmeal so we can pack up and get going.  Here's what we tend to bring on every trip:

Travel Days:
Breakfast:
Instant oatmeal - 2 packs for my daughter, 3 for me

Lunch:
Wraps (they don't get crushed, some last for weeks) with cheese (baby bell or the plastic wrapped 2ish oz ones like on airplanes), pre-cooked bacon or salami/pepperoni style meat

Sometimes we have the freeze-dried meals as it doesn't take long to fire up the stove, heat some water, and pour it in the bag. 

Camp Days:
Breakfast:
Pancakes (Harvest Foodworks - includes maple syrup)
Pan-fried bread, jam
Pre-cooked bacon, freeze-dried eggs

Lunch:
Freeze dried meals or fresh fish when they cooperate

Dinners are the HF meals when possible, but I always pack extra freeze dried meals in case we need something quick.  The first day or two we usually have burgers or sausages that I've frozen and wrapped in newspaper.

I bring a lot of hot chocolate, water flavouring for my daughter, many extra oatmeal packages (great for a snack or to get more calories at any time), trail mix, oatmeal bars, dried fruit, marshmallows, and I'll even hump around fresh fruit for a couple of days.

I carry enough food to eat like a pig, always lose at least 4-5 pounds, and have enough for an additional 2 days, in case of emergency.  If something happened where we would be stuck for several days, we could easily last an extra 5-7 days on what we have.  I've come across guys who ran out of food with 2-3 days left.  I'm not that guy.

I do bring an 800ml flat plastic wine bottle full of rye whiskey.  Usually, it comes back close to empty.

Sorry for the length; hope it helps.

Offline Black November

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2015, 02:14:43 PM »
I have been meaning to try my new simple camping meal:

Camping Shish-Kabob

1 Bell pepper
1 onion
1 pineapple (or can of slices)
1 pressure canned jar of cubed chicken breast

No need for refrigeration, fresh vegetables always store best whole
Chop up veggies
Bring skewers or use sticks and hold over the fire. (approx. 15 minutes)
« Last Edit: May 14, 2015, 02:20:06 PM by Black November »

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2015, 03:44:36 PM »
One of the best breakfasts I ever had was also one of the simplest.

Scrambled eggs in a bag

Crack a couple of eggs into a 1-quart FREEZER ziploc bag - use the freezer bags or no breakfast for you! Unless you want to ladle it out of the boiling water . . . .

Add necessary accompaniments to the eggs, e.g. diced ham, bacon chunks, onions, cheese, whatever.

Seal the bag and mash up the contents of the bag well.

Toss sealed bag into boiling water for 5-10 minutes.

Cut pita bread in half and open each half.

Dump contents of bag (when done of course) into 1/2 open pita, add other stuff (e.g. salsa) if you want, and enjoy.

Cleanup consists of the used baggie and pot of boiling water. And egg shells.

Offline trekker111

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2015, 05:33:20 PM »
When doing the bag omelettes I have had problems with the egg wanting to stick to the bag, a bit of butter fixes it.

Offline Carl

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #27 on: May 14, 2015, 05:49:15 PM »
Boiled eggs last for a few days,cold fried chicken is good for some time and penut butter with flat bread and honey are also filling .
My favorite is 321 cake: Use angel food cake mix (one with EGG in the mix) and another box mix of carrot cake ,etc (Devil's  food my fav) Mix both boxes in a big zip lock bag DRY. When hungry .

3 measures of the combined cake mix
2 measures of water
1 microwave minute,or cook in a pan,can,on flat rock etc makes cake,pancake like yummy food

When I drove a truck all night ,at a stop ...I would add mix to a Coke or other can with the top removed (P38) and 'cook' on the truck engine wile unloading/reloading the truck...Nothing like the smell of fresh BREAD Cake to make the driver happy.

Offline ellefsonbooks

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #28 on: August 05, 2015, 10:23:43 AM »
I am a big fan of pastas while camping.

If I am car camping, I love to go fancy and make some Shrimp Alfredo Linguini.  Or even Lo Mein noodles with Orange Chicken.

When I go backpack, I tend to stick to hamburger helper type meals with dehydrated meat.

endurance

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Re: Food for Camping
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2015, 11:09:23 AM »
I am a big fan of pastas while camping.

If I am car camping, I love to go fancy and make some Shrimp Alfredo Linguini.  Or even Lo Mein noodles with Orange Chicken.

When I go backpack, I tend to stick to hamburger helper type meals with dehydrated meat.
I forgot about hamburger helper.  That's a classic good one and works just as well with rehydrated, freeze dried hamburger if you're backpacking.