Author Topic: Cedar's Garden 2015  (Read 38896 times)

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2015, 05:11:18 PM »
Cedar,
Came across this and thought I'd pass it on, just in case your looking for a cash crop. Don't know how much work is involved, or if your soil is right for it, but.......
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/02/hop-farming-hops-beer-aroma-alpha-ruhstaller
soup

Thanks again soup. Where I am, it is not a great spot for growing hops commercially, due to our Class 2 soils, although we do have hops here in Oregon. The Willamette Valley is one of the world's top spots for growing hops. I am sending you a link to my blog on the day I went to interview one of the largest growers for hops in Oregon for the newspaper. It was highly interesting.. super hot above the kilns and smelled really good and really bad at the same time.

I think we are too far to truck it to these guys. We would never be able to afford the facilities, or the equipment to harvest/process it.

I took these pics on that day.














This is the owner I was interviewing and he is filling a bag of "Magnum" hops for me to take to Z.


Cedar

Offline soupbone

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2015, 09:08:36 PM »
. ;)

s

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #32 on: February 27, 2015, 08:58:21 PM »
Ok.. one of these days I will go down and take some photos of the growing plants. I was kinda waiting until the tomatoes had 4 true leaves to make it look a little more impressing. Tonight however, I want to show you what I was so happy about yesterday. Both, when restored will technically be used in the garden and on the farm.

Today I acquired some really neat stuff with the help of Z. I have been eyeballing an old beat up piece of agricultural history for a little over two years sitting at someone's run down uninhabitated property and during all that time, I have failed to make contact with the owners after multiple tries. So I kept watching and watching, until a real estate sign went up the other day, so I called the realtor’s office. And he contacted the owners, who gave me their blessing after I told him why I wanted this piece of possible junk.. and they told me to take it and where to find other pieces of agricultural equipment at the site.



So what is this really cool thing which makes me so happy? A very misused poorly-kept "Twin City Separator Co. Hero Fanning Mill". It is between 110-116 years old. Fanning mills are used to separate grain from chaff and sort grain size. They were originally hand operated, but later adapted to utilize horse power. Manufactured in Minneapolis, patented June 13, 1899 this is the "Hero" model. It looks like they quit making this particular model in 1905. Unfortunately this piece of machinery has been sitting outside for numberous years. Fortunately it has been under a covered roof and against the inside of the single walled building. Sadly, there might not be alot of salvagable wood on it. Why do I want this piece of 'junk' then? Two words.. the pattern, the cast iron pieces.. and ok.. three words.. the fan. The fan is inside, thankfully protected by the louvers to allow air in were shut, protecting it. The fan is completely made of wood and it was intact and dry. The cast iron turns freely.

Many early fanning mills, had such furniture-like details as pinstriping or stenciling. This one does/did. Later fanning mills were not necessarily as well made as the earlier ones. How it works is there are several layers of screens, which produced cleaner grain as they go through the screens. Adjustable wind boards were installed after the fan to direct the air blast up or down and outside the fan to change the amount of air moved. These were hand powered, because most farms did not have the luxury of electricity until the middle 1940's. Even by hand, this "Hero" will do 60 bushels per hour. Twin City Manufacturing, out of Minneapolis and Winnipeg, Canada, made mills of both high and low quality. The company's Competition model was cheaply constructed out of pine; the New No. 1, constructed by Twin City for Deere & Company, had an all-oak frame, mortised joints, a threaded feed adjustment and an adjustable damper on the fan. I need to look closer to see which model this is, but I am pretty sure it is not a New No. 1. It is very light, so I guessing NOT oak. Again, it was pouring down rain and I did not want to get it, or us any more wet than we were. I will be happy with the 'cheap' model, as as a novice woodworker, I won't have to deal with all the mortised joints? I can also get pine or fir easily and relatively cheap. Including from our own on-site lumbermill if need be.



I have not been able to find alot of information on the Twin City Separating Co. yet, but I have actually contacted a couple of agricultural museums that have this model of fanning mill to see if they can tell me more. When I thought this was a "Clipper 2", I actually found the manual for it, but the company who makes it, is still in business. The "Clipper" and the "Hero" were two of the best known and used fanning mills of their day.


Inside the fanning mill to check on the actual fan

I had to shove my cell phone through the little louver door, which allows more air in or less air into the fanning chamber to take this photo and check out conditions. The fan looks to be intact and in perfect shape. This is one of the componants I know I will be able to use in the restoration of this machine. I will have to dig my pocktknife into various sections of wood to check the quality, like I know I have to replace at least two legs.



It always amazes me how paint which is on things like this and on headstones up in Canada whch get so weathered, but can hang around for so many years after it was painted. This was painted somewhere between 110-116 years ago.

Like I said, it is alot easier to find information on the Clipper 2 Fanning Mill which was sold by Gurney Seed and Nursery Co./A.T. Farrell & Co.  I found manuals, seed screen sizes and all sorts of information on cleaning grains and seeds for the Clipper, I ought to be able to use it on the Hero, if I cannot get more info for the Hero.

Here is a short video made of a working "Hero Fanning Mill".  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iO7mvKJggxQ

There are options of not running it by my hand, but those are projects for another year. One involves a sheep or a dog, and goes back to the 1800's as well. http://www.americanartifacts.com/smma/advert/ay184.htm Why use alternative power instead of a half horsepower engine? Cause it's COOL! THAT's Why!



When I called to see if I could acquire this fanning mill, the owners, who were pleased with my plans for this, through the realtor also said that there were other agriculture related items outside the building that we could have if we wanted them. So along with two dairy cow headgates, we also discovered there was a Banner Root Cutter there. It was made sometime between 1896-1914, but I will know better when I look at model numbers and such. It was monsooning out, so I figured that could wait until a much drier day. The same for another item there, but we could not take it today, since we ran out of room with something we picked up previously, and it was raining enough we did not want to get wetter on a wild goose chase.


This is a photo after we got it loaded onto the trailer

What on earth is a root cutter? I had never seen one in person, but I knew what it was. A root cutter is for cutting potatoes, cabbage and other vegetables into thin strips for chickens and other livestock to cut down on feed costs. This particular one I could find alot of information on. One of the missing pieces is on eBay right now and I am not sure I want to spend the $75 for it. It is a lovely piece of cast iron and I just know someone is going to use if for something other than restoration. Which is cool and sad at the same time. There is nothing on it to ID it, so most people would not have a clue. It is the cast iron part which goes over the blade.

The man who made this cutter was Oliver E. Thompson was born in Ypsilanti in 1838, the son of a pioneer family. In 1856 O. E. Thompson began the manufacture of wagons, and began to make carriages in 1870. He became a wagon dealer in 1871, when he began to sell Jackson wagons made by Tomlinson & Webster. Then in 1873 he became a dealer in agricultural implements, including root cutters, grass seeder, and krut and slaw cutters. These were made in the building, and many were of his own invention. Thompson and his sons, Benjamin, Edward and John, were also active in the house, sign and carriage painting, as well as the sale of porch swings and patterned wallpaper. In one year, Thompson & Sons sold more than 200 bicycles. Oliver E. Thompson died in 1910, and his sons took over the business. The long occupancy of the Thompson family ended in 1950, when the family closed the last of their business interests.

The Banner Root Cutter, was a hand-cranked cutter with multiple gouge knives mounted on a large steel disk. The cutting disk is mounted at the back of a large wooden stand with a wide tray, painted red with gold lettering. The crank handle is mounted below the tray. The knives only cut in one direction. Here is a restored one, or one in good condition.





The one we picked up today, looks intact, including it's handle, except for the very front piece, which can be easily (I think) rebuilt, and the cast iron shield (?) which arches above the blade.

It will be fun to restore these and actually get them functional. Many of the seed companies like Siskiyou Seed Cooperative in southern Oregon use something much like the fanning mill we have to clean their seeds. When we do farm tours, it will also be fun to show folks how things were done on the farm 'in the old days'. I would think that the original owners of our heritage farm would not have used a seed cleaning fanning mill, but it is highly likely they used some sort of root cutter for feeding their dairy cows, their pigs or turkeys and chickens.

But I honestly enjoy saving our agricultural heritage items like this, and using them. I am not brave enough to tell Z about the 1930's (?) thresher down the road. I have been eyeing that for the last year.   :rofl: But I do actually want to contact someone at Powerland in Brooks, Oregon and see if I can get on the threshing demo crew during the Power Up.

Cedar

Offline Carl

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #33 on: February 28, 2015, 06:43:05 AM »
Cedar,There soon won't be many items like this history to pass to future generations as wood and steel make way for plastic and fiberglass and pot-metal.Wood and steel built our past and soon,if not now,our past will be disposable and we will only have photos (crap,photos are gone too) Images (if you keep a back-up and don't get a virus) of our past to show the future how we lived.   :'(

Offline RitaRose1945

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #34 on: February 28, 2015, 06:58:01 AM »
Wow!  Those are really great finds!

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #35 on: February 28, 2015, 11:23:14 PM »
great finds!

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #36 on: March 01, 2015, 08:43:03 AM »
I am sending you a link to my blog on the day I went to interview one of the largest growers for hops in Oregon for the newspaper.

Goschie Farms in Silverton? . . .  I've been there.  Fixed some problems they were having on a welder.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #37 on: March 01, 2015, 08:50:37 AM »
Goschie Farms in Silverton? . . .  I've been there.  Fixed some problems they were having on a welder.

Annen Bros. Farm in Mount Angel. His family started farming that land in 1865 and Annen grows 16 hop varieties on 265 acres.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #38 on: March 01, 2015, 09:10:50 AM »
28F when I woke up this morning. Glad I did not out the 50-some artichoke plants out like I almost did yesterday, before taking a 'lazy day'.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #39 on: March 01, 2015, 09:21:43 AM »
Annen Bros. Farm in Mount Angel. His family started farming that land in 1865 and Annen grows 16 hop varieties on 265 acres.

Cedar

They all look alike when you lack field of view.  Goschie Farms grows 12 varieties on 500 acres and other crops on an additional 600 acres.  They've been farming in Silverton for over a century.

Some more facts about Oregon hops:
Quote
Oregon has been at the center of hop production almost as long as it’s been a state. The crop was first introduced in the 1850s, and by the late 1860s, it was being grown commercially, according the Oregon Historical Quarterly. In the early twentieth century, there were 1,500 growers in the Willamette Valley, and Oregon produced more hops than any other state in the country.
 
The 1940s brought new machinery for processing hops, which helped advance the industry. When prices hit a low point in the 1950s, however, many farmers gave up on hops. Today there are only a couple of dozen commercial farms remaining in the Willamette Valley—most of them between Independence and Hubbard.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #40 on: March 01, 2015, 09:25:12 AM »
Goschie Farms grows 12 varieties on 500 acres and other crops on an additional 600 acres. 

I know them too. Pretty sure that is who I got some of my grains from. I think they also have been growing pumpkins for the cannery the last two years.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #41 on: March 01, 2015, 07:11:14 PM »
Been doing a bit more research on the Thompson's Root Cutter. It is from 1891-ish. And it is a "Thompson's Banner Root Cutter No. 20." It cost about $12 new. What cost $12 in 1891 would cost $311.39 in 2014. Before you all jump up and want to get one of these dubious beauties, it could cost me $200 in money and time to restore it.

In doing online research (the museums likely won't contact me on the weekend, and it might be a few days yet before they do), looking for photos for restoration, I found these really neat photos a man posted up.



That date is March 7, 1891.. for a seeder, and it is signed by E.O. Thompson


Cedar

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #42 on: March 01, 2015, 07:22:51 PM »
On the gardening front in the 48' greenhouse (I am thinking of naming them when the other one gets finished.. like "Frog" and "Dragonfly" or something and painting that character above the doors), it was 85F in there at 1pm, I woke up with the outside temps at 28F (which is a great deal colder than it has been). I saw 2 pea plants out of 5 varieties in a 40 foot row had come up.. and the only ones to come up. I dug up some seeds to check on their germination and lo-and-behold, NO SEEDS. I am thinking a vole or field mouse has dug up and eaten them all, but for those two. I am currently brainstorming on how to remedy that situation. The same can be said for the summer squash test row I put in there.

I am not happy with how my tomato seedlings look. I cannot tell what is 'off' with them, other than they do not quite look right to me, so today I scooped up a bucketful of rabbit poo, added water and I will let that sit overnight before I strain it and then use it as bottom water for the plants.

The peppers are looking lovely, but as normal, the 56 varieties are staggered coming up. Happy to say my "Tequila Sunrise" favorites are up. The 'mini Bells' which is fresh seed from last fall from a commercial seedhouse are failing to come up yet, three different varieties, so that one I am keeping an eye on. Hopefully they are just stragglers.

I would have put out 96 feet of celery of one variety, and 96 feet of celery on another variety if it had not frozen this morning. With the huge fluctuation in temps, it will cause it to bolt. So I will have to wait for it to stabalize a bit.

This week I am finalizing my seed saving event which is coming up soon, but it always gets me in the mood for PLANTING! My beekeeper who was supposed to come, is stuck in Germany with a sick family member, so I had to find a new one this weekend. I love putting this event on, this will be the 10th year I have held it between two countries. A sandwich sign needs to get painted and stenciled, but if it stays dry, I will do that Tuesday maybe.

We picked up a 275 gallon ICB tank for a water reservoir for the smaller greenhouse and hope to get that moved down tomorrow or Tuesday.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #43 on: March 13, 2015, 06:47:14 PM »

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #44 on: March 16, 2015, 10:34:46 PM »
A few days ago, I held my 10th Seedy Saturday that I have put on (although there was a little second one, two years ago to make 11, but I will stick with ten). It was not as large as some years I have put on, but it was just community and a few from surrounding areas, and I like that too, as I can have better conversations with people. Not only did we talk seeds, but I have been invited to a camp I went to as a child to give a talk, invited to a grange to talk about seed saving, invited to another grange to give talks, putting on a grafting party for our community, invited to go along with a marine biologist that does research for Oregon State University, on a hike with a local to one of our hidden gem waterfalls, and was given an interesting looking book about seed saving (maybe).

There was 40-60 people in the hall when I had time to take a couple quick photos, not that it looks like it.




There were local plants people brought in ranging from heritage strawberries from one of the founding families in the community, who settled here in the 1860's; yellow iris's from another community nearby; live mint, feverfew, chocolate mint; cranberries, pears and apple scions from the United States Germplasm Repository. Many people brought in packet remains from their gardens in years past and some that they had saved. Even had people who got seeds from last year's Seedy Saturday, grew the seed out to seed again and returned them this year to pass onto others.

Out of 10 years, this is the first time I have had so many returned seeds, which is wonderful. A couple people asked what was a priority to grow out and I wanted them to grow out for me, so since those people were now trusted in growing out and returning seeds, I gave them some good ones. A couple people who have grown out corn for me last year are getting some really special varieties this year.

I took some of my "Bloody Butcher" corn, and parched it and showcased it as something different for people to try. Z really is enjoying eating that type of 'snack food'. Parching corn nowadays is mostly known by the brand name "Corn Nuts". But Corn Nuts are not as good as homemade parched corn. It is the original Trail Mix. This is not a very good photo of it, but it pops, but mostly 'cracks', but a few pieces will pop. Known in the U.S. since 1845, it was originally grown in Virginia. Plants grow up to 12' tall and have at least two ears per stalk; each ear is 8-12" long. Striking maroon and red-black kernels. Used for flour, cornmeal, or corn-on-the-cob when young. It also has good drought tolerance.It is not the BEST parching corn, there are varieties which are better, but it is still pretty good. If Z keeps dipping into it, it must be OK.



Out of 10 years, this is the first time I have had so many returned seeds, which is wonderful. A couple people asked what was a priority to grow out and I wanted them to grow out for me, so since those people were now trusted in growing out and returning seeds, I gave them some good ones. A couple people who have grown out corn for me last year are getting some really special varieties this year.


I also popped up some of my homegrown "Calico" popcorn. I did not think about it until around the 20th person stated, "Oh, you even added butter!".. but I didn't. I only added a little bit of sea salt. "Calico" is a miniature looking 'indian corn',on small stalks, but they come in so many colours. No two ears looks the same. It pops up marveously You can see the popcorn in thebowl under my hand and the unpopped kernels. This is probably the best tasting popcorn I have ever had. I will grow this one out this summer at the large greenhouse garden, but I am growing out a black popcorn this year too at the Lodge garden.

--------


98F in the greenhouse today with the high being 53F outside. Because only the two peas are in there, I was not too worried about it getting warm.

So after much procrastination due to thought for two weeks.. today I decided what plan of attack I will take in the greenhouse with the peas. Hopefully this will keep those [insert bad word of your choice here] voles and field mice at bay. Out of 48'x2 they ate all those seeds except TWO. A single "Parsley Pea" and a single from another variety survived. None of the 48'x2 squash seeds survived the probably vole/field mouse snacking frenzy either. I soaked all the peas in their individual quart jars and when they sprout, I will plant them out. So I am starting three varieties of summer squash tomorrow in the basement, so I can plant them out too.

The peppers are looking awesome, as is the celery and artichokes. A couple varieties did not come up, so I will replant the seed. It was fresh seed too from a company for 2014/5, so I wonder what happened to it, since some seed I plant on peppers can be up to 5 years old and I have few fails. However I keep them cold, very dark and very dry.

The tomatoes look way better after their rabbit poo drink, and I have more set up tonight to strain for them tomorrow. I hate this particular brand of potting soil and I will not be using it again. I really miss my Canadian brand in the huge bales.

Started laying out more of the field fencing around the frame of the larger greenhouse to keep the geese and ducks out of it (one duck will be moved to the breeding pens, and one will be eaten). We are not planning on skinning the large greenhouse until fall at least, but I am going to use it as a garden anyway. Planted more cutting flowers in there today, as well as 10 cuttings for native Blue Elderberry. Tomorrow I might get carried away and plant 10 more cuttings of elderberry. I figure it is better to propagate my own, then fight blackberries and scramble down cliffs anymore. I did that for 20 years. Easier having them in my backyard, although I did enjoy those adventures of finding them.

I gave away all the former skin for the smaller greenhouse to two community members who want it for a 'sunroom' and for cold frames. I want to do something different for my cold frames and I did not want to just haul it to the dump or recycle it. So I was happy with that, and getting it off the grass and the 'floor' of the large greenhouse.

Tomorrow I am starting multiple flats of herbs. Probably some melons and squash as well. I am itching to get the onions in. I think I have 7 different kinds? I would also like to get the kales planted and several varieties of lettuce, but I am wavering on in the small greenhouse or in the skinless larger greenhouse. Maybe both. I do not look forward in tilling the small greenhouse. I pull up the sides, open the windows and doors, and still only make one pass through, holding my breath the whole way until I get to a door, turn off the tiller and then breathe outside and then do it again the opposite direction. Thankfully it will be weed free next year, but I have all these millions of wild onions coming up in there.

My 500+ feet of soaker hoses for the newest section of watering system arrived today, but it was a fail on the connectors. Instead of like MANY in a package. There was ONE.

Soon the 1,500 gallon former tilapa tank will get installed on it's berm(?) to get some head on it. We also have a 225 gallon IBC cube we picked up off CL for under $100 for the start of the watering system from the North Barn, which will go about 300-some feet down to the former tilapa tank (and there will be another enclosed water tank there eventually), which will water the two greenhouses. As soon as it is dry enough to get the trackhoe, tractor and dumptruck down there, that project will be happening.

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #45 on: March 17, 2015, 01:41:49 AM »
I was pretty sure it was something to do with the potting soil. Everything but the tomatoes likes it however, so I thought the tomatoes themselves was the clue. I did not like the seed starting soil last year either. So I did some research tonight (yes it is 12:40am) and was trying to figure out what the deal with my tomatoes is. They are not stunted, but stunted looking. They have purple leaves and stems, like they would if it was cold, which it isn't. It is 60F down there. And also near an egg incubator.

I bottom water, but let it dry out between a bit. Apparently when the artificial soil is saturated no nutrients can be taken up, especially phosphorus. "When deficient in phosphorus, tomatoes have rigidly erect leaves which are dark green to bluish green in color. The stems are thin and fibrous with a dull purple discoloration.' Ta-Da!.. That is exactly what the problem looks like. So tonight I added more liquid rabbit manure tea to the flats. I used a very dilute ratio before.

Rabbit manure is packed with nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and many minerals, lots of micro-nutrients, plus many other beneficial trace elements such as calcium, magnesium, boron, zinc, manganese, sulfur, copper, and cobalt just to name a few.



So I triple strengthed the rabbit manure tea tonight. We have always even planted in 100% rabbit manure in dad's greenhouse, so I know it will not burn the plants. Let's see what happens in a few more days time.

Cedar

Offline Carl

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #46 on: March 17, 2015, 03:52:11 AM »
Killer tomatoes?

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #47 on: March 17, 2015, 11:03:18 AM »
The dilute rabbit manure sounds like a good idea for your tomatoes. I use dilute human urine for seedlings that look like they need Nitrogen -- but doing this bothers some people.... you dont even need to do it all the time, but for the sake of plants needing a quick nitrogen fix, pee in a bucket and add water......

Offline ResidentCelt

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #48 on: March 17, 2015, 01:02:19 PM »
Yep, it's a phosphorus uptake problem. I had it last year. It fixed itself when I moved the tomato plants into their beds that were prepped with composted horse manure. That provided enough phosphorus I guess, or at least enough phosphorus in a consumable format.

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #49 on: March 27, 2015, 10:33:58 PM »
The reason SP and I made a trip this week to Colorado was due to an addiction I have started having. I have a friend who collects many Oliver tractors, I have another friend who owns 14 Studebakers, I have a friend who collects antique barb wire. On our trip home, I just saw a man who collected about 10 acres of antique farming equipment at his home. So my addiction is I have accidentally started to collect mid-sized farming equipment for seed collection and other crops. This time it was for an original complete "The Winner Improved" fanning mill, made by the American Grain Separator Co, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and sold by E.E. Scott of Denver, Colorado in 1911, to the Doll family of Gypsum, Colorado. Franklin and Lucy Slusser Doll, came from Ohio to the small settlement of Dotsero, where the railroad ended, in 1887. The next year they moved to the town of Gypsum where they lived the rest of their lives. In 1911 they bought this fanning mill. Except for the 8 years the man whom I got it from had it, the rest of it's life it had been in the Doll family barn. At this point, I do not know for sure what they used it for, but I presume wheat. It would/will clean 500 bushels of wheat a day. 60lbsX500bushels= 30,000 pounds of grain. Who needs to work out at the gym?





It actually makes sense for me to start collecting these fanning mills and root cutters with my seed collecting. This particular one is fully functional, has all the original screens with it (10?), the original grain elevator (which is mostly wooden, with a hand forged chain), and the original handle. Often the handle is nowhere to be found, as after 1940 and electricity was more common, the handles were taken off, and misplaced, as electric motors were put on. The metal at the bottom needs some repair where the elevator hooks on, but I believe it is fully functional.

After I had been talking to the man who owned it, I told him the history of the machine, what it was worth, how they were used and all of the other information I have been gleaning (no pun intended) about these machines and the stuff I had been given by museums, he told me to come get it for the price of a hamburger dinner, as he felt like I would give it a good home. I traded him a cooler full of homegrown pork, which he was also very happy about.

This "The Winner Improved" is much heavier than the "Hero". But both will be wonderful to use for separating the garbage out of the seed, and I won't have to do large quantities by hand, and also for using for demonstrations when I hold Seedy Saturdays or have demonstrations here at the farm.

These are definitely part of my garden, just at the harvest end of the gardening season.

Cedar
« Last Edit: March 27, 2015, 11:04:04 PM by Cedar »

Offline Carl

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #50 on: March 28, 2015, 04:22:35 AM »
There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness.......

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #51 on: March 30, 2015, 08:36:02 PM »
There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness.......

Like this. I had to take a survey today of what we had for fruits, as I have to order rootstock this week for grafting more.. 12 rootstocks for apples, 4 for plums/peach, 1 cherry. (*) denotes the ones I have to graft up next week.

Apples - 24
"Arkansas Black"
"Baldwin"
"Braeburn"
"Bramley's Seedling"
"Calville Blanc d'Hiver"
"Cortland" *
"Darcy Spice" *
"Dyer" *
"Empire" *
"Fameuse"
"Flower of Kent" *
"Fuji"
"Geneva Early"
"Grimes Golden"
"Irish Peach" *
"Margil" X2
"Mother"
"Pound Sweet"
"Sheepnose" (aka "Black Gillyflower") *
"Smokehouse" X2
"Summer Rambo"
"Twenty Ounce"
"White Pearmain"
"Winter Banana"

Considering grafting up: "Jonagold", "Liberty", "Brock", "Belle de Boskoop" and "Mutsu" (aka "Crispin"). This does not include the heritage apples which have been here 50-100 years, which include "King", "Red Delicious", "Yellow Delicious" , "Transparent", and 6 more I have no idea what they are. Yes, after this year, I think I am done planting apples. That will give the farm around 40 apple trees.

Pears: - 3
"Aurora"
"Ubileen"
"Seckle" - 3 already established here

Plum - 3
"Green Gage" (?) which was already on the farm and hit hard by winters the last 2 years.
"Opal" *
"Middleburg" *
"Shropshire Damson" *

Cherry - 2
"Bing"
And two kinds which is on the farm for 20+ years

Medlar - 1
'Monstreuse d'Evreinoff'

Peach - 1
"Reliance" *
(I have to find one more variety to plant for pollinating)

Quince - 2
"Limon"
"Pineapple"

Grapes - 11
"Canadice"
"Einset"
"Dad's Gamay"
"Glenora"
"Himrod"
"Manitoba" (anyone know about this variety? It seems to be a native landrace?)
"Niagra"
"Reliance"
"Suffolk Red"
"Vanessa"
"Venus Blue"

Blueberries - 9
"Berkley"
"Bluecrop"
"Blueray"
"Chandler"
"Collins"
"Herbert"
"Jersey"
"Pink Lemonaide" - which I think I might hate
"Toro"
and I really want to propagate "Brunswick" for landscaping purposes, none of my soft cuttings made it.

Highbush Cranberry - 1
"Ukraine"

Lowbush Cranberry - variety unknown

Wintergreen - variety unknown

Strawberries - "Hamar"
Hope to get 5 more varieties this summer.

Cedar

PS I took photos of my garden seedings today, so I will finally get them up this evening. I FINALLY remembered to take a camera down there with me.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #52 on: March 30, 2015, 09:30:33 PM »
I have kept thinking that each time I go down to the seed starting area, I will take my camera. And each time, I fail and say, "Well I will grab it next time." So today, I finally remembered to take my camera down.

Here are a few flats of tomatoes and peppers. The tomatoes look way better after their rabbit poo drink, and I have more set up tonight to strain for them tomorrow. I started 102 varieties of tomatoes this year to trial them all with the same conditions as I have room this year. Each tag represents a different variety. I planted around 6 of each variety.


Some of the flats of lettuces. At this point I am growing out 10 of my favorites, out of 41 varieties I have in my collection. I hope they go out soon.


Some more of the flats in one of the seed racks under grow lights. Some of these were planted out 2-3 weeks ago. Each of the two racks has 5 tiers, so I can get 30 flats between the two which is around 2,100 plants. I also have flats I just sow into .


Some of the 48 "Green Globe" artichokes. There is another variety I am trialing this year, called "Purple of Romagna". Yes, it is purple-y. I could not get a very good angle of them due to the lights, but hopefully they can go outside this coming weekend if it stays dry enough.


All of the peppers are looking nice. I think I planted 56 varieties of them.


This is my favorite celery. It is "Golden Self Blanching". I also planted two other kinds to trial against it. "Utah Green" and "Tendergreen". It doesn't look like it, but there are hundreds of celery plants in there.


The stupid mice/voles in the greenhouse have once again eaten all the peas seeds I put out last Monday. I tried to sprout them and then plant, and Friday, there were none to be found. They ate all my squash seeds too, so it may just be peppers, tomatoes and melons in there after all.

Cedar
« Last Edit: March 30, 2015, 09:36:30 PM by Cedar »

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #53 on: March 31, 2015, 06:32:24 PM »
This is not my garden, but I am hoping that by what I did today, instills love of gardening and growing into the next generation. A local school invited me to teach two classrooms about seed saving, and the circle of life of seed-to-seed. Today was the day. The kids had been studying plants for the last few weeks. So they asked intelligent questions and I was also able to ask them questions about how they thought seeds ought to grow.

I put together seed packs with six kinds of different named heritage vegetable seed in it, plus instuctions of what the vegetable was (all of them were 80 years or older varieties), how to grow them, and how to save seed from the plants to go to the next year... and maybe even years to hand off to their children or grandchildren. How growing and saving seeds in their area each year would custom make perfect vegetables for their needs and our climate.

I delibrately did not label the seeds inside their packs, but they were all different shapes and sizes. I had them draw out the shape on their paper and then label if it was a bean (white kidney shape), a pea (round and green), a squash seed (tan and teardrop shaped), a cucumber (small and pointy on both ends), a zinnia seed (brown to black and arrow shaped) or corn seed (yellowish and looked like dried corn). Then they could match it up with the variety on their papers and in their seed packs. It was the spur of the moment to have them draw them out and label their drawings, but it worked out great and made the talk more interactive. The kids were very excited to go home and share their seeds with their parents.

They have enough seed to plant a 4x5' garden space.

First classroom, you can see the kid in the grey shirt putting his hand up for a question.


Second classroom. all the kids holding up their seed packets and instructions.


Cedar


Offline RitaRose1945

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #54 on: March 31, 2015, 06:51:44 PM »
I am SO very jealous!

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #55 on: April 01, 2015, 02:26:16 PM »
Seems to me that Cedar just planted a new crop of gardeners - WAY TO GO, MA'AM!!!

soup

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #56 on: April 01, 2015, 03:23:22 PM »
There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness.......

When drawing that line it is best to use a chalkboard so the line can be erased and redrawn as needed; or, if need be, wiped clean entirely.   ;D

Seems to me that Cedar just planted a new crop of gardeners - WAY TO GO, MA'AM!!!

soup

^^^^
This!

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #57 on: April 01, 2015, 05:40:36 PM »
Seems to me that Cedar just planted a new crop of gardeners

This is my dream every time I have a Seedy Saturday, a grafting party or do a school 'thing'...

Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #58 on: April 01, 2015, 05:48:02 PM »
I sent in the rootstock order to the guy who is picking it up for our community for our 'Grafting Party' next week, and lo-and-behold.. Mr. UPS Man, brought me an order I forgot I ordered from last summer. My almond order was most exciting, especially since I was expecting rhubarb.

Almonds:
"Dessertniy" (aka Bounty) - A hardy, late blooming Ukrainian variety that bears heavy crops of sweet, soft shelled nuts.
   
"Foros" (aka Oracle) - A very late blooming variety. This hardy variety ripens its large, sweet semi-soft-shelled nuts early, making it an excellent variety for short season areas where other varieties fail to fruit.
   
"Primorskiy"  (aka Seaside)- Hardy and late-blooming variety. Very heavy production of sweet, semi-softshell almonds

I am going to plant three in the backyard for landscaping as well as edible. They are supposed to start producing in 3-5 years and produce about 25 pounds of nuts per tree.

These are all almond scionwood which I will be grafting and with luck, I will end up with 9 trees.

How gorgeous are they?




Cedar

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Re: Cedar's Garden 2015
« Reply #59 on: April 03, 2015, 11:03:03 AM »
As a 'Spin Off' from Seedy Saturday, I am holding a community apple & pear tree grafting party in a couple weeks. This is the second year I have put this on. I put the order in this morning for what rootstocks we need, and I was very pleased that there will be 60-70 new fruit trees in our community. Not bad for a population of 82 people. One lady wants 10 apples and 10 pears, the rest want 2-4 trees each.

At our Grafting Party,  I am teaching our local community members how to graft up their own fruit trees, but I will do the grafting for them if they chicken out. This year I have 23 varieties of scionwood for them to graft. It will be fun, and there will likely be a potluck sort of thing involved.

I will post pics when we have it.

Cedar