Author Topic: Long term storage of eggs  (Read 18332 times)

Offline archer

  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 17058
  • Karma: 379
  • #ImissAmerica
    • Journey to Greener Pastures
Long term storage of eggs
« on: May 20, 2009, 03:27:49 PM »
from http://www.classic-cooking-school.com/eggs/preservation_of_eggs/home_preseration_of_eggs/home_preseration_of_eggs.shtml
Anyone done this?


Home Preservation Of Eggs
The housewife who desires to run her household on an economical basis will not depend entirely on eggs that are commercially stored, but will take advantage of one of the many methods by which eggs may be successfully kept in the home. By being prudent in this matter, she will be prepared to supply her family with this commodity at times when the market price is high.
As many as twenty household methods have been tried out for the preserving of eggs, but each one is based on the theory that decay is hindered when the shell is covered with some substance that renders it air-tight and prevents evaporation or the entrance of bacteria and mold. Among the methods that have met with the most success are burying eggs in oats, bran, or salt; rubbing them with fat; dipping them in melted paraffin; covering them with varnish or shellac; and putting them down in lime water or in a solution of water glass.

No matter which of these methods is adopted, however, it will be well to note that only eggs laid in April, May, or June should be used for storage purposes, as these are the best ones laid during the year; also, that the eggs should always be packed with the small end down, because the yolk will not settle toward the small end so readily as toward the large end or the side.

Of these various ways of preserving eggs in the home, probably the oldest method is that of packing the eggs in oats, bran, or salt. This method is fairly effective, but the eggs preserved by it do not keep so long as eggs preserved by other methods, nor is their quality so good. Preserving eggs by completely covering the shells with fat, vaseline, paraffin, varnish, or other substance that will exclude the air but not impart flavor to the eggs, proves a more satisfactory method so far as the eggs are concerned, but it requires more time and handling. To assist in their preservation, eggs are sometimes immersed in boiling water for 12 to 15 seconds. This process, which causes the white to harden slightly just inside of the shell, keeps the eggs fairly well, but it is rather difficult to accomplish, as the least overcooking renders the egg unfit for use as a raw egg.

As a result of many trials, it has been found that putting eggs down in the various solutions that are used for this purpose is the most effective way of preserving them under home conditions, provided, of course, the solutions in which the eggs are immersed do not flavor the eggs. Therefore, to assist the housewife, detailed directions for using lime water and water glass for this purpose are here given.

PRESERVATION WITH LIMEWATER.--To prepare limewater for the preservation of eggs, dissolve 1 pound or 1 pint of salt and 1 quart of finely slaked lime in 3 gallons of water, stir the solution at frequent intervals for a day or two, and then allow the liquid to settle. Place the eggs in tall stone crocks or kegs with their pointed ends turned down, filling the receptacles to within a few inches of the top. Pour the clear limewater over the eggs so arranged, allowing it to rise an inch or two above the top layer. Then stand the vessel in a cool place where the temperature will not exceed 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Eggs so treated will keep for at least 6 or 8 months. The only objection to this plan is that the eggs preserved by it sometimes acquire a slight lime taste.

PRESERVATION WITH WATER GLASS.--Putting eggs down in a solution of water glass is without doubt the most satisfactory method of storing them in the home. So effective does this method prove that the housewife who has a convenient and proper storage room should not fail to take advantage of this way of laying up a supply of eggs.

The commercial form of water glass is usually a mixture of potassium and sodium silicate, which, besides being cheaper than that which is chemically pure, is the kind that is preferred for the purpose of preserving eggs. A good quality of it either in a sirup-like solution or in the form of a powder retails in drug or grocery stores for about 10 cents a pound. To make a solution of the desired strength to preserve eggs satisfactorily, dissolve 1 part of water glass in 7 parts of warm water that has first been boiled to drive off bacteria, mold, spores, etc. One quart of water glass will make sufficient solution to cover about 12 dozen eggs. With the solution thoroughly mixed, it is ready to pour over the eggs.

In selecting eggs for the purpose of storing, be careful to choose only those which are clean, fresh, and perfectly sound, and, if possible, infertile. It is advisable not to wash them before they are put into the preservative, for they will keep better if their bloom is not removed. Place the eggs in receptacles in the manner explained for preserving eggs in limewater, and over them pour the water-glass solution until they are all covered. If the eggs so prepared are stored in a cool place, they will keep as long as those preserved in limewater; besides, there will be no danger of their acquiring any foreign flavor.

Offline Louisiana Suvivor

  • Can't Spell His Own Name
  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1767
  • Karma: 54
  • I'm back! I miss you too.
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2009, 04:04:07 PM »
very cool!

Offline “Mark”

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1382
  • Karma: 57
  • Freedom lovin' Canadian
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2009, 07:18:57 PM »
I'd keep them in the chicken myself...

Offline DIM TIM

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 169
  • Karma: 34
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2009, 08:39:25 PM »
These types of things are very good to know. A  +1 from me.   ;D

Offline quietmike

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
  • Karma: 12
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2009, 08:50:27 PM »
Good post, I remember my grandma keeping her eggs in waterglass. For those who have never experienced waterglass...well there's nothing like reaching down into a bucket of stuff with the consistency of snot first thing in the morning to ruin your appetite.

sage0925

  • Guest
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2009, 08:58:24 PM »
Ok...color me stupid, but I've never seen the items for sale anywhere to make water glass...can anybody give me a specific store and what section of the store they were in? I'd like to try it when we get chickens next year.

And the bit about eggs from April, May and June...is that for any part of the country? I mean, June for us in Idaho is about equivalent to April in Georgia, insofar as temperatures.

And what is "bloom"? And quietmike, just damn.  :D Lovely description.  ;D

Thanks,
Sage

Winchester32

  • Guest
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2009, 09:37:19 PM »
My experience is that fresh farm eggs, unwashed or cleaned, will store for many months if kept cool.  They do not have to be refridgerated, only kept cool. 

Processed eggs do not store as long, and therefore the storing methods are helpful. 

As a kid, we only had fresh farm eggs.  I was so surprised as a young adult that there were expiration dates on eggs bought in the store.   :o 

Thanks for the great info Archer!


Offline quietmike

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
  • Karma: 12
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2009, 10:38:56 PM »
Ok...color me stupid, but I've never seen the items for sale anywhere to make water glass...can anybody give me a specific store and what section of the store they were in? I'd like to try it when we get chickens next year.

And the bit about eggs from April, May and June...is that for any part of the country? I mean, June for us in Idaho is about equivalent to April in Georgia, insofar as temperatures.

And what is "bloom"? And quietmike, just damn.  :D Lovely description.  ;D

Thanks,
Sage

Here's a source.

http://www.lehmans.com/store/Tools___Farm___Farming___Poultry_Equipment___Waterglass__liquid_sodium_silicate____10406?Args=&from_search=1

Sorry if I grossed you out, but if you try some, report back and tell us what you would compare it to.

sage0925

  • Guest
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2009, 10:46:33 PM »
*sigh* I've heard that particular description from more than just you, dearie...lol...that doesn't make it any less gross.

Yuck...can't wait to try it out, and thanks for the link! We keep eggs in the fridge for a really long time, but I wanted the info on water glass in case of no electricity.

BTW, if you break the egg, and poke a hole in the yolk (I heard of that somewhere, can't recall why you do it), do eggs freeze well in a zip-lock? Or do they get gross and weird, like tofu? And like brown rice...that doesn't freeze worth a damn...consistency gets really crumbly and odd.

Thanks
Sage

Offline “Mark”

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1382
  • Karma: 57
  • Freedom lovin' Canadian
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2009, 08:27:17 AM »
My experience is that fresh farm eggs, unwashed or cleaned, will store for many months if kept cool.  They do not have to be refridgerated, only kept cool. 

You can keep them on the counter for a couple weeks even, if your house isn't too warm.

Offline Sarcasmo

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 47
  • Karma: 2
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2009, 02:07:44 PM »
I also like Mark Rose's idea of keeping them with the chickens..., but anyway, what about pickling the eggs? Link: http://www.helpwithcooking.com/egg-guide/make-pickled-eggs.html

sage0925

  • Guest
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2009, 03:09:49 PM »
Thanks for the idea, Sarcasmo, but pickled eggs rank right up there with canned giant water bugs for me.  :D

Appreciate the input, though...have to find out if my husband likes then...I was wanting to preserve eggs to be used in cakes and other baked goods. LOL...wonder what a cake would taste like made with pickled eggs...yum...  ;D

Offline briarjumper

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 48
  • Karma: 3
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2009, 09:41:31 AM »
    Whenever we have too many eggs, we break them into a bowl with a little milk, like scrambled eggs.  Then grease a plastic ice tray and freeze them.  two ice cubes of frozen egg= 1 large fresh egg

sage0925

  • Guest
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2009, 12:08:40 PM »
Oh, now that's cool...so you can freeze the unshelled eggs okay? I'd heard you could, if you popped the yolk, but I haven't seen anyone back up that claim.

Offline briarjumper

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 48
  • Karma: 3
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #14 on: June 27, 2009, 01:14:55 PM »
yeah, you gotta mix em up like you would for scrambled, or like you were making a omelette  (spelling?) and make sure you give the ice tray a good shot of Pam or some such, or they will stick bad and not wanna come out. 

Thox Spuddy

  • Guest
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2012, 09:16:40 AM »
but anyway, what about pickling the eggs? Link: http://www.helpwithcooking.com/egg-guide/make-pickled-eggs.html
I like this recipe from that link:

 British pub pickled eggs
Ingredients

    12 hard-boiled eggs (see our section on how to boil an egg)
    4 cups of malt vinegar
    1 finely chopped chilli pepper
    10 black peppercorns
    10 whole cloves
    3 cinnamon sticks
    2 tsp of allspice

Method

    Peel the hard-boiled eggs, allow them to cool and then place them in a large clean jar.
    Heat the vinegar and the spices in a saucepan until the liquid begins to boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.
    Remove from the heat and allow to cool to about room temperature.
    Strain the liquid and pour over the eggs covering them completely.
    Seal the jar tightly with the lid and store in a cool and dark place for a minimum of two weeks before consuming.




Except  I don't like the cinnamon & cloves, it seems like every pickled egg recipe has that in it. Is there a pickled egg method where you don't have to refrigerate it? 

Offline Cedar

  • ...just aDD water...
  • TSP Supreme Galactic Ant
  • ************
  • Posts: 28429
  • Karma: 1396
  • Dont wait for the storm to pass, dance in the rain
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2012, 01:25:08 PM »
Starting in October through April-ish I start filling the bottom drawers of my fridge with fresh eggs. They last all those months. Towards the end of the time, I crack them into a cup to make sure they are ok. Waterglassing and more is OLD OLD OLD methods. I would never use them personally. Eggs are porous and many of those methods can force in and trap pathogens in them. If you are using commercial factory eggs, most of those eggs have salmonella in them, as salmonella is part of the genetic makeup of those birds, so the salmonella is in the egg before it is laid many credible sources say.

Cedar

Offline archer

  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 17058
  • Karma: 379
  • #ImissAmerica
    • Journey to Greener Pastures
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2012, 07:44:03 PM »
Starting in October through April-ish I start filling the bottom drawers of my fridge with fresh eggs. They last all those months. Towards the end of the time, I crack them into a cup to make sure they are ok. Waterglassing and more is OLD OLD OLD methods. I would never use them personally. Eggs are porous and many of those methods can force in and trap pathogens in them. If you are using commercial factory eggs, most of those eggs have salmonella in them, as salmonella is part of the genetic makeup of those birds, so the salmonella is in the egg before it is laid many credible sources say.

Cedar
how do you tell they are not ok? smell? sight? texture?

Offline Cedar

  • ...just aDD water...
  • TSP Supreme Galactic Ant
  • ************
  • Posts: 28429
  • Karma: 1396
  • Dont wait for the storm to pass, dance in the rain
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2012, 08:41:20 PM »
Thin. runny, off colour...

Cedar

Offline archer

  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 17058
  • Karma: 379
  • #ImissAmerica
    • Journey to Greener Pastures
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2012, 09:51:42 PM »
Thin. runny, off colour...

Cedar
ah thx.
wait, that sounds like large box grocery store eggs.. i'm so confused!

Offline dvtully

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: 1
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2012, 10:17:38 PM »
For you guys that like pickled eggs, if you want to kick it up a notch, slice up a jalapeno into each quart jar when you can them.
Oh yeah, that's what I'm talkin about.

Thox Spuddy

  • Guest
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2012, 10:21:05 PM »
I wanna kick em up a coupla' notches!

I want a pickled egg that will make me sweat. A dipping sauce of hot mustard, salt and peppa.

And a big frosty lager.

Chips too.

Offline caverdude

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 838
  • Karma: 17
  • larrydgray.net
    • blog dot Larry D Gray dot net
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2012, 10:28:03 AM »
You can keep them on the counter for a couple weeks even, if your house isn't too warm.
That's what Waffle House does.

Offline rikkrack

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1180
  • Karma: 36
  • Permaculture Entrepreneur
    • Wolf-Beach Farms
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2012, 10:39:10 AM »
I dehydrated mine. Scrambled (did not cook) and dehydrated at 175 for a day or two. Then into the blender and into jar on shelf. 5+ dozen eggs fit into quart jar. All we do is rehydrate and scramble. Have only made scrambled eggs, not sure if I can use to bake or rehydrate and bake or bake with egg powder or the measurements. Seems like you could. Maybe experiment this weekend.

Offline caverdude

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 838
  • Karma: 17
  • larrydgray.net
    • blog dot Larry D Gray dot net
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #24 on: October 03, 2012, 03:16:21 PM »
You could always separate the yokes and whites, then blend each separately, then dehydrate.

Offline Redman

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2386
  • Karma: 51
  • Lost in the 50's
Re: Long term storage of eggs
« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2019, 06:57:51 AM »
Browsing You Tube this morning I came across this. Historical methods of preserving eggs. Much of this was presented by the OP. Here some of it is in video form.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUYgguMz1qI