Author Topic: precancerous breast  (Read 5690 times)

Offline surfivor

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precancerous breast
« on: November 16, 2017, 12:08:54 PM »

 My mother went for a mammogram, then they told her she had thick breast tissue so she had a biopsy and had to be put under. She was all worried the whole week, they said it was just pre cancerous but now they said there was a lot of pre cancerous cells and they want her to go back again for another biopsy.

  If you ask me the term pre cancerous sounds too vague anyway and sounds a lot like medical BS. These people tried to get me to take cholesterol meds and go for prostate biopsy. I researched it all and found there is tons of evidence that they grossly exaggerate the risks to scare people
 

LVWood

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2017, 12:20:24 PM »
On the other hand, self diagnosis can kill you.

Offline Carl

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2017, 01:29:10 PM »
  Replace PRECANCEROUS with ABNORMAL tissue....ignoring the situation can bring lots of misery for your mother.

While more men die 'with' prostate cancer and few die FROM prostate cancer,I say you should not ignore that either, Cancer is not like the church visit or relative that will go away if you ignore it.You really won't like what happens when you wait to see what happens later.

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2017, 01:33:41 PM »
  Replace PRECANCEROUS with ABNORMAL tissue....ignoring the situation can bring lots of misery for your mother.

While more men die 'with' prostate cancer and few die FROM prostate cancer,I say you should not ignore that either, Cancer is not like the church visit or relative that will go away if you ignore it.You really won't like what happens when you wait to see what happens later.

^^^^^^^This

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2017, 09:42:24 PM »
  Replace PRECANCEROUS with ABNORMAL tissue....ignoring the situation can bring lots of misery for your mother.

While more men die 'with' prostate cancer and few die FROM prostate cancer,I say you should not ignore that either, Cancer is not like the church visit or relative that will go away if you ignore it.You really won't like what happens when you wait to see what happens later.

 I am not impressed at all with the medical establishments track record or ability to cure cancer or the vast dismissal of alternative treatments or their exaggeration of risks. Someday everyone dies but they try to play the heads I win tails you lose game. If you die from cancer then they say "look he should have got treatment", if they treat you and you die they say "well there was nothing we could have done".

 Why is cancer so feared ? Because their ability to cure it sucks while they charge exorbitant obscene costs for the treatment. You don't even know that the actual cure could have been people layed up for a long time once they got it. If you where stressed out at your job then layed in bed for a few weeks or changed your life, who knows what that could effect

It seems easy to establish that many or most cancer treatments help to severely weaken or destroy the immune system

 People are cured by gerson method as well using juicing.

 My mother has a means to measure her blood pressure, when they told her to go for a biopsy she looked like a miserable scared animal and her blood pressure went way up. First they cut into her, found nothing but precancerous which you can find statements like "could lead to cancer but usually does not" then they want her to go back again for another biopsy.

 My grandfather died from anesthesia administered by doctors ..

 I know another guy running off to doctors to do the cancer screening tests with the long obscene snake. He probably would do better for his overall health to just lose 50 pounds

  My sister had some minor cyst or tumor, 3 measly radiation treatments cost $9K. She is supposed to not drink alcohol but I don't think she is doing very well as she likes wine and saki. So there you go, people follow the testing protocol but yet .. ? ? ? ? ? ! ! ! ? :(   



« Last Edit: November 16, 2017, 10:01:17 PM by surfivor »

Offline Carl

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2017, 05:57:06 AM »
  Share time with them while you can.....

Offline LvsChant

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2017, 04:33:18 PM »
Surf: I have to disagree with you on the breast cancer screening. It is a good thing your mom is listening to her doctor and getting the recommended biopsies. Hopefully they will come back with no cancerous cells, (which you may say indicates it was a needless test), but in any case, she will be getting high visibility on her future screenings so that they can react quickly if cancer does occur. Early detection is so important.

Yes... the tests are unpleasant (I speak from experience), but the disease is far worse.

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2017, 09:20:59 PM »
My dad has been cured of 3 or 4 different kinds of cancer (I lost count).

My cousin found a lump in her breast, and was too scared to go to the doctor and get it checked out.  She died from that cancer 10 years ago.

Offline Redman

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2017, 02:51:36 AM »
The screenings are an important part of preventative medicine. For several years my wife had what they were calling calcium deposits, biopsies indicated that. Then it turned into cancer, Stage Zero. Lumpectomy and radiation and she's been clear for 4 years now.


Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2017, 07:24:16 AM »
I just heard Gary null talk about proof based on case studies of certain doctors using unOrthodox means had cured 10% to 17% of cases that where terminal cases where the success rate for other doctors was 0% but no newspapers or magazines would report on it

There also seems to be evidence that mammograms themselves and such procedures can increase cancer risk

« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 07:52:35 AM by surfivor »

Offline LvsChant

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2017, 07:48:39 AM »
Well... at this point, the mammogram is still our best option for discovering cancers in the early detection stage.

Those 10-17% positive results on those terminal cases were likely for breast cancer that was already far developed. Early detection is the key here. If at all possible, I'd like to avoid making it into that group at all.

Surf: Encourage your mom to get the screenings and be supportive... hopefully they don't find any cancerous cells this time and will be especially vigilant in the coming years when they continue to monitor her. For the current availability of tests such as these and other medical treatments (such as effective vaccines) that are available (despite our broken healthcare system), I am particularly happy that TEOTWAWKI has not yet occurred.

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2017, 11:38:36 AM »


 Odd thing that has happened .. So first she had the biopsy the week before last, then the primary care doctor called and said to set up another biopsy with the surgeon. When she went to the surgeon's today she was told everything was fine and they didn't know why the primary care doctor had told her to have another biopsy

LVWood

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2017, 11:40:05 AM »
Second opinion time...

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2017, 01:02:26 PM »
my opinion is that too many biopsies may contribute to cancer. That was previously reported in some studies that they had to scramble try to deny with their usual counter studies. Similar to other cover ups of actual cancer alternatives that may be better and cheaper than what they have.

LVWood

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #14 on: November 20, 2017, 01:20:50 PM »
One the other hand, one of the doctors was wrong.
Are you willing to gamble your mothers life on an opinion?

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2017, 02:21:26 PM »
 I just don't have a lot of faith in doctors, they promote flu vaccines, questionable info and policies on cholesterol. The surgeon I saw years ago seemed like a total cold fish to me and had nothing warm and fuzzy about him. Not only that, after I did some research I found that his risk analysis of prostate cancer was way to the side of trying to scare you.

 Our family doctor from years ago seemed like he became a cold fish towards the end of his career. Maybe having to push a bunch of nonsense does that to people. I knew him for many years but he seemed like he was just going through the motions in the years before his retirement. He knew enough however to realize the AIDS epidemic was total hype as when asked about the risks back in the 1980's he just said it was extremely rare and nothing to worry about. Now I know that it is most likely a man made disease and hyped to the max in Africa where it many cases it is not the cause of those symptoms
« Last Edit: November 20, 2017, 02:27:08 PM by surfivor »

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2017, 07:02:22 PM »
What difference does any of this make, anyways?  I mean, what are the chances your mother actuality takes any of your advice?  My mom doesn't take mine.

Actually, maybe we could switch moms.  Mine sucks down every conspiracy theory and health claim she's ever heard on Coast to Coast and Infowars.  I'd give my right arm to have a mom who listened to NPR.

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2017, 09:23:02 AM »
What difference does any of this make, anyways?  I mean, what are the chances your mother actuality takes any of your advice?  My mom doesn't take mine.

Actually, maybe we could switch moms.  Mine sucks down every conspiracy theory and health claim she's ever heard on Coast to Coast and Infowars.  I'd give my right arm to have a mom who listened to NPR.

 I consider myself a moderate but I think the left has gone way too crazy and I can hardly take it anymore.

 I don't criticize people for not believing all the conspiracies but most people seem to believe none of them or never talk about them, know nothing etc

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2018, 09:24:46 AM »

 My mother had some procedure done a couple of months ago and asked her primary care doctor if it was covered by her insurance which she was told it was but she just got a notice saying a charge was denied by the insurance for $1,700 because it was out of network. I am not sure what you do in that case or if next time you need to have your doctor and others sign legal papers ahead of time ?

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2018, 12:52:46 PM »
What difference does any of this make, anyways?  I mean, what are the chances your mother actuality takes any of your advice?  My mom doesn't take mine.

Actually, maybe we could switch moms.  Mine sucks down every conspiracy theory and health claim she's ever heard on Coast to Coast and Infowars.  I'd give my right arm to have a mom who listened to NPR.
:rofl:

Offline bigbear

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2018, 01:49:53 PM »
My mother had some procedure done a couple of months ago and asked her primary care doctor if it was covered by her insurance which she was told it was but she just got a notice saying a charge was denied by the insurance for $1,700 because it was out of network. I am not sure what you do in that case or if next time you need to have your doctor and others sign legal papers ahead of time ?

It may not help for this bill, but talk to the doctor/medical facility and see if they can get in-network.  If they can't/won't, let them know you'll need to look around for an in-network provider.

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2018, 01:52:36 PM »
It may not help for this bill, but talk to the doctor/medical facility and see if they can get in-network.  If they can't/won't, let them know you'll need to look around for an in-network provider.

She asked them if it was in network and if her insurance would cover it. The doctor told her yes but then afterwards they where wrong because her insurance didn't cover it.

 If that's how they operate, I would get it in writing next time with anyone I saw. I would make them fill out paperwork that I would provide

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2018, 02:04:31 PM »
sort of like this, I googled "doctor lies about in network", not an isolated case

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/07/15/doctor-admits-to-intentionally-misleading-patients-about-health-insurance.html

Imagine being told that your doctor accepts your health insurance, only to discover you have been stuck with a hefty medical bill at the visit’s end.

That’s exactly what happened to numerous patients of podiatrist John Lanham in Milwaukee, Wis. As a result, Lanham has been the subject of more complaints to state regulators within the past five years than any other foot doctor in the state, the Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel reported.

Lanham maintains that he doesn’t outright lie to his patients.  He simply tells them he accepts their insurance, but doesn’t explain the situation further.  Then, he sticks them with significantly larger bills than if he were in the patients’ network.

Lanham said it’s the only way he can stay in business, because patients would leave if they knew they were not in his network.  He also claims he’s certain that no judge will legally be able to force him to disclose this information.

“I unfortunately have to survive on patients’ ignorance,” Lanham told the Journal Sentinel.

Up to 92 complaints against Lanham have been filed with the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Service since 2001.

Mary-Iris Taylor told the Journal Sentinel that she took her daughter to Lanham’s office to treat an ingrown toenail, believing she was in his network.  A couple months after the visit, Taylor received a $6,000 bill for the treatment – care she said would have only cost $200 in copays with an in-network doctor.

While Taylor hasn’t made a formal complaint, she did hire a lawyer to dispute the bill.  Lanham cut the bill down to $4,000.

“He’s basically doing this because he can get away with it,” Taylor told the Journal Sentinel.  “I don’t know how he can sleep at night.”

==================


http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-out-of-network-doctor-bills-surprise-new-york-times-20140922-story.html

The New York Times' Elisabeth Rosenthal offered an important lesson in healthcare economics over the weekend that's a must-read for anyone about to undergo a major medical procedure.

Rosenthal's piece explored how charges from out-of-network providers can magically show up on a hospital bill. She focused on one particularly nasty practice, called "drive-by doctoring," in which physicians call in colleagues not in a patient's network to consult or assist on a procedure. The out-of-network provider charges the retail rate -- in some cases, hundreds of times what the government would pay them for the same work, and invariably far more than what the patient's insurer will cover. The provider then tries to collect the remainder directly from the patient, a process known as "balance billing."

Sadly, patients have little protection against this sort of maneuvering -- at least at this point. The Affordable Care Act places an annual limit on out-of-pocket costs, but that cap doesn't apply to out-of-network services. Here's what I wrote about the gap in the cap in April:

"Once you reach it, your insurer will cover 100% of the cost only of the essential health benefits covered by the plan, and out-of-network services are exempt (except for emergency treatments). That's a troubling thought, considering how many insurers are reducing the number of doctors and hospitals in their plans. These 'narrow networks' increase the chances that a doctor, therapist or clinic you'd like to use won't be subject to the annual cap.

"More ominously, being treated at an in-network hospital is no guarantee that the specialists who see you there will be in your plan's network as well. If there's no emergency involved, you could be stuck paying the difference between the contracted amount and the specialist's charges, even if you've hit the out-of-pocket limit. And the difference can be staggering: In one extreme example cited by the insurance industry, an out-of-network California pathologist charged $8,100 for a tissue exam for which Medicare reimburses $128."

Even those who confirm that their physicians and hospitals are in network can wind up being billed by out-of-network providers they had no idea would be involved in their care.

It's bad enough that consumers who bought policies through the state's new insurance marketplace, Covered California, have gotten erroneous or incomplete information about which doctors are in network. Even those who confirm before surgery that their physicians and hospitals are in network can wind up being billed by out-of-network providers they had no idea would be involved in their care.

Unfortunately, given how loath doctors and hospitals are to tell you in advance what they'll charge, being forewarned about out-of-network charges may not lead to being forearmed. Rosenthal's piece also warned that some physicians groups are using the out-of-network loophole to circumvent the billing limits they agree to when they sign contracts with insurers. It works this way: a patient chooses Dr. A to do the procedure at least in part because Dr. A is in network. But then Dr. A summons a partner who is out-of-network to assist on the procedure and bill at the considerably higher retail rate. The two later split the fees.



« Last Edit: January 03, 2018, 02:10:16 PM by surfivor »

Offline Carl

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2018, 02:17:49 PM »
She asked them if it was in network and if her insurance would cover it. The doctor told her yes but then afterwards they where wrong because her insurance didn't cover it.

 If that's how they operate, I would get it in writing next time with anyone I saw. I would make them fill out paperwork that I would provide

There are too many exceptions these days and the Dr is not liable...the PATIENT is responsible to insure that insurance covers such things.

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #24 on: January 03, 2018, 02:25:39 PM »
There are too many exceptions these days and the Dr is not liable...the PATIENT is responsible to insure that insurance covers such things.

 It's unclear that that is always possible from reading the articles above and if that is the case, then it would be quite irresponsible for a doctor to tell you that you are covered if he not does not really know.

Offline Carl

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #25 on: January 03, 2018, 02:29:05 PM »
  Then go fight the insurence company...but read first the included coverage within your mothers contract.

Offline AvenueQ

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #26 on: January 03, 2018, 04:37:29 PM »
There are too many exceptions these days and the Dr is not liable...the PATIENT is responsible to insure that insurance covers such things.

Kind of shitty, but true. Most doctors aren't maliciously exploiting insurance loopholes, but they are just as clueless as patients in a lot of cases (mostly due to insurance and billing being so damn complicated). If I'm ever unsure, I call my insurance directly and ask about a specific doctor.

Offline Carl

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #27 on: January 03, 2018, 05:41:25 PM »
  I got billed $90,000 that way some time back and I avoid problems by sending them a check for $5 each time the place sends me a bill.

Offline surfivor

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #28 on: January 03, 2018, 09:20:15 PM »
 That's great, the medical system could leave you broke so that you end up homeless and then you will die from poor health. You will not be able to eat right or have adequate shelter or you will die from stress from working too hard to pay your bills.

I can except the doctors don't know how billing works but it is unprofessional, screwed the hell up or unethical  to tell people that their insurance will cover something if they don't have a clue. If doctors are paid a zillion dollars the least they could do is not do a lousy job. Apparently from this one little screw up I now know more then this stupid doctor and I know that I would not listen to what they tell me. If they are that messed up then who knows what the hell they're doing anyway or if they can actually cure people
« Last Edit: January 03, 2018, 09:29:08 PM by surfivor »

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: precancerous breast
« Reply #29 on: January 03, 2018, 10:24:40 PM »
I can except the doctors don't know how billing works but it is unprofessional, screwed the hell up or unethical  to tell people that their insurance will cover something if they don't have a clue.

Report their unprofessional conduct to the medical board.