Farm, Garden and The Land > Permaculture, Land Management and Foraging

Angle grinder for shiitake mushroom inoculation

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surfivor:

I had gotten discouraged with mushrooms as drilling holes in the logs is so time consuming. I have a new idea however using an angle grinder as there are adapters and it makes drilling holes into the logs much faster


Here is the adapter:
https://www.fieldforest.net/mobile/Angle-Grinder-Adapter/productinfo/W%2DAGA/

Here is the actual angle grinder that they sell:
https://www.fieldforest.net/mobile/Express-Drill-Tool-125mm-for-use-with-sawdust-spawn/productinfo/W%2DSEDT%2D12/

“Your time is at a premium so why not save a lot of it by drilling your logs with our Express Drill Tool? Turning at 10,000 rpm, our converted angle grinder makes drilling holes a delight, not a chore. Using a soft steel screw tip drill bit, just touch the log and the hole is drilled. It really is that easy. As Joe always says, “Less time drilling means more time fishing.”

Includes grinder, aluminum adapter and 12.5mm bit with stop (for use with sawdust spawn). Specs: electric, 120V ac only, 7.5 amps, 10,000 rpm, paddle switch, 4.5 lbs.”

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However, I want to use a cordless angle grinder as my camp has no electricity. Hopefully I can plug the charger into my 12 V battery. This angle grinder looks like it fits the bill and I had called field and forest and asked them about using a cordless grinder as well:


https://m.grainger.com/mobile/product/BOSCH-4-1-2-Cordless-Angle-Grinder-53DM71

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They also have tools to fill in the drilled holes in record time

https://www.fieldforest.net/mobile/Okuda-Hand-Inoculator-125mm/productinfo/W%2DOHI%2D12/

Jeffsmith:
I want to note that Angle grinder safety is critical when using this type of tool used to cut hard materials like stone and metals. An angle grinder comes with enough power to spin abrasive discs 8000 times a minute. That’s well over 100 times a second. Angle grinder safety should be the starting point for anyone using one of these powerful tools to do a job.


EDIT: Deleted spam link, banned spammer

surfivor:

Those things do seem to have a lot of power. I was told you need one that operates at 10,000 rpm

Here are some videos. Given the speed, the guys hand in the second video may get kind of close to the grinder

The rate at which a log can be drilled is quite dramatic compared to using a drill and looks much easier. I actually developed tennis elbow from drilling logs a few years ago with a standard drill



https://youtu.be/rrVXu3LkkJg

...

https://youtu.be/0cd_fXxQq3c

....

This one shows how slow a regular drill is, what a difference

https://youtu.be/TAYrWINi0x4

...


https://youtu.be/kCiBt9foTFY

Zef_66:
I know absolutely zero about mushrooms. But those tools look WAY overpriced to me. To start, the adapter any machine shop can make one for about $10. The angle grinder can be had at harbor freight for a tenth of that price and probably last just as long. Even a battery powered one from there will last a long time.

But how many logs are you drilling that you can save money doing this while buying all these tools? If you spend hundreds of dollars on tools to grow a couple mushrooms, is it really worth it? I would think tools like this are for when you are doing hundreds of thousands of mushrooms. As just a guy doing this on the side after work, how is buying these tools cost effective?

surfivor:

--- Quote from: Zef_66 on August 22, 2018, 10:28:53 AM ---I know absolutely zero about mushrooms. But those tools look WAY overpriced to me. To start, the adapter any machine shop can make one for about $10. The angle grinder can be had at harbor freight for a tenth of that price and probably last just as long. Even a battery powered one from there will last a long time.


--- End quote ---

 I have never heard of harbor freight, interesting. I see there are some of those stores around here though you have to drive a ways.



--- Quote ---But how many logs are you drilling that you can save money doing this while buying all these tools? If you spend hundreds of dollars on tools to grow a couple mushrooms, is it really worth it? I would think tools like this are for when you are doing hundreds of thousands of mushrooms. As just a guy doing this on the side after work, how is buying these tools cost effective?

--- End quote ---

 If I buy the tools and do mushroom logs every year, it will add up. A 5 pound bag of sawdust spawn can do quite a few logs. It can also be a good cold weather activity as I need stuff to keep me occupied. It also helps me to learn more about growing mushrooms. I already have learned a great deal. If I was retired some day, possibly I could get more serious about mushroom growing.

 On the other hand, if I had to use a standard drill to do logs, I think I have had enough of that and would not bother to grow any more mushrooms if that was my only option.

 There are ways of cutting slots with a chain saw or a totem method but my impression is that those are inferior methods for shiitake. They may work well for oyster mushrooms but I am tired of growing oyster mushrooms. I like the shiitake better I think. Oysters are easier to grow but seem to work best on poplar logs. Somewhere on the web you can probably find people who have grown shiitake using the totem method but I personally have not had the best luck with it and trying to grow mushrooms is sometimes a weird learning experience
 
 The last time I had a big bag of oyster mushrooms, I went to the buffet at the Indian restaurant. The head chef wasn't in so I told the waiter, "just give him this bag of mushrooms". I didn't get any money for them that time and I didn't care, I was just trying to get rid of them. I have given them to my friends and neighbors. A couple of years ago I sold a small bag to the Indian restaurant. After the logs are all spent, I will have a bunch of dead wood in my back yard. I don't think oyster logs last more than a couple of years

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