Author Topic: Yeast storage  (Read 1265 times)

Offline never_retreat

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Yeast storage
« on: January 29, 2019, 04:55:08 PM »
Just found a unopened brick of flishmans yeast in the cabinet (not the freezer where it belongs) dated 2016.
Any guess if this is still usable?
It must have been a multi brick pack or something because I'm just finishing up one with the same date that was in the freezer.

Offline Applejack

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2019, 08:26:42 AM »
Since it is a brick, it might be ok. I have used the bricks of yeast a couple of years past date and it did fine. though it was in a cabinet that stayed cool all the time. So if it was not where moisture and heat got to it, you should be good to go.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2019, 09:27:17 AM »
easy to check... just take out a bit and add to lukewarm sugar water... if it bubbles up...

Offline Stwood

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2019, 09:38:56 AM »
Bought 4 one pound bricks about 3 years ago, and just opened #3 brick.
Wife hasn't complained, and the bread is still awesome.  ;D

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2019, 09:42:49 AM »
What are proven best practices for long term storage of yeast?

Buy bricks and toss them in the freezer?

Offline Redman

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2019, 09:46:48 AM »
I've kept the 1 lb. bricks in the freezer for several years, don't know how many. Kept open bags in the frig for at least a year, was still good.

Offline Stwood

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2019, 09:48:55 AM »
I haven't ever researched it.
Ours is in the storeroom, kept dark unless we have the lights on. Stays cool in there.

Offline Redman

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2019, 10:25:22 AM »

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2019, 10:34:26 AM »
I'm not looking to rebuild civilization, but knowing we can bake for a couple years is something...

Thanks

Offline David in MN

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2019, 11:01:03 AM »
Pro bakeries really like it  fresh. But they work under time constraint. If your yeast is only 50% viable it might take a longer rise. For a home baker that might not be a problem. If you're worried consider stepping up the yeast using a very wet dough (poolish method) and adding the  remaining flour and salt once you have good signs of yeast growth.

I tend to use active dry yeast and I *think* I've used it 4 years out of code. Modern commercial yeast is pretty hardy stuff.

Offline Redman

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2019, 11:14:01 AM »
I'm using instant dry yeast. I've read on The Fresh Loaf that less yeast is needed with this. I tried it. Went back to using the same amount as active dry yeast. You get half the raising time that way. I still cut down the yeast amount if I want a slower rise.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2019, 11:17:11 AM »
Pro bakeries really like it  fresh. But they work under time constraint. If your yeast is only 50% viable it might take a longer rise. For a home baker that might not be a problem. If you're worried consider stepping up the yeast using a very wet dough (poolish method) and adding the  remaining flour and salt once you have good signs of yeast growth.

I tend to use active dry yeast and I *think* I've used it 4 years out of code. Modern commercial yeast is pretty hardy stuff.

We had over a week of "snow days" out here, so I made a few loaves of bread to get back into practice.  I got some higher end flour, King Arthur brand.  I figure I'm still in for pennies on the dollar compared to decent commercial bread.

I've kept flour in the freezer for over a year without issue.  One of the easiest recipes I've found was 6 cups flour, 1 tbsp salt, 1 tbsp sugar, water and the yeast packet.
All that stuff stores pretty well, and none is particularly expensive. If I was hardcore I could store wheat berries, but I figure unless I have yeast that can keep as long, the added labor to mill and prepare offsets the long term life a bit.

 

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2019, 11:20:06 AM »
Out of curiosity, just checked my SAF yeast in the freezer... haha. It says the best if used by date is 07/2017.

I can tell you that the bread I made last night has no idea that the yeast was no longer viable :)

It has been stored in the freezer mostly, but also was transported when I moved house in September... I ordered it from Amazon Jan. 25, 2016. Not bad. I store it in a 1-cup jelly jar in the freezer (and the rest remaining in the original mylar brick wrapping with a rubber band to keep it closed - not as carefully as some with the vacuum-sealing and mylar)

Offline Stwood

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2019, 12:07:05 PM »
We're kinda hard core on the bread. 17-18 buckets of berries  ::), enough to last 7-8 years of bread baking. All the freeze dried honey and butter to go with it.


We should be keeping an active growing yeast and feeding it, but we dropped that a year or so ago. That's something you have to work with, keeping it going.
We've done that several times over the years. But you can't do everything, all the time.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2019, 12:28:03 PM »
We should be keeping an active growing yeast and feeding it, but we dropped that a year or so ago. That's something you have to work with, keeping it going.
We've done that several times over the years. But you can't do everything, all the time.

I do that. I like really intense sourdough with all its funk. Not hard to do but sometimes hard to remember. So you restart it when need be.

I would (as I have done before) recommend Ken Forkish's Flour Water Salt Yeast as my favorite bread book (and I have many). Using his methods I use just .8g of yeast per 2 baked loaves. You give the small amount of yeast a long slow rise to develop more flavor. Turns out a lot of traditional baking (including pizza) take advantage of this method. Traditional Neapolitan pizzarias start the dough after they close at night for the next day. (Forkish has a great pizza book as well.)

Just something to consider. Your "yeast needs" might go down as mine have.

Offline Redman

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2019, 01:40:09 PM »
Paying attention here.

 :popcorn:

Offline Stwood

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Re: Yeast storage
« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2019, 03:37:43 PM »
+1

 :popcorn: