Author Topic: Pistol resale value  (Read 625 times)

Offline fritz_monroe

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Pistol resale value
« on: December 14, 2018, 08:34:35 PM »
I'm not a big gun guy, I do have a couple of weapons.

I'm looking at getting a revolver in .357.  I like revolvers mainly because they are gorgeous.  Much better looking than any semi-auto pistol.  I've always wanted a revolver.  I'm thinking of a Ruger GP100 or a S&W 686. There's about a $100 difference between comparable models of each of these.

Like many, I've been looking at the Colt Python for 30 years.  It's a gorgeous gun and some of them are selling for a small fortune.

That got me thinking about the resale value on handguns.  I'm not buying a revolver as an investment, but if I decide to sell it in a couple of years, I'd like to keep the most value.  I know each of these is pretty good, but does the Ruger or S&W hold value better than the other?

Offline iam4liberty

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Re: Pistol resale value
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2018, 09:25:20 PM »
Here is some book value averages for comparable versions.  In either case if you bought at MSRP and kept in 100% finish (unshot) you would have gained a little value.  If you used it regularly, but kept it in good finish (95%), you would have lost a little value.

GP100 in Stainless
In 2006 MSRP was $580
In 2018 100% is $625 and 95% is $495

S&W MODEL 686 DISTINGUISHED COMBAT MAGNUM
In 2006 MSRP was $667
In 2018 100% is $725 and 95% is $600

The Colt Python is an entirely different matter.  Colt collectors are the most fanatical.  And you have heavy movie/TV tie ins so entertainment collectors are in play as well. And then you have shooter demand for a model with no current comprable being made.

In 2006 a common Colt Python in 100% was $950. 
In 2018 a ccommon Colt python in 100% is unlisted (sky's the limiit in auction), in 98% is $3,500, in 95% is $2650

Few other revolver brands will hold value as S&W, Ruger, and Colt.  These are the classic revolver brands with lots of attention and history. 
« Last Edit: December 14, 2018, 09:32:25 PM by iam4liberty »

Offline David in MN

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Re: Pistol resale value
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2018, 09:26:22 AM »
I can maybe speak to this as I run a 686 and my father in law uses the GP100. Nothing  wrong with either gun. Out of the box the 686 will have a better trigger and cleaner lines. But a GP100 can be cleaned up by a gunsmith to run better than an out of the box Smith.

All guns hold value. The Colt is a little weird because of collector value. But bear in mind if you intend to use it Colts "spin the wrong way" and open the cylinder with that bell. Training with S&W, Ruger, and Taurus all cross over. Colt doesn't. I might think the Python is beautiful but after 15 years of running a 686 it just doesn't work with my muscle memory.

Also bear in mind that these are frequently purpose built. I have a friend with a 6 shot 8" barrel 686 for hunting. I have a 7 shot 4" 686 for defense. I don't know the pricing differences but the build purpose is something to consider.

One last oddity... The handgun I own that has had the wildest swing in value is my H&K USP. Io don't think I paid more than $500 for it ~17ish years ago when I couldn't find my dream Beretta G2 Elite and since then I've been offered $1k for it. I love the  gun and won't sell (though I should have) but H&K is just one of those fetish companies. Weirdo Euro guns do the price dance more than most. And I shoot my M&P9 better so...

I guess my advice is to buy for your purpose. All the revolvers you like will hold value. But a "revolver" is many thigs to many people. Do you want a long barrel with a scope for hunting? Short barrel self defense gun? All purpose? If you asked me my favorite it would be a S&W 640 snub. My father in law would probably say the k frame .22 he shot bullseye with. My wife would say the 686. But if you said 686 vs. GP100 I'd take the 686 and he'd take the GP100. It's Ford and Chevy.

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Pistol resale value
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2018, 11:08:59 AM »
Thanks for the replies. 

For the purpose, I just want to shoot it.  It would be mostly range use.  Possibly home protection, but I like my shotgun better for that.

I'm in Maryland, so there's little chance that I'll ever be able to get a carry permit.  I noticed that MD doesn't have a concealed carry permit, we have a "wear and carry" permit.  I'm pretty sure that this is because the politicians worry that the feds could pass a reciprocity law.  If that would happen, MD could claim that it is invalid because we don't have concealed carry at all.

Offline iam4liberty

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Re: Pistol resale value
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2018, 11:32:42 AM »
Thanks for the replies. 

For the purpose, I just want to shoot it.  It would be mostly range use.  Possibly home protection, but I like my shotgun better for that.

I'm in Maryland, so there's little chance that I'll ever be able to get a carry permit.  I noticed that MD doesn't have a concealed carry permit, we have a "wear and carry" permit.  I'm pretty sure that this is because the politicians worry that the feds could pass a reciprocity law.  If that would happen, MD could claim that it is invalid because we don't have concealed carry at all.

The Maryland permit is treated as a CCW permit in reciprical states and the federal government.  it is recognized in over twenty other states. Only problem is you have to be beaten up to apply for it!  The way reciprocity works is that non-residents have to follow same rules as residents of that state. So if state only allows open carry with license for residents then non residents could only open carry.   Net, national reciprocity, if passed, would still be valid in Maryland just the type of carry would be limited so residents and non residents would be treated equally under the law.  Same as driver's licenses, marriage licenses, etc.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Pistol resale value
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2018, 12:25:58 PM »
If you're just using it as a range toy just get what you want. The old joke about revolvers is that your grandkid will use it. Brand doesn't really matter so either choice is great. I shot a slicked up Ruger at a gun show and with a little time and effort that was the finest revolver I've ever shot. And I own a 686. Like I said, Ford and Chevy.

Don't discount it as a home defense tool. With the .357 125 grain hollow point I believe Texas police officers described it as a "lightning bolt effect" when they had to shoot. Ammo companies have been trying to bring the 9mm to the legendary .357 in the past decade with some success. But revolver hollow points are often jokingly referred to as ash trays they are so big. And there is that subtle fact my wife loves that the big badass revolver is intimidating as Hell.

The only way to lose money on a revolver is to aftermarket it for a competition. I've seen guys saw off the hammer spur, badly port barrels on their drill press, fiddle with springs, things like that. A revolver is essentially a big chunk of stainless steel that never goes bad. You can still get Webleys and Nagants. Not to say you'll never have an issue; I have broken a firing pin on my 640 and sent my 686 in for work; but in general they just hold up. If you had an 1800s Colt revolver it would still work given the correct ammo.

It's also a good prep. .38 special is still one of the most available rounds out there. Globally. 9mm might be winning out but good old .38 is everywhere. If I'm in a pinch I can find it in fishing tackle stores.

One other thing and I hope I don't get flak over this. There's a certain class of gun that you want to hand down with value. Your daily carry beat up Glock or M&P just isn't it. The guns you want passed down to your grandkids are big revolvers and 1911s. I will tell you flat out my favorite guns are my M&P and 640. I shoot them better than other guns and use the crap out of them. But I expect my 686 and my Kimber 1911 will be passed down as treasures. There's just something weird about these guns. They have an elegance the tupperware guns just don't get. Utilitarian guns aren't sexy. My dad has his grandfather's 1872 Springfield trapdoor over the mantle. You'd never do that with an AR-15. These revolvers live in that category for me. When my father in law passes we're going to have an emotional time divvying up the guns and I know my brother in law will get most because I own many more but beyond wanting my daughter to shoot her great grandfather's shotgun these are the guns that really carry meaning. As I write this I'm tearing up a little. There will be a day when I ask my child if she wants daddy's 686 or grandpa's GP100. And there will be a day when she has both.

I'm rambling again. Just buy one of them. If you've got the cash you won't regret it.