Author Topic: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday  (Read 71028 times)

Offline muchpain

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #60 on: January 17, 2010, 04:13:37 PM »
Re: Deodorant

For awhile now, I've been using rubbing alcohol (90%).  I put it in a cheap spray bottle that cost around $.50 and a litre of alcohol cost around $1.00.  I spray about 2 to 4 spirts under each arm and its good for the whole day - no smell at all (confirmed by my spouse).  I'm one of those few people that preferrs a spray over roll-on or stick.  The funny thing is, the alcohol works better than any deodorant I've ever used. 

Offline Cool Blue

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #61 on: January 17, 2010, 04:18:13 PM »
If you trim your pit hair it helps with the smell as well.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #62 on: January 17, 2010, 05:21:44 PM »
very interesting, muchpain... welcome to the forum... if you haven't already... stop by the intro thread.

Offline ebonearth

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #63 on: January 20, 2010, 03:23:44 PM »
If you trim your pit hair it helps with the smell as well.
A lot of the smell comes from the happy little bacteria supping upon your perspiration I believe. Less hair, less germy real estate. :)

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #64 on: January 26, 2010, 08:39:09 AM »
I have reverted to homemade pancake syrup...

In recent years, with the exception of real 100% maple syrup, all the pancake syrup you can buy is mostly high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). When I was growing up in a big family, we never bought that stuff because it was too expensive... probably better for us anyway, right?

You can make your own syrup from your food storage very easily:

Maple Syrup

2 cups sugar
1 cup water
1/2 teaspoon maple flavoring (I sometimes use a bit more... you decide)

Boil the water and sugar together until no more crystals... add flavoring... use hot on your pancakes or waffles. It will form crystals fairly quickly (within a few weeks) in the refrigerator, so don't make up a huge amount beyond what you will use in a reasonable amount of time. You can dissolve the crystals later, but it takes awhile...

We switched to real maple syrup a few years ago (concern about HFCS) and it was a bit of an adjustment for the kids since it didn't have that really thick consistency... Going from real maple syrup to homemade was no adjustment at all... they actually like the homemade stuff as well as the real maple syrup.

This is a great low-cost alternative and something you can easily make from your stored food if you just keep a bottle (or two) of maple extract in the house. I saved a couple of the nice maple syrup glass bottles for storage of leftover syrup... easy to use for reheating in the microwave (or in a pot of water on the stove). Who doesn't love hot syrup for pancakes?
« Last Edit: September 07, 2010, 04:10:26 PM by LvsChant »

Offline ebonearth

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #65 on: January 26, 2010, 10:10:21 AM »
Oh that note of maple syrup it should be added that it stores great dehydrated down to powder.

Offline Cave Dweller

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #66 on: February 04, 2010, 10:38:33 PM »
Oh that note of maple syrup it should be added that it stores great dehydrated down to powder.
Is that maple sugar?

Offline ebonearth

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #67 on: February 05, 2010, 08:47:27 AM »
Is that maple sugar?
Yes but in much smaller crystals, the manganese and other mineral content remains the same though.

Offline Carl2

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #68 on: February 15, 2010, 09:33:38 AM »
I'll second the opinion on rubbing alcohol for deodorant; works great.

Save your old phone books/newspapers for emergency TP.  That's what they use in third-world countries.  In farm country, they used corn cobs.  A heavy downpour was called a "cob floater," i.e. floating up from the outhouse.

We wash all but greasy clothes using plain baking soda instead of detergent.  I don't like my clothes scented!  Baking soda works great for washing oneself, also.  Perhaps a bit rough-feeling at first, but it really gets the grime off.

We save a lot shopping at the "dented can" store. 

Offline Ditch

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #69 on: September 03, 2010, 07:30:37 PM »
Uses for old clothes, socks, and rags, etc.:

1. An alternative to lined draperies for blocking out the sun and insulating a window area:
Use the cheap pull down shades and attach some remnant material on one side.  Glue and stitch the edges after you match the sides.  The blind will not have the snap back into a rolled up position, but you can place double draw strings on both ends to pull the covered blind up and down.  The cloth can be added to both sides for extra insulation, and even quilted.  Clean with hot soapy water and a hose.

2. Guys . . . save those old torn camo clothes and use these in your hunting lodge or cabin for quilt work chair covers, blankets, throw pillows, etc.

3. Gals . . . use a patchwork design with memories scraps of material from old clothes for the same purposes at home.

4. Save all old socks and cut in a spiral pattern; like peeling an apple around and around without tearing the apple skin.  Tie or stitch these strips/pieces end to end.  Get three very long pieces and start twisting each piece.  As you twist the three long pieces, braid them together.  After the braiding is complete, start roping one end in a circle or oval shape to form a rope rug.  Stitch the circle or oval as you go and make it as big as you need it.  It is very thick and warm under foot.  Use these in a dogs bed too.

5.When the old terry cloth towels start showing the frayed edges, make a patchwork robe from the pieces.  Nothing like a long terry cloth robe in the winter when getting out of a shower.

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #70 on: September 07, 2010, 04:12:17 PM »
LdMorgan, do you happen to have a link to that study?

Hey, Mamabear! Sorry to be gone for so long. (Took me a while to make bail.)

Info regarding the link between aluminum in deodorants & breast cancer can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deodorant

They have info footnoted both for and against, as well as comments on the Alzheimer's/aluminum link, and some others.

It's a controversial subject, but there are foreign studies to be found as well as American ones. Amalgamated UnderArmCo has funded a few schlock-science disinfo studies, just to keep things confused, so consider everything carefully.

Offline mamabear

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #71 on: October 15, 2010, 01:36:35 PM »
Thanks LD. I checked that out. I have a lot of deoderant and antipersperants that I got for free using coupons and sales, but may try the salt or rubbing alcohol as an alternative.

If you have cats and get your cat litter in buckets, don't throw the buckets out. I use mine for storing anything not food related. Like home made laundry detergent, clothes, garbage bags, and things like lotion, soap etc. They obvioulsy come with lids and they stack really well. They are definitely sturdy since 20-30 pounds of litter came in them.

Offline archer

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #72 on: October 15, 2010, 02:35:52 PM »
I use cat litter boxes (after being washed and dried) for storing medical supplies and kitchen/cooking equipment.

Offline chezrad

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #73 on: October 16, 2010, 05:34:49 AM »
Kind of related. Pepper poured in the radiator will stop leaks. I have done this with mixed results. I have also heard a raw eg dropped in the radiator will work too.

Emergency use only!!! These work on the same principle as the "Stop Leak" that you can buy at the auto parts store. These items swell in hot water and then clog the leak. It will mess up your cooling system if you don't change the radiator and flush everything really well.

Use with extreme caution.

Offline TJx

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #74 on: November 06, 2010, 06:58:45 PM »
For a good spot carpet cleaner I use about 1 part liquid laundry detergent to 5 parts water in a spray bottle, works great and smells a lot better than traditional carpet cleaner.

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #75 on: January 28, 2011, 07:48:24 AM »
Here are some 'tips' that were emailed to me, not necessarily applicable when the SHTF, but maybe?

A sealed envelope - Put in the freezer for a few hours, then slide a
   knife under the flap. The envelope can then be resealed.

  ============================================
  Use Empty toilet paper roll to store appliance cords. It keeps them
  neat  and  you can write on the roll what appliance it belongs to.

  ============================================
  For icy door steps in freezing temperatures: get warm water and put
  Dawn dish washing liquid in it. Pour it all over the steps. They won't
  refreeze.    (wish I had known this for the last 40 years!)

============================================
  To remove old wax from a glass candle holder, put it in the freezer for
  a few hours. Then take the candle holder out and turn it upside down. The
  wax  will  fall out.

  =========================================
  Crayon marks on walls? This worked wonderfully! A damp rag, dipped
   in baking  soda. Comes off with little effort (elbow grease that is!).

  ===========================================
  Permanent marker on appliances/counter tops (like store receipt
  BLUE!) rubbing alcohol on paper towel, sometimes hairspray will do the job too,
  it really depends on the type of ink used.
  ========================================
  Whenever I purchase a box of S.O.S Pads, I immediately take a pair of
  scissors and cut each pad into halves. After years of having to throw
  away rusted and unused and smelly pads, I finally decided that this would
  be  much  more economical. Now a box of S.O.S  pads last me indefinitely!
  In fact, I  have noticed that the scissors get 'sharpened'' this way!

  =========================================
  Blood stains on clothes?  Not to worry!  Just pour a little hydrogen
  peroxide on a cloth and proceed to wipe off every drop of blood.   Works
  every time!  (Now, where to put the body?)    LOL

 ==================================
    Use vertical strokes when washing windows outside and horizontal
  for  inside  windows. This way you can tell which side has the streaks.
  Straight vinegar  will get outside windows really clean.  Don't wash windows
  on a sunny day.  They will dry t oo quickly and will probably streak.

  ============================================
  Spray a bit of perfume on the light bulb in any room to create a lovely
  light scent in each room when the light  is turned on.

  ============================================
  Place fabric softener sheets in dresser drawers and your clothes will
  smell freshly washed for weeks to come. You can also do this with towels
  and linen.

  =============================================
  Candles will last a lot longer if placed in the freezer for at least  3
  hours prior to burning.

  =============================================
  To clean artificial flowers, pour some salt into a paper bag and add the
  flowers. Shake vigorously as the salt will absorb all the dust and dirt
  and leave your artificial flowers looking like new! Works like a charm!
  (wonder where I can get the bag for my 6' silk fig trees...)
  =============================================
  To easily remove burnt on food from your skillet, simply add a drop or
  two of dish soap and enough water to cover bottom of pan, and bring to
  a boil on stove top.

  ==============================================
  Spray your TUPPERWARE with nonstick cooking spray before pouring
  in  tomato based sauces and there won't be any stains.

=============================================
  Wrap celery in aluminum foil when putting in the refrigerator and it will
  keep for weeks.

  =============================================
  When boiling corn on the cob, add a pinch of sugar to help bring out the
  corn's natural sweetness

 .=============================================
  Cure for headaches: Take a lime, cut it in half, and rub it on your
   forehead.   The throbbing will go away.

  =============================================
  Don't throw out all that leftover wine: Freeze into ice cubes for  future
    use  in casseroles and sauces ........  Left over wine? What's that? :)

  =============================================
  To get rid of itch from mosquito bites, try applying soap on the area
and  you will experience instant relief.

=============================================
  Ants, ants, ants everywhere ... Well, they are said to never cross a chalk  line. So,
get your chalk out and draw a line on the floor or wherever ants tend to march. See for yourself.

============================================
  Use air-freshener to clean mirrors. It does a good job and better still,
  leaves a lovely smell to the shine.

  ============================================
  When you get a splinter, reach for the scotch tape before resorting to
  tweezers or a needle. Simply put the scotch tape over the splinter, and
  then  pull it off. Scotch tape removes most splinters painlessly and easily.

  =====================================
  Now look what you can do with Alka Seltzer........
  Clean a toilet.
  Drop in two Alka Seltzer tablets, wait twenty minutes, brush and flush.
  The citric acid and effervescent action clean vitreous China ..

  ============================================
  Clean a vase.
  To remove a stain from the bottom of a glass vase or cruet, fill with water
  and drop in two Alka Seltzer tablets.

  ==================
  Polish jewelry.
  Drop two Alka Seltzer tablets into a glass of water and immerse the
   jewelry  for two minutes.

  =============================================
  Clean a thermos bottle.
   Fill the bottle with water, drop in four Alka Seltzer tablets, and let soak
   for an hour  (or longer, if necessary).

  ================================== ===========
   Unclog a drain.
   Clear the sink drain by dropping three Alka Seltzer tablets down the
   drain  followed by a cup of  Heinz White Vinegar. Wait a few minutes,
   and then run the hot water.

Offline GoingToDoIt!

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #76 on: February 09, 2011, 08:15:51 AM »
Rubbing alcohol:

I once bought a used car with remote unlock. The battery in the little keychain device was dead, and it was very dirty so it didn't work with the new one. All you have to do to clean them is take them apart and soak overnight in rubbing alcohol. Dry off on a paper towel. I put it back together with a new battery and it was great!! My mechanic learned something new from me. (And I am the most mechanically challenged person on the planet lol)

Offline sippinkoolaid

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #77 on: February 21, 2011, 08:01:36 PM »
Save paper milk cartons and used panty hose. My grandmother from the Ukraine was like McGyver with those two items. I remember the pantyhose used for tying up tomato vines and other plants. Milk cartons for flower pots and bird feeders etc. It all up to your imagination I guess!
Thanks
Stay safe

Offline krickie

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #78 on: May 14, 2011, 05:38:40 AM »
We started making our own laundry and cleaning supplies a few years ago,.  The only thing we still buy is dishwasher detergent because I haven't found a replacement I like.  You can clean practically anything with baking soda, Borax, white vinegar, lemon juice, and salt!  The recipe variations are almost endless.   You have to play around a bit to find what you really like.  We started with the book "Clean Home, Clean Planet" by Karen Logan.

A few of our substitutions are:

Laundry soap: 
1 grated bar of Fels Naptha
1 cup of super washing soda
1 cup of Borax
Essential oil for fragrance

1 scoop (we use a medicine cup) for regular loads, 2 scoops for large or extra stinky loads

--We use white vinegar instead of fabric softener.  I just fill up a Downy ball with vinegar.  If I want fragrance, I put a few drops of essential oil on a damp washcloth and throw it in the dryer with the clothes.
--No more Swiffer cloths!  Microfiber cloths work better.  Bonus that they can just be washed and reused over and over so that's much less waste.
--Club soda works great as glass cleaner.   It's also a good stain remover for clothes or carpets. 
--Baking soda with a little liquid detergent mixed into a paste is a fantastic soft scrub.   It rinses pretty clean, but if there's any grit you can give a quick white vinegar rinse.
--Toilet cleaner is just baking soda to scrub with a white vinegar rinse. 
--Plain rubbing alcohol shines up faucets and fixtures.
--Instead of Febreeze, I fill up a spray bottle with some unscented fabric softener (totally optional, but I find it really does help with softness and cling) and white vinegar, add some essential oils for fragrance, and top off with distilled water.   Also, I save the peels from citrus fruits and they either go down the garbage disposal with some ice and salt, or they just get simmered in a stock pot for potpurri. 


Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #79 on: September 17, 2012, 06:29:17 AM »
Jewelry cleaner  For gold, platinum, and diamonds.

Cup of hot water and a teaspoon of ammonia.  Soak jewelry and use an old tooth brush.
This is not for silver or soft stones like pearls and turquoise.

Best thing to use to get a ring off a stuck finger.....Windex.  I kid you not. The entire Jewelry industry sprays peoples hands to get stuck rings off.

The above jewelry cleaner with a few drops of dish soap works for homemade Windex.

Offline Mystidawn

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #80 on: November 03, 2012, 08:18:36 AM »
I have an easy to follow recipe for an all purpose spray cleaner.

We fill one quart sized mason jar with orange peels, and cover with vinegar. Let the mix sit for 2-3 weeks before straining the liquid into a spray bottle. This recipe will also work using lemon and lime peels.

Just to be clear... we do not peel an entire bag of oranges all at once. We just add our new peels to the jar of vinegar each day.

This spray works really well at cleaning hard water off facets. If you don't like the smell of vinegar, you may try adding some essential oils to enhance the smell of the oranges.


Offline LibertyBelle

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #81 on: November 03, 2012, 09:03:28 PM »
I became very sensitive to chems a few years ago (esp odors) and so had to find alternatives to common everyday products.
Here are a few of the things I use:

Deodorant - mix of organic coconut oil, arrowroot powder and baking soda in summer....crystal mineral salts in winter
Liquid Laundry Cleaner - Mule Team borax, washing soda, Fels naptha, water
Fabric Softener - vinegar
All purpose cleaner - vinegar and water
Bath soap - homemade lye soap
Shampoo and Conditioner - wash with a mix of baking soda and water, and do a finishing rinse with vinegar
Paper towels - reusable purple "rags in a bag" by FlyLady.  These are awesome!!!!!
Bath Tissue - "family cloth" ... for more info, check out http://www.mothering.com/community/t/389009/family-cloth-what-nobody-ever-told-you  and  for pictures http://etsyhcteam.blogspot.com/2010/03/what-is-family-cloth.html  (neither site is mine, but nice ones all the same)
Feminine Pads - homemade cloth pads aka "mama cloth"

Offline Mystidawn

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #82 on: November 03, 2012, 10:29:14 PM »
I have a question. I am interested in making my own deodorant, using mineral salts. Where do I buy them? Will they specifically salt 'mineral' salt? I was looking for some today at whole foods, but all I saw was bath salts, and Epsom salt. I know I can buy the Crystal Brand deodorant, that looks like a rock of salt, but I was hoping to buy the mineral salts to make my own mix, thinking it would come out cheaper for me.

Offline LibertyBelle

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #83 on: November 03, 2012, 11:07:30 PM »
I have a question. I am interested in making my own deodorant, using mineral salts. Where do I buy them? Will they specifically salt 'mineral' salt? I was looking for some today at whole foods, but all I saw was bath salts, and Epsom salt. I know I can buy the Crystal Brand deodorant, that looks like a rock of salt, but I was hoping to buy the mineral salts to make my own mix, thinking it would come out cheaper for me.

There are several places online that sell the dead sea mineral salts. I haven't tried making my own "Crystal" type deodorant...yet.   

Oh and another thing I do is make my own sugar wax for my legs, etc.  The only thing is, I have to keep the kids from eating it all before I get a chance to use it!  ;D    All it is, is just sugar, water, and lemon juice.:) 
Here is the sugar wax recipe I use (you've got to read the entire thing....the way she describes it all is a HOOT!)
http://www.instructables.com/id/how-to-sugar-wax-your-legs/

Offline rikkrack

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #84 on: January 10, 2013, 11:14:41 AM »
Wanted to revive this tread as good posts.

I save milk jugs and fill with water to keep in my freezer for power outages and energy efficiency. Full freezer works less.

I saw last night at my local farm supply store Xeroxed copies of how to make your own laundry detergent along with the borax, naphtha, and washing soda in the store. Someone just placed a stack on the shelves.

We feed our tilipia duckweed rather than fish food.

We turn toilet paper rolls, leaves and other scrap wood or wood pellets and candles into fire starters.

We use essential oils for vapor rub on kids when congested, as well as odor removal from old shoes etc. Wife mixes EO with baking powder as carpet deodorizer.

Bought bleach tablet for pool for bleach storage. Tablets take up less space than liquid. When we need, just add a tablet to bucket and refill bottles.


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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #85 on: January 10, 2013, 11:44:34 AM »

I need to read back through this thread, haven't seen it before.   

I take old vitamin bottles, any OTC bottle w/o a child proof cap, and reuse for all sorts of things.   They hold my firestarters, char cloth, tinder etc in my BOB.   They are good for nuts and bolts and any little fastener that comes in those annoying plastic bags.    Anything you want to keep dry and can fit into it, makes for a good reuse.


Offline rikkrack

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #86 on: January 10, 2013, 11:50:40 AM »
rather than buy snare wire, I found I could get picture hanging wire to do the same think and was cheaper.

Then saw the same tip on Yukon men week later. wife rolled her eyes said yeah yeah yeah

Then caught raccoon that was after our chickens. It took all I had not to tell her "I TOLD YOU SO". but i didn't. She doesn't mock my ideas anymore...well not as much at least. 

Offline AvenueQ

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #87 on: November 21, 2013, 07:06:56 PM »
Facial Cleanser

I found this recipe online somewhere and was very skeptical at first. However, my favorite face wash has been discontinued so I decided to give this a shot. Combine in a small squeeze bottle:

1 part extra-virgin olive oil
1 part castor oil

Shake well to combine. To use, dampen your face. Squeeze a quarter-sized amount into hand and massage it in. Take a hot washcloth and place it over your face for 30 seconds. Wipe clean with cloth.

I usually just use it in the shower. I rub it in and then let the steam from the hot water do the work, then wipe it off. I definitely thought rubbing oil on your face was nuts, but it actually works pretty well. My skin is considered "normal to dry" so YMMV with this cleanser. If only I could find a recipe for moisturizer now...

Offline Josh the Aspie

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #88 on: April 09, 2014, 03:52:08 PM »
Quote
shampoo or soap, or even something like fabric softener?

Take oak ashes, run water through.  Filter from mixing container to new container to remove ash particulates.  Caution: The resulting lye is caustic, and hot.

Add naturally hot mixture to fat, mix.  If desired, add essential oils, or finely chopped bits of flowers/herbs.

Pour into large, heat resistant container such as a baking pan.

Wait for mixture to cool and harden.

Cut into bars.

I don't recall the exact proportions off hand.

This is both my soap and shampoo.  I don't use fabric softener, or starch.

I buy it made from others to save time. I have been considering making some of my own, but the people I buy it from buy their supplies in bulk, so it would almost definitely be more expensive to buy my own, not less.

Offline joe121

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Re: Alternative Options For The Things You Use Everyday
« Reply #89 on: November 10, 2015, 01:27:32 PM »
My sister and I have been cutting corners since fuel cost have gone so high.  We no longer purchase laundry detergent, instead we use this age old recipe.
I store it in a quart jar and you use only 1 or 2 tablespoons of detergent depending on how dirty the clothes are. 

1 bar of Fels Naptha soap (grated fine)
1/4 c Arm & Hammer washing soda
1/4 c 20 Mule Team Borax 
Mix & store.  1 quart of this cost us about 2.00 instead of costing 15.00.  This does about 50 loads depending on if you use 1 or 2 tablespoons.

It cleans very well.

Wife makes the same stuff and it works very well. I think she also adds oxiclean powder but I could be wrong. Plus the extra washing soda is useful for electrolysis rust removal.