Author Topic: Storing Eggs  (Read 3012 times)

Offline TwoBluesMama

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Storing Eggs
« on: November 03, 2009, 09:56:34 PM »
I am wondering if anyone has tried to dry eggs before.  I have been dehydrating a bunch of stuff lately and came upon a recipe in the dehydrator book (from the late 70's) for drying eggs.  Says you can scramble them and pour on to a tray and dry.  Another article I read said to first cook them (scrambled) to kill any samonella and then dry.  After they're dry to crush into a powder keeping track of how many eggs you used so when you reconstitute you know what you have and then store airtight.  Hmmm- need to do something as I'm not really liking freezing my extra hen eggs-trying to get away from the freezer. Course right now don't have to worry about extra as we're not getting ANY - the ladies have decided they need new frocks and are running nearly naked in the yard. It's too cold for such silly behavior. Although if I were into tying fishing flies I'd have it made with all the feathers flying. Any suggestions?  Thanks TBM

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Storing Eggs
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2009, 02:07:03 PM »
I have tried using mineral oil when I found a great deal on eggs to preserve them longer. It worked very well for me... methodology from my chicken book:

Eggs should be oiled 24 hrs after being laid so some of their carbon dioxide can escape and the whites won't take on a muddy appearance.

Into a small bowl pour white mineral oil, availalbe at any drugstore. The oil must be free of bacteria and mold, which you can ensure by heating the oil to 180 degrees F. for 20 minutes. Cool the oil to 70 degrees F before dipping the eggs.

The eggs must be at room temp 50-70 degrees F and fully dry. With tongs or slotted spoon, immerse the eggs in the oil one by one. To remove excess oil, placed each dipped egg on a rack and let the oil drain for at least 30 minutes. Oiled eggs may be used like fresh eggs except when it comes to cake baking - oiling eggs interferes with the foaming properties of the whites they won't whip up as well as fresh ones.

In clean, closed cartons in a cool place, eggs dipped in oil will keep for several months. Like all eggs stored for the long term, they'll eventually develop an off flavor... a flavor changed is obvious in eggs stored at 34 degrees F for more than four months... by six months the off flavor is unacceptable to most people.

.....

What I actually did (I don't always follow directions exactly):  I let the eggs purchased at the grocery store on sale sit until they reached room temp. Then, I just used my hands to oil the eggs and placed them back in the cartons (pointy end down). I don't think any of them were kept longer than about 2 months and they all were just fine for us. My method would probably prove to be inferior for the longer storage... but it was a lot less mess and fuss.

Offline TwoBluesMama

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Re: Storing Eggs
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2009, 02:30:15 PM »
Thanks lvschant - I did find a YouTube video about dehydrating eggs and may try it and your method both.  Oiling the eggs makes sense and since (well when they are laying -right now they are molting) I have very fresh eggs this may be a great method.  I am always looking for ways to preserve stuff without refrigeration or freezing for that just in case scenario.  Blessings TBM