Author Topic: What I learned from many years of camping  (Read 36971 times)

Offline Adam B.

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #60 on: June 19, 2012, 10:32:23 PM »
For backpacking a 24oz pop bottle re-filled with good vodka (think Belevedere or Grey Goose) — along with those lemonade single serve packets can turn your ordinary water into at least a weekend's worth of vodka lemonade and keep you more buzzed around the campfire than a 6 pack of beer (for MUCH less weight cost). A 24oz plastic pop bottle won't break even when you drop it on a rock from a good height, AND you can toss it in the campfire when you are finished (or better yet, have an extra "ghetto canteen" if it becomes necessary).

ALSO — vodka will disinfect a wound (at least I think it will) hahaha.

Offline idelphic

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #61 on: June 22, 2012, 10:53:33 AM »
For backpacking a 24oz pop bottle re-filled with good vodka (think Belevedere or Grey Goose) — along with those lemonade single serve packets can turn your ordinary water into at least a weekend's worth of vodka lemonade and keep you more buzzed around the campfire than a 6 pack of beer (for MUCH less weight cost). A 24oz plastic pop bottle won't break even when you drop it on a rock from a good height, AND you can toss it in the campfire when you are finished (or better yet, have an extra "ghetto canteen" if it becomes necessary).

ALSO — vodka will disinfect a wound (at least I think it will) hahaha.
Take some paracord and that bottle and make the canteen..  burning the bottle or any trash (other then plain paper) puts toxins in the air..  NTM that one that bottle is burning it is difficult to put out.  Have you had burning plastic come in contact with any of your gear or even you? nasty mess,..and damn painful.

Offline Adam B.

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #62 on: June 22, 2012, 02:17:09 PM »
When I see the corporations stop making packaging such as a 2ft wide by 2ft giant plastic container for a computer chip that is .25" x .25" — or see them stop dumping TONS of toxins directly into the river, I'll be worried about what burning a single plastic bottle is going to do LMFAO. But again, I usually don't burn anything I think I can use later.

And yes I have been burned by hot plastic. Doing Ptex repairs on skis when I was in high school at the bike shop over the winters...

I cannot even COUNT the number of times I have had the drippings from a hot Ptex candle land on my skin and you are supposed to immediately dunk your hand into a bucket of water (next to your workbench) and NOT peel back the plastic because you basically have a 2nd degree burn (at least) by the time you even get your hand to the water.

I used to come home from that job covered in plastic "pock marks" that had to heal a little before peeling the plastic off.

Between slicing my knuckles on ski edges and Ptex burns I hated that crap — as much as I love to ski I hated doing those.

Offline idelphic

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #63 on: June 22, 2012, 06:57:26 PM »
Ouch - Can't say that sounds like much fun.. I tried ski'ing once..  just about wrenched my knees off.

I have a 2-liter bottle we just emptied.. thought about keeping it, cleaning it and using it as a 'large canteen'...  but I'm not sure right now.  It would be at least more then I have now.. Need more gear!

Offline RPZ

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #64 on: June 22, 2012, 09:31:56 PM »
Buy lightweight highest quality gear in all categories. It is worth it.

Never pitch a tent on a mountainside in the dark in a slight hollow.

Offline Cryptozoic

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #65 on: July 14, 2012, 11:17:22 AM »
I think more like a backpacker than a car camper.

Less is more.  Dave Canterbury ("Dual Survival") has about 500 YouTubes out:
http://www.thepathfinderschoolllc.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-i3pFPhs9o&feature=fvwrel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCacg57rxwU&feature=relmfu
and some innovative high quality gear in his online store.

Earlier I posted here about a fold-up miniature camp stove but now there are better ways:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtSoKaZ3Qxk
http://stores.thepathfinderschoolllc.com/-strse-437/Pathfinder-Pack-Stove-w-fdsh-/Detail.bok
The "Pathfinder Pack Stove" can also be put in the coals of a fire to give you a nice place to put your cook pot.

2 Liter soda bottles really are a great way to carry water but you need a metal container to put that water on the fire.
Dave has put together an elegant system:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYukUty4-1U&feature=relmfu
Canvas cover
http://stores.thepathfinderschoolllc.com/-strse-424/Water-Bottle-Bag/Detail.bok
In that canvas canteen holder I have fit an amazing amount of stuff.
Like (2) heavy duty 42gallon barrel liners which can serve as shelter, poncho and other uses.
Like 3 different ways of starting fire (including the cotton ball & Vaseline trick in a small zip-lok bag).
Like a plastic bottle of iodine.
Like a sawzall blade.  They have a tip on the tang which fits perfectly into the gap between the jaws of 6" vice grips to make a great hand saw. (I hang the vice grips outside the bag, along with some duct tape wrapped around a short piece of 3/4" PVC pipe, 75' of paracord).  I put an old rifle strap on the canvas holder and tied another bandanna around it.   

That's a LOT of potential in a small package for those who wish to travel light.  Throw it over your shoulder, grab your staff, strap on
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdby3NvyAYQ
The Hoodlum knife, which has a sheath with enough extra carrying capacity to be almost a survival kit in itself, and as long as you are properly dressed, you have everything you need.  Well, except a girlfriend, but she would have to carry her own gear ;)
 

Offline Adam B.

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #66 on: July 16, 2012, 09:18:24 AM »
Quote
I have a 2-liter bottle we just emptied.. thought about keeping it, cleaning it and using it as a 'large canteen'...  but I'm not sure right now.  It would be at least more then I have now.. Need more gear!

I can't think of a better water carrier than a 2 liter pop bottle. They are designed to withstand so much pressure I swear by them. A 1 gallon jug will rupture if you drop it from table height. I assume you could drop a 2 liter off a skyscraper and it will just bounce LOL.

I've given 2 liter bottles full of water to my son for a whole weekend watching him throw it against rocks, dropping it from all heights, and putting it through every test imaginable to not only have it unbroken, but still sealed tight!

I pretty much wash out all of my 2 liter bottles when they are empty and fill them from the water filter for my water storage needs from now on. Those and any plastic 1-gallon jugs you get that have iced tea or some other drink in them that are solid.

Here is another idea I had (someone gave me) — which would be GREAT to keep in mind.

Before I go camping next time I am going to take a one gallon drinking water bottle (a solid bottle, not a jug) and freeze it (with the cap off of course to prevent splitting).

Then I basically have a 1 gallon ice block inside of my cooler which should last all weekend, and as it melts is also providing cold drinking water!

Camping in Kentucky for a week in 110 degree heat, having to go get 50lbs of ice every day to keep our fold cold made me start thinking of better ways of keeping stuff cold longer and I know from experience that very large blocks of ice tend to last much longer than ice cubes from a bag of ice will.

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #67 on: July 16, 2012, 09:56:28 AM »
As others have said, big blocks of ice stay frozen much longer than cubes.  Freeze a gallon jug of water and put that into the cooler.  It should last several days.

To extend the life of your ice, pre-chill the cooler.  A couple of hours before packing the cooler, stick one of these blocks of ice in the cooler.  When time to pack the cooler, replace the block of ice with another block and pack your cooler with the rest of your stuff.  Keeping the cooler in the shade makes a huge difference in the life of the ice.

Keep drinks and food in separate coolers.  The drink cooler gets opened far more often than the food cooler, so the ice will melt quicker in the drink cooler.

Offline Adam B.

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #68 on: July 17, 2012, 07:59:39 AM »
I don't know if it has been mentioned in this thread or not but this works VERY well — buy a roll of that solar reflective bubble wrap insulation stuff at Lowes or Home Depot...

http://www.homedepot.com/buy/building-materials/insulation/reflectix/16-in-x-25-ft-staple-tab-insulation-20960.html

Using duct tape you can use this stuff to make a form-fitting liner for just about any cooler you have. It really does a good job making the ice take twice as long to melt. I've really only gone to the trouble to do this for backpacking trips and for use in small coolers, but I can wrap a frozen steak in this stuff and keep it in a cooler bag lined with the same stuff, and a handful of ice cubes and the steak will stay cold for 2 days.

When I get more ambitious I have plenty of this stuff (a roll will last you for YEARS) and plan on insulating a larger cooler on a hot camping trip to see if I go through less ice. That combined with keeping a frozen jug of water in the cooler should help tremendously.

I also found on Craigslist an ice cube maker that plugs into a wall outlet, where you pour water into it to make cubes — and wondered if it would run on a vehicle's outlets with a DC / AC converter. That would be a great way to avoid having to run to some store to find ice on a camping trip for sure! I never ended up buying the thing but it did make me think about the potential there.

Offline idelphic

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #69 on: July 17, 2012, 08:06:08 AM »
I don't know if it has been mentioned in this thread or not but this works VERY well — buy a roll of that solar reflective bubble wrap insulation stuff at Lowes or Home Depot...

http://www.homedepot.com/buy/building-materials/insulation/reflectix/16-in-x-25-ft-staple-tab-insulation-20960.html

Using duct tape you can use this stuff to make a form-fitting liner for just about any cooler you have. It really does a good job making the ice take twice as long to melt. I've really only gone to the trouble to do this for backpacking trips and for use in small coolers, but I can wrap a frozen steak in this stuff and keep it in a cooler bag lined with the same stuff, and a handful of ice cubes and the steak will stay cold for 2 days.

When I get more ambitious I have plenty of this stuff (a roll will last you for YEARS) and plan on insulating a larger cooler on a hot camping trip to see if I go through less ice. That combined with keeping a frozen jug of water in the cooler should help tremendously.

I also found on Craigslist an ice cube maker that plugs into a wall outlet, where you pour water into it to make cubes — and wondered if it would run on a vehicle's outlets with a DC / AC converter. That would be a great way to avoid having to run to some store to find ice on a camping trip for sure! I never ended up buying the thing but it did make me think about the potential there.
Another things about those units is that they use a metal plate (so I have been told) to freeze the ice not air like in a home freezer setup.  so they make ice quicker and more efficiently.

Feed it water, power and you (in theory) should have buckets of ice every 2 hours..

Offline Adam B.

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Re: What I learned from many years of camping
« Reply #70 on: July 20, 2012, 02:57:38 PM »
That's cool. I don't know how fast it would have worked. The guy was selling his for $50 when they were listed online for about $200 +/- but I have better things to spend money on than an ice maker right now so I passed on it.

I am definitely interested to see if it draws too much current to use the biggest power inverter I keep in my truck or if it would run well without draining the battery too bad. I am assuming it takes a bit of power to freeze water however it works.

It sure would have come in handy down there in Kentucky instead of having to drive up to Morehead to buy ice every day when it was 110 degrees LOL!!! We estimate we went through at least 200lbs of ice during the time we were there, probably more!