Author Topic: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show  (Read 46204 times)

Michael Masse

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #60 on: March 03, 2009, 01:59:57 PM »
Well I am have about nil in first aid training.  I got the soldiering iron idea from the "Patriots" book I believe.

I am thinking of a first aid kit in the event that no hospital is available and "in the field" is all you got.

With that in mind what would you want and need.

My wife is an RN.  I should probably leave that up to her.




Offline 19kilo

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #61 on: March 03, 2009, 10:53:49 PM »
Quote
Regardless, I still think it sounds like a good "for the hell of it" item to have in a survivalist's first aid kit. The packet is lightweight and doesn't take up much space. I plan on getting one for my personal kit soon.



I have two celox packs and a couple quik clots down in my first-aid bag.  I bring one with me when ever I go out on long rides on the bike to.  Like you said.  you never know.

Offline Nate

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #62 on: March 04, 2009, 02:23:33 PM »

My wife is an RN.  I should probably leave that up to her.


This is definitely a good place to start with assembling a kit.  However, most nurses are used to working in a hospital where they have access to what they need when they need it.  At least, this is what I have been told by family members.  Nurses may not have the experience to improv. a solution to a situation you did not pack something for.  For the ultimate resource on improvisation with what you have in the field, I would consult a combat medic.  From my very limited experience talking with these guys, they can do wonders with very little!

Offline CBMS

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #63 on: March 04, 2009, 02:35:42 PM »
combat medic or ER nurse. Also Heli-EMT's and SAR Medics. these people are used to getting things done RIGHT NOW with whatever they have on hand.
Good things to remember.

Michael Masse

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #64 on: March 04, 2009, 03:12:33 PM »
Ya right on.  A friend is an ER doctor.  He knows how to get it done with 2 days no sleep.


Offline Heavy G

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #65 on: March 21, 2009, 07:55:02 PM »
(This thread has been selected as a “best of” thread by Heavy G.  You can search for “best of” threads by using that term in the search mode.  Everyone on the forum is encouraged to reply to a post they think is “best of” worthy so we can all search for them.  For more information on the “best of” thing, see http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3423.0 )

Cucuy

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #66 on: May 05, 2009, 06:35:16 PM »
Hit up some technicare.  It's awesome stuff, just a little pricey.  If I remember correctly(and please feel free to correct me, it's been a while since I compared skin preps), alcohol requires 30 seconds of friction to achieve a 90% skin disinfection, betadine/iodine take 5 minutes of constant friction for a 99% disinfection, but technicare has a 99.99% kill rate after 30 seconds and a 45.54% residual kill rate for up to six hours.  Plus, it can be used on all mucus membranes safely and comfortably, and it makes a great toothpaste and shampoo.   

buffalosoldier

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #67 on: May 09, 2009, 11:00:12 PM »
Here is my opinion on the OP, from my limited experience as a first aid buff, and a nurse in training.

First and foremost, leave the booze behind, it is dead weight and giving it to someone who is hysterical or entering shock may or may not have the calming effect you want, but simply a stuporous or mayhap even violent.

As for the stitching, forget it unless you have the suture experience you need. lining up layers and proper debridement, those are just two of the issues that will come up. Honestly you are better off with steri strips for wounds, or even the classic super glue unless the wound is too big.

Offline Spamity Calamity

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #68 on: May 09, 2009, 11:34:47 PM »
I would also want to include some stimpacks and rad-away in my first aid kit.

Offline Bones

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #69 on: May 10, 2009, 08:33:12 AM »
I think it is important to evaluate (like you do with all your preparations) what is our goal here? What are the threats and incidences that you hope for this kit to be able to address? Who will be using it and on what population? A kit for a family with small children will of necessity be different in its focus and contents than one designed for an armed patrol of adults or for an elderly couple. This may sound obvious but unfortunately it is the Achilles’ heel of most “pre-packaged” commercially sold kits on the market.

Just as there is no one firearm that is ideal in all situations, there is no one medical kit that will meet the needs of all users in all environments. What is needed is a modular system of kits that revolves around a common core of contents, but, that can then be supplemented with additional equipment, supplies and medications to address the specific user’s needs at the time. Hold that thought as I will get back to it after I review some commercially available kits I've seen.

I’d like to use the following criteria for scoring the kits in question so we can compare apples-to apples as much as possible. I am looking for a kit that is:


*   Comprehensive – has an adequate range of supplies, meds and equipment for a family or small group of 6 or less with sufficient quantities to last a
     week or more in a post SHTF type environment
*   User focused – the kit is directed at addressing the specific needs of specific scenario (this can be a positive or a negative
     depending on whether that is YOUR need)
*   Cost efficient – how does the amount being charged compare to what you could get on your own assembling your own kit, are there high dollar
     but extraneous supplies or equipment included
*   Portable/transportable – can you pack it in your BOB or your BOV (or is it too large to be easily handy when you need it
*   Lay-person friendly – does it contain advanced items that require special skills and training beyond the scope of the average lay-person first-aider
*   Expandable/customizable – is the kit modular in construction and does it have room to add or exchange modules based on the needs of the group or situation




http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/category/k-ems

Although this site sells several different “kits” I looked at their CERT team and CERT vehicle bags as these appeared closest to the type of kit you seem to be looking for. The kits here are designed for members of Citizens Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) which are typically lay-people who have been trained as first-responders (think advanced first aid providers) by a FEMA directed program. They are called up and deploy in response to local disasters in their communities and are required to keep a kit of this type close at hand (usually in their vehicles) so they can be ready at a moment’s notice. As a result the supplies that were selected for these kits are typical of what a minimally trained lay-person would need to address the injuries (and a few illnesses) of civilian victims of natural or man-made disasters. Like most preassembled kits they focus heavily on bandaging of minor wounds – which makes sense given the types of injuries normally encountered in disaster scenarios. Also, like most preassembled kits they are charging WAY more than the contents would cost if you bought them separately (especially if you bought them in bulk as part of a group purchase). The positives of these kits are that they are focused, transportable and lay-person friendly. The negatives are that the focus may not meet your family’s needs, they are lacking in a number of meds that might be helpful in treating certain common illnesses and that the are not cost effective.
Scoring:
   SCORE
·   Comprehensive   C
·   user focused   A
·   Cost efficient   D
·   Portable/transportable   A
·   Lay-person friendly   A
·   Expandable/customizable   C
·   OVERALL   B-



http://www.wildernessmedical.com/details.ASP?KitNr=4

This site has multiple levels of kit and seems to take to heart the scalability of their product as a means to address the varied needs of various users. There are about 7 different levels of kit, each with a cute name and each housed in a pretty bag they had made to match their marketing scheme. Their top-of-the-line kit is commendable in its scope and extremely comprehensive and includes a dental kit, skin staplers and better instruments than any other kit I evaluated. They also include in this kit a supply of survival gear items not normally seen in FAKs (first aid kits). But do you really need a cable saw in your FAK? Only if you intend to do field amputations. Also, at $960 for the top of line kit you are tying up precious capital for something that you hope you never have to use! Granted they have a cheap kit ($169) but that kit is, well, cheap. It has insufficient supplies and no serious equipment – but the bag is cute!

Scoring:
   SCORE
·   Comprehensive   A
·   user focused   C
·   Cost efficient   F
·   Portable/transportable   A
·   Lay-person friendly   B
·   Expandable/customizable   C
·   OVERALL   C


http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/products.php?catname=Professional&cat=7

This site touts itself as the supplier to the field professional and its kits reflect that focus. They appear to be directed at WEMS (Wilderness Emergency Medical Services – a branch of the EMT profession focused on adventure trip medical support) personnel and as such are NOT family or lay person friendly. Think “ambulance crew without the ambulance and in the middle of nowhere” and you will understand who they are targeting with their products. While the modular format is good (probably the best of those evaluated) the modules themselves are directed at various advanced skill-sets (surgery, suturing, etc) that are beyond the scope of the average lay-rescuer. As you click through their site and look at the specifics of the supplies in each kit you will notice that the although the pricing is better it is at the expense of the breadth of supplies and their quantities included. I like the portability of the kits here and they are certainly expandable. Unfortunately, you would HAVE to expand them if you want to have the bare basics you might need for the typical family FAK.

Scoring:
   SCORE
·   Comprehensive   D
·   user focused   A
·   Cost efficient   C
·   Portable/transportable   A
·   Lay-person friendly   B
·   Expandable/customizable   A
·   OVERALL   B


So, what does this all mean? It means that due to the commercial nature of the business these vendors are in they have done an adequate job of coming up with “pre-fab” kits that appeal to a broad spectrum of people who are looking to spend their allocated budgets on “first-aid supplies/kits” without spending a lot of time thinking about what it is they really need. However, the kits in question probably aren’t focused enough or cost effective enough to meet the needs of the average family looking to address the “Band-Aids” area of the 3-B’s.

So what’s an expecting mother to do in this situation? I’m glad you asked. Put it together YOURSELF! I have written a working document that I call a modular medical kit for the family. It is based on addressing the needs of the average family or small group based on the criteria I used to score the kits above. I'll be sharing this list with the attendees at the Region 5 Campout on Memorial Day weekend. (If anyone else wants a copy just email me after Memorial Day).

The concept here is very simple, the small individual first aid kit contains many of the same items as the large family size kit only in smaller quantities. These first lists assume that no one is available with formal medical training (beyond basic first aid). The individual kit should fit in a small box or zippered bag that can go in a cargo pocket on your pants or in your BOB. The family sized kit could be stored in a medium to large tackle box with individual trays for the items. Additionally, these kits assume 4 weeks or less of need without benefit of restock. If the anticipated need is greater then bulk stock should be stored separately elsewhere in the preps.

Most of these items are available through online vendors – just not always in the quantities you are looking for. The OTC meds can be purchased locally and rotated to maintain potency. Additionally, the meds list would need to be expanded for small children or people with special medical needs.  I have not sat down and priced the contents of this kit although I estimate I spent about $200 stocking our family kit.

As a point of reference I buy most of my bulk stuff from:

https://www.shopmedvet.com/

I apologize for the length of this post but like most things survival related – it isn’t as simple as it appears on the surface. Hopefully I didn’t bore you
« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 08:37:24 AM by Bones »

Offline Spamity Calamity

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #70 on: May 10, 2009, 09:39:46 AM »
^^ great post

Offline The Wilderness

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #71 on: May 10, 2009, 11:49:00 AM »
Great post Bones,

I haven't had time to read it in detail but will do so this evening. Looks like you put a fair amount of time into it, good job.

The Wilderness

Offline shangrily

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #72 on: May 11, 2009, 08:12:36 PM »
Having a guide to medicinal herbs would be a nice addition should you run out of medical supplies.

walker

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #73 on: May 11, 2009, 11:59:47 PM »
Bones,

Great post.  I agree 100%.   Beyond a basic first-aid (band-aids, dressings, OTC meds, etc.) one must consider the situation likely to be encountered and the actual training one has to utilize advanced gear.  My remote wilderness kit is very different than my urban vehicle travel kit.  Both of these are often adjusted to meet specific needs of the group and length of time I would expect before being able to evacuate the casualty.  Remember, most (but not all) military medical kits are designed around the fact that a medevac is expected to be inbound, which may or may not be obtainable in very remote or SHTF scenarios.   

For a wilderness kit, I like to prioritize based upon what are the most likely illnesses/injuries, and build up from there.
http://www.wemjournal.org/wmsonline/?request=get-document&issn=1080-6032&volume=014&issue=03&page=0174
http://www.wemjournal.org/wmsonline/?request=get-document&issn=1080-6032&volume=019&issue=02&page=0091
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2610017


If you only read one, read THIS one:
http://www.em-news.com/pt/re/emmednews/fulltext.00132981-200411000-00019.htm;jsessionid=KJDb224J95sL4x1GwzXQhYHd2GwfQLTZzyHSVHvBpyyswyWWr7J3!762269091!181195628!8091!-1

Without any ambition to hijack this thread, remember that many techniques can be utilized to improvise things like stretchers, splints, wound flushing/closure, etc.
If you only had one first-aid level course to attend, I would recommend the Wilderness First Responder course.  They will teach you this, and more.

I look forward to seeing your write-up Bones, please post a copy after the get together!
« Last Edit: April 30, 2013, 11:40:50 PM by Archer »

I miss Dixie

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #74 on: May 14, 2009, 04:39:52 PM »
Thinking about some folks who are not trained like I am, I would suggest some good hemostats, scissors, trauma shears, a good SHARP knife, a n exacto knife or scalpel will have lots of uses. Solid tweezers gauze pads and kerlix for the big stuff. Kerlix is the soft plush bandage roll, it can be used for a lot of things. Triangular bandages (cravats) are multi use things that I will not leave the road without, why do you think the scouts wear them around the neck? Quick sling or bandage. They make a good tourniquet if really needed. Look for lots of multi use items so that there is little need to overlap. Think back packing. Carry what you need and not a lot of stuff you will not use. If you really need a tourniquet and there is no follow up in the next week, are you gonna make it anyway? Sutures are good, but how many of you would know what to do with them? Steri Strips work just as well for most lacs. If there is damage internally what you do is temporary anyway. If it is a really big bleed you need something like quickclot. The one with silver helps reduce infection too. Tourniquets put on something that doesn't really need one will cause death of the limb by its self. Someone suggested a thoroseal or something similar for a chest injury, a piece of plastic taped on 3 sides works just about as well and takes up less space.  You can't downplay Motrin it helps everything. Epi pens are great, but 25 mg benedryl and a prilosec works and you can buy them. Using both for an allergic reaction covers H1 and H2 receptors. betadine is a great cleanser for wounds if you need to really debried one and then dress it. for low blood sugar, D 50 is prescription, instant glucose that you squeeze onto the gums to absorb is not. and it works without an IV. Ace wraps have their uses, but only minimally. They do not support well enough to walk out on an ankle, but some cravats tying a splint fashioned out of limbs, and a crutch the same way might. Again a good sharp knife. Sam splints rock also by the way. Hypothermia, carry fire starting and space blankets. Water, water, water. I gave out more water and IVs for hydration than anything in Iraq.

buffalosoldier

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #75 on: May 16, 2009, 07:26:05 AM »


I have two celox packs and a couple quik clots down in my first-aid bag.  I bring one with me when ever I go out on long rides on the bike to.  Like you said.  you never know.

You know, there is a lot of research out there that shows quick clot may have negative outcomes... I will try and find some to post.

Offline student

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #76 on: May 16, 2009, 01:58:25 PM »
A rationally prepared risk/benefit-driven first aid kit need not be expensive, cumbersome or high-maintenance. Applying 'threat-matrix'-type thinking towards your unique health situation (dependent on age, long term medical problems, intended survivalist persona - hard core militant or survival pacifist or both, age of kids, etc.) will guide the rationalisation of your kit. I think of the 'health-matrix' in terms of (i) the likelihood that an event will occur and (ii) the benefit achievable should appropriate equipment be available (taking into account the possible limitation in tertiary healthcare i.e. staffed/stocked hospital). As you will see, in most likelihood you will not need intensive care gear. That said, certain high-value, low-availability medical supplies may be of considerable barter value in a post-WSHTF scenario.

Higher-likelihood / Higher-benefit Events

  • Exposure-related illness. Need to have good blankets / cold-weather gear / fire equipment / shelter if it is cold and good UV-resistant cover / sunscreen / hat / hydration if it is hot. Need to have equipment for purifying / sterilizing water (this may be high tech, or simply cooking equipment for boiling).
  • Burns. Need to have some soothing ointments for sunburns and fire / scald-related minor burns. Need to have first aid knowledge for dressing and management of moderate burns. Severe burns will likely be fatal in a WSHTF scenario without healthcare (they are often fatal even with healthcare).
  • Minor cuts and scrapes. Most injuries will be mild and not require sutures. An antiseptic ointment of some sort (I like Betadine), wound irrigation / cleaning material (gauze and normal saline / sterilized water), simple dressings and bandages and butterfly bandages / superglu for those wounds that need opposed edges. Simple analgesia like acetaminophen and ibuprofen.
  • Blisters. Particularly if walking long distances or working manually when you weren't doing much of this before WSHTF. Prevention is best. Hence, well fitted shoes, lots of clean dry thick socks, gloves with shovelling / gardening for the first time, etc. Appropriate bandages for blister management. Antiseptic ointment. Simple analgesia.
  • Minor soft tissue trauma. Bumps, bruises, ligament and tendon injuries (sprains and strains). Could consider topical anti-inflammatory creams (Voltaren, etc) - although there is no evidence to suggest these work. Simple analgesics. Basic first aid knowledge on RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation) and immobilisation as required (for ankle ligament tears). Bandages/slings.
  • Period pain. For women. Simple analgesics. Sanitary products.
  • Pregnancy. Contraception (condoms for men/women, OCPs for women who use them) if you plan to be sexually active and believe in this. Condoms useful for a whole lot more than loving and good to have around anyway.
  • Mild self-limiting respiratory tract infections. This will most likely be viral. Especially if you have kids. Benefit from a thermometer and simple (including kids) analgesia / antipyretics (acetaminophen). Basic first aid knowledge to know when a simple infection may be something more serious requiring travel to somewhere with more advanced medical supplies.
  • Regular medications for chronic illness. If you take medications for chronic diseases such as hypertension, IBD, diabetes, arthritis, etc., you will need a stock of these to last you until civility returns. The duration and size of your stockpile will likely reflect the shelf-life of your medications. Diabetics will need to ensure access to a functioning glucometer and access to management options for hypoglycaemia.
  • Stress-related / anxiety-related reactions. If members of your team have not psychologically prepared for a WSHTF situation, you may find yourself managing their hysteria. Simple psychological techniques can be helpful, as can alcohol in substitution for benzodiazepines (which are a controlled anxiolytic). Knowing how to take a calming leadership role can be reassuring to many.
  • Gastroenteritis. Especially as septic systems begin to fail and hygiene practices go out the window because of lack of clean water and soaps. Keeping good hygiene, learning to make soap, avoiding septic waste / contaminated water are all preventatives. Oral rehydration solution is the best and simplest fluid replacement option for a kit. For more discussion on this, see this forum thread.
  • Bites and rashes. Vaseline for chafe. Soothing creams for simple insect bites. Appropriate mosquito protection if in a high risk area (this means clothing cover, repellent and mosquito nets). Basic first aid management for snake bites (there is a poison control aspect to this and a wound care aspect). Wound infections from animal and human bites are managed with different antibiotics to wounds caused by object trauma.

Moderate-likelihood / Moderate-benefit Events

  • Exacerbation of chronic illness. If you have condition for which you regularly take medication, you need to plan on it flaring (if it can flare) without medical services available. This means you and your team knowing how and having materials to manage an exacerbation of your asthma/Crohn's/UC/arthritis/smoking-related lung disease, etc. For people with asthma, having a spacer is invaluable as it is just as effective as a nebuliser in an exacerbation. If you are a smoker and have a daily morning cough/emphysema, you are at risk of developing an infective exacerbation of your airways disease. Appropriate vaccination (if you believe in vaccines) will reduce your 5-year risk pneumococcal chest infection and is standard of care.
  • Common conditions. Common conditions occur commonly. This does not change post-WSHTF. Heart attack, stroke, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, gastric reflux and haemorrhoids will occur, to name but a few. Some of these (MI, stroke) will not benefit without diagnostic / therapeutic facilities. Others (UTIs, reflux, haemorrhoids) may be managed with natural remedies or common sense. How you prepare for these depends upon your expected risk for each.
  • Moderate soft tissue +/- bony trauma. Significant tendon / ligament injuries can severely limit your mobility. Rather than purchase expensive cumbersome immobilisation equipment, learn how to create a crutches / stretchers / supports from bush and urban scrap materials. Newspaper and duct tape can splint across simple fractures. Having access to reading material on fracture management / external reduction of simple fractures and dislocations will be useful. More significant analgesics will be required in this situation, and should be seen as temporising short-term solutions only. Without access to surgeons and radiology, the management of a simple ankle fracture and a severe ankle ligament injury will be the same in a WSHTF scenario: rest, ice, compress, elevate, simple analgesia.
  • Moderate cuts or scrapes. These are larger wounds that probably would have been sutured when doctors were available. They will occur when behaving recklessly and hence can be avoided with appropriate knowledge of knife techniques and careful travel. Management is largely as for minor cuts and scrapes as above. Cleaning the wound and removal of foreign debris is particularly important. They can be closed with correct dressing, butterfly bandages, superglue, staples or sutures as you see fit / are comfortable. Some of these wounds will heal appropriately if dressed correctly, kept clean and allowed to heal by secondary intention.
  • Wound infections. Most younger healthier people heal relatively well following properly cleaned and managed contaminated wounds without the use of antibiotics. Others with some degree of immunosuppression (including the elderly, those with diabetes / malnutrition / vascular disease and those using immunosuppression) as well as those with complicated wounds (particularly involving the groin, mucosal surfaces or collections of pus) are at higher risk of wound infections. I don't intend to use antibiotics for wounds unless they are frankly infected or have shit in them at the time of injury. Draining pus wherever possible is mission number one. This may mean leaving open a wound to heal by secondary intention, frequently cleaning/debriding/packing it as required. Sterile gauze and betadine are a must. Topical antibiotic creams are probably less useful than betadine for wound infections. Penicillin-containing antibiotic creams have been taken off the market in many countries due to a high propensity to induce penicillin-resistance. Penicillin/ampicillin is not the antibiotic of choice for wound infections in a post-WSHTF scenario. If they are post-traumatic skin wounds, the likely organisms are Staph aureus/epidermidis (resistant to penicillin/ampicillin), Streptococci (sensitive to penicillin/ampicillin in some settings) or Pseudomonas (resistant to penicillin/ampicillin). Choice of antibiotic is dependent on the setting of injury and likely contaminants, and is a topic for another thread at another time. Proper wound management in a well fed, well cared for healthy individual should avoid need for antibiotics. Only use antibiotics to which you know you are not allergic, as reactions can be severe and life-threatening.
  • Allergic reactions. Some people are prone to allergy and others are not. If someone in your team has asthma/hayfever/eczema/food sensitivities or skin sensitivities, being well stocked to manage reactions is important as they may threaten life. Sedating antihistamines are useful in managing allergic reactions, as well as nausea, vertigo and insomnia. Nonsedating antihistamines are useful for managing allergies without impairing alertness but they may be slightly less effective. Both are good. Steroids, ventolin+spacer, H1 antagonists and an epi-pen are all dependent on your expected risk of allergy. Some poisonous plants can trigger a histamine-derived allergic reaction, so for the low-risk allergy person some antihistamine supply is useful.

Lower-likelihood / Lower-benefit Events

  • Major trauma. Unless you are medically trained and plan to use your medical kit for work/emergency purposes, I would not stock for major trauma. If it occurs, without medical skills and backup of a surgeon / intensive care / hospital resources, likelihood of survival is low even if you are fully stocked. The best treatment is prevention, and this means driving safely and avoiding conflict in a post-WSHTF world. If you intend to adopt a more combative approach to your survival or see yourself driving through mine-fields under RPG fire dodging IEDs, perhaps you might stock some limited items. Otherwise, save yourself the cost and weight.
  • Upper airway obstruction in kids. Kids can get some nasty upper airway conditions that threaten life. This is particularly the case if they are not vaccinated. Being able to recognise impending upper airway obstruction in an otherwise sick kid is important. Appropriate treatment will require a stocked hospital/doctor - but first aid will buy time.

You will see that the vast majority of health issues likely to occur in a WSHTF scenario are preventable with proper preparation, training and discipline. A lot of other management elements can be fabricated from urban / bush scrap (stretchers, immobilisation) or obtained through traditional methods. The core medical kit seeks to achieve the most bang-for-buck on risk/benefit rationalisation. The result is a kit that is useful, light weight, portable, scalable, relatively inexpensive, disposable and low maintenance. Specialised equipment should be reserved for those with appropriate training who intend to use their kit in normal-day settings with hospital backup.

As has been pointed out already in this thread, nothing beats staying as healthy as possible when times are good so that you are better able to survive when times are bad.

Edit: formatting.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2009, 03:01:04 PM by student »

walker

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #77 on: May 17, 2009, 12:38:39 AM »
Excellent post Student!  You put the list I have in my head on paper!  I organize most of the “High Likelihood/High Benefit” items into my primary first-aid kit that I carry on my person every time I go off the beaten track.  I place the “Moderate Likelihood/Moderate Benefit” items along with larger re-supply items into my advanced kit, which I often leave at base camp/vehicle, unless the journey dictates that I have it on hand. 
Maybe we should start a separate thread to discuss the details of each “treatment module”, so we can share knowledge without bogging down the details in this already very lengthy thread.

Remember, this is my carried kit for remote care, not my vehicle kit or home kit which is designed around a different set of potential injuries.
To start with, here is the list of problems I anticipate to address in my basic remote care kit, and I choose to carry enough supplies for 3 days of treatment for one person. 

Blisters
Diarrhea/Vomiting
Skin irritation/chaffing
Minor musculoskeletal injuries (sprains, strains, tendonitis)
Minor abrasions, lacerations, burns (eyes included)
Minor illnesses (respiratory illnesses, headaches, minor infections)
Environmental Injuries (insects, sun, venom, poison ivy, altitude, heat/cold)

I don't have any chronic health problems.   If I or my group did, I would add 7 days of necessary medications, and emergency meds when indicated.  (nitro tabs, albuterol inhaler, ASA, epi pen, benadryl, etc.)  Why 7 days worth?  Well if we get REALLY lost or evacuation time is lengthy, we have some additional margin for safety.

I regard a “trauma kit” as highly specialized equipment for extraordinary circumstances.  I can only envision utilizing such equipment if I anticipate a potential for a:
mountain lion/bear attack, fall onto an arrow shaft, fall from a height, accidental or intentional gun shot wound.  Do I carry one with me?  Depends upon the journey.  In SHTF, yes I would wear it.  Even though hospital level care may not be available, I might be able to do a few more procedures if the patient can survive the “golden hour”, or if I can get to my advanced kit in time.  I have the training to back up my equipment choices, and I think that is key to carrying advanced gear.

Here is another firearm analogy, I carry my basic (and sometimes trauma) kit so I can fight my way to my advanced kit and 911.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2013, 11:40:55 PM by Archer »

Offline Buffy

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #78 on: May 27, 2009, 11:12:17 AM »

You might also want a Foley catheter (sterile kit).
Tek-nu for poison ivy.
An over-the-counter asthma inhaler.
I have used polo wraps (for horses) to treat broken ribs.
Cheap stuff available at drugstore: boric acid, glycerin, cola syrup.
Women's sanitary pads are cheap and good for wound dressing.
Honey is a good antibiotic if you don't have anything else.
Maggots can be used to debride a wound. They only eat dead tissue.

Offline TrashCanMan

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #79 on: May 27, 2009, 01:26:10 PM »
In all of my first aid kits, I always pack anti-blister plasters made by Compeed.  They form an almost invisible cushioned skin over any blister and I have personally walked 60 miles with one of these protecting a burst and red raw heel blister with very little discomfort.  Don't leave home without one.

Offline bubtech

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #80 on: September 22, 2009, 08:53:04 PM »
Does anyone have a good link to buy a pre-made first aid kit? I was looking for something higher end...
http://www.practicaltrauma.com/respond.shtml
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Offline Heavy G

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #81 on: September 23, 2009, 03:15:54 PM »
Here's a thread on a kit I put together which fits in a 2 qt. canteen cover:

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=9009.0

roof_top_eagle

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #82 on: September 28, 2009, 12:02:31 PM »
Electrical tape is amazing! I was busy doing stuff around my place and I cut my finger (minor cut but still) I was in a hurry to get this stuff done so I put a piece of cotton ball on my finger and let it sit for about a minute with pressure to stop the majority of the bleeding then I cleaned out the wound with rubbing alcohol on another cotton ball, then put a fresh piece of cotton ball on the cut and wrapped it in electrical tape.  The elasticity of the electrical tape put minor pressure on the wound for me while I finished cleaning my apartment up.

This might not work well for larger cuts or wounds but it worked great for my finger's minor cut!

Offline LICountryBoy

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #83 on: September 28, 2009, 01:23:52 PM »
I second or third having superglue on hand.

I keep the following items in my first aid kits as a rule:

 Orthodontics wax - great as a quick temporary filling - keeps the air off the sensitive parts.
Also Ora-gel, has helped me when I had tooth pain.
Listerine in a pinch, after all it was designed as a surgical antiseptic. And it keeps your mouth fresh smelling.

Paper or Surgical Tape. This stuff sticks when other tapes and bandages won't also can be used to make butterflies.

A couple of compression, ace, bandages

A couple of instant Cold packs, not just for sprains etc. Good to cool down someone if they are over heating.

Hand Warmers - for the obvious reasons.

Asprin, Tylenol, Ibuprofen.

A square of muslin cloth. Light weight and fairly strong, Folded over it's a sling, can be used for compression, spare bandage, tie on a splint etc.


Offline BigDanInTX

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #84 on: September 29, 2009, 08:19:16 AM »
I was watching a video that someone had posted where they were showing what they carry into the woods for 3-4 days when they go out and camp, etc.  One thing he showed was a big container of Cayenne Pepper.

I did a little research and it turns out that it can indeed stop bleeding when mixed with a little water for a paste.  Plus, he says he also adds it to his meals, since he loves the flavor.  =-]

I'm going to get a small canister of it so that the next time I get a cut, I can try it out.  I can just picture it now...I'll be bleeding, asking the wife where the hell the cayenne is.  I'm sure she'll consider checking me into the looney bin after...  ;-]

ALPHIE OMEGA

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #85 on: October 07, 2009, 08:21:37 AM »
Well.....tried to keep it simple but just can't do it any easier than this,heck got 10 times more than this... Hell, left out half of what I wanted to put in!!!
Bandaging Supplies
Steri Strips/ butterflys tape assorted sizes
One tube (approximately 100) unsterile 4x4 dressings
One tube (approximately 100) unsterile 2x2 dressings
Packages of sterile 4x4’s
Packages of sterile 2x2’s
ABD type dressings 5 x 9 / of 8 x 71/2
Trauma Dressing 10” x 30” sterile
Vaseline guaze/Zeroform dressing 3”x9”/ 5” x 9”
Sterile oval eye patches (use paper tape for eye dressings)
Rolls of gauze bandage 4 “ sterile and unsterile
Kerlix guaze rolls 4.5” x 4.1 yds sterile
Assorted Band-Aids 1 x 3 and 2 x 4
Telfa / non-adherent pads 3”x4”
Triangular bandages 40” x 40” x 54”
Chemical ice packs small or large
Chemical heat packs
Four inch ACE wraps
Six inch ACE wraps
Rolls of tape clear tape, Paper tape and white heavy adhesive tape 1” and 2”
SAM splints the rolls or the flat splint
Arm Slings
Crutches / adjustable
Irrigation fluid (saline or sterile water) prefer all saline 0.9% (Contact saline solution works)
Trauma Shears 7 ¼”/ Paramedic shears
Unsterile nitrile gloves med /lg
Isopropyl Alcohol
Hydrogen Peroxide
Betadine solution 10%
Benzoin liquid
Eye irrigation solution/ Contact saline solution works
Betasept antiseptic surgical scrub(chlorhexidine gluconate 4%)

Medications
Ibuprofen/Motrin/Advil 200mg
Acetaminophen/ Tylenol 500mg
Aspirin 81mg
Antacid /Mylanta/ Pepto Bismul/ Rolaids your choice
Benadry/ Diphenhydramine HCL 25mg
Decongestant (Sudafed) 5mg or 10 mg if you can get it
Cough medicine/ Robitussin DM
Cough drops ( your choice)
Nyquil/Equate Nite time cough/cold /flu
Nasal spray/genasal/ (oxymetazoline HCL) 0.05%
Aleve-Naprosyn Sodium 220 mg
Lomotil/loperamide 2 mgl
Calamine Lotion
Carmex/Chapstick
Sore Throat spray w/ phenol1.4%
Several Sting-Eze Swabs
SolarCaine Spray
Vaseline or KY lubricant
Hemorrhoidal cream/ preparation H
Dimetapp if available for decongestant
Zinc Oxide ointment
Anti fungal cream /spray lotrimin (Lamisil) the best!!
Thermazene/ Silvadene /(silver sulfadiazine) cream 1 %
Antibiotic ointment/ Neosporin/triple antibiotic ointment
Betadine/Providone Iodine ointment 10%
Water Jel Burn jel w/lidocaine
Hydrocortisone ointment 1%
Assorted Children’s strength medications if needed from list above
InstaGlucose/ OR just Orange juice and add sugar 1 tsp to 4 oz OJ
Betadine/Providone Iodine ointment
Ammonia Inhalants
Alcohol Prep pads
Betadine Prep Pads/ampules

Other Supplies
Stethoscope
Blood Pressure Cuff
Oral and Rectal Thermometers with Probe covers
Probe covers
CPR mask with one-way valve
Penlight or flashlight


This is the basics I use
I have IFAK for Trauma with the sof tourniquet and nasal airway 28 or 30 fr, lubricant, Israeli dsgs 4 and 6"  4" kerlix and chemical light and Ace wrap 4", Quik clot ACS

 fIRST AID KITS ARE LIKE TOOLS EACH HAS ITS PURPOSE YOU CAN ALWAYS ADD,ORAL ANTIBIOTICS, COBAN,CELOX, AND ON AND ON
 Then I have Chest Decompression kits with Decompression needle 14 GA 2.25" TO 3 1/2", condom for flutter valve and a 3 way stopcock, vaseline guaze ,and 2" zonas tape

ALSO THERE ARE IV KITS, SPLINT KITS AND MED KITS IN MY ARRAY


Offline drthumbs

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #86 on: October 15, 2009, 12:32:22 AM »
Discussion of first aid kids on the internet often cause me to shake my head. This thread has had some really great post and some are less than wise.  In other places I have herd out right stupidly. 

First and foremost is training.  Then buy or build your kit to your level of training.

When you are building your kit, stay away from items that you are not trained to use. IV supplies, chest decompression kits and the like are great if you know how to use them and have had real field experience, but can cause more harm in the hands of some one that is not trained.

If you use a chest dart to decompress a pneumothorax and you don't know your landmarks, not only can it be ineffective, but you can easily cause a hemothorax....worse

Lets say you want to keep IV supplies.  What is the standard bolus?  What are the signs that you are overloading your pt.

If you have a suture kit, do you have sterile gloves and the ability to create a sterile field.  Why are you suturing In the first place, bleeding control, or wound closure. (suturing is not for bleeding control) If you use lidocaine,  what is the dose, how is is administered, and at what levels can cardiac arrhythmia or cardiac arrest a threat.

Now I am not bashing those that have listed these type of items. I have many of these items myself, but I have been trained in proper usage and I have field experience. (I have never sutured a real person)  Still, they do not belong in my FAK.

My point is if it is a bandage or a field cricotomy, know what you are doing before hand. Training is a must and preferable experience on real patients. You will then be able to make a good assessment on what needs to be in your kit and what doesn't, and if your are not 100% on an item, it doesn't belong in your kit.

roof_top_eagle

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #87 on: October 15, 2009, 06:58:19 AM »
Earlier I suggested a Sharpie, I think a better idea would be a china marker or grease pencil.  They wont fail over time as a ink marker might.  You know exactly when it is almost dead because you're running out of grease!  Just a thought.

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #88 on: November 04, 2009, 10:44:21 PM »
Injectable benadryl isn't in the same category as lidocaine, and is just as effective for things like sutures and the like.

It works as a local anasthetic for the same reason that it makes you drowsy.

Think little bitty pinpricks around the wound site vs. actual injections, though - works even better if you know some basic anatomy and where the main nerves are leading to/past the wound. You can follow these up to their most common root and inject nearby, but not into the nerve itself. THAT would hurt.

seriously, like OMFGSHOOTMENOW hurt. For a LONG time. Luckily you'll feel that sort of pain before you press the plunger, much more than the tiny prick from a 22 ga needle like those used for insulin.

FYI, my mom is allergic to all the -caine's, not just the preservatives - sends her into primary cardiopulmonary failure. Injectable benadryl and NOx got her through a root canal.

Topical versions of lidocaine (think anbesol) are somewhat effective, depending on the location of the wound, but depending on the type and other ingredients in the compound, these may or may not be suitable for contact WITHIN the wound - especially not the kind designed to gel up and form a skin on your gums - that would NOT be acceptable. Also, those products are far from acceptable for use as injectables - topical, intramuscular, intravenous, subcutaneous, oral, rectal, nasal, ocular are NOT equivalent even if it's the same compound - very very bad things can happen with any of them when used elsewhere than designed. The best bet is to actually get EMT training, and then you can have access to something like injectable benadryl, and the training required to use it properly.

And make some money on the side as an on-call/fill-in EMT/Paramedic/Hospital transport

Non-medication solutions include application of pressure to nerve roots. I have a wisdom tooth coming in, for example, and when things get a bit inflamed and uncomfortable, pressure directly above and in front of my left ear completely relaxes my jaw. The trigeminal nerve runs through there, and although the descending/inferior branch is what's inflamed, pressure at the junction of the three branches forces relaxation of everything downstream. I still FEEL it, but it's certainly better than before pressure is applied.

Ice can work as well, especially when close attention is paid to nerve pathways.

Take a pathophysiology course, or a cadaver lab inclusive anatomy/physiology course at your local college. Well worth the time, money, and effort.

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Help me assemble a first aid kit list for a new show
« Reply #89 on: November 04, 2009, 10:51:48 PM »
Here's an idea for how to design a universal kit to be presented in the show:

1. Cover TYPES of trauma - Blunt force (fall and bump your head) vs. Gunshot vs. Stabbing vs. laceration (car wreck - glass -etc.) etc. etc. etc.

2. Cover treatment for that type of trauma

3. Cover the skills required to administer those treatments

4. organize the treatments into skill/trauma packs. One ziploc for each kind of injury. A rock climber for example, might want some quick clot, a few cold packs, some ace wraps and a few sponges/gauzes, and a staple/suture kit, as well as some aspirin/tylenon/advil/etc. - this covers scrapes/falls/head-bangs

In a car, you can have a complete kit that covers damn near everything, since motor vehicle accidents produce such a spectrum of injuries

Hunters would need a gunshot/puncture kit due to bullets and antlers flying around at inopportune moments.

With a breakdown of type of trauma, and skill level, you could have three or four or five different little packs that could be assembled with a few items common to all of them into a single pack tailored for your specific sport, activity, or situation.

I think that would make for the easiest-listening show and make it logical enough to use as a potential shopping list starting point.

Amirite?