Author Topic: Financial scams (online, phone, mail, etc)  (Read 20106 times)

Offline dep190

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Financial scams (online, phone, mail, etc)
« on: December 23, 2009, 03:08:29 PM »
Scam Artists Strike In Summit

Con artists are stretching their schemes to all ages in a slew of recent scams. Within the last 45 days, the Summit County Office of Consumer Affairs has received numerous reports of fake checks being sent in the mail.




(please click link for full article - post was edited by Alpha Mike, in accordance with DMCA rules and regulations)

http://www.akronnewsnow.com/news/itemdetail.asp?ID=36690&section=news&subsection=localnews






« Last Edit: January 26, 2020, 05:58:24 PM by Mr. Bill »

Offline mash

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Credit card phone scam - beware!
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2010, 09:45:48 PM »
This is a scam that is going on is Australia right now, but it could happen to anybody anywhere.... Of course if you have eliminated credit cards from your life it's not an issue right?  ;)


This one is pretty slick since they provide YOU with all the information, except the one piece they want.

Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it... This information is worth reading. By understanding how the VISA & Master Card Telephone Credit Card Scam works, you'll be better prepared to protect yourself.

One of our employees was called on Wednesday from 'VISA', and I was called on Thursday from 'Master Card'.. The scam works like this: Caller: 'This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My Badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for $497.99 from a Marketing company based in ?'

When you say 'No', the caller continues with, 'Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from $297 to $497, just under the $500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?'

You say 'yes'. The caller continues - 'I will be starting a Fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 1- 800 number listed on the back of your card and ask for Security.'

You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. 'Do you need me to read it again?'

Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works.


The caller then says, 'I need to verify you are in possession of your card'. He'll ask you to 'turn your card over and look for some numbers'. There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security Numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, 'That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?' After you say No, the caller then thanks you and states, 'Don't hesitate to call back if you do, and hangs up.
 
You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number.. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question.. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of $497..99 was charged to our card.

Long story - short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card, don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or Master card directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a 'Jason Richardson of Master Card' with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this Scam is happening.

Please pass this on to all your family, friends and neighbors. By informing each other, we protect each other.  

Offline luke

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Re: Credit card phone scam - beware!
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2010, 11:15:22 AM »
I've received calls from my credit card companies in the past offering me more services or a deal to pay down my balance. Every time, I don't give them any information and tell them that I will call them back at the number listed on my card. I think they've all been legit calls, but you never know.

Offline ColdHaven

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Re: Credit card phone scam - beware!
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2010, 11:24:45 AM »
I don't keep credit cards. Hopefully I will never use one for the rest of my life.  Good info though. +1

Offline Chris70

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Re: Credit card phone scam - beware!
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2010, 11:35:29 AM »
Mash Thank you!

Offline luke

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Re: Credit card phone scam - beware!
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2010, 06:16:25 PM »
I don't keep credit cards. Hopefully I will never use one for the rest of my life.  Good info though. +1

I'm in the process of getting rid of them, but I've noticed that even with cards that have been canceled for years, I am still getting emails about them, even after I asked them to delete my account. Will it never end?!

Offline womule

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heads up
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2010, 01:53:43 PM »
We need this thread so we can give each other a heads-up about scams.

I just received a call from 973-735-5438. Its clearly a scam. The first time they called I didn't answer because I don't know the number. They didn't leave a message so I returned the call. No one answered but a pre-recorded message from verizon wireless explaining that "this number is invalid or no longer in service".

I googled the number and found out that others had the same experience.

1 hour later I get a call from the same number, a indian man answered the phone explaining that I won a vacation and needs my info.

Obviously a scam, you all don't really need warning about this one in particular but I think we should post scams to warn others.

Again the number is 973-735-5438

Offline dep190

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Scam of the week
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2010, 11:03:31 AM »
http://www.cleveland.com/consumeraffairs/index.ssf/2010/06/lakewood_police_round_up_illeg.html

The "grandma" telephone scam continues to make the rounds. That's the one where con artists target older women and men and pretend to be a grandchild in trouble. their Social Security or bank account information to anyone who contacts them about the checks.

Of course, the department could help consumers enormously by not using people's Social Security numbers in their Medicare account number. Just a thought


Edited in accordance with DMCA rules and regulations by OKG
« Last Edit: September 04, 2010, 11:43:45 AM by OKGranny »

SnugInMyPod

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Re: Scam of the week
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2010, 12:20:06 PM »
Dep190,

You mean there's just one a week?  That would be manageable if that were the case.

 ;D  ;)

Quote
Of course, the department could help consumers enormously by not using people's Social Security numbers in their Medicare account number. Just a thought

I'm with you and I've said it for years.  If people want to stop identity theft, simply stop using the Soc. Security Number as a universal identifier.  I mean, it's not like businesses and government agencies can't generate new numbers for their data bases. 

IIRC, It's actually supposed to be illegal even under the Soc. Security Act for anyone to use the Number for any purpose other than witholding and drawing Soc. Security.  But then again, illegal immigration is supposed to be illegal too...

 :)



Offline JerseyVince

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Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2010, 03:27:27 PM »
I just got off the phone with Citibank's fraud dept, luckily I keep close tabs on my credit cards. They called me about a $1.00 charge that went through fri morn from the "SOE" corp which I didn't make and wanted me to dispute it, then informed me of a charge from South Africa this morning for $1350 which the Computers caught and flagged as fraudulent because neither have the card verification number entered and they figured it wasnt me charging in person. They informed me this was a card number that was just generated at random and have a large block of card numbers that are being scammed. Be on the lookout for a $1 charge first from the SOE corp for music then the biggie hits later on your bills. even if your guys don't use them much or at all, it's all the more reason to watch your bills for these dirtbags.

New card coming monday and new passwords just in case

Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2010, 04:39:44 PM »
Thanks for the heads-up Vince.  ;)

Stickied...

Offline PAGUY

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2010, 07:32:37 AM »
Thanks for the heads up about this. 

Offline grizzman

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2010, 01:31:29 PM »
Sounds like another great reason to pay the cards off and cut them up. Thanks for taking the time to share the heads up!

Offline Mr. Bill

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Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2011, 09:19:00 AM »
A new telephone scam, courtesy of the Better Business Bureau:

Quote
...A caller reported she received an automated phone call telling her that her computer and IP address had been noted as having visited the Wikileaks site, and that there were grave consequences for this, including a $250,000 or $25,000 fine, perhaps imprisonment. It left an option for leaving a message as to how she was going to handle this and the fine payment. She figured it was a scam, and did nothing but hang up. ...

The article notes that phone scams like this generally use VOIP (Internet) phones, and the caller-ID number is fake and therefore useless in tracking down the scammer.

endurance

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Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2011, 09:59:11 AM »
The worst part of that is the VOIP caller ID part.  How would you like it if someone used your phone number as the source of the calls to hundreds of people?  You'd have every local, state and fed knocking on your door to question you. 

Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2011, 11:43:00 AM »
This is something I have talked about since the government "solved" the telemarketing problem with its stupid "Do Not Call List".
The people most likely to be fooled by scam phone calls are the people that assume that since they put their number in the Do Not Call registry they are somehow protected from scam calls or that there are no more scam telemarketers.
The scam artists don't care about the list or the law. They are thieves.
I'm not saying not to use the Do Not Call list. My number is on it. Just don't assume you won't be called by a scam artist.

Offline sludgy_nixer

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Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2011, 01:19:30 PM »
"It left an option for leaving a message as to how she was going to handle this and the fine payment."

a) i'm making wikileaks my new homepage
b) i'm sending you 250 pennies you can shove up your xxx

Offline Nicodemus

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Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2011, 03:36:41 PM »
I'm not usually one to dabble in conspiracy theories... OK, that's a total lie, I look at that stuff all the time...  :D

Anyway, the gub'ment could whip up a scam like this for nothing more than an attempt to keep just a few more people from reading wikileaks.

"You know I would like to read that wikileaks, but I hear you can get fined for doing so."

Eh... Probably not.

It struck me as somewhat similar to a couple of suspiciously similar op-ed pieces that were floated not so long ago which eluded to the idea that someone reading and visiting a site that disclosed government secrets, such as wikileaks, was committing the actual crime of treason.

SnugInMyPod

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Re: Scam: $25,000 fine for visiting Wikileaks
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2011, 06:39:02 PM »
Fellow Survivalists,

Five seconds of thought (or less) will tell any thinking person that this pure BS.

I mean, how do the TV, radio, print, and blogosphere outlets find out about Wikileaks if not by browsing the Site?

Even if it was a crime, they'd still have to present you with search and arrest warrants, set bail, indict you before a grand jury, convict you before a judge and jury of peers, and the ruling would have to survive the appeals process.  Hell, I'm not a "Patriot Movement" habitue of the court system and I knew all that!  WTF does this scam artist take us for?

???

This scam artist probably also scans curbsides for old matresses without tags.  If I got a call from an operation like that, I'd leave a message counter-charging the proprietor with owing unassumed debts and order him and unto his third generation to report to the nearest debtor's prison.

;D ;)


Offline PistolWhipped

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Odd.  Thanks for the heads up. 

I had something similar happen last week.  It was 2 charges for exactly $13 for Radio Shack exactly 24 hours apart, and then 2 more charges, one for flowers and one for an escort service.

Apparently someone wanted to feel  like a politician, and buy hookers on my dime.

Thox Spuddy

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Thanks for the heads up. My credit card issuer allows me to place an alert for a charge over any amount that I set. Once we made a charge across the country for a reservation via phone and got a call from the credit card issuer asking if we made it.

Scams over credit/debit cards will get more sly, as "skimmers" are now showing up.

Offline mobilus

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Can they do the same with debit cards? 

Seems reasonable that they could, but maybe they see a greater opportunity to increase someone's debt without them noticing as much as if the funds in a bank account were diminished. 

Hare of Caerbannog

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Lottery/Sweepstakes phone scam with NV phone #
« Reply #22 on: June 27, 2011, 01:04:42 PM »
I received two calls today from these scammers.

The Number Displayed ~ 1-702-765-4362
The caller asked for me by name, says the name of the fake company in Las Vagas that he works for, and claims I have won $2,000,000. He only needs to verify some personal details then he can transfer it right into my bank account right now.
He then reads some basic info that is all available in public records.


It appears this scam has been going on for at least two years now using the same number. Since the displayed number in a Caller-ID can be tricked into displaying anything you want, the number above is likely fake.
Be advised, police forces know about this scam but local police don't have the authority or the resources to go after these scum.
The FCC created a National Do Not Call data base and set up a weak system of investigation and prosecution some years back, but they work on the assumption that scam artists will volunteer to obey the Do Not Call list, will display their real calling number, and will stay in the same location using the same scam for long periods of time while the FCC investigates. Guess what, the FCC can't seem to catch the bad guys.

No real mechanism of stopping phone scammers exists except you and your watchful eye. When anyone calls me, if I don't know them I assume they are calling to rip me off.
Guard yourself and those you care about.

These same cautions should be used when answering the door.
One door to door scam involves a younger looking man or woman who comes to your door under any number of excuses, and tries to figure out if your house is a good target for a home invasion. All they want to do is talk to you, do a survey, buy a candy bar to help them through collage, etc., but their real goal is to collect info on weaker targets so they know which houses to target with a forced entry.

Be aware and stay safe.

Offline JerseyVince

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Re: Lottery/Sweepstakes phone scam with NV phone #
« Reply #23 on: June 27, 2011, 01:35:46 PM »
contact these guys  www.ic3.gov maybe they need the eye-searing spotlight of the FBI on them for a while

thorquest

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2012, 05:11:05 PM »
Sounds like another great reason to pay the cards off and cut them up. Thanks for taking the time to share the heads up!

Absolutely, and if you have shop on-line, they say a credit card is better to use than a debt card because it's easier to get your money back.   Fraud is on the rise everywhere in fact I'm getting a little nervous because it's been almost 3 weeks since I filed my taxes and no refund yet.  They just said on the local news that my town is a hotbed of tax fraud.  They're getting most of the SSNs from the health care industry of which I'm not a part.  I purchased Identity theft insurance through my bank but that might be a scam too.  Lastly some company just sent my kid an 'internship" offer asking for $3,000 for a 4 day trip to Washington.  In the envelope, they had her name and student ID which I find disturbing an it has me wondering about the legality of releasing student info to outsiders.   

Offline chickchoc

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2012, 08:53:06 PM »
My Visa card was recently hacked and I simply cancelled that account and opened another with better security.  In addition, credit cards are not the only things:  my Hotmail email was hijacked and it's caused all kinds of headaches since my entire address book was stolen and then erased from the account.  I have since learned that Hotmail has been subject to many hacking incidents since at least 2009, but of course no warning was given to customers. 

Regarding buying things online, I am very cautious about using my credit card at all.  I prefer to use PayPal so my number is not going over the internet at all.  In fact, I keep no balance in my PayPal account, but it is linked to my checking account.  So far, I've had no problems...  (crossed fingers)

thorquest

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #26 on: February 10, 2012, 07:20:39 AM »
And no sooner did I get done reading this when a brand new story popped up on twitter.   I hate to post links to other sites when something might be sensationalized but this one seems important.  It's about new attacks at restaurants where a virus is steeling debit card information originating out of remaining.  Don't be alarmed informed.  Who knows if this is all fact or sensationalized but I'm using identity theft insurance, and paying only with cash or pre paid credit cards where possible.  Also if you cant afford a paper shredder, soak the paper in water for a few days and it will dissolve into paste.  Thats what the NSA does allegedly.

Here's the link or you can search for your self:


http://www2.tbo.com/news/breaking-news/2012/feb/10/cyber-war-continuing-at-local-restaurants-ar-357191/

Offline FrugalFannie

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2012, 07:49:22 AM »
In another thread I asked if a bank account was really necessary.

About 10 days ago our bank account got breached. I saw the charge 'pending'  (hundreds of dollars)and called the bank it was not ours. They said they couldn't stop it. It would have to go through then I could dispute it and once it was resolved (if in my favor) I would get my money back. How long? They can't tell you that! I decided right then and there I wasn't just closing my account but finding another bank! And you cannot close the account while anything is pending.

Big worry was that 2 days later my husband's paycheck was due to be direct deposited. His company said there was no way they could cancel the DD on such short notice and get him a live check. So we crossed our fingers and I showed up first thing on payday. Again, they wouldn't let me close the account because the deposit hadn't 'physically cleared.' (don't get me started on that stupid answer) So I withdrew all the money (on a Friday) and closed it as soon as I could after that but I couldn't get there until Tuesday. I actually left $90 in it which was good because I had my electric bill  scheduled to come out on Monday. As it turns out Tuesday was the earliest I could close it 'according to their rules' and nothing else was withdrawn from our account.

Sunday night I see a charge on the credit card my husband uses only for business travel. As soon as it clears on Monday morning I call the cc company, dispute the charge, and close the account. New cc in the mail the next day. Not responsible for the bogus charge.

So all this makes me wonder if the risk is worth having these types of accounts. After buying a couple of money orders to pay bills that were due after I closed the bank account, but before I could get a new account set up, I decided to find a fee- free checking account only so we could atleast pay our bills.  Went to a credit union, opened a checking account and had to open a savings account (don't have to keep any money in it). So the plan going forward is to have my husband cash his live check from now on during his lunch break. Deposit what we need to cover checks for that 2 week period and keep the rest in cash. I will do the same with my check. We got a debit card only to be able to make deposits of cash to cover checks. We will no longer use it for POS. Going back to writing checks and mailing them in so my account number isn't floating around anymore than it has to. And back to the 'envelope method' of budgeting. Our savings will be locked in a safe. We won't be losing anything as the banks don't really pay interest any more on deposits.

Unfortunately we have to keep a credit card for my husband's travel. And we have a seperate one with a balance from a LARGE expense we had just before my husband went back to work this fall. But everything else is going to be paid in cash from here on out and when the credit card is paid off it won't be used again.

Offline chickchoc

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2012, 10:30:53 PM »
Wow, Fannie, you folks have been through the ringer!  I have often thought of going back to a cash only basis simply because it prevents overspending.  (Obviously one can't spend what one doesn't have!)  But you bring up some good points about the hassles of paying bills.  We've got accounts at three different credit unions and one standard bank.  The bank account is kept only for my PayPal purchases online.  Paying bills out of a credit union account seems OK for right now, but you've got me thinking about hacking scenarios.

Thanks for posting your story.

Offline lettuceman

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We had the same kind of activity with a Chase card approximately on year ago.  Unfortunately we still have cards in the payoff mode and have not closed the accounts yet.