Author Topic: Financial scams (online, phone, mail, etc)  (Read 20107 times)

Offline JerseyVince

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News of another email phishing scam

if you have a citicard be on the lookout for an email thanking you for applying for a new card, it looks like a real citicards email and almost fooled me. i just spend 2 hours on the phone with Citibank's fraud, customer service, applications and internet security depts making sure i have no applications and that my card and identity are secure.

look for a confirmation number on the email as per citibank no number is the first sign its bullshit

citibank confirmed to me the last email they sent and they can monitor any they send in realtime so if another dept sent one a sec ago the security dept can find it as its sent

the scammers are getting smart watch your stuff

Offline LJH

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I got an e-mail this morning regarding my Citi Bank credit card, something about confirming information by clicking a link. Had the Citi logo and looked really legit. Delete.  ::)

I don't have a Citi Bank credit card. I don't have ANY credit cards.

Offline wraithe

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #32 on: February 12, 2013, 04:42:04 PM »
Got a USAA notice in email today, sent it on to their fraud department. I knew it was phishing since it didn't have my name on it. USAA won't send out email asking for information, and they always have my name on the email.

Got a text from them on Christmas eve, are either of these charges fraudulent? One was a fairly sizable amount that I had just done at Target to buy my Mother groceries and staples. The other was for $1.36. I called and got the fraud department, someone had tried to float a charge at a "motel" in Dearborn, MI. Of course, the account had to be closed, and reissued. Huge PITA, wish that scammers could be given a public flogging when caught and prosecuted.

osubuckeye4

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Sounds like another great reason to pay the cards off and cut them up.

Someone can pickpocket your wallet, is that a reason to burn it along with all of your physical cash?

Look, if you're a responsible person, credit cards are great. The major companies are all fighting for your business and you get cash back, airline miles, hotel rooms and all other kinds of free stuff (assuming you pay your balance in full every month, like I do).


Just make sure you do your homework and verify that the card you're signing up for has 100% fraud protection (most of the good ones do).

Yes, it's a pain in the behind when fraudulent charges are racked up on your account (I had it happen with one of my cards), but the major companies are used to it by now and they just shut down your current account, open a new one, send you a new card and you're back up and running in 48 hours without any charges assigned to you.

The key is that you monitor your account and notify the credit companies immediately. If you have time to check your wallet every day to ensure it's still in your back pocket, surely you have time to log onto your credit card and view your statement to make sure no fraud charges posted?


I've made thousands of dollars over the last ten years by having a credit card and using it responsiblity, I've also been able to take trips to visit relatives and friends that I never would have booked without my free miles.

This whole, "all credit is bad" notion is crazy. Credit is bad if you let it control you... if you control it, it's good and you can benefit from it. Just be smart.

Offline BlueHound

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Capital One's fraud department has contacted me a number of times about similar activity.  It's good to know that the credit card companies are keeping an eye out for these scams.

Offline CKMe

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I do pretty good with my cards too. I have a cashback option on my main credit card - have gotten $75 back so far this year, there are better ones out there, but I've had this one for a while so am keeping it.

I don't have a credit feature on my ATM card - that scares the bejesus out of me, if I lose my card someone can go to walmart and drain my account without a pin #. I can get the $$ back, but it will take a while and why should I wait?

I also have a low threshold set for my daily withdrawals, max of $300 - after that I have to write a check, trips me up every time I'm at Costco (love that store!) but I'd prefer to have a manager come over and sign on my check than have to wait for my bank to reimburse me because I got robbed and besides if I need more I can always go into the branch.

Offline allofthemonkeys

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Re: Heads up to anyone here with a Citibank Credit Card (news of another scam)
« Reply #36 on: September 25, 2013, 06:33:04 PM »
I check my checking history at least once a week.  I don't have a credit card, just a debit, but I choose good credit unions that back me up all the way.  I caught once a couple of dollar purchase, made in Mexico.  I called the credit union, they sent me the fraud paperwork and I got it stopped in the small test purchase phase.  You guys are right, I had a class when I was an officer about credit card fraud and that is a classic card thief move.  They do it to see if you catch it, if you don't then they hit hard and fast, and try to take everything they can then hit the wind. 

Offline AZDuffman

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Stock Gumshoe and the gasoline rebate scam
« Reply #37 on: March 01, 2014, 02:49:27 PM »
I heard Jack talk about a site called "Stock Gumshoe" a few months back.  He stated they have a section where they look at the latest scams and figure out from the ad copy what they are really selling.  For example they used to say "Obama's secret income" which was nothing more than book royalties.

I received an email from a legit source but with a link about some kind of rebate on gasoline.  I know it is a scam but can't figure out what they are really talking about.  Usually I either see right through it to the real thing or don't care.  But this time my curiosity is up enough to just wonder.

Problem is, I cannot find where on stock gumshoe they do this.  Can someone point me, or even just does anyone know what the scam is?

Offline inconel710

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Offline AZDuffman

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Re: Stock Gumshoe and the gasoline rebate scam
« Reply #39 on: March 01, 2014, 05:45:47 PM »
Thanks.  Looks like it, and if they are going to send a scam email they could at least make it a new one!

Offline oktheniknow

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Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #40 on: August 06, 2015, 08:43:45 AM »
Got a recorded message from 509-295-6815 supposedly from the IRS stating that we were being sued by them. It left a phone number to call. Just something to be aware of.
Reported it. Was tempted to call the number and tell them they have been reported and government agents are aware of their location and recording their movements.
Wonder how many people fall for it.

nkawtg

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #41 on: August 06, 2015, 09:27:24 AM »
Lots

Offline gopack84

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #42 on: August 06, 2015, 09:40:47 AM »
I got a variation on this a few weeks back. Mine offered the opportunity for me to call back and settle to avoid the unpleasantness of the sheriff serving me papers to seize my house and arrest me by the end of the week.

osubuckeye4

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #43 on: August 06, 2015, 10:28:52 AM »
A co-workers wife got a call like this last year and answered it. Guy (with a thick accent) tried to get her to pay $500 over the phone to him, very pushy and at one point threatened to have her arrested. Fortunately she called her husband before divulging any pertinent information and he put the scammer in his place.


The people trying to pull off these scams are true scum.

Offline inconel710

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #44 on: August 06, 2015, 11:31:41 AM »
Had a voicemail on my cell phone a few weeks ago from (646) 918-5883 saying that I needed to call back or have my attorney contact them. Apparently the idiot doesn't realize we have this thing called the Internet. Googled his number and its a known scammer. Claims you have a bad debt and you need to pay now or all kinds of bad things are going to happen.

It pays to be suspicious.

Bonnieblue2A

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #45 on: August 06, 2015, 11:37:33 AM »
Hope you reported the call to your Secretary of State's office.

endurance

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #46 on: August 06, 2015, 12:00:05 PM »
What!?!  I just went down and bought a prepaid Visa card and mailed it to them like they told me to do. ;)

Offline archer

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #47 on: August 06, 2015, 12:19:58 PM »
What!?!  I just went down and bought a prepaid Visa card and mailed it to them like they told me to do. ;)

i hope they told you to use my address this time.. last time it was re-directed to some african prince.

Offline CKMe

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #48 on: August 06, 2015, 02:05:05 PM »
What!?!  I just went down and bought a prepaid Visa card and mailed it to them like they told me to do. ;)

Why would you do such a dumb thing..

The only time I ever sent money to someone who wrote me a letter was because of an inheritance I was to receive, I didn't even know I was part Nigerian royalty.

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #49 on: August 06, 2015, 03:09:24 PM »
...Claims you have a bad debt and you need to pay now or all kinds of bad things are going to happen. ...

Sometimes these are for-real, but the debt collector has a fake or outdated phone number for the person they're trying to find.  We've had 4 or 5 collection agencies call here, looking for the same guy.  Annoying, but they've always promptly removed our phone number from their call list when we explained.

Offline Hurricane

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #50 on: August 06, 2015, 03:45:35 PM »
I used to get calls about department store credit cards I never had. Seemed quite apparent they were calling everyone with a similar name in the area.

Offline Carl

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #51 on: August 06, 2015, 03:54:06 PM »
Why would you do such a dumb thing..

The only time I ever sent money to someone who wrote me a letter was because of an inheritance I was to receive, I didn't even know I was part Nigerian royalty.

We must be related then because I gave them a bank account number to put the 60 million deposit in and now I wait......

Offline The Spartan Dad

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #52 on: August 06, 2015, 04:58:24 PM »
Last year, I interestingly enough got a call on my cell phone for my mother-in-law from the "Royal Bank of Scotland". Any ideas how they linked my cell number with her? I can't think of any document or place that would have linked us together other than a newspaper clip on the wedding or a genealogy search on my kids (either of which would be quite an effort if doing for all of their targets).

It took me about 5 minutes to actually get the RBS name as I couldn't understand the thick Nigerian accent and then I started laughing because it was just so absurd. News to the small-town America inlaws that they apparently have an untold fortune waiting for them in the RBS vault.

Offline Beetle

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #53 on: August 06, 2015, 08:25:14 PM »
Doesn't anybody own a whistle anymore?

Offline oktheniknow

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #54 on: August 06, 2015, 08:37:07 PM »
That would be a good thing with a live person scammer.

Offline Carl

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #55 on: August 06, 2015, 08:40:18 PM »
I have a tale to add:

My father got a phone call from a 20ish young man saying what state and city my son was working in...telling 'grandpa'
not to tell me that he got drunk and had an accident and needed bail money...but NOT TO TELL ME..

The caller knew my son's name ,where he had JUST started working in a new state as his wife and kids were still in Norfolk
cleaning and packing to move to the new house my son had just bought...they knew my name and my dad's name..

BUT my dad didn't get old without having a bit of smarts...he asked the person acting like my son what his MOTHER'S family
name was...an easy question for my REAL son...that and the fact my dad has NEVER OWNED A CREDIT CARD saved some grief.

Somebody put in some time and study to attempt such an elaborate scam .... 

Offline CKMe

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #56 on: August 07, 2015, 05:36:52 AM »
Last year, I interestingly enough got a call on my cell phone for my mother-in-law from the "Royal Bank of Scotland". Any ideas how they linked my cell number with her? I can't think of any document or place that would have linked us together other than a newspaper clip on the wedding or a genealogy search on my kids (either of which would be quite an effort if doing for all of their targets).

It took me about 5 minutes to actually get the RBS name as I couldn't understand the thick Nigerian accent and then I started laughing because it was just so absurd. News to the small-town America inlaws that they apparently have an untold fortune waiting for them in the RBS vault.

This is from something called skip tracing. It is a technique used by debt collectors to track down someone they suspect is related to the person who owes the debt. What they do is attach someone to you from a credit report being ordered in both of your names, i.e. when you and your wife bought a house together or signed up for your first credit card together. They then back trace it to everyone your wife has ever had her credit pulled with, i.e. if your mother in law cosigned for a car or a student loan for your wife. They can use this data to determine everywhere you lived (if you had credit pulled there, or had your address changed on an existing credit account) who live with (as they will have their credit accessed from the same location) any aliases you have (i.e. John Spartan, Jon Spartan, Jack Spartan etc).

The skip tracing 'system' is already up and in place. Those who provide data to the skip tracer don't always verify fully the data before they release your information. When I started in the mortgage industry we would get 20-30 calls a week from someone who was hunting down our customers for a bad debt, we never provided information to the tracer as we wanted to do business with the customer. If we had wanted to provide them with information we wouldn't have verified if the debt was valid, we would have just given out current name, address, phone number etc all of which were freely provided by the customer to us already.

It's actually pretty scary when you think of it.

Offline inconel710

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #57 on: August 07, 2015, 06:13:26 AM »
Hope you reported the call to your Secretary of State's office.
Nah. He never called back and I'm not calling him. His MO is to troll for easy marks and he's not in my state. Not worth my time.

Offline gopack84

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #58 on: August 07, 2015, 07:18:34 AM »
This is from something called skip tracing. It is a technique used by debt collectors to track down someone they suspect is related to the person who owes the debt.

[snip]

It's actually pretty scary when you think of it.

Similar to its evil cousin call "the nearby". This was a report we used to pull back in my days supporting a computerized collection business database. If you had an address that was no good you could pull a nearby contact report (all happily provided by the big 3 credit bureaus) that would give you name and phone numbers of the 5 or 10 nearest adjacent addresses. Then you could call them to see if you could get updated contact info for the debtor. All completely legal and above board provided you followed the law. You couldn't discuss the reason for the call (ie, you can't say, "I'm looking for deadbeat Joe Somebody that skipped out owing $10k to the Penile Enlargement Surgical unit in Anytown USA". But you could simply say you were trying to track down Joe Somebody and wanted to know if he still lived at address X and had phone number Y. And you could only do it (legally) if you're trying to get an updated phone number or address because you got a mail return or disconnect type event.

You'd be amazed how many times that would net some confirmation one way or the other. But yeah, that one was easy compared to a skip trace. A skip trace was labor intensive and required a bit of dedication and skill on the part of the collector.

Offline The Spartan Dad

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Re: Prank/scam call from the IRS
« Reply #59 on: August 11, 2015, 11:09:08 AM »
This is from something called skip tracing. It is a technique used by debt collectors to track down someone they suspect is related to the person who owes the debt. What they do is attach someone to you from a credit report being ordered in both of your names, i.e. when you and your wife bought a house together or signed up for your first credit card together. They then back trace it to everyone your wife has ever had her credit pulled with, i.e. if your mother in law cosigned for a car or a student loan for your wife. They can use this data to determine everywhere you lived (if you had credit pulled there, or had your address changed on an existing credit account) who live with (as they will have their credit accessed from the same location) any aliases you have (i.e. John Spartan, Jon Spartan, Jack Spartan etc).

The skip tracing 'system' is already up and in place. Those who provide data to the skip tracer don't always verify fully the data before they release your information. When I started in the mortgage industry we would get 20-30 calls a week from someone who was hunting down our customers for a bad debt, we never provided information to the tracer as we wanted to do business with the customer. If we had wanted to provide them with information we wouldn't have verified if the debt was valid, we would have just given out current name, address, phone number etc all of which were freely provided by the customer to us already.

It's actually pretty scary when you think of it.

Thanks for that explanation. Seems like a lot of work by the scammers for random spitballing as opposed to a known lucrative target.