Author Topic: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY  (Read 5194 times)

Offline swanson

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BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« on: November 25, 2008, 02:23:45 PM »
DRIVING AND SURVIVAL

I am surprised this topic has yet to come up in any depth...

Most of us take driving for granted.

For the survival minded, driving has to be taken seriously and not as a casual affair.

No matter what dangers crop up in the world, one of the most dangerous things most of us do every day is drive.

Personally, I almost lost my life in Iraq due to issues encountered on the roadways. I am sure others here have also had close calls or know someone who has been seriously injured in vehicle accidents. In my profession, driving is a critical skill, and even that withstanding it almost snatched the life right out of me.

So how can we better manage some of our roadway activites in light of the risks we take?

Here’s a Do’s and Don’ts list from Tony Scotti that I picked up in my training that may be of great use to those who take driving seriously as part of their survival planning and lifestyle…

Basic Driving

Tony Scotti

This page lists the Do's and Don'ts of security driving.

Basic Driving Procedures

1.   Become familiar with the operation of the vehicle and its accessories.

2.   Adjust all equipment to your comfort (seat, seatbelts, mirrors, etc...)

3.   Always fasten your seatbelt.

4.   Keep your car clean and keep fire extinguishers and first aid kits readily available.

5.   Pay attention to driving and traffic conditions.

6.   Accelerate, decelerate, and turn smoothly.

7.   Visually scan the area several hundred yards in advance of your vehicle as you drive, keeping alert for hazards - things in the road such as bricks/stones, lumber, pot-holes, pedestrians, weaving autos, and anything appearing out-of-the-ordinary.

8.   When driving the Principal. signal lane changes, turns, and stops, to assist the follow-up car.

9.   Learn the conditions of your routes, i.e. narrow bridges, construction, narrowing roadways (e.g. 3 lanes down to 2), and anything which might create a hazard to the Principal.

10.   When driving Follow-Up, keep your eyes on the Principal's car, anticipate un-signaled turns and stops, stay close in heavy traffic, drop back slightly in light traffic, and keep alternate plan-of-action in mind.

11.   Be considerate of the men working the Follow-Up car, since their lives depend on how well you operate the vehicle.

12.   When the Principal's car signals a lane change, open the lane for him by blocking oncoming traffic until the change has been made.

13.   Turn wide on corners to protect the exposed side of the Principal's vehicle on turns.

14.   DO NOT BLUFF OTHERS! You may have the right of way, but it is not worth the risk.

15.   DO NOT leave you vehicle unless directed to do so by your supervisor.

16.   DO NOT engage in conversations, play commercial radios, smoke or "skirt-ogle".

17.   DO NOT get of the car to open doors for either the Principal or guests.

18.   DO NOT stare at the lane dividing lines or at the area directly in front of the car, since this tends to promote "Road Hypnosis".

19.   DO NOT lull yourself into a false sense of security in the newer cars, because they frequently break down (at the most inopportune times!!).

20.   If you are driving Follow-Up, DO NOT let another vehicle between you and the Principal's vehicle.



What are your thoughts?

What would you add to this list?

swanson


Offline Beetle

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2008, 02:32:52 PM »
Swanson,

You probably have experience with this..

    I just took a driving class in which they brought up what to do if you had a Molotov cocktail thrown at your vehicle. They told us DO NOT turn on your windshield wipers!!! They said that your wipers will smear rubber all over the windshield making it impossible to see. I have never personally experienced this...Thank God. But wouldn't the burning Molotov prevent you from seeing any ways???

Offline swanson

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2008, 02:42:32 PM »
Bailey,

My assumption would be a big yes, but then again i haven't experienced the Molotov.

I have, however, experienced the love of grenades and concrete pieces being chucked at my vehicle from overpasses.

Tactically, speed saves the day and we always changed lanes/positions when passing under bridges and overpasses to make any aggressor have to respond to us versus his anticipated point of attack.

Driving tactically is a thinking man's game for sure.

I am not sure I've given you a clear answer on the Molotov though...sorry.

swanson

Offline Beetle

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2008, 02:51:14 PM »
    Well the discussion that was brought up was your first response would be to hit the wipers to use the windshield washer to try and extinguish the fire. But the instructor said absolutely not, and then brought up the smearing idea. I don't know how one would know a correct answer and god forbid it ever happen, but I thought maybe you had some personal experience after seeing your rides...Would have been cool to go back to class with somone who had first hand knowledge.

Offline swanson

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2008, 03:22:26 PM »
My only further thoughts is that vision might not be reduced by the actual flames (or smoke when at speed) themselves but the Molotov mixture itself- usually some type of detergent or thickening base is used to make a sticky slush.

So, the Molotov's point of impact and how it's contents the spreads on your vehicle my be the real point to consider when it comes to vision impairment.

Maybe someone else out in the forum's netherworld could add from a point of experience...

swanson

Offline Tycoon

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2008, 09:01:27 AM »
Great post Swanson,
It's one of those things we may not always think about. We talk, talk, talk about getting out when SHTF but not much about the next step which are our bov skills when we're actually out. I remember taking my EVOC (Emergency Vehicle Operator Course) in the police academy, and  though we weren't learning things like what to do when a Molotov hits your windshield we learned a lot of basics that were very beneficial on how the vehicle reacts in certain situations. One other point is that every vehicle reacts differently also, so just because I can drive a Crown Vic Police cruiser skillfully doesn't mean I can drive my Dodge MegaCab Truck the same way.

Offline scanman

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2013, 01:27:41 PM »
DRIVING AND SURVIVAL

I am surprised this topic has yet to come up in any depth...

Most of us take driving for granted.

For the survival minded, driving has to be taken seriously and not as a casual affair.

No matter what dangers crop up in the world, one of the most

Personally, I almost lost my life in Iraq due to issues encountered on the roadways. I am sure others here have also had close calls or know someone who has been seriously injured in vehicle accidents. In my profession, driving is a critical skill, and even that withstanding it almost snatched the life right out of me.

So how can we better manage some of our roadway activites in light of the risks we take?

Here’s a Do’s and Don’ts list from Tony Scotti that I picked up in my training that may be of great use to those who take driving seriously as part of their survival planning and lifestyle…

Basic Driving

Tony Scotti

This page lists the Do's and Don'ts of security driving.

Basic Driving Procedures

1.   Become familiar with the operation of the vehicle and its accessories.

2.   Adjust all equipment to your comfort (seat, seatbelts, mirrors, etc...)

3.   Always fasten your seatbelt.

4.   Keep your car clean and keep fire extinguishers and first aid kits readily available.

5.   Pay attention to driving and traffic conditions.

6.   Accelerate, decelerate, and turn smoothly.

7.   Visually scan the area several hundred yards in advance of your vehicle as you drive, keeping alert for hazards - things in the road such as bricks/stones, lumber, pot-holes, pedestrians, weaving autos, and anything appearing out-of-the-ordinary.

8.   When driving the Principal. signal lane changes, turns, and stops, to assist the follow-up car.

9.   Learn the conditions of your routes, i.e. narrow bridges, construction, narrowing roadways (e.g. 3 lanes down to 2), and anything which might create a hazard to the Principal.

10.   When driving Follow-Up, keep your eyes on the Principal's car, anticipate un-signaled turns and stops, stay close in heavy traffic, drop back slightly in light traffic, and keep alternate plan-of-action in mind.

11.   Be considerate of the men working the Follow-Up car, since their lives depend on how well you operate the vehicle.

12.   When the Principal's car signals a lane change, open the lane for him by blocking oncoming traffic until the change has been made.

13.   Turn wide on corners to protect the exposed side of the Principal's vehicle on turns.

14.   DO NOT BLUFF OTHERS! You may have the right of way, but it is not worth the risk.

15.   DO NOT leave you vehicle unless directed to do so by your supervisor.

16.   DO NOT engage in conversations, play commercial radios, smoke or "skirt-ogle".

17.   DO NOT get of the car to open doors for either the Principal or guests.

18.   DO NOT stare at the lane dividing lines or at the area directly in front of the car, since this tends to promote "Road Hypnosis".

19.   DO NOT lull yourself into a false sense of security in the newer cars, because they frequently break down (at the most inopportune times!!).

20.   If you are driving Follow-Up, DO NOT let another vehicle between you and the Principal's vehicle.



What are your thoughts?

What would you add to this list?

swanson


#10, I do not understand why u would stay close in heavy traffic...?


Offline Cordovil

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2013, 08:07:30 AM »
This situation probably goes beyond "Basic Driving," but it just happened in NYC yesterday, and is worth consideration should you ever find yourself in a similar situation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INfElroIKO0
 
With the advantage of now having had some time to think about it ahead of time, I will not make the same mistake the driver of this SUV did.


Offline soupbone

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2013, 06:21:25 PM »
This thread needs to be brought to the forefront occasionally because of situations like this. The only thing that would have saved this guy, lacking police assistance, would have been for him to keep moving. His most serious mistake was to allow himself to get stuck in traffic - head out to the suburbs or keep going on the freeway for cripes sake. You just ran over a couple of them - keep going. Call 911 and stay on the line describing everything you can. And make sure your family is as well trained as you are in responding to emergencies.

Look at this in terms of normalcy bias - The Mrs. and the child were probably useless, screaming their heads off, not believing it's actually happening - it couldn't be happening to THEM!!! The driver was probably as concerned about them as he was about avoiding the bikers, and was lulled into getting to his destination assuming safety there.

Knowing how to fight with a vehicle is just as important as knowing how to fight with a firearm. Knowing how to avoid situations is equally as important, if not more so.

soupbone

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2013, 06:41:18 PM »
I'm curious if any forum members have taken defensive and/or evasive driving courses and which schools, open to non-LE/non-military they recommend.   I can see this being a skill I have neglected. And as a woman who drives long distances alone it is a set of skills I should be acquiring.

There is no reason to believe that as the disparity between haves and have-nots continues to become amplified, that car-jackings and other such vehicular ambushes might become more frequent.  It would be good to have more tools in the toolbox when it comes to defending myself in the car.

Offline Dainty

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2013, 01:42:22 AM »
Wow, what a situation.

It reminds me of something that happened to a family friend, they were driving a remote highway at night and up ahead saw a chain of people holding hands standing in a line blocking the road ahead. He looked in his rear view mirror and saw an identical chain of people forming across the road behind him. In a split-second decision, he stepped on the gas and the car collided with one of them as it passed. He kept driving to the nearest police station and told them what had happened. Returning to the scene, policemen found blood, but no one was around. Police said "as far as I'm concerned you hit an animal" and that was that.

Regarding basic driving and survival, I personally thing the absolute more important thing is ensuring you're alert and fit to drive. Don't drive when you're exhausted or experiencing excessive repetitive sneezing/coughing fits that take your eyes off the road or jolt your arms around, for example. If you drink, make sure it's not in your system at all while driving - even blood alcohol below the legal limit impairs driver response time. Eating, texting, and other distractions are also hazardous.

I've noticed people tend to want to "tough it out" be all "I'm really sleepy/tired but I have to drive" or "there's just not time to stop to eat" which I think is sheer stupidity. My health isn't 100% so whenever I drive somewhere I plan for any contingencies my body might throw at me, including the potential need to pull over for half an hour or so to attend to things. And if it takes longer and I'm late, then I'll just have to be late. Or if I wake up the morning of an appointment not fully fit to drive, it just means I'm going to have to ask someone else to drive me. If no one else can drive me, it means I have to reschedule. Yes, this can sometimes make life slightly more of a hassle, but I take driving seriously, not only for my own safety but also for the safety of everyone else on the road. Ensuring I'm ready to react to the unexpected means that when a sleepy or inebriated or reckless or distracted driver does something stupid, I at least have the sharp reflexes to hopefully respond in time to avoid a collision.

Offline Cordovil

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2013, 11:58:21 AM »
The only thing that would have saved this guy, lacking police assistance, would have been for him to keep moving. His most serious mistake was to allow himself to get stuck in traffic - head out to the suburbs or keep going on the freeway for cripes sake. You just ran over a couple of them - keep going. Call 911 and stay on the line describing everything you can. And make sure your family is as well trained as you are in responding to emergencies.

Look at this in terms of normalcy bias - The Mrs. and the child were probably useless, screaming their heads off, not believing it's actually happening - it couldn't be happening to THEM!!! The driver was probably as concerned about them as he was about avoiding the bikers, and was lulled into getting to his destination assuming safety there.

Knowing how to fight with a vehicle is just as important as knowing how to fight with a firearm. Knowing how to avoid situations is equally as important, if not more so.

soupbone

Good points, soupbone.  As more information has come out about this story, we learned that when the bikers first surrounded the guy's car, they slashed his tires and were trying to break into the vehicle (this part occurs mostly off-frame in the video) and then the driver of the SUV tried to escape (and ran over a couple of them).  I think the flat tires were the reason why the SUV seemed to be going slower than you would have expected after that, and also that's the reason why the guy decided he needed to pull off the highway.  I don't agree with that decision - I'd rather drive on no wheels at all than stop and put my family at risk like that, but I think that played into his thinking when he pulled off the highway.

Another fact is that the wife called 911 -- twice.  No cops arrived on the scene (and this is Manhattan) during the 6 minutes or so of the video, and indeed after the video ends the beating of the father driving the SUV continued for a few minutes, and still no cops showed up.

Even more disturbing, local law enforcement have been taking a "hands off" approach to these gangs, supposedly out of fear that they'll just make the situation worse and risk hurting civilians if they try to put a stop to the motor-rampaging:

http://nypost.com/2013/10/02/nypd-lets-pop-up-bike-gangs-rampage/

So basically, the disarmed sheeple in NY, who are supposed to trust law enforcement to protect them, have been knowingly abandoned to these gangs.  Stuff like this makes me want to accelerate my plans to Walk to Freedom and get out of this area, where I'm stuck for now due to work.

Here's another vid of the same gang, and a comment from a local trucker below explaining how they operate to harass and intimidate people.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aReFR6GaqKw

Post from a local truck drive familiar with these gangs:

"Here is some additional information you all might want to read. This is my personal experience with this situation. I made sure to post this on the support site as well. As a trucker that would deliver in north jersey and New York I am familiar with these gangs. I can hopefully clarify a few things.

First the initial "accident" is part of a game they play. They ride in a huge group and will operate together to slow down traffic. Next they pick out high end vehicles targeting people with families in them, the targets will usually be white or Asian. Then one of the riders will do a "brake check" and stop suddenly in front of the target vehicle causing a minor bump. In some cases they will just roll back into their target vehicle. They will then mob the vehicle demanding money and or begin attacking the person inside. It is their practice to also slash the tires to prevent the vehicle from escaping.

Truckers are well aware of them and are advised not to stop. You can clearly see in the video how they are well practiced in this style of attack. The police in NY have backed off them after an officer ran one down using his vehicle a few months back. The video was all over the net so I advise you to check it out. These "bikers" ride dirt bikes and sport bikes very few of which are street legal and even fewer have plates. They run red lights, stop signs, and have no regard for the law. If you are ever in this situation do not stop, immediately call the police and do whatever you have to to keep them from boxing you in.

NEVER leave the scene of an accident if you are not under direct threat!!! Only run if you have no other choice, and again immediately call the police. This is not rare by any means, the only reason this incident got any attention is because of the helmet cam video being posted on the net. If you see anyone in this situation, call the police. Make no mistake confusing these punks with true bikers.

You will rarely if ever see a member of these gangs on a Harley. Do not for a minute blame true bikers for this kind of behavior. Bikers like those involved in the 2 million Bikers to DC Rally are American Patriots and would be among the first to come to your aid. A final note, always be aware of motorcycles and share the road. Check your mirrors and don't ride anyone's bumper, motorcycles have a much smaller profile then a car and are harder to see."

Offline soupbone

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Re: BASIC DRIVING AND SURVIVAL- TAKE IT SERIOUSLY
« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2013, 03:25:36 PM »
Cordovil, thanks for the good info.

One question I have is why did the wife call 911 twice? SOP is to stay on the line 'till the police arrive or the situation resolves itself. Assuming, of course, a competent 911 Operator. Furthermore, if my old memory serves me right, wasn't it an NYC case that set the precedent that "the police" have no duty to protect any individual, but that they are there to protect "society" as a whole?

"...So basically, the disarmed sheeple in NY, who are supposed to trust law enforcement to protect them, have been knowingly abandoned to these gangs...." Thankfully, the driver or his wife didn't pull a gun, a can of CS or something else like that or they would have been in SERIOUS trouble with the Authorities. [Did you catch the sarcasm, or will I have to repeat myself?]

Again, this event shows the need to think outside of the box when it comes to situational awareness and how to defend yourself. And that includes not driving a fancy car even though you can afford it, investing in run-flat tires, etc.

soupbone