Author Topic: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them  (Read 42200 times)

Offline chickchoc

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #180 on: January 25, 2012, 08:58:09 PM »
When I dehydrated apples this fall, I also dried the peels then ground them up.  They make a really nice apple tea (no caffeine) and are good to add flavor to dessert stuff. 

Offline TwoBluesMama

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #181 on: January 27, 2012, 11:24:02 PM »
Great idea Chick - I never thought of this.  I usually give the peels to my chickens as they love apples. It's lucky for us that we have apple trees and they get the trashed apples and peels and cores from any canning or dehydrating process.  I don't feel wasteful in any way if I can supplement them with good stuff but I may have to keep some for me and try this and since it sounds delicious.
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Offline TxGal

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #182 on: March 12, 2012, 05:19:24 AM »
I'm still learning what does and doesn't work in dehydrating; also learning how to prepare the dehydrated food. I've dehydrated all kinds of things:

apples--lots of them! apple pie, but I snack on them sometimes
beef jerky
blueberries, from fresh and also from frozen
bread crumbs
broccoli--tried it with frozen and also blanched fresh--but we didn't like this (tough and also very strong smell) yuk!
carrots, celery (soups/stews)
canned fruit (peaches and pineapple)--just an experiment--it's turns out like a fruit rollup, didn't make it to food storage--eaten immediately
cantaloupe--fun summer snack! sweet and chewy, but it's sticky (I rolled in wax paper) didn't make it to food storage--eaten immediately!! YUMMY!
cauliflower
citrus (lemon and orange) lemon for lemonade!
purchased dried fruit like raisins and craisins, then RE-dried them in dehydrator to make them not sticky and is supposed to extend the life
frozen veggies--corn, mixed veggies, carrots, lima beans, okra, green peas, green beans, shredded potatoes
garlic-the elephant variety is preferred
hash browns (frozen, then dehydrated)
herbs-parsley, basil, cilantro, bay leaves
kale--this is very light and crispy, can be eaten as kale chips or added to soups
ginger
greens--like collard (can be added to soups)
mushrooms-favorite!!!!
leeks, onions, green onions
peaches-peach cobbler
peppers-diced--all kinds
pineapple-fun snack, but didn't make it to food storage! roll in wax paper to separate
potatoes-cook them whole, chill, next day --peel and shred them before dehydrating
rice
spaghetti sauce rollups (without meat)! Also great for left over tomato paste
strawberries, prefer drying fresh ones over frozen--didn't like the quality of the frozen ones because they were not ripe and ended up very tart when dried
sweet potatoes
tomatoes, sliced
watermelon--same as cantaloupe above!
zucchini

On my to try list:
I plan to make some recipes from this site:
http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-food.html
Love the bark idea using beans! I also want to try ham, but plan to keep it in the freezer/fridge--just want to extend the life of it
On this site he says to add bread crumbs to ground beef and it will rehydrate more tender--plan to try that
He also says pressure cooked meat dehydrated will rehydrate more tender

I read in a VERY old book that cottage cheese could be dried; would like to try it.

   


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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #183 on: March 12, 2012, 10:08:50 AM »
Last night, I had quinoa with dried carrots, dried onion, dried Golden Chanterelle wild mushrooms in it with a dash of chicken boullion and it was delicious.

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Offline idelphic

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #184 on: March 12, 2012, 11:36:40 AM »
I'm still learning what does and doesn't work in dehydrating; also learning how to prepare the dehydrated food. I've dehydrated all kinds of things:

<...>

On my to try list:
I plan to make some recipes from this site:
http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrating-food.html
Love the bark idea using beans! I also want to try ham, but plan to keep it in the freezer/fridge--just want to extend the life of it
On this site he says to add bread crumbs to ground beef and it will rehydrate more tender--plan to try that
He also says pressure cooked meat dehydrated will rehydrate more tender

I read in a VERY old book that cottage cheese could be dried; would like to try it.

   

Very nice list,.. Will have to expand my goals a bit.

Curious about the book - is it a book on Dehydrating or another topic that just had a section on it.
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Offline TxGal

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #185 on: March 12, 2012, 12:18:28 PM »
Very nice list,.. Will have to expand my goals a bit.

Curious about the book - is it a book on Dehydrating or another topic that just had a section on it.


the booklet promotes dehydrating as a simple, convenient, wholesome, flavor preserver, space saver. It says that "to dry food products is to save them for food. It is therefore patriotic as well as good business".

The booklet is called Home Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, compiled and edited by Edgar Cooley of the Agricultural Extension Department--pub 1918

"The process of home drying described in this bulletin was developed by H. S. Mobley of the Agricultural Extension Department, International Harvester Company of N. J. (Inc.), and has been used and demonstrated by him during the past 15 years."

To dry: Cottage cheese—Cover the bottom of the rack with cheese cloth; spread the cottage cheese on the cloth to the depth 1/4 inch; dry for about four hours, or until the cheese becomes yellowish and grainy.

To restore:
Cottage cheese—Cover flat pan 1/4 inch deep with product and barely cover with water. Let it stand two hours. Do not use milk to restore it as it is only the water that has been evaporated.

The standard method of storage for the dried items was a paraffin coated paper bag--except for dried eggs, cream, meat, and watermelon which they say should be stored in glass.




Offline LvsChant

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #186 on: March 12, 2012, 12:28:09 PM »
+1 TxGal  That was an inspiring list. I've had similar results with my dehydrating experiences. (We also didn't like broccoli dehydrated -- although I was wondering if I could grind it up and use it as a cream of broccoli soup or something of the sort... future experiment).

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #187 on: March 12, 2012, 12:30:05 PM »
+1 TxGal  That was an inspiring list. I've had similar results with my dehydrating experiences. (We also didn't like broccoli dehydrated -- although I was wondering if I could grind it up and use it as a cream of broccoli soup or something of the sort... future experiment).

yeah, our broccoli was yucky too.  and I thought about broccoli soup, but I was so disappointed with the dried broccoli that I jsut don't want to deal with it again.
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Offline SteveandTracyinKY

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #188 on: March 12, 2012, 12:49:54 PM »
although I was wondering if I could grind it up and use it as a cream of broccoli soup or something of the sort... future experiment).

We tried the soup thing with the broccoli and we didn't like it. The broccoli had a VERY strong flavor that came through extremely bad in the soup. It was not the normal soft tones that we get with the same recipe and fresh broccoli. Hope yours turns out better than mine.
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Offline zackandjen2004

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #189 on: March 12, 2012, 12:59:36 PM »
I dried eggplant thinking that I could use it as a substitute for no-boil lasagna noodles.  Wrong.   YUCK. VERY thinly sliced and seasoned eggplant turned out ok as a "chip."  Kale and spinach and SHREDDED zucchini are great.  I de-bitter my zucchini by shredding, salting, rinsing, and then squeezing/wringing.  Then dry.

  My favorite dehydrated veg is tomato slices: I take cull heirloom tomatoes, slice them very thinly and dry till crisp.  I get $2/oz for them at the farmer's market.  You can eat them like chips, crush them into salads or toss into something that needs a little red color.  I DO leave the skin on, and that is a factor in cooked foods sometimes.  They MUST be stored in glass with a very robust O2 absorber and perhaps some dessicant.  That would keep 'em crisp.
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Offline idelphic

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #190 on: March 12, 2012, 06:37:53 PM »

the booklet promotes dehydrating as a simple, convenient, wholesome, flavor preserver, space saver. It says that "to dry food products is to save them for food. It is therefore patriotic as well as good business".

The booklet is called Home Drying of Fruits and Vegetables, compiled and edited by Edgar Cooley of the Agricultural Extension Department--pub 1918

"The process of home drying described in this bulletin was developed by H. S. Mobley of the Agricultural Extension Department, International Harvester Company of N. J. (Inc.), and has been used and demonstrated by him during the past 15 years."

To dry: Cottage cheese—Cover the bottom of the rack with cheese cloth; spread the cottage cheese on the cloth to the depth 1/4 inch; dry for about four hours, or until the cheese becomes yellowish and grainy.

To restore:
Cottage cheese—Cover flat pan 1/4 inch deep with product and barely cover with water. Let it stand two hours. Do not use milk to restore it as it is only the water that has been evaporated.

The standard method of storage for the dried items was a paraffin coated paper bag--except for dried eggs, cream, meat, and watermelon which they say should be stored in glass.

Amazing what you can find on the InterzNet..

http://ia700209.us.archive.org/1/items/homedryingoffrui00cool/homedryingoffrui00cool.pdf
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Offline chickchoc

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #191 on: March 12, 2012, 06:43:08 PM »
I'm gluten sensitive, so I've been very glad to dehydrate my own food and combine fugality with health.  Here are some recipes I found.  I especially liked the "hamburger rocks".  Enjoy!

Apple Pie
3 1/2 C. dried apples
2 C. water
3/4 C. sugar
1 t. cinnamon
Cook apples until tender. The apples will rehydrate during the cooking and baking process. Add sugar and cinnamon. Fill and top with pie crust and bake 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
Cherry Pie
3 C. dried cherries
3 C. boiling water
2 Tbs tapioca
1 C. sugar
Cover cherries with water and let soak for 30 minutes. Simmer and add sugar and tapioca. Pour into pie crust and add top crust. Bake at 400 degrees for about 35 minutes.
Peach Pie
3 C. dried peaches
3 C. boiling water
3 tbs tapioca
1 C. sugar
2 t. cinnamon
1/4 t. nutmeg

Cover fruit with water and let soak for 30 minutes. Simmer and add sugar, spices and tapioca to thicken. Pour into pie crust, dot with butter, and cover with pie top. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes.

Creamed Corn
1 C. dried corn
4 C. boiling water
2 t. sugar
1/2 C. milk
1 T. margarine
salt and pepper to taste
Add corn to water and let stand for 30 minutes. Simmer corn until tender. This may take as long as an hour or so. Drain and add remaining ingredients. Simmer for an additional 5 minutes, stirring frequently to avoid prevent scorching.

Cooked Fruit
3 C. dried fruit of your choice
2 C. boiling water
1 t. cinnamon
Sugar to taste
 
Let fruit soak in the boiled water for 20 minutes. Simmer for another 20 minutes and add cinnamon and sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved and serve.

Vegetable Soup
1 C. diced cooked meat
3 C. dried mixed vegetables
salt and pepper
Cover dried vegetables with boiling water and soak 1 hour, then simmer for 2 hours or until tender. Remember you can add fresh vegetables, in case you don't have a particular dried one, to the pot as well.
Instant Jam
3/4 dried fruit - use a single fruit or combination like bananas and strawberries
3/4 to 1 cup fruit juice or water, heated to boiling
1/4 cup honey or other sweetener, if needed
Cover the fruit with warmed juice and let sit overnight, if possible. Put this in a blender, and add your sweetener. Puree until spreadable. This is delicious.
Dried Fruit Stew
1 cup dried fruit (I like to use a combination of fruits like apples, pears, peaches, raisins, cherries
1 cup boiling water
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 to 1 teaspoon spices to taste. Try: cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, ginger.
Combine all and let set until it softens. For a dessert, sweeten with honey and serve with shortbread cookies. For breakfast, stir in a little yogurt and honey.
?
Dried Veggie Seasoning
Powder dried vegetables in the blender in any combination you like. Add to boiling water for instant vegetable broth, or put in a shaker and use at the table as a seasoning for vegetables, pasta, and rice.

Banana Bread made in a dehydrator
1/2 cup cashew or almond butter
3/4 cup agave nectar or date paste (dates blended up to form a paste)
1/2 cup raisins
1 tsp. fine celtic sea salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. vanilla extract or vanilla bean
1/2 cup walnuts (soaked for 7 hrs. and blended up in a blender to form a cream)
1 1/2 cup almond flour (just powdered almonds)
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Blend all the ingredients together (except the chopped nuts), and put into a loaf pan lined with wax or parchment paper. Top the batter with the chopped nuts and place in the dehydrator for 6-12 hrs. Enjoy warm right out of the dehydrator!
Banana Macadamia Nut Fudge Cookies (no cook)
1 cup raisins
1 cup walnuts
1 cup macadamia nuts (chopped into big pieces)
1 cup bananas (chopped up)
In food processor blend raisins and walnuts until smooth. Add in macadamia nuts and bananas. Dehydrate for 8 to 10 hours.
Classic Gorp
1/2 c. dried apples
1/2 c. dried apricots
1/4 c. dried peaches
1/2 c. dried pears
1/2 c. dried pineapple
1/4 c. coconut flakes
1/2 c. golden raisins
1/2 c. cashews or blanched almonds
Cut apples, apricots, peaches, pears and pineapple into 1/2" pieces. Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl. Package in airtight plastic bags and store in a cool dry place. Use within 3 to 4 weeks. Makes about 3-1/2 cups.
Tangy Sunflower Seeds
2 T. vegetable oil
1 T. soy sauce
1/4 tsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. celery salt
Dash cayenne pepper
2 cups dried shelled sunflower seeds, raw
Preheat oven to 300 F. In a medium bowl, mix oil, soy sauce, paprika, celery salt and cayenne pepper. Add sunflower seeds. Stir until seeds are evenly coated. Place mixture in a shallow baking pan. Bake in preheated oven 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Drain on paper towels. Makes 2 cups.
Peanut Butter Bites
2 cups coconut
2 cups dried apples, peeled, cored and chopped
2/3 cup peanut butter
1 1/2 tablespoons vanilla
In a large bowl, combine all ingredients; mix well.
Shape into 1/2-1" balls.
Dry at 135º for 4 to 5 hours, or until firm and crisp on the outside.
Hangdog Oatmeal
•   2 1/2 cups oatmeal
•   2 Tbsp brown sugar
•   1/2 cup dried bananas, powdered
•   3/4 cup chocolate chips
At home: Mix ingredients into zip lock bag.
On the trail: Boil 4 cups of water into separate pan. Stir in contents of zip lock bag and reboil. Remove from stove and set aside until cool.
Makes 1 serving Recipe courtesy of Backpacker Magazine; April 1996; Pg 45
Cranberry Orange Rice
•   1/4 cup instant rice
•   1 Tbsp dried cranberries
•   1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
•   1 packet True Orange
•   1 Tbsp powdered milk
•   1 tsp brown sugar
Note: True Orange is also available at www.truelemon.com or some grocery stores. You can also substitute 1 teaspoon citrus juice or zest per packet.
Cherry Almond Oatmeal
•   1 packet instant oatmeal
•   2 Tbsp dried cherries
•   1 Tbsp slivered almonds
•   1 Tbsp powdered milk
•   1 tsp brown sugar
At home: Combine everything in a freezer zip lock bag.
On the trail: Add 2/3 cup boiling water to oatmeal (or more if you like a thinner cereal).
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders
Chocolate Banana Oatmeal
•   1/3 cup instant oatmeal
•   1 tsp unsweetened cocoa powder
•   2 Tbsp powdered milk
•   2 tsp brown sugar
•   1/4 cup freeze-dried bananas  (finely crumbled dehydrated works, too)
•   Chocolate cookies, crumbled (optional)
At home: Combine everything except the cookies into a zip lock bag. If you are bringing the cookies, package them separately.
On the trail: Bring 1 cup of water to a boil, add the oatmeal mix and stir. Simmer until the oatmeal is cooked through. Serve topped with the cookies.
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders
Bacon Polenta
•   1/2 cup instant polenta
•   2 Tbsp shelf-stable bacon
•   1/2 Tbsp dried onions or dried onion flakes
•   2 tsp butter powder
•   1 tsp chicken or vegetable broth powder
•   1/4 tsp paprika
•   2 packets Parmesan cheese
At home: Combine everything, except the Parmesan, into a quart size freezer zip lock bag.
On the trail: Bring 1 1/2 cups of water to a boil. Add the polenta and simmer until cooked and creamy. Top with the Parmesan cheese.
Makes 1 serving
This recipe courtesy of One Pan Wonders

Emergency Essentials Recipes using dehydrated /freezedried products http://beprepared.com/recipes.asp_Q_ai_E_1_A_c2r_E_tn_A_name_E_Recipes

 
Jars of canned butter & hamburger rocks.
"Hamburger Rocks" are small chunks of cooked, dehydrated, fresh beef. They will store effectively for two or more years. Once rehydrated by soaking one cup of rocks in two cups of boiled water, the pre-cooked meat can be used in any recipe. It is delicious for tacos, spaghetti sauce, hamburger helper, tamale pie, lasagna, or your favorite recipe. It is very difficult to distinguish from fresh hamburger in a meal!
RECIPE FOR HAMBURGER ROCKS
1. Using a large skillet (cast iron is great), brown and fry 5 pounds of ground beef. When thoroughly cooked, transfer the meat to a colander. Rinse under hot running water to remove the fat. Then clean the skillet with paper towels to remove excess fat from the first cooking.
2. Place the washed meat back into the wiped skillet and fry it again over medium/low heat, stirring often until you see no more steam. Keep the heat/flame low once the rocks are browning up nicely.
3. Place the "twice cooked" rocks into an oven roasting pan. Turn the oven to 200 degrees F, stirring and turning occasionally as the meat continues to dry. One to two hours should finish the job. Remove from the oven and check for dryness. When cool, pack into zip lock bags or mason jars. Pack tightly, expelling as much air as possible. Store in pantry drawers or shelves.
4. To "can" the hamburger rocks for long term storage, preheat canning jars in the over at 250 F, simmer the lids as usual, put the "rocks" into the jars while still hot, then seal the jars. After 15 minutes or so the jars will cool and you will hear the jar lids "pop" as they seal in place.
 
Carrot Pecan Burgers
•   4 Carrots
•   1.5 C Pecans (or another nut or mix in some seeds also)
•   1/2 C shredded zucchini (dried off a bit in paper towel or a towel)
•   2 Tbsp cilantro (fresh)
•   2 green onions (more if you like)
•   1.5 Tbsp olive oil
•   1/2 tsp curry powder
•   1/2 tsp salt
•   1/4 tsp pepper
Blend carrots first.
Add rest of ingredients and blend.
Form into burger patties. Note that the larger you make them, the longer they take to dehydrate. Place the patties on dehydrator trays.  If necessary, use parchment paper on trays to keep mix from dropping through.
Dehydrate about 7-8 hours, take them off trays, turn them over and put on mesh sheet. Dehydrate them until you like the consistency.

Offline TxGal

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #192 on: March 12, 2012, 08:18:03 PM »
Amazing what you can find on the InterzNet..

http://ia700209.us.archive.org/1/items/homedryingoffrui00cool/homedryingoffrui00cool.pdf

Yes! That's it! I knew it was archive.org, but didn't have the link handy.
There are lots of interesting finds there!

Offline LvsChant

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #193 on: March 13, 2012, 07:18:29 AM »
great post chickchoc. Thanks for sharing! +1

Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #194 on: August 26, 2012, 05:51:32 PM »
This is my first year dehydrating.

I have done blueberries.  I just washed them and put them in the dehydrator.  I didn't blanch or cut them.
Apple slices with cinnamon are becoming one of my favorites.
Cherries.  Washed and pitted.  We like them better than fresh cherries.  These are my husband's favorite.
Strawberries.  I used a mushroom slicer to cut them. 

My husband mixes these fruits with various nuts and eats it for breakfast.

I am drying a batch of mushrooms right now.  They are so easy to use dried.
I also did a batch of bell peppers. 
Celery is next on the list to make along with more apple slices.

 

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #195 on: August 26, 2012, 06:10:28 PM »
I tried watermelon.  it was nasty.
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Offline Shadowrider

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #196 on: September 03, 2012, 07:09:06 PM »
If this has been covered in a topic, I can't find it. What is everyone using to powder their dehydrated product? DH uses his Ultimate Chopper and it works, but powder is all over the machine and the counter when he's done. My old Oster food processor chopper is larger, but there's powder everywhere again. Mom uses her Magic Bullet and says she also has powder all over the counter. We have an old Oster blender, but I don't think it is powerful enough to powder, although we haven't tried it yet. Tammy at dehydrate2store.com uses a blender that I think is a Vita Mix, but wow, they are expensive.

In spite of it all, we have powdered blueberries to add to ice cream, powdered butternut squash for pumpkin pie and pumpkin pancakes. Powdered ginger and garlic in the spice cabinet. In the dehydrator now is peach puree that I'm hoping will get crisp enough to powder. Yum!!!

At 1/2 cup of powdered butternut squash/pumpkin for a pumpkin pie, you can get a lot of pies stored in one quart jar. Pretty amazing.

Offline Cedar

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #197 on: September 03, 2012, 08:22:41 PM »
If this has been covered in a topic, I can't find it. What is everyone using to powder their dehydrated product?

My Cuisinart food processor.

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Offline Frugal Upstate

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #198 on: September 04, 2012, 06:34:13 AM »
DH uses his Ultimate Chopper and it works, but powder is all over the machine and the counter when he's done. My old Oster food processor chopper is larger, but there's powder everywhere again. Mom uses her Magic Bullet and says she also has powder all over the counter. We have an old Oster blender, but I don't think it is powerful enough to powder, although we haven't tried it yet. Tammy at dehydrate2store.com uses a blender that I think is a Vita Mix, but wow, they are expensive.

I have not yet started powdering my dehydrated food, although it is on the list!  But I had a similar problem withaking my powdered laundry soap in my food processor-the very fine powder seemed to leak out no matter what. So I started taking a kitchen towel, wetting it down and then wringing it out well and then drappimg it over the machine before I started it.  The combo of cloth and slight damp ess seem to catch the really fine particles.  Then I just give it a bit before I remove the cloth & open the food processor for everything inside to settle back down.  Maybe this technique would work for your powders?
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Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #199 on: September 04, 2012, 08:08:08 AM »
for big amounts, I use my vitamix.  for small amounts, my coffee grinder; I have 2 actually.  One for sweet foods (fruits, berries, etc) and one for savory (veggies, spices).
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Offline LvsChant

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #200 on: September 04, 2012, 09:13:50 AM »
I powdered tomatoes with my blender and didn't have much problem with mess and powder everywhere... (you did put the lid on, right? hehe)

Offline Shadowrider

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #201 on: September 04, 2012, 10:21:05 AM »
Thanks to the TSP Brain Trust, problem solved!

I have not yet started powdering my dehydrated food, although it is on the list!  But I had a similar problem withaking my powdered laundry soap in my food processor-the very fine powder seemed to leak out no matter what. So I started taking a kitchen towel, wetting it down and then wringing it out well and then drappimg it over the machine before I started it.  The combo of cloth and slight damp ess seem to catch the really fine particles.  Then I just give it a bit before I remove the cloth & open the food processor for everything inside to settle back down.  Maybe this technique would work for your powders?


My Cuisinart food processor.

Cedar

I dug out my Oster food processor and wrapped a damp towel around it. That worked great! The powder was the same consistency as the Ultimate Chopper and the dust was more contained. The damp towel idea is genius! I'll let Mom know so she can wrap her Magic Bullet.

I powdered tomatoes with my blender and didn't have much problem with mess and powder everywhere... (you did put the lid on, right? hehe)

Even though I was POSITIVE my blender wouldn't do the job, I dug it out next and tried it. When I put the lid on :D all the dust was contained and the powder is extra fine. The winner, hands down!

for big amounts, I use my vitamix.  for small amounts, my coffee grinder; I have 2 actually.  One for sweet foods (fruits, berries, etc) and one for savory (veggies, spices).

We thought about using the coffee grinder, but wanted to do larger amounts. I can see getting an extra one to do herbs though, so I like that idea.

+1 and thanks to Cedar, FrugalUpstate, Morning Sunshine & LvsChant who all replied with the great ideas I knew you would have.

Shadowrider


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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #202 on: September 04, 2012, 11:05:01 AM »
So glad to have helped!
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Offline Shadowrider

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #203 on: November 13, 2012, 01:05:00 PM »
Since I learned to powder my dehydrated foods (thanks again, everyone) I've been drying more and more. I chopped fresh ginger root and powdered it after dehydrating. It is far superior (of course) to what is in the little bottles at the grocery store. I've powdered chives, the tops of green onions. And I have small garlic that comes up every year but is too small to fuss with peeling, so decided I'll pull them up as young garlic (like scallions) and dehydrate them for powder. We've also started making our own spice mixes for different uses, using home made powders and adding store bought when necessary.

My husband loves persimmon cookies and in past years I've bought all I can find in the fall and made several batches of cookies for the freezer. This year I have 1 cup of persimmon pulp in the dehydrator. I'll measure it when it is powdered and know how much I need for a batch of cookies. Hopefully it won't be too sticky to powder. I have other persimmons ripening on the windowsill for dehydrating soon.

The stickier fruits are difficult to powder and tend to clump. Peaches were the stickiest. But I was able to use peach powder in homemade ice cream. WOW! Was that ever a hit! I probably won't try to powder peaches again though.

My mother discovered tomato powder and has decided it is a perfect fast food. She boils some water, adds tomato powder and has a lovely hot bowl of tomato soup in minutes. Along the same line, she has been powdering greens and using them to add to soups and as a seasoning on baked chicken. I haven't tried that myself yet, but she loves it. Powdered celery is another one I want to use for seasoning.

My dehydrator is going now with butternut squash (pumpkin pie!), persimmon and dog biscuits. Not all on one tray of course. ;)

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #204 on: November 17, 2012, 10:40:43 AM »
Ok, dehydrated baked pumpkin that I pureed--now I'm trying to powder it in my food processor.  I'm getting powder on the bottom and small flakes (about the size fish food maybe? but a tad bit thicker)--and the flakes don't seem to be powdering with more time.  What am I doing wrong? Should I just say heck with it and use the powder/flakes together? 

I know on Dehydrate2Store she said 1/2 C powder to 2 cup Water made 2 C puree--I'm wondering if I keep it as flakes if that will change the proportion as a 1/2 C flakes wouldn't be as dense as 1/2 C  powder...
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Offline Bennington1776

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #205 on: November 17, 2012, 11:57:14 AM »
I am a dehydrating NOOB.

So far I have made Beef Jerky, Pinapple Chunks and Pineapple Slices.  None have made it into my short or long term storage.  Most have made their way into my belly.  ;) Happy Belly.

Just started anoth batch of pineappple slices.

Offline Shadowrider

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #206 on: November 17, 2012, 04:12:30 PM »
Ok, dehydrated baked pumpkin that I pureed--now I'm trying to powder it in my food processor.  I'm getting powder on the bottom and small flakes (about the size fish food maybe? but a tad bit thicker)--and the flakes don't seem to be powdering with more time.  What am I doing wrong? Should I just say heck with it and use the powder/flakes together? 

I know on Dehydrate2Store she said 1/2 C powder to 2 cup Water made 2 C puree--I'm wondering if I keep it as flakes if that will change the proportion as a 1/2 C flakes wouldn't be as dense as 1/2 C  powder...

Frugal Upstate, I don't see a problem with the small flakes. I've had that happen too. Since you started with a puree, the flakes will dissolve when you add the water to rehydrate. At least that's been my experience. And I've just measured out to the 1/2 cup line and haven't felt like I needed more to make up for the flakes.

Also, if for some reason you do find they are staying as flakes, you can always run your pumpkin pie mix through the blender like Tammy does on Dehydrate2Store. I found that made the pie too creamy for our taste, but still definitely yummy.

Hope that helps!  :)

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #207 on: November 17, 2012, 09:23:48 PM »
Thanks Shadowrider!  I experimented with rehydrating 1 TBS of the powder/flakes to 4 TBS of hot water and it seemed to come out the right consistency :)
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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #208 on: November 18, 2012, 07:00:57 AM »
when I try to rehydrate pumpkin, it is mostly smooth with those larger bits never really coming smooth.  maybe I am dehydrating it too long, and it is too hard to grind up?  cuz my larger bits are NOT flakes, but hard balls about the size of mustard seeds, and when they rehydrate, they get soft, but not smooth.
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Offline Shadowrider

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Re: your dehydrated foods - what you dried, and how you used them
« Reply #209 on: November 18, 2012, 07:59:40 AM »
Thanks Shadowrider!  I experimented with rehydrating 1 TBS of the powder/flakes to 4 TBS of hot water and it seemed to come out the right consistency :)

Hooray for your success! Now you can make pumpkin pancakes (YUM!) as well as pumpkin pie!

when I try to rehydrate pumpkin, it is mostly smooth with those larger bits never really coming smooth.  maybe I am dehydrating it too long, and it is too hard to grind up?  cuz my larger bits are NOT flakes, but hard balls about the size of mustard seeds, and when they rehydrate, they get soft, but not smooth.

Morning Sunshine, I don't know what the larger bits are. I dry my pumpkin until it is crispy. I have also forgotten about it and let it go longer in the dehydrator, but even though it is to the harder stage, it still powders up, with just a few flakes.

Is it possible that the bits were uncooked? I know the last butternut squash I cooked in my pressure canner did not cook through the center (my mistake, I put the 15 pound weight on so figured to cook it less time -- NO!) I did take the uncooked portions and put them in my steamer for a few minutes before spreading the puree on the Paraflexx sheets in the dehydrator.

Did you try pureeing the rehydrated pumpkin before putting it in your crust?