Author Topic: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars  (Read 23212 times)

onmyway

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Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« on: December 09, 2008, 09:55:32 AM »
Does anyone know how to dry-pack grains and rice in glass jars? I would be interested in the technique.

Offline Lowdown3

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2008, 12:48:54 PM »
Using glass jars- i.e, canning jars is very wasteful and costly, IMO.

The jars are NOT a light barrier also, so there effectiveness long term is dubious.

Costs are prohibitive for any serious quantities-

Case of wide mouth quart jars may cost you upwards of $10. for a dozen. That MAY hold 40 lbs. of dry goods.

A 5 gallon bucket from Firehouse subs will cost you $2. Mylar liner a little over a $1. With wise purchasing you'll be able to package about 3 times the amount for the same money.

Drop a 5 gallon bucket out of the back of your truck and it's going to be none the worse the wear. Do the same with the mason jars and you'll have a heckuva mess to clean up. Earthquake areas? Why bother with anything glass?

Bug out load out- a case of jars takes 2 hands to carry out to a vehicle. A 5 gallon bucket can be carried with one hand, the other hand free to use a weapon, carry other things or carry a young child.

Save the canning jars for there intended purpose- canning your home fruits and veg.

Lowdown3

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2008, 07:08:51 PM »
When I open a big box of something dry - soup, dry milk, etc.

I put them into used spaghetti sauce and salsa jars.

I like doing this. Open the cabinet, and you can see what all you have and how much you have.

I am looking at finding one of those vacuum sealers that can do jars.

millerized1

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2008, 07:58:31 PM »
I use them when I open #10 cans.  No sense letting the rest get moist or go to waste.  It's only the wife and I, so food doesn't disappear quite as fast here.  I've got lots stored in them, from green coffee beans to dehydrated celery, carrots and pancake mix.  I use the jar attachment from my Foodsaver to seal them.  This IS my BOL, so I'm not too worried about transporting them, but that is a valid concern in both transportation and in an environmental unstable locale (earthquake).

Offline Stein

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2008, 11:31:46 PM »
I would second the plastic bucket idea.  If you don't want/need 5-6 gallons, there are smaller buckets out there.

Offline BerserkerPrime

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2008, 05:05:43 PM »
Good call on the smaller buckets.  My wife is pretty small, so I would end up doing all the moving around of 5g buckets. 

BP

Offline CTF250

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2008, 06:21:18 PM »
We seal small volume dry items isuch as dehydrated fruits, potatoes and rice, in 1 qt canning jars with a vacuum sealer.  I have a food saver vac sealer with the jar attachment which, will vac seal a canning jar lid on a jar.  Just place the dry item in the jar, place the lid ontop and attach the vac seal lid.  Apply vacuum and poof the lid is sealed to the jar. 

Ive found that this process will hold a vacuum for a long while 6 months at least.  Wife likes it when using small amounts of an item and then re seal them in the jar to retain freshness.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2008, 06:26:03 PM by CTF250 »

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2008, 06:42:31 PM »
We seal small volume dry items isuch as dehydrated fruits, potatoes and rice, in 1 qt canning jars with a vacuum sealer.  I have a food saver vac sealer with the jar attachment which, will vac seal a canning jar lid on a jar.  Just place the dry item in the jar, place the lid ontop and attach the vac seal lid.  Apply vacuum and poof the lid is sealed to the jar. 

Ive found that this process will hold a vacuum for a long while 6 months at least.  Wife likes it when using small amounts of an item and then re seal them in the jar to retain freshness.

Will this work ok the spegetti sauce and salsa jars or does it only work with a regular canning type lid?

millerized1

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2008, 06:52:11 PM »
I'm not entirely sure.....I'd say you'd have to try it to see.  I guess if you put the lid on just enough to hold, used the sealer, then screwed it on the rest of the way once it sealed you might get it.  The regular lid seals just set there and seal, then you screw the ring on.  I guess you're not out anything to try, right?

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2008, 06:59:10 PM »
I'm not entirely sure.....I'd say you'd have to try it to see.  I guess if you put the lid on just enough to hold, used the sealer, then screwed it on the rest of the way once it sealed you might get it.  The regular lid seals just set there and seal, then you screw the ring on.  I guess you're not out anything to try, right?

Right. I don't have one at the moment.

My mother may have picked up my hinting and may be getting me one for Christmas, so I may not even get one with the jar sealer.

I missed the walmart clearance on preassure canners this year - didn't like the one I saw anyhow. So the food saver is going to be the toy of the year if I do get it.

I just like recycling used jars. I was hoping this would be a good way to do it.

Offline CTF250

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2008, 07:06:10 PM »
As I previously described, it will only work with canning jar lids.  The jar lid attachment will accept different size canning jars but the lid needs to fit flat on the jar. 

A screw top jar like a pasta sacue jar has the lid that screws on.  The sealer dosnt seal around the side of the lid.  It only creates a vacuum at the top, so a canning lid can be sucked on the jar.

For a vac sealler, try Ebay.  I got our on their last year for under $80.00.  In the stores last year they were over  $200 for new. 

« Last Edit: December 10, 2008, 07:12:40 PM by CTF250 »

millerized1

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2008, 07:14:28 PM »
Just tried it with a normal screw on commercial lid.  Took 2 tries, but I put it on just to the point of catching the threads of the glass, pressed the sealer down over it putting pressure on it (both the glass to get a good vacuum seal, and on the lid to get a good lid to glass to seal) and it sealed.  I lost the seal the first time I screwed the lid over, but I got it to seal the second time.  Probably no need to screw the lid on if you're just looking for a short time seal.  But, if you're going to go for a long term seal, I'd go for the ring and seal like you're supposed to. And any jar that held a vacuum before, should hold a vacuum again as long as the rim stays unchipped.

Of course, your mileage and test results may vary.

millerized1

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2008, 07:35:45 PM »
FWIW, this is from over at survivalblog.com:
As my friend "Kevin Lendel" likes to say: "Such a deal!" More than 175 SurvivalBlog readers have bought Foodsaver vacuum packers at the special December sale price. Don't miss out on this! You can buy a FoodSaver v2830 for $59.99 (originally $169.99) with free Standard Shipping for orders over $100, directly from FoodSaver.com.Use code L8FAV28 at checkout. This offer is valid during the month of December, or while supplies last. BTW, I recommend getting the optional set of Mason Jar suction attachments, as they are particularly useful.

Storm

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2008, 01:31:31 AM »
Thanks Millerized, I've been looking for one of those on the cheap.

onmyway

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #14 on: December 13, 2008, 04:00:50 PM »
Thanks to everyone for the info. I was wondering if this might be a good way to go, now I have something to think about. Sorry I haven't read this till today, but I'm on the road alot and have limited availability of internet.

systemaddict1

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2008, 07:33:43 PM »
I have to agree with the majority that it would be better to store bulk dry goods in plastic buckets. But mason jars do have there advantages. I use a variety of sizes to store my dry goods and spices in my kitchen. I just refill them from my buckets when they get low. I do this because as other have said " I can use the food saver attachment to reseal them and keep it fresh. The only problem is that I wont be able to do this if there is no power. My uncle who has been preparing for years has told me that you can put uncooked rice in mason jars, put the lid on, and put them in the oven for a while at 250 degrees. I am not sure for how long but once you put them on the counter to cool they will seal. I will try to do more research and see if I can come up with any sites with the specifics on it. I think that I just might be inspired to build a solar oven and run a few experiments myself.

Tommy Jefferson

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2008, 04:52:51 AM »
Good info for me.  Thanks guys.

Storm

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #17 on: December 14, 2008, 06:12:09 AM »
Indeed. Tis a waste of a good mason jar to dry pack it with grains. They're more suited to chilis, soups if possible, sauces, apple butter (YUM), and things of that nature.

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2008, 12:37:41 AM »
I put powdered milk into jars and cooked them in the oven for 10 minutes or so. I wanted to draw off just a little air, and dry the milk out if it absorbed any moister in the cardboard box.
I didn't want to do it too long, and risk cooking the milk or carmalizing the sugars in it.

It seemed to work.

Probably not necessary, but it gave me cheap entertainment.

Offline IRKCOD

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2009, 06:19:04 AM »
Have been searching for a cheap method to vacuum seal jars and came across the Judy of the Woods web site : http://www.judyofthewoods.net/pump.html#2

This shows an interesting method for vacuum sealing with home made seals made from electrical tape, a narrow strip of polythene and an easy release paper ie waxed paper.
The other requirements are a pin and jars with lids.    Jars can be recycled screw top or bottling (canning??) jars
Instead of the manual vacuum pump you could probably use your vacuum cleaner.

While the website has photos covering the technique the basics are :

1) Make seals by sticking a narrow strip of polythene along the sticky side of the electrical tape ( or duct tape).  The polythene should be about 1/3rd the width of the tape.   Then stick the tape to the easy release paper.   The result should look like an elastoplast / band-aid sheet.  The seals are cut from this sheet as required.
2) Put a small hole in the centre of your lid using a pin or small nail.  The hole is from the top to the underside, so that that any jagged points do not puncture the seal.
3) Cut a seal from your 'band-aid' sheet (1).  Remove the easy release paper and stick the seal firmly over the hole in the lid.  Ensure that the polythene 'pad' is over the hole.
4) Insert the product to be stored into the jar and tighten the lid.  Ensure the lid has a good internal seal/rubber-ring.  If it looks slightly 'doggy' you could try a hot hair-dryer on it to soften it and ensure a 'tight' seal.   Make sure that the top of the lid is smooth, dry and clean to ensure good adhesion of the seal.
5) Place your vacuum over the seal and 'suck'.  With a manual vacuum you should feel high resistance as the air empties from the jar.   The polythene strip allows the air to be sucked out from the jar.  The lid should 'indent' as the vacuum takes hold.   When you stop vacuuming the pressure should such the seal down tightly on top of the hole.   You can always put additional tape on the lid to ensure less risk of the seal breaking.
6) Dust/Powder from the product being stored can affect the adhesion of the seal.  One person commenting in Judy's article suggests   sticking a small wad of tissue paper on the underside of the hole to act as a filter.  Do not fill your container to the top with product.

The same method can be used for sealing buckets with lids.   ( Maybe with some form of gasket/silicon sealer around the lid )


I've just dehydrated 6 large pumpkins ( about 15 to 18kgs raw ) and ground the the results into flour.  One type of flour from the meat and another from the dehydrated seeds.   The flours are then sealed in sandwich sized ziplock plastic for vacuum sealing in jars or buckets

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2009, 10:40:10 AM »
I've just dehydrated 6 large pumpkins ( about 15 to 18kgs raw ) and ground the the results into flour.  One type of flour from the meat and another from the dehydrated seeds.   The flours are then sealed in sandwich sized ziplock plastic for vacuum sealing in jars or buckets

What do you use pumpkin flour for?  :o and how do you dehydrate pumpkins?  I bottles 70 quarts last fall - waste of time and energy; each quart only gives about 1 c of pureed meat.  If dehydrating is a better time/ energy investment, SIGN me up!!

Offline khristopher23

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #21 on: March 25, 2009, 02:03:19 PM »
   I don't really think it's too much of a waste, especially if you've got the jars already. I thought about doing this myself, but right now, I'm using bigger glass canisters from Wal Mart to put a little bit of dry goods in, as I haven't worked my way up to a full food reserve yet. Although most f what I am putting in them is going to be used in the next month or two hopefully, as my family tries to move more into making thing from "scratch" as opposed to buying all of the prepackaged stuff. I think the glass containers look a little neater setting on the counter, or in the pantry. I will probably get 5 gallon buckets on down the road as my stockpiles grow, but for what you'll use in a month or two, I don't see anything wrong with it, except for maybe the transportation aspect.
 
   I think they would be good for dry stuff you might not use all the time, such as brown sugar, for instance. Every time I try to use brown sugar at our house for anything, its always a mystery what's gonna be in that bag in the box in the back of the cabinet, and how caked up it's gonna be. So, a glass jar there I feel would be better.

  As far as food needing to stay dark, to me dark = dark, whether you are keeping the excess mason jars in a cabinet that doesn't get opened much, or a five gallon bucket that doesn't get opened much, it'll still be dark. Thats just my opinion, as I haven't really built up enough food stores to speak from experience yet. I am gonna try glass jars and canisters for a few things though.

Offline IRKCOD

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Re: Dry-Pack Canning in glass jars
« Reply #22 on: March 25, 2009, 09:17:32 PM »
Morning Sunshine

Uses of pumpkin flour include : soups, casseroles, breads and scones.  As a supplement to wheat and rice flour, can taste pretty potent on its own.   Taste is also dependent upon the type of pumpkin used.

The type I used was called 'Whanga', likely a local NZ variety.  Yellow firm meat, like a good dry potato texture and plenty of good sized seeds.  Average size between 2.5 and 3+kg each.  Currently in plentiful supply as Autumn (Fall) here.  Cost NZ$1 per Kg or approx US$0.56c (or 0.28c per lb)

Process :
1) Cut Pumpkin in half, scooping out pith and seeds.
2) Separate seeds from pit, wash and put to one side.  The pith is added to the compost bin ( tried dehydrating it - not very successful)
3) Cut Pumpkin into strips, about 2 inches wide.  Size to fit the neck of my old ' Kenwood kitchen-wiz slicer' attachment.  (She-who-must-be-obeyed will not let me near the good stuff)
4) Peel/Cut the 'shell/skin' off the strips.
5) Cut or machine slice the strips into 2 inch by about 1/8 inch slices.  the 'whiz' just rockets through it.
6) At this point you can 'blanch' the slices - dip then into boiling water for a minute and then flush with cold water.   I found that this tended to 'cook' the slices.
7) Place the slices on your drying trays and place in your dehydrator until bone dry.  (Timing varies with the type of dehydrator - see below)
8) The dried slices go into the blender on the good old 'whiz' and have the living day-lights bashed out of them until course granduals or powder is formed.   You determine your own 'grain' coarseness requirement.
9) The results are then packed in ziplock bags and can be vacuum sealed.

10) The washed seeds are put on drying trays and dehydrated.
11) The fine paper like outer skin flakes off and this can be removed  by rattling the seeds together in a container and then blowing the gossamer like flakes away.   A hairdryer is hand for this.
12) Make sure the seeds are fully dry, returning them to the dehydrator if required.
13) Process through steps 8) and 9) above
14) The resultant Pumpkin Seed Flour is a gray to stone colour.  Good in scones.

Dehydrators:  To make the last lot of flour I uses a 10 tray electric dehydrator and ran it overnight.
I have used a 'light in a box' system to dehydrate some apples for flour, it worked well though it took about 2 days to dry adequately.
Have looked at the solar system Jack was proposing, it looks good but will need to wait until our next summer to try.

Have made flours from Potatoes, Carrots, Apples, Pears over the last couple of weeks.
The prices for these are currently good around the 30c per lb mark , so stocking up.
Also stored some dehydrated vegies without turning them to flour, requires a bit more space.

Came across some good 'specials' on frozen vegetables and dehydrated these.  It certainly brings you back to earth when you compare the volume and weight of the dehydrated product with what it was in the frozen state.    The amount we pay for water.

Looked at Bottling (Canning) which we did years ago but it struck me as to messy.   The dehydrating doesn't require as much use of the kitchen facilities, which suits the home PTB.  ;)

Offline surfivor

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mason jars for dried food storage ?
« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2009, 01:08:13 AM »

 A woman told me storing dried beans/rice in mason jars will make it keep indefinitely, though my mother disagrees though she thinks it will last longer. Any thoughts on that ?

 What do you think the shelf life is for rice and beans in just bags inside of those 5 gallon buckets before I should give the stuff to goodwill and buy a fresh supply ?

 I sort of estimate this to be maybe around 9 or 10 months .. but I am considering some mason jars for the next batch possibly ..

Offline Roknrandy

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Re: mason jars for dried food storage ?
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2009, 03:29:49 AM »
if the food is stored with an oxygen absorber (either jar or bag) they should be good for years (probable 15-20) at minimum. Jars are nice because you can store smaller portions but more expensive to store the same amount of food (say a 25# bag of rice).

Offline Lowdown3

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Re: mason jars for dried food storage ?
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2009, 07:12:21 AM »
If packed correctly in mylar bags, absorbers, etc. your whole grains should last DECADES, even in warm climates. I know cause I've done it. I donated some of the food shown in this vid-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBoKCSFA1lQ&feature=channel_page

Even just poured into clean buckets, that rice was good almost 20 years later. Showed a lot of oxidation but that was packed in the days before mylars and oxygen absorbers could be obtained easily.

Why you DON'T want to use mason jars for dry good storage-

1. Very costly packaging- $10. or more to put up around 40 lbs. of rice versus less than $5. if you have to buy the bucket.
2. No light barrier. Light is a major detriment to long term storage.
3. Very awkward to handle. If you had to load out for a bug out, would you want both hands tied up carrying an awkward case of jars?
4. Prone to breakage- live in an earthquake, tornado or hurricane prone area? (That's most of the country btw) A 5 gallon bucket falls from 3 feet is survives, glass jars falling from 3 inches won't survive.


I understand the basic concept- smaller serving size. We have gotten too convenience oriented in our culture. For bulk storage we want to try to save every buck we can. The savings are clear, the superiority of the bucket over the jar is clear. For the folks that think "well I don't want to open a full 5 gallon bucket"- trust me it's not a big deal and your food will not go "POOOFF" and disappear within a few days of you opening the bucket!

Cut a small bit of the mylar near the top, scoop what you need out, roll the mylar back on to itself, put the lid on and I guarantee you your whole grains will still be good a few years later. They don't evaporate into thin air just because you opened the mylar.

Lowdown3

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: mason jars for dried food storage ?
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2009, 09:01:44 AM »
I understand the basic concept- smaller serving size. We have gotten too convenience oriented in our culture. For bulk storage we want to try to save every buck we can. The savings are clear, the superiority of the bucket over the jar is clear. For the folks that think "well I don't want to open a full 5 gallon bucket"- trust me it's not a big deal and your food will not go "POOOFF" and disappear within a few days of you opening the bucket!

Cut a small bit of the mylar near the top, scoop what you need out, roll the mylar back on to itself, put the lid on and I guarantee you your whole grains will still be good a few years later. They don't evaporate into thin air just because you opened the mylar.
ditto to everything you said.  I would just add one thing.
If opening a 5-gal bucket for a few cups of rice bothers you, get some gamma seals for your "open" buckets.  I have 8 6-gal buckets of hard white wheat.  since i follow the "eat what you store and store what you eat" philosophy, I use those buckets regularly (well one at a time anyway).  I open a bucket (break the seal), pour it into the bucket with the gamma seal, and then unscrew whenever I need a few cups of wheat.  The rest stays good, the bucket with the gamma seal is still air and water tight (Thank Goodness! - my 2-yo daughter was standing on one and had a potty-training accident.  ick!  But after cleaning her up, I washed the outside of the bucket with a clorox wipe, unscrewed the lid, and washed that with soapy water and clorox wipe, and all was good.  NOTHING got into the bucket.)  And the emptied bucket gets a refill next time I am at Costco or where ever I buy my bulk grains.
 

Offline surfivor

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Re: mason jars for dried food storage ?
« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2009, 08:36:56 PM »

 That guy is saying that rice stored in 5 gallon buckets can last for years.

 Where can you buy mylar liners and oxygen absorbers anyway ??

Offline Bones

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Re: mason jars for dried food storage ?
« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2009, 08:45:51 PM »
That guy is saying that rice stored in 5 gallon buckets can last for years.

 Where can you buy mylar liners and oxygen absorbers anyway ??

Try this: https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/emergency_supplies/mylar_food_storage_bags.htm

Winchester32

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Re: mason jars for dried food storage ?
« Reply #29 on: May 18, 2009, 11:35:52 PM »
That guy is saying that rice stored in 5 gallon buckets can last for years.

 Where can you buy mylar liners and oxygen absorbers anyway ??

Here are some of the places I use.

http://www.frugalsquirrels.com/store/food_storage/mylar_bags.html

http://www.survival-center.com/foodfaq/  (general storage info site)

http://sorbentsystems.com/