Author Topic: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?  (Read 19562 times)

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2014, 03:28:50 PM »
My $0.02.

Don't let customer service play into this.  I have had nothing but fantastic service from Lee, RCBS and Hornady.  I can only assume Dillon has fantastic service also, I haven't gotten anything from Dillon.  My advise to anyone is if your reloading stuff breaks or doesn't seem to work correctly call the manufacturer.  They will often times send you parts or give you knowledge for free!

I originally bought a Lock N Load kit from Hornady just because it was the cheapest kit with almost everything I needed.

I spend most of my rifle reloading time on case prep and very little time on the press, so I don't think it would matter much what press I had.  It takes a long time to clean brass, lubricate, knock out primer & Resize, cut down to size, debur, clean out primer pocket, ream out military crimp (if present), measure everything... The actual act of priming, tossing in powder and putting a projectile on top seems to be the least time consuming of all (after the dies and powder throw are setup).  So from everything ready and getting 100 to 500 rounds per hour with a progressive, vs. 100 rounds per hour with a single stage just doesn't seem to matter to me.  Your mileage may very.  I am speeding things up a little over time, I bought a couple of case trimmers from little crow (amazing), and an RCBS case prep center.  But, overall the better faster things only save my hands from all the repetitive motions, they don't speed things up radically. 

I do 100's of rounds at a time with 250 probably being the most ever in one sitting, all with my little hornady lock n load press.  So far, 9 mm, 380 auto, .40 S&W, .223, 300 blackout.

+1

brass prep, esp. rifle brass can be tedious and involves many off the press steps.  For all the cartridges I handload, I like to have primed cases prepared in advance.  That way regardless of the bullet type or powder charge I am ready to go.  Given this habit, having a single stage is less of an issue.  If there's no crimp involved, I simply: charge case by hand, set bullet with fingers, run through seating die.  So that's just a single pull of the handle for each cartridge. 

Planning ahead like this can make a single stage fairly usable.

Offline Carl

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #31 on: September 10, 2014, 03:31:13 PM »
I was a commercial loader with Dillon 550B, three Dillon 1000's ,2 Dillon 1050's ,and 4 AMMO LOAD electric loaders that ran 5000 rounds an hour...If you can pay the extra for the Dillon and the dies(Dillon dies are special and many dies are not long enough to work) The support and LIFETIME WARRANTY are worth it and the Dillon 550B is worth the price.

That said ,with the low quantity of reloads you want to do ,the LEE,or RCBS single stage will do ...if you want to spend more time loading than shooting.

The LEE turret press is OK,but you must fiddle with it often to keep it working AND it is not nearly so heavy duty as the 550B.

The single stage will take about 5 to 10 times the TIME to produce the loads you want.

The Dillon DIE HEADS and the dies STAY ADJUSTED,you just change the shell plate and caliber head...10 Mins and you are loading . If you want a machine that you will spend less time messing with and be able to spend more time shooting...of your selections...the Dillon 550B is the hands down winner.

Offline AngusBangus

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #32 on: September 12, 2014, 09:15:08 PM »
I'm just saying... I think that I AM worth more than any guy named Lee...
Thanks,
Dillon (angusbangus)

Offline trekker111

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #33 on: September 13, 2014, 12:45:07 AM »
If you will be reloading a lot of cartridges of one type, then a Dillon is worth the money. I also wouldn't overlook one of the progressives from hornady. Otherwise, a single stage press will serve you well, especially now that the lock n load type bushing based presses, and the turret presses, are available.

I do all my reloading on single stage presses, but I only reload is spurts. I will sit down and reload 200 375 H&H mag cartridges, then I probably won't reload any more of that cartridge till I start too run low, which may be years. The only things I reload regularly are 45 colt, 45-70, and 308 win, and with those, it will be 20 rounds of one here, 50 rounds of the other there, with weeks in between reloading sessions. A Dillon doesn't make sense for me, IMO.

If I were to take up cowboy action shooting, or some other high volume hobby, were I was reloading several hundred rounds of one cartridge at a time, I would get a Dillon without batting an eyelash.


Offline shambo

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2014, 10:11:02 PM »
I set up the  new Dillon 650 today and knocked out 500 rounds in no time.  On my single stage press,  it  would have taken me a week to prep and load all that brass.  If you are a active shooter,  I highly recommend the Dillon.  My loader friends have  had the Lee progressive presses and got rid of them and purchased the Dillon.  Its well worth the money. 

I have Lee dies and love them.  I used  my Lee dies in the Dillon press.   Works good.  I did have to solve a problem.  The Lee dies are shorter than the Dillon dies and when I screwed my deprimer-decapper die into the first stage, I found out that there were no threads on the top of the tool  head and plenty of threads sticking out below the tool  head.  So I put thelock nut on the underside of the tool head and adjusted the die.  It worked great. 

Offline TiredOldGrunt

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #35 on: September 15, 2014, 05:25:42 PM »
Im saving up for a Lee single stage kit as I type, I can always use the dies with a progressive later if I ever upgrade.

Im not a reloading factory, got plenty of time to reload between range trips, so I think Ill be good.

Plus Im broke as heck and the budget is friendly enough for me!

TOG

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #36 on: September 15, 2014, 06:57:46 PM »
Im saving up for a Lee single stage kit as I type, I can always use the dies with a progressive later if I ever upgrade.

Im not a reloading factory, got plenty of time to reload between range trips, so I think Ill be good.

Plus Im broke as heck and the budget is friendly enough for me!

TOG

Low price lee stuff lets you experiment cheaply.
I recently got some .32s&w lee dies for an antique revolver a relative had and they shipped for $27 at amazon.

Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #37 on: September 18, 2014, 03:13:17 PM »
Im saving up for a Lee single stage kit as I type, I can always use the dies with a progressive later if I ever upgrade.

Im not a reloading factory, got plenty of time to reload between range trips, so I think Ill be good.

Plus Im broke as heck and the budget is friendly enough for me!

TOG

I can afford lots of reloading gear, and most of it is Lee.  Nothing wrong with inexpensive. Mainly because it does what needs to be done and at half the cost of others.  My press is a Lee Challenger single stage and Classic Turret. For cranking out a few hundred rounds in a few hours they work great.

I have dies going on 28 years of Lee, Hornady and RCBS and they all perform fine.  I do buy other brands as needed for special purposes such as the RCBS X-die for sizing semi-auto rifle brass.  The Dillon tumbler and swager I have are badass brutes.

Any brand will do the job.  Pick what you like and in 20-40 years when it might wear out you can switch. :)

Offline sukivel

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #38 on: October 06, 2014, 11:48:33 PM »
I set up the  new Dillon 650 today and knocked out 500 rounds in no time.  On my single stage press,  it  would have taken me a week to prep and load all that brass.  If you are a active shooter,  I highly recommend the Dillon.  My loader friends have  had the Lee progressive presses and got rid of them and purchased the Dillon.  Its well worth the money. 

I have Lee dies and love them.  I used  my Lee dies in the Dillon press.   Works good.  I did have to solve a problem.  The Lee dies are shorter than the Dillon dies and when I screwed my deprimer-decapper die into the first stage, I found out that there were no threads on the top of the tool  head and plenty of threads sticking out below the tool  head.  So I put thelock nut on the underside of the tool head and adjusted the die.  It worked great.

Have you timed yourself yet? When I got my 550 I could barely load 100 rounds in 15 minutes. Now I can easily do 100 in about 11 minutes. Nice thinking on putting the lock nut on the underside of the Lee die, I will have to do that.

Offline frankd4

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Re: Is Dillon worth the money over Lee?
« Reply #39 on: October 15, 2014, 11:30:04 AM »
All I have is Dillon and one RCBS C press for the big stuff that I rarely reload for like .375 H&H and 45/70, Dillon just flat out works for me and their warrenty can not be beat, I have reloaded over fifty K of .223 and at least that much .45 ACP with out any head aches so my bench will remain Dillon blue just speaking for my self some of my presses are over fifteen years old and they keep replacing parts for free.