Author Topic: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags  (Read 515719 times)

JPBeck

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #180 on: January 25, 2015, 07:31:33 PM »
I have a much more comprehensive kit in my truck here's the link to that:
http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=53241.0

JP's Eagle  Becker Pack-- this one I take with me when we take someone else's car, or when we go out for a medium hike.

It's a medium to small pack. Nothing fancy, just one zippered pocket on the lid. There are two slips along the side, but they are not pockets per-say.

I use one side to hold my water bottle. I attach the bottle via a clip so it doesn't slip through.


Tarp and light Snugpak


Mess kit with rice, gravy pack. alcohol cat stove
 

MRE, water bottle, small first aid kit, knife, cap, tape, poncho, cordage (550, bankline), whistle, multi-tool, compass, belt


Cold Steel SRK (with fire rod and diamond sharpening rod), fire rod, another tarp, fire kit (lighter, match book, slimed cotton balls, small rod, magnifying lense) , Altoids box (with sewing kit, nails, lighter) , hand sanitizer, storm whistle, head lamp, hand held led light,  extra batteries, space blanket
 




Cat stove

 
Candle and hanky, compass,







Contractor's bag






It has a removable waste belt, but it's a light pack so it doesn't see much use.


I have a CCW and usaully have this on me, Kimber Warrior


Thanks for you time.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2015, 07:50:25 PM by JPBeck »

Offline Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #181 on: January 25, 2015, 07:38:57 PM »
What is the weight on it JPBeck?

Cedar

JPBeck

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #182 on: January 25, 2015, 07:40:36 PM »
Probably 12 pounds max. The heaviest thing is the actual pack it's self.

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #183 on: May 02, 2015, 10:30:27 PM »


This is really my get home/go hiking/car prep/my life is unstable and it's good to have gear with me bag and not my bug out bag, but it's a freaking sweet picture in my not so humble opinion

Taken from South Boulder Peak, Boulder County, Colorado. Beautiful but intense hike!

Edit: apparently that link won't work that way for pictures. Sigh. I really need a better way to make this work/a better place to put pictures online. But here's this if you still want to see it https://instagram.com/p/0RqhP5kOhj/
« Last Edit: May 02, 2015, 10:50:09 PM by RuggedCyclist »

nelson96

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #184 on: May 03, 2015, 11:10:28 AM »
This is really my get home/go hiking/car prep/my life is unstable and it's good to have gear with me bag and not my bug out bag, but it's a freaking sweet picture in my not so humble opinion

Taken from South Boulder Peak, Boulder County, Colorado. Beautiful but intense hike!

Edit: apparently that link won't work that way for pictures. Sigh. I really need a better way to make this work/a better place to put pictures online. But here's this if you still want to see it https://instagram.com/p/0RqhP5kOhj/

Nice pack, what is it. 

Offline RuggedCyclist

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #185 on: May 03, 2015, 12:37:08 PM »
Nice pack, what is it.

It's a Voodoo Tactical level 3 assault pack I think. I used to have the Fox Tactical version of it (they call it a medium transport pack I think?) But that thing fell apart right away and I was constantly sewing it together. This one is built tough as hell though.

Offline RuggedCyclist

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #186 on: May 09, 2015, 12:15:41 AM »
Now that I have a photobucket account and the photobucket app so I can actually use it.


Hiking with it.

Contents:



3600 calorie ration bar
Bag of chia seed
Clid bars, random snacks, etc
.5 liters water in bottle inside the pack. 1 liter bottle clips to outside or 2 liter camelbak goes inside.
First aid kit (bandages, OTC pain meds, steristrips, large non stick pads for road rash, yada yada
Generic brand Emergen-C drink mix
CamelBak elixir electrolyte drink tablets
Potassium gluconate pills
Quick clot pad
Local mountain trail maps and city maps
Pocket Bible
Pocket Constitution w/ Declaration of Independence
Spare glasses
Orange safety vest, folded in package like a rain poncho
Rain poncho
Emergency blanket
Condoms (this is my go with me everywhere including dates bag, after all)
50 ft of 550 cord
Hand warmers
2 glow sticks
Coleman flashlight that's been with me wrenching on every car I've ever owned
Water purification tabs
Home made wax fire starters/fuel tablets
Candle
Coghlan's brand Camp Heat canned fuel, like Sterno but with a wick and safer
Black electrical tape
Backup USB phone chargee that runs on 4 AAs
Charging cables: micro USB, Apple Lighting, Apple 30 pin
USB wall plug
Spare batteries: 4 AAs, 3 AAAs (spare set for each device)
Zippo lighter
Waterproofed strike anywhere matches in Altoids mini tin, with back scored for striking surface
Book of matches
Commercial waterproof matches
Thermal base layer top and bottom
Milsurp 100% wool glove liners
Bacalava (still set up for winter)
Headlamp, in MOLLE grenade pouch on outside of pack, with spare set of batteries taped to the headband
Rain jacket strapped to bottom

Later I'm going to do a rundown of my full on bug out bag.


Offline Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #187 on: May 09, 2015, 08:35:56 AM »
Looks nice Rugged. And I looked at your stone pics.. nice work there. And the rock flower was cute.

Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #188 on: June 04, 2015, 08:33:12 PM »

This is really my get home/go hiking/car prep/my life is unstable and it's good to have gear with me bag and not my bug out bag, but it's a freaking sweet picture in my not so humble opinion

Somehow I read that as "my wife is unstable," and I was trying to figure out how the contents of your pack would protect you....

Maybe I need to get some sleep....  :-\

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #189 on: June 05, 2015, 01:59:29 PM »
     It occurs to me, after looking at the amassed information on this forum, lots of YouTube videos and stacks of survival magazines and books/guides, that we all have a pretty good idea of what constitutes an emergency kit. There's everything from the Altoids tin to the full blown Never Comin' Back bag. I've personally spent hours gathering, weighing and arranging kit contents, all the while hoping to find that special item that will swing the odds in my favor, even a little bit. There comes a point when you've educated yourself (and hopefully family), made prudent preparations and constructed well thought out kits and bags to meet your needs in a variety of disaster situations. I've realized that at some point, at least for me, this can all become a bit obsessive. At some point, it's time to say "we're good" and get on with life.
     That's not to say that I don't check expiration dates or buy a better type of flashlight battery if one comes on the market, or read the latest issue of American Survival Guide but as it stands now "we're good". After all, how many knives, firestarters, sleep systems, guns & ammo, emergency food do you really need? I've accumulated enough high quality gear to stock my own outdoor store. I feel that it's time to back off a bit and enjoy other interests. If the only purpose in life is to prepare to stay alive awhile longer, I feel like that could lead to a pretty shallow and unfulfilling life.   

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #190 on: June 05, 2015, 02:44:26 PM »
I am good with mine. I just try to check them every 3-4 months to make sure everything is still good.. and SP has not outgrown her clothing.

Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #191 on: June 05, 2015, 07:09:03 PM »
     It occurs to me, after looking at the amassed information on this forum, lots of YouTube videos and stacks of survival magazines and books/guides, that we all have a pretty good idea of what constitutes an emergency kit. There's everything from the Altoids tin to the full blown Never Comin' Back bag. I've personally spent hours gathering, weighing and arranging kit contents, all the while hoping to find that special item that will swing the odds in my favor, even a little bit. There comes a point when you've educated yourself (and hopefully family), made prudent preparations and constructed well thought out kits and bags to meet your needs in a variety of disaster situations. I've realized that at some point, at least for me, this can all become a bit obsessive. At some point, it's time to say "we're good" and get on with life.
     That's not to say that I don't check expiration dates or buy a better type of flashlight battery if one comes on the market, or read the latest issue of American Survival Guide but as it stands now "we're good". After all, how many knives, firestarters, sleep systems, guns & ammo, emergency food do you really need? I've accumulated enough high quality gear to stock my own outdoor store. I feel that it's time to back off a bit and enjoy other interests. If the only purpose in life is to prepare to stay alive awhile longer, I feel like that could lead to a pretty shallow and unfulfilling life.

Well, I'll admit that when I was younger, I almost obsessed over our preps.

Like you, I'd spend hours fitting, refitting, researching, comparing and restructuring.  I spent ENTIRELY too much money on gear just to test it out or to see if it fit, looking for an edge.

However, as I got older, I started noticing that my gear sorta mellowed out.  I think a lot of it had to do with my wife and I making the concerted effort to learn new things and do actual "bug outs."   When we were in Colorado, we had our BOL's within relatively easy travelling distances.  We went twice a year and actually walked or rode our bikes up to, and back from, the BOLs.

When we walked, we would even "guerrilla camp" on the overnight portion, finding a place to hide and set up for the evening.  As we got more comfortable with what we were doing and learning, our packs got lighter and our equipment more efficient.

Sure, I still look at, and evaluate, things for my kits.  I think I always will. But knowledge and experience has replaced much of the gear.

As well, our "mission" has changed.  We had to move back to the midwest and  now have a larger support system in place that minimizes much of what we need to evacuate.   There'll always be the potential for a Worst-Case-Scenario involving long-distance relocation, but that threat has been reduced quite a bit.

The Professor

Offline RuggedCyclist

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #192 on: June 05, 2015, 11:12:18 PM »
Somehow I read that as "my wife is unstable," and I was trying to figure out how the contents of your pack would protect you....

Maybe I need to get some sleep....  :-\

You absutely just made my night. My wife is unstable. Lmao. To be honest, the girl that would most likely be my wife if I somehow married this young, is a very unstable person, so it's not that far off! Lol!


     It occurs to me, after looking at the amassed information on this forum, lots of YouTube videos and stacks of survival magazines and books/guides, that we all have a pretty good idea of what constitutes an emergency kit. There's everything from the Altoids tin to the full blown Never Comin' Back bag. I've personally spent hours gathering, weighing and arranging kit contents, all the while hoping to find that special item that will swing the odds in my favor, even a little bit. There comes a point when you've educated yourself (and hopefully family), made prudent preparations and constructed well thought out kits and bags to meet your needs in a variety of disaster situations. I've realized that at some point, at least for me, this can all become a bit obsessive. At some point, it's time to say "we're good" and get on with life.
     That's not to say that I don't check expiration dates or buy a better type of flashlight battery if one comes on the market, or read the latest issue of American Survival Guide but as it stands now "we're good". After all, how many knives, firestarters, sleep systems, guns & ammo, emergency food do you really need? I've accumulated enough high quality gear to stock my own outdoor store. I feel that it's time to back off a bit and enjoy other interests. If the only purpose in life is to prepare to stay alive awhile longer, I feel like that could lead to a pretty shallow and unfulfilling life.   

100% guilty here. Even after I got to the point where I realized that like, oh shit, I have to plan for if shit doesn't hit the fan so I can live a happy successful life if everything is halfway ok and make sure it fits in with economic trends shifting towards more instability and the progression of downward class migration, I still get caught up in optimizing my bug out bags designing modular systems finding or developing the best emergency food and on and on.

I've literally had to force the idea of "oh shit the shit could hit the fan tomorrow and my cheap surplus tactical vest and SKS are going to be the only things keeping me alive AHHH" out of my head to keep focus on my priorities. Time to work on shit like moving out, getting a real job, probably starting a business, eventually buying land, and building that better life.

endurance

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #193 on: June 06, 2015, 08:08:12 AM »
Great post Bcksknr.  +1

Like my overall interest in most activities, they wax and wane, they evolve and transform, and they find a rhythm to it all. Recently my firefighting bunker gear went through its kit building evolution; what did I need, where did I want it, where would I carry it, and then the culling, lightening, simplifying, and retooling that my BOBs, EDC, hiking kits and car kits have gone through dozens of times. Even when I'm not thinking about it in a building/rebuilding phase, I might find something I need or need to replace and the goodies inside evolve. I'll admit, I love being 'that guy' when it comes to being the problem solver for a group and when you're surrounded by folks who also love being 'that guy' it becomes a bigger and bigger challenge. I eventually had to invent the lighted door wedge to gain some notariety for my geekness with my department.

I always wonder if I'm really doing anything to build a better life with these kits; is version 5.3 really that much better than version 2.0 that it was worth the money I've spent?  Maybe, maybe not, but the fringe benefits of going through 'what if' scenarios always helps. I work my problem solving muscles and learn to expand my toolbox of solutions. What was once just a ladder to climb to high places evolves to be a temporary bridge to cross high waters; what was once a door wedge for controlling ventilation becomes a signal to show me where my exits are in a smoke filled house. It becomes a process that matters more than the kit itself and if I ever find myself on vacation away from the majority of my preps, I'm confident I can walk into a grocery or hardware store and build myself the kit I need to create safety and comfort for me and my family. That's the ultimate takeaway from these kits.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #194 on: June 06, 2015, 10:27:15 AM »
I always wonder if I'm really doing anything to build a better life with these kits; is version 5.3 really that much better than version 2.0 that it was worth the money I've spent? 

Endurance, as you know I have 2 BOB's for myself.

#1 BOB I started in 1990. Everything in it cost me less than $100, as I was not affluent in money. Alot of it is second hand, found items. That bag has served me for $25 years and I have not changed much up on it other than adding maps from a thrift shop for 10 cents each.

#2 BOB I also started from salvage and found things, but when I made Z get a BOB put together for himself, he bought 'high end' stuff to put into it, and bought triplicate things, so I would have one, he would have one, and SP would have one.

Between my two BOB's is ... I like my BOB#2 better, but I actually use BOB#1 more. Both for myself and others. Even though BOB#2 has 'cooler' things in it, BOB#1 has tried and proven things in it over the last 25 years. They work equally as well as the thing in BOB#2. BOB#1 also is where I usually need it for others, as it is in my vehicle, wereas #2 is in the house.

In 25 years in the BOB#1 I have not ever lacked something in there in an emergency, or  'emergency'.

So my response to your question if "version 5.3 really that much better than version 2.0 that it was worth the money I've spent", is that, no.. you do not want that Dollar Store pocket knife in there, but you might be able to get a very good knife for the same price at a Garage Sale.

It comes down once again to Time, Cost, or Quality. I had no money and alot of time. So I knew what I wanted in my BOB's and so I was open to TIME, and kept my eyes open for seeing the opportunity to add that item to my bag. It took me two years to get my BOB#1 together to the way I wanted it.

Z. Time to him is different than time to me. I would not say he is impatient, but often he wants things done NOW. So he will throw money at things he wants to get done. In this case of his BOB's he tossed money at them to get it done.

Which of our ways is right? Neither? Both? But in the end, both our ways got our BOB's done. Many people don't start making their BOB's as they feel they do not have the money. I just know if I was able to get my BOB done on $400 a month income, so can other people. But having a backpack and a bottle of water in it, is better than NO backpack and NO bottle of water in it. At the very minimum a person should have "The 10 Essentials".

    Map
    Compass
    Sunglasses and sunscreen
    Extra clothing
    Headlamp/flashlight
    First-aid supplies
    Firestarter
    Matches
    Knife
    Extra food

I am willing to bet that in two days time, anyone can pick these items up for less than $30. If I were to challenge myself I think I might even be able to do it for $10 if I gave myself a weekend and a couple garage sales.

Cedar

« Last Edit: June 06, 2015, 10:43:43 AM by Cedar »

nelson96

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #195 on: June 06, 2015, 11:52:24 AM »
How about the thought of needing one at all?  Or do I really need all the stuff that most people include?

First of all, I personally think it's a good idea, even given the fact that in my lifetime (of 50 years) I've never needed one, but then again I've never been a homeless person and/or been without transportation where stuff was commonly stored.  To answer those questions for yourself you'll have to do a risk assessment.  If you live in the city and never venture away from it, how necessary is it to pack supplies you can probably find on every other corner?  Or better yet, simply ask for help from the next 20 people to pass by.  Whether I live in the city or in a rural area, if I only travel in common areas, why do I need a map or a compass, especially if I am going to stick to roadways with signs and/or markers?

I'm not saying don't pack a BOB.  In fact I stated that I think it's a good idea.  What I am saying is that you may not need all that you think you need and in some cases you may not need one at all (if you can acquire those from your surroundings).  I certainly wouldn't get hung up over the little things......  I figure you're going to die anyway, if you don't know how to find and use things around you.

The Professor probably says it best.....

Well, I'll admit that when I was younger, I almost obsessed over our preps.

Like you, I'd spend hours fitting, refitting, researching, comparing and restructuring.  I spent ENTIRELY too much money on gear just to test it out or to see if it fit, looking for an edge.

However, as I got older, I started noticing that my gear sorta mellowed out.  I think a lot of it had to do with my wife and I making the concerted effort to learn new things and do actual "bug outs."   When we were in Colorado, we had our BOL's within relatively easy travelling distances.  We went twice a year and actually walked or rode our bikes up to, and back from, the BOLs.

When we walked, we would even "guerrilla camp" on the overnight portion, finding a place to hide and set up for the evening.  As we got more comfortable with what we were doing and learning, our packs got lighter and our equipment more efficient.

Sure, I still look at, and evaluate, things for my kits.  I think I always will. But knowledge and experience has replaced much of the gear.

As well, our "mission" has changed.  We had to move back to the midwest and  now have a larger support system in place that minimizes much of what we need to evacuate.   There'll always be the potential for a Worst-Case-Scenario involving long-distance relocation, but that threat has been reduced quite a bit.

The Professor

Offline Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #196 on: June 06, 2015, 12:06:36 PM »
How about the thought of needing one at all?

I know if I really needed to save my posterior, the BOB will not be the first thing on my mind. If I had to bail without it, I would, but I sure would be grumbling about not having it. How many times have I used mine on me? Very little. How many times have I used it on people who needed help. Alot. And not when I was doing SAR either. The map was when 2 would-be fishermen were looking for a certain lake and I had a topo map and we found it. Another time a lady was stuck in her coat when her zipper broke and I used my multitool to free her of it.

Cedar

nelson96

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #197 on: June 06, 2015, 12:22:20 PM »
The map was when 2 would-be fishermen were looking for a certain lake and I had a topo map and we found it. Another time a lady was stuck in her coat when her zipper broke and I used my multitool to free her of it.

Both were way far off from life threatening, but it does feel good when you can help someone out. 

Both support my silly argument....  Neither had on them what they needed, but they found someone who did.

.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2015, 12:30:31 PM by nelson96 »

Offline Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #198 on: June 06, 2015, 12:34:36 PM »
Both support my silly argument....  Neither had on them what they needed, but they found someone who did.

So someone somewhere needs to be prepared  ;)

Cedar

nelson96

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #199 on: June 06, 2015, 12:43:31 PM »
So someone somewhere needs to be prepared  ;)

And I too prefer to be that person, but I can honestly say I've never obsessed over my bag or its contents and most of the time it's not a backpack style bag the contents are kept in, it's some other kind of container, which include permanent storage areas in my vehicles and trailers.

endurance

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #200 on: June 06, 2015, 02:21:57 PM »
The closest thing I have to a BOB is my GHB in my car. It's a 20+ year old safety award I got from a previous employer and was my lunch pack for at least five years. Two-thirds or the bulk of it is clothes. It's not sexy, but it has made a number of situations more comfortable and helped me have a better life, whether it has been using the tarp at a company picnic to block the wind, pulling out work gloves to help lift heavy things, pulling out a wool hat when it was colder than I expected it, or pulling out bug spray to make life a little less annoying. Whether I've needed it or not is questionable. If I didn't have it I can't tell you how many plans would have been cancelled, how many hours would have been unnecessarily uncomfortable, how many friends would have caught a cold because they would have been soaked.

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #201 on: June 06, 2015, 03:56:49 PM »


Eberlestock G4 Operator with 20" barreled ;D

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #202 on: June 06, 2015, 05:22:15 PM »
Eberlestock G4 Operator with 20" barreled

I love my Eberlestock Gunslinger pack.

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #203 on: June 07, 2015, 05:59:44 AM »
     I hope this isn't to far off thread, but it is a short Murphy's Law anecdote. Years ago, we were in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area and there was a ban on open fires. Since we were canoeing for a week, we had brought a Coleman stove and a gallon of fuel (hopefully to fry walleyes). The stove's tank emptied after the first day and when it came time to refill, we found that the tank cap was stuck. It wouldn't budge. No problem, as I had a multi-tool. Soon found that it wouldn't open wide enough to fit the cap. At the next portage, we ran into two canoes of campers and asked if anyone had a standard pliers. They each reached into a back pocket and produced pliers, visegrips, channelocks, etc. We opened the cap and greased it with cooking oil after filling up.
     Who would have anticipated something like this? Between the four of us, we had a very complete set of supplies. One of our group was an emergency room doctor and he had even brought injectable morphine! But something as small as a stuck gas cap and no tool to remove it (yes I even tried wrapping my leather belt around it, hoping it would work as a "strap wrench") could have meant no decent eats for a week. Every multi-tool I now own has been tested to see if it will open enough to grip a Coleman stove gas cap.
     The point to all this is that even with two canoes full of well thought out supplies (much more that one BOB could hold) and four seemingly woodswise adults, Murphy can still step in to mess with you. You can't possibly foresee all eventualities. You will make yourself crazy if you try and in the end, your survival may come down to the good will and cooperation of others. So I do my best to plan and pack for what seems reasonable to expect and hope to be adaptable and lucky enough deal with the things you never imagined.
     

     

nelson96

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #204 on: June 07, 2015, 08:27:24 AM »
     I hope this isn't to far off thread, but it is a short Murphy's Law anecdote. Years ago, we were in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area and there was a ban on open fires. Since we were canoeing for a week, we had brought a Coleman stove and a gallon of fuel (hopefully to fry walleyes). The stove's tank emptied after the first day and when it came time to refill, we found that the tank cap was stuck. It wouldn't budge. No problem, as I had a multi-tool. Soon found that it wouldn't open wide enough to fit the cap. At the next portage, we ran into two canoes of campers and asked if anyone had a standard pliers. They each reached into a back pocket and produced pliers, visegrips, channelocks, etc. We opened the cap and greased it with cooking oil after filling up.
     Who would have anticipated something like this? Between the four of us, we had a very complete set of supplies. One of our group was an emergency room doctor and he had even brought injectable morphine! But something as small as a stuck gas cap and no tool to remove it (yes I even tried wrapping my leather belt around it, hoping it would work as a "strap wrench") could have meant no decent eats for a week. Every multi-tool I now own has been tested to see if it will open enough to grip a Coleman stove gas cap.
     The point to all this is that even with two canoes full of well thought out supplies (much more that one BOB could hold) and four seemingly woodswise adults, Murphy can still step in to mess with you. You can't possibly foresee all eventualities. You will make yourself crazy if you try and in the end, your survival may come down to the good will and cooperation of others. So I do my best to plan and pack for what seems reasonable to expect and hope to be adaptable and lucky enough deal with the things you never imagined.

That's a great example bcksknr.  Some may actually take that the wrong way though.  Some may say, "that's a perfect reason to make sure I carry an adequately sized pair of channel locks in my pack", along with a bunch of other stuff that a person would rarely use.  I would say that's a perfect example of good preparation, making sure your fuel is in a container that you can access without packing tools you would rarely need.  And if you do find yourself needing a rare tool, I would bet that most situations will accommodate finding that tool somewhere else (other than your BOB), which I believe is the point that bcksknr made.

.   

Offline Roknrandy

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #205 on: June 09, 2015, 04:42:17 PM »
Great posts in this thread but I know there are updates and new members that haven't posted yet so lets get busy

Online Stwood

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #206 on: April 01, 2016, 07:39:54 PM »
I have no bug out bag to show. But I do need to put together a get home bag.
Is the GHB I've noticed just that? A get home bag?
Thanks

Offline machinisttx

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #207 on: April 01, 2016, 08:16:03 PM »
Yes.

GHB = Get Home Bag
BOB = Bug Out Bag
INCH = I'm Never Coming Home

I'm a proponent of INCH rather than BOB.

Offline Carl

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #208 on: April 02, 2016, 07:17:33 AM »
I have no bug out bag to show. But I do need to put together a get home bag.
Is the GHB I've noticed just that? A get home bag?
Thanks

They are actually ALL life support bags,no matter where you are going....
You do have a planned place to go ,don't you?

Online Stwood

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #209 on: April 02, 2016, 08:03:06 PM »
If I'm away, I'm coming home.
If I'm home, I'm staying put.
I'm in the woods, 25 miles to the nearest grocery store