Author Topic: Unrecognised survival skills  (Read 14935 times)

Offline dodgetruckmom

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Re: Unrecognised survival skills
« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2010, 06:39:19 AM »
Knitting and crocheting are becoming lost arts I'm afraid.

Just found this forum and this thread. Actually, knitting and crocheting enjoyed something of a pretty huge revival over the past 5 years. I am a professional knitting designer, so maybe my perspective is skewed a bit, but there are a LOT of people (not just women) who know how to knit and crochet. The hundreds of books published each year on knitting makes me believe they are far from being "lost arts."

A friend of mine from high school and his wife came to visit us a few weeks ago. This is a guy I've known for 30 years--since I was 14 and a far different person than I am today. They stayed at our guest cabin, and the first night I sent them back to the cabin with a strawberry-rhubarb pie made from strawberries and rhubarb from my garden and a loaf of homemade whole-wheat bread. (Those of you who think bread-making is too time-consuming/difficult should buy the book "Healthy Artisan Bread in Five Minutes." I bake bread three or four times a week and yes, it only takes five minutes and no kneading to make fabulous bread.) At one point my friend started referring to me as "Dolly Domestic," although I don't think he was doing it in a derogatory way. He said that when the SHTF, he knows he should try and make his way to our house. I'm not sure how he'll be able to do that from 2500 miles away, but I appreciated the sentiment, especially coming from a guy who knew me in my younger years when I refused to take a home ec class because I planned to be a doctor. I can't tell you the last time I needed to use calculus, but we had a tough winter this year and I had to figure out how to make stored groceries stretch until my husband had work again.
 
Again, maybe my perspective is a bit skewed because I live in a rural area, but those "home arts" that will serve us well in a disaster are alive and well here. We have a ladies' group which quilts every Thursday. The older women at my church (many widowed farm wives) are a wealth of information about how to "make do" and have the tastiest canning recipes. I try to pick their brains at every opportunity. My husband's a mechanical genius, so we're covered in a lot of those areas. It's a process, and it's one we're doing together.

Offline CandyBabyE

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Re: Unrecognised survival skills
« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2010, 07:39:32 AM »
Hi everyone,
There are so many excellent comments in ths thread, I don't know where to start.  Comments about the school system are so true. They seem to think everyone should go to college, but not everyone's cut out for that. And if everyone had an MBA or PhD, who would grow food for the masses, or build the freeways for the suburbanites?  Our high school has an arrangement with the local community college, so the kids can take college classes during their high school day. Wonderful program, and it gives the kids who don't want a college education the chance to take the certification programs at the college to learn a professions, such as auto mecahanics, physical trainer, electricial, etc.  The really great thing is they don't have to pay the unit credits only registration, about 30 bucks, and their books.

I must be a bit older than you all, graduated in spring of '68.  My mom always wanted to learn to tat, but my understanding was that this was done with a "shuttle" and very fine crochet thread. Basically it was making lace.  I did find someone once who knew how to do it, but she moved before I was able to get the hang of it. I do crochet though.

I think some of the skills we ladies need to learn aren't even thought of as skills. We need to know how to jump start our car, change a tire, change our oil. unclog a drain, check the breaker if the electricity goes out.
These are all things most women never bother to learn, but they help us take care of ourselves if necessary. Man, I know one gal who, when I asked to borrow her vaccum because mine croaked, and she said the bag was full and she had to wait for her husband to get home to change it for her. WOW. I had to walk away or my sarcastic mouth might have said something unkind.  :censored: Unbelievable!

Anything we can learn to do is useful, under the right circumstances. Even knowing to carry duct tape an some water in your car incase of a hose leak. And knowing never open the radiator when the car's overheated.

Got tu run. Need to feed the chickens before I go to work. Love the thread. You ladies keep up the good work.

Candy




Offline Docwatmo

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Re: Unrecognised survival skills
« Reply #32 on: July 29, 2010, 08:35:15 AM »
What about the slightly more esoteric skills. 

1.  Diplomacy
2.  Sales - Barter

These can be two very difficult skills to master but they can have a huge benefit even with just a little experience.  They can make a tremendous difference in the quality of transactions and interactions post SHTF (And can be beneficial in just day to day living now).  If you have never had any sales experience or barter, when the time comes to barter or sell goods, can you expect to make reasonable, mutually beneficial trades that keep people coming back or are you going to get taken by a more experienced "Salesman" or alienate purchasers or traders/barters so they don't return. 

There are many ways to pick up these skills.  Telemarketing.  (I did telemarketing fund raising as a 2nd job for a couple of months out of the year for 2 years and picked up some excellent experience and skills)  My sons are in Scouts and they sell popcorn, I go with them door to door and not only are they learning and getting experience in sales and techniques, but I learn by watching the interactions as well.  (Not to mention the background stuff like determining what products are moving, inventory management etc that can be very good organizational skills).

I learned diplomacy working Tech support phone service.  When some irate person who just lost hours of their hard work because of a system crash or program error or (The most difficult, their own mistake) and you have to talk them down, and get them to understand what happened, how it happened, how to fix it and how to avoid it in the future, you learn some great diplomacy skills.

I believe diplomacy is in fact be a critical life skill, it can mean the difference between an uncomfortable or amicable exchange in a given situation and an escalation that causes a fight or loses a potential source of income.

These are skills that you can pick up a little of in classes, but you REALLY need to get some experience in the real world to develop them and hone them.  A little experience can go a long way with these.

Offline Russet

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Re: Unrecognised survival skills
« Reply #33 on: October 09, 2010, 07:05:53 PM »
My family and I live in a rural section of N.H.,where the skills of self sufficiency are still used. Raising your own food (chickens, rabbits, goats, bee-keeping...and garden veggies). Knowing how to butcher and prep what you've raised.  How to cut, split and stack cord wood, then know how to cook on the stove it's burning in. How to fire a gun, then clean it. Recycling old clothes into patchwork quilts. Putting up the food you've raised and grown with a solar/ electric dryer or home canning. Knitting/crocheting clothing or blankets, and making what you've just made pleasing to look at too! Candle making and soap-making. And then is the greatest unrecognized skill...WE are our childrens first and greatest teachers ( what are you teaching yours?). My fave saying is " The hand that rocks the cradle, rules the world." Somehow we lost that in the last 50 yrs. I love teaching my girls skills they may never use, but will allow them to always be capable of taking care of themselves in whatever situation they are in. I loved reading this thread and seeing other ladies that think like myself and many of my friends! Thank you! =)
 
"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects." Robert A. Heinlein

Offline DaiseyMae

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Re: Unrecognised survival skills
« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2011, 04:52:49 PM »
I'm putting this here because I think maybe women tend to under value things they know how do. 
I also do pottery occasionally, especially if I need to blow off steam, it's very theraputic to whack around clay. I make baskets when I need to destress. There's something relaxing in the repetitive motions of basket weaving. I had never given either of these a thought as being worthwhile survival skills and it wasn't until I saw or heard them mentioned in podcasts or books that I even realized they were worthwhile skills. Am I alone in not seeing what's in front of me?

Cool... I have been wanting to make pottery for a long time. I can't seem to get a pottery wheel.  ???
I was thinking that would be great because here in our country, we know about the glazes having to be lead free.Something that scares me is our plates and things we eat off come from other countries. Some do not care whether it may be lead free if you know what I mean.
I have Fiestaware which is made in the great USA still.
Good idea!
The basket weaving is a cool idea too!  ;D

Offline TwoBluesMama

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Re: Unrecognised survival skills
« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2011, 05:57:44 PM »
Cool... I have been wanting to make pottery for a long time. I can't seem to get a pottery wheel.  ???
I was thinking that would be great because here in our country, we know about the glazes having to be lead free.Something that scares me is our plates and things we eat off come from other countries. Some do not care whether it may be lead free if you know what I mean.
I have Fiestaware which is made in the great USA still.
Good idea!
The basket weaving is a cool idea too!  ;D

Daisy Mae - Lucky you on the Fiestaware. It's weird that you brought this up because I've been thinking about dishes mostly being made in other countries and wonder when you heat them (microwave or oven) if any lead or any other chemical or compound is released into our food.

Most especially I never microwave in plastic - I even send glass in my hubby's lunchbox for him to heat at work. Maybe I'm being paranoid but how many people do you know that have cancer or some other disease that's becoming more and more prevalent and where is all this toxicity coming from? And since our food is so over processed and chemicalized and grown in over produced soil what chance do we have? Ah but I digress and rant, so easy for me to do.

Good luck on getting your own pottery wheel!

 

Offline OKGranny

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Re: Unrecognised survival skills
« Reply #36 on: January 17, 2011, 07:42:15 PM »
Cool... I have been wanting to make pottery for a long time. I can't seem to get a pottery wheel.  ???
I was thinking that would be great because here in our country, we know about the glazes having to be lead free.Something that scares me is our plates and things we eat off come from other countries. Some do not care whether it may be lead free if you know what I mean.
I have Fiestaware which is made in the great USA still.
Good idea!
The basket weaving is a cool idea too!  ;D

You can make some cool stuff rolling your clay out into slabs, dishes and bowls can be really nice done that way. Since I don't have a professional slab roller for clay I use a heavy rolling pin and carefully measure my thickness so one dish isn't 1/8" and the next one 3/16ths or something. That doesn't sound like a lot of difference but it's noticeable once they're fired. I'm a bit of a worrier about what our stuff is made out of also and what all the chemicals we don't know about are doing to our bodies.