Author Topic: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST  (Read 112361 times)

Offline Doc K

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DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« on: March 19, 2010, 06:41:13 PM »
The following posts are something I put together over the last few months in my (rare) spare time.

I am often asked:
What medicines should I have on hand at my house?
Which medicines should I have for TEOTWAWKI? 
What medicines should I have that I can purchase without a prescription?
What medicines should I have if I had access to any prescription medication?

What I wanted to do was assemble a list of medications that are important in everyday life for me as a Family Medicine physician.  Some are common.  Some are not so common.  Some are used to treat common problems.  Some would only be used to treat rare problems.

At this point all medicines listed are for adults.  I will try and get to pediatric dosing next.

I do not talk about life expectancy for any medication.  The U.S. Military is currently conducting extensive testing with the FDA to examine the shelf life of medications.  None of that data is public information.  I have tried to gain access to the database for my own knowledge being in the military… I was denied.  I think it is safe to say that most medications can be safely used after the expiration date.  There are some notable exceptions that can be deadly.  I do not know what all of these deadly exceptions are, so I will not elaborate.  If in doubt, throw it out (or at least weigh the risks vs. benefits of using expired medications).

This list is long but not exhaustive.  I tried to be selective so as to not overwhelm someone trying to assemble a home pharmacy, but I also wanted to include commonly used (or commonly heard of) medications.

Depending on where you live (in the USA or not), some medications may or may not be available or may be sold under a different trade name.

I have medications listed by Major Category in each post. 
The medicines are listed by their generic name followed by the trade name if available or examples.
The next line is the indication for the medicine (what it is supposed to be used for). 
Under this is the regular dosing of the medication and, if available, the maximum dose.

**If you notice an error, please let me know so that I can check it and correct it if needed.  If you notice a glaring absence of an important medication, please let me know so I can add it as well.

KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS
I tried to avoid using abbreviations as much as possible, but a few are so easy to use…
PO = Per Oral (this means by mouth)
OTC = Over The Counter (this means you can buy this without a prescription)

OBLIGATORY COVER MY BUTT COMMENT:  I have gone to school for many years and have trained for many years to prescribe medications.  You most likely have not.  This is not meant to insult, but to show the importance and potentially dangerous effects of using any and all medications.  This list is only a list.  This is not a prescription.  This is not a diagnosis.  I may have some errors in this list, although I have tried to be as accurate as possible.  I am in no way responsible for the use or misuse of this list.  This list should not be used in place of utilizing a properly trained healthcare practitioner.  That would be foolish and potentially life-threatening.  Use at your own risk.  I do not knowingly own any stock or have any financial ties to any pharmaceutical or medication producing company that is or is not mentioned in this list. 

As always…
Hope this helps,
Doc K

Offline Doc K

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2010, 06:41:50 PM »
PAIN MEDICATIONS
You should have the OTC meds at a minimum.  
If you have prescription strength pain meds, caution should always be used.  Overdose is easy.
I have included Migraine medications in this section as well.  There are many Migraine meds out there; this is just a sampling.

OVER THE COUNTER

Acetominophen (Tylenol)
Pain, Fever
500 mg - 1,000 mg PO every 3-6 hrs (max 4,000mg in 24 hrs)

Ibuprofen (Motrin)
Pain, Fever
400 mg - 800 mg PO every 4-8 hrs (max 3,200 mg in 24 hrs)

Aspirin
Pain, Fever
325 mg - 650 mg PO every 2-4 hrs (max 4,000 mg in 24 hrs); Heart attack: 325 mg chewed

(edit: archer: added this from later in thread)
Naproxen sodium (Aleve)
Pain
200 mg PO every 8-12 hrs (max 600 mg per 24 hrs)

PRESCRIPTION

Naproxen (Naprosyn)
Pain
500 mg PO initially, then 250 mg every 6-8 hrs (max 1250 mg per 24 hrs)

Tramadol (Ultram)
Pain
50 mg - 100 mg PO every 4-6 hrs (max 400 mg per 24 hrs; may need to titrate up)

Tylenol-3 (acetaminophen 300 mg / codeine 30 mg)
Pain
1-2 tabs PO every 4-6 hrs; with food (max 4,000 mg acetaminophen in 24 hrs)

Percocet
Pain
Dosing varies

Lortab
Pain
Dosing varies

Darvocet N 100 (acetaminophen 650 mg / propoxyphene napsylate 100 mg)
Pain
1 tab PO every 4 hrs (max 6 tabs per 24 hrs)

Fentanyl
Pain
50 mcg - 100 mcg IV/IM every 1-2 hrs

Morphine sulfate
Pain
2.5 mg - 10 mg SC/IM/IV every 2-6 hrs

Ketorolac (Toradol)
Pain
30-60 mg IM (max 120 mg per 24 hrs)

Sumatriptan (Imitrex) - Oral
Migraines
Oral: 25-50 mg (with fluids); May repeat in 2 hours (max dose 200 mg in 24 hrs)

Sumatriptan (Imitrex) - Intranasal
Migraines
Intranasal: 5-20 mg in one nostril; May repeat in 2 hours (max dose 40 mg in 24 hrs)

Sumatriptan (Imitrex) - Sub Cutaneous
Migraines
SubQ: Up to 6 mg; May repeat in 1 hour (max dose 2 injections in 24 hrs)

Rizatriptan (Maxalt) - Oral Tablet or Oral Dissolving Tablet
Migraines
5-10 mg PO; May repeat in 2 hours (max dose 30 mg in 24 hrs)

« Last Edit: March 21, 2010, 09:04:12 AM by Archer »

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2010, 06:42:30 PM »
GI MEDICATIONS
Lots of stuff in here from dehydration to heartburn to motion sickness.
Note: Constipation is not a joke.  It can make your life miserable and could lead to serious medical problems.  If we ever have a TEOTWAWKI scenario, many people will get constipated from the drastic changes in everyday life.  Be proactive and eat some fiber.  1-3 bowel movements a day is normal.  25-30 grams of fiber a day is your goal.  Try to get there now… slowly.

OVER THE COUNTER

Oral Re-Hydration Salts (electrolyte replacement mix: Gatorade, etc.)
Dehydration
Use as directed on packaging

Loperimide (Imodium)
Diarrhea
4 mg PO x 1 dose; then 2 mg PO after each loose stool (max 16 mg in 24 hrs)

Pepto Bismol
Diarrhea
CHEWABLE TABS: 2 tabs PO every 30-60 minutes (max 16 tabs in 24 hrs)

Simethicone (Gas-X)
Gas
1-2 tabs PO (max 6 tabs in 24 hrs)

Calcium Carbonate (Tums, Rolaids, Maalox)
Heartburn
Tums: 2-4 tabs PO (Tums: Max 15 tabs per 24 hrs);  Rolaids: 1-2 tabs PO  (may repeat hourly if symptoms return)

Ranitidine (Zantac)
Heartburn/Reflux, Allergic Reactions
150 mg PO every 12-24 hrs (max 300 mg in 24 hrs)

Famotidine (Pepcid AC)
Heartburn/Reflux, Allergic Reactions
20-40 mg PO twice a day (max 80 mg in 24 hrs)

Magnesium Hydroxide (Milk of Magnesia 400mg/5ml)
Heartburn/Constipation
LIQUID: Heartburn - 5-15 mL as needed up to 4 times/day; Constipation - 30-60 mL at bedtime

Magnesium Hydroxide (Milk of Magnesia 311mg Tabs)
Heartburn/Constipation
TABLETS: Heartburn - 2-4 tablets needed up to 4 times/day; Constipation - 8 tablets at bedtime

Docusate (Colace)
Constipation
100 mg PO twice a day

Polyethylene Glycol 3350 (Miralex)
Constipation
17 g of powder (~1 heaping tablespoon) dissolved in 4-8 ounces of beverage, once daily; do not use for >2 weeks

Bisacodyl (Dulcolax)
Constipation
ORAL: 5-15 mg PO at bedtime (max 30 mg per 24 hrs); RECTAL: 10 mg rectally one time

Enema kit
Constipation
Use as directed on packaging

Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine)
Nausea, Motion Sickness
50-100 mg PO every 4-6 hours (max: 400 mg in 24 hrs)

Meclizine (Bonine)
Nausea, Motion Sickness
25-50 mg PO (max 100 mg per 24 hrs)

Prochlorperazine (Compazine) suppositories
Nausea, Vomiting
25 mg rectally twice daily

Promethazine (Phenergan) suppositories
Nausea, Vomiting, Allergic reaction
12.5-25 mg rectally twice daily

Activated charcoal
Poisoning
25-100 g PO as a single dose

Preparation H
Hemorrhoids
Use as directed on packaging


PRESCRIPTION

Esomeprazole (Nexium)
Heartburn/Reflux  
20 mg - 40 mg PO every 12-24 hrs; take 1 hr before meal (max 80 mg per 24 hrs)

Ondansetron Oral dissolving tablet (Zofran ODT)
Nausea
4-8 mg PO every 8 hrs (max 24 mg per 24 hrs)

Scopolamine Patch (Transderm Scop)
Motion Sickness
Apply 1 patch behind the ear at least 4 hours prior to exposure and every 3 days as needed

Dicyclomine (Bentyl)
Abdominal Cramping / Irritable Bowel Syndrome
20-40 mg by mouth every 6 hours as needed for cramping (max 160 mg per 24 hours)
« Last Edit: March 28, 2010, 05:01:17 PM by lvschant »

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2010, 06:43:00 PM »
ALLERGY MEDICATIONS
Allergies can range from annoying to life threatening.  There have been other posts about alternatives to an Epi-Pen.  I include Asthma medications in the Repiratory section.  Also note that some of these medications are used for other purposes.  Keep this in mind when stocking your pharmacy.  If one drug can do more than one job, consider it strongly.

OVER THE COUNTER

Sinus Rinse (Neil Med)
Allergies
Use as directed on box (1-2 rinses per day)

Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Allergic Reactions, Motion Sickness, Insomnia
25 mg - 50 mg PO every 4-6 hrs (max 100 mg per dose; max 400 mg per 24 hrs)

Loratidine (Claritin)
Allergies, Allergic Reaction
10 mg PO every 24 hrs (max 20 mg per 24 hrs for a few days)

Ceterizine (Zyrtec)
Allergies, Allergic Reaction
5-10 mg PO every 24 hrs (max 10 mg per 24 hrs)

Ranitidine (Zantac)
Heartburn/Reflux, Allergic Reactions
150 mg PO every 12-24 hrs (max 300 mg in 24 hrs)

Epinephrine Inhaled (Primatene Mist)
Allergic Reaction, Asthma
One inhalation, may repeat after one minute; wait 3 hours before using again


PRESCRIPTION

Epi-Pen
Anaphylactic Reaction (respiratory compromise)
0.3 mg IM x 1 dose; May repeat

Epi-Pen Jr
Anaphylactic Reaction (respiratory compromise)
0.15 mg IM x 1 dose; May repeat

Epinephrine vials with needles
Anaphylactic Reaction
0.1-0.5 mg (1:1000 soln) SC/IM every 5-15 minutes (Max 1 mg per dose)

Epinephrine vials with needles
Severe Asthma Attack
0.1-0.5 mg (1:1000 soln) SC/IM every 20 minutes - 4 hrs (Max 1 mg per dose)

Prednisone
Severe Asthma Attack; Many other reasons
40-80 mg PO every 12-24 hrs (max 80 mg per 24 hrs)

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2010, 06:43:29 PM »
RESPIRATORY MEDICATIONS
The OTC meds are mainly for common cold issues.  The prescription meds are Asthma medications.  Antibiotics are addressed below.

OVER THE COUNTER

Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed)
Nasal congestion
30-60 mg every 4-6 hours (max 240 mg/24 hours)

Phenylephrine (Sudafed PE)
Nasal congestion
10-20 mg every 4 hours

Oxymetazoline (Afrin) - Decongestant nasal spray
Nasal congestion
2-3 sprays into each nostril twice daily (not to exceed 3 days)

Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Allergic Reactions, rhinorrhea
25 mg - 50 mg PO every 4-6 hrs (max 100 mg per dose; max 400 mg per 24 hrs)

Loratidine (Claritin)
Allergies, rhinorrhea
10 mg PO every 24 hrs (max 20 mg per 24 hrs for a few days)

Guaifenesin (Mucinex)
Cough, phlegm
600 mg tablets: 1-2 tabs PO every 12 hrs (Max 4 tabs per 24 hrs)

Dextromethorphan (Robitussin)
Cough
10-20 mg every 4 hours or 30 mg every 6-8 hours (max 120 mg/day)

Cough Drops
Cough
varies

Sore throat spray (Chloraseptic)
Sore throat
Use as directed on packaging

Dayquil
Cold/flu - combo of above meds
Use as directed on packaging

Nyquil
Cold/flu/sleep  - combo of above meds
Use as directed on packaging


PRESCRIPTION

Albuterol Inhaled (Proventil HFA)
Asthma wheezing (bronchospasm)
2 puffs inhaled every 4-6 hrs (max 12 puffs per day)

Levalbuterol Inhaled (Xopenex)
Asthma wheezing (bronchospasm)
2 puffs inhaled every 4-6 hrs (max 12 puffs per day)

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2010, 06:44:01 PM »
SLEEP MEDICATIONS
I debated for some time about including sleep medications in this topic.
However, I decided to put them in after all, because sleep is so important.
Between simple things like travel and time zone changes, a person can easily lose focus and emotional stability without proper sleep.  If you are not sleeping well, nothing seems right, and hope is low.
So I included these medications.

OVER THE COUNTER

Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
Insomnia - great place to start for insomnia
25 mg - 50 mg PO every 4-6 hrs (max 100 mg per dose; max 400 mg per 24 hrs)


PRESCRIPTION

Zolpidem (Ambien)
Insomnia - best for sleep initiation problems
5-10 mg PO at bedtime (max 10 mg per 24 hrs)

Zolpidem Continuous Release (Ambien CR)
Insomnia - best for sleep maintenance problems
12.5 mg PO at bedtime (max 12.5 mg per 24 hrs)

Eszopiclone (Lunesta)
Insomnia - alternative to Ambien CR
2 mg PO at bedtime (max 3 mg per 24 hrs)

Trazodone
Insomnia
25-50 mg PO at bedtime (may gradually work up to max of 200 mg at bedtime)

Tamazepam (Restoril)
Insomnia - can be used with Ambien if needed
15-30 mg PO at bedtime

Modafinil (Provigil)
Fatigue / Narcolepsy
200-400 mg by mouth one time per day (max 400 mg per 24 hrs)
« Last Edit: March 28, 2010, 04:58:40 PM by lvschant »

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2010, 06:44:28 PM »
TOPICAL SKIN MEDICATIONS
There are a ton of medications for the skin.  I only included ones that I commonly use or recommend.  That doesn’t mean that others are not just as good.  Specifically, I do want to mention the multiple antibiotic ointments (Polysporin, Neosporin).  Recent research has shown that these are not as good as single antibiotic ointments (like Bacitracin).  Also, Neosporin has a high rate of causing allergic-type skin reactions.


OVER THE COUNTER

Diaper Cream (Balmex, Desitin)
Heat Rashes, Chaffing
Apply topically to affected area 1-3 times per day

Aloe Vera
Burns, Sunburns
Apply topically to affected area in thin layer 3-4 times per day

Topical Benzocaine (Anbisol, Orajel)
Cold sores, Stings, Burns, Sunburns
Apply topically to affected area in thin layer 3-4 times per day

Topical Lidocaine Sting/Burn Relief Sprays (Safetec, Solarcaine, etc.)
Burns, Bites
Use as directed on packaging

Topical Antihistamines (Benadryl Cream)
Itching
Apply topically to affected area up to 3-4 times per day

Hydrocortisone Topical Steroid 1% (Cortaid, Cortizone)
Rash
Apply topically to affected area 2-4 times per day

Topical Antifungals (Tinactin, Lamisil, Lotrimin, Micotin)
Ringworm, Athletes foot, Jock itch, etc.
Apply topically to affected area 1-2 times per day

Bacitracin (topical antibiotic)
Topical antiseptic
Apply topically to affected area 1-5 times per day

Silver sulfadiazine 1% cream (Silvadene)
Topical antiseptic, Burns
Apply topically to affected area 1-2 times per day

Zanfel
Poison Ivy, Oak, Sumac
Scrub onto affected area for 15 seconds, rinse with water; May repeat until no itching remains


PRESCRIPTION

Mupirocin (Bactroban)
Topical skin infections (e.g. Impetigo)
Apply topically to affected area 3 times per day - watch closely for worsening

Topical Steroid (Multiple Higher Potency Meds Available)
Rash
Apply topically to affected area 2-4 times per day

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2010, 06:44:49 PM »
MISCELLANEOUS MEDICATIONS
Just a couple of things that didn’t fit easily into any other category.


Ammonia Smelling Salts
Passing out
Use as directed on packaging

Clotting Agents (QuikClot Combat Gauze)
Massive hemorrhage (bleeding)
Unroll gauze and pack in wound; hold with pressure - GET TO HIGHER LEVEL OF CARE ASAP!

Acetazolamide (Diamox)
Acute Mountain Sickness Prevention
250 mg PO twice a day (24-48 hrs before ascent, 48 hours after arrival at altitude)


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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2010, 06:45:48 PM »
ENDOCRINE MEDICATIONS
I included the thyroid protection medication here for the almost impossibly needed use after radiation exposure.
If you have Diabetes or Thyroid problems, make sure you have plenty of medications on hand.  A short term disaster (e.g. a hurricane) can cause a city to shut down for a week.  This can lead to death if a person is not prepared.


OVER THE COUNTER

Potassium Iodide (ThyroSafe = 65 mg Tabs, ThyroShield=65 mg per mL)
Thyroid protection after radiation event
Adults
130 mg (2 tabs) PO per day until significant radiation exposure has passed;
Childrens Dosing: 
<1 month: 16.5 mg PO every 24 hrs (1/4 tab)
1mo-3yrs: 32.5 mg PO every 24 hrs (1/2 tab)
3-12 yrs: 65 mg PO every 24 hrs (1 tab)


PRESCRIPTION

Levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid)
Thyroid hormone replacement
Use as directed for Hypothyroidism

Glucose tabs (many brands out there)
Hypoglycemia
3-4 tablets PO as needed (Use as directed on packaging)

Glucose paste (Glutose paste)
Hypoglycemia
Use as directed on packaging

Insulin
Diabetes glucose control
Use as directed for Diabetes

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2010, 06:46:12 PM »
EYE MEDICATIONS
Eye injuries and infections need to be evaluated quickly.  If you are able, seek expert help.

OVER THE COUNTER

Rewetting Eye Drops
Dry eyes, Eye irritation
Use as directed on packaging


PRESCRIPTION

Erythromycin Ophthalmic 0.5% Ointment
Bacterial eye infections
Apply 1 cm ribbon of ointment to affected eye(s) 4-6x per day for 7-10 days

Ciprofloxacin Ophthalmic Ointment
Bacterial eye infections
Apply 1 cm ribbon of ointment to affected eye(s) 3x per day for 2 days then twice a day for 5 days


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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2010, 06:46:40 PM »
DENTAL MEDICATIONS
Dental pain after a chipped tooth, cavity, or lost filling/cap can be very painful.  These are great items to have on hand in a bug out bag as well as at home.


OVER THE COUNTER

Temporary Filling Material (Cavit)
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Clean tooth, dry tooth, pack with temporary filling as directed, seek higher level of care ASAP

Temporary Filling Material (Intermediate Restorative Material)
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Clean tooth, dry tooth, pack with temporary filling as directed, seek higher level of care ASAP

Temporary Filling Material (Express Putty)
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Clean tooth, dry tooth, pack with temporary filling as directed, seek higher level of care ASAP

Zinc oxide powder
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Can mix with oil of cloves to make a paste to temporarily fill

Paraffin (dental wax) stick
Loss of filling, crown, new cavity
Can muse to temporarily fill

Oil of Cloves (Eugenol)
Tooth pain from loss of filling, crown, or cavity
Apply one drop of oil of cloves to affected tooth; cover with wax or temporary filling;  Alternatively, soak a cotton ball with mixture of a few drops Oil of Cloves and cooking oil and place on tooth - Either one provides temporary tooth pain relief

Kenalog in Orabase
Oral ulcer or painful oral lesion
Press a small dab (about 1/4 inch) to the lesion until a thin film develops - use only enough to coat the lesion with a thin film.


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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2010, 06:47:10 PM »
ANTIVIRAL MEDICATION
If there is going to be one huge worldwide event that leads to TEOTWAWKI, the most likely is a viral pandemic.  There is not a lot you can do to treat a virus, but Elderberry has shown some promising results in recent research.  I included treatment and prophylactic doses of the most common prescription anti-flu medications we have currently available.

OVER THE COUNTER

Elderberry Extract (Sambucol)
Influenza prevention/treatment
Use as directed on packaging


PRESCRIPTION

Zanamivir (Relenza) - TREATMENT
Influenza Treatment
Two inhalations (10 mg total) twice daily for 5 days. Doses should be spaced by ~12 hours. Begin within 48 hrs of signs or symptoms.

Zanamivir (Relenza) - PROPHYLAXIS
Influenza Prophylaxis
Two inhalations (10 mg) once daily for 10 days. Begin within 36 hrs following onset of symptoms in index case; Community outbreak: Two inhalations (10 mg) once daily for 28 days. Begin within 5 days of outbreak.

Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) - TREATMENT
Influenza Treatment
75 mg PO twice daily initiated within 2 days of onset of symptoms; duration of treatment: 5 days

Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) - PROPHYLAXIS
Influenza Prophylaxis
75 mg PO once daily; initiate treatment within 2 days of contact with an infected individual; duration of treatment: 10 days.  Community outbreaks, dosing is 75 mg once daily. May be used for up to 6 weeks


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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2010, 06:47:41 PM »
ANTIFUNGAL MEDICATIONS
“There is a fungus among us!”  
Keeping the area clean and dry goes a long way in prevention.


OVER THE COUNTER

Miconazole (Monistat)
Vaginal yeast infections
Suppository or Creams (Use as directed on packaging)

Topical Antifungals (Tinactin, Lamisil, Lotrimin, Micotin)
Ringworm, Athletes foot, Jock itch, etc.
Apply topically to affected area 1-2 times per day


PRESCRIPTION

Nystatin (swish and swallow, cream, or powder)
Thrush, Topical skin infections
Oral Swish and Swallow formulation - 4 x per day; Cream - Apply topically to affected area 2-3 times per day; Use powder for moist areas

Oral Antifungals
Nail fungal infections, Severe fungal infections
Use as directed (based on the medication); Should only be used if proper lab work is available

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2010, 06:48:18 PM »
ANTIBIOTIC MEDICATIONS
I debated about putting this section in here.  There are so many antibiotics on the market.  Some are extremely expensive.  All ones designed for humans are prescription only.  I will not go into the use of antibiotics sold for animals… because I just don’t know enough about that to talk about it.

I first list common infections and the antibiotics that can be used.  The antibiotics are basically placed in order of preference/usefulness for that infection.  Yes, you can treat many of these infections with other antibiotics.  I tried to keep it simple, and I tried to keep it with oral antibiotics only.  If you need IV antibiotics, you should be in a hospital or under the care of a professional.

Following the list of infections, I have the actual antibiotics listed with the dosages following (for each specific infection type).  Again, not all indications and dosages are listed.  But this will give you a good start.


INFECTIONS

Strep Throat
Penicillin V, Amoxicillin, Cephalexin, Azithromycin

Pneumonia (mild to moderate, uncomplicated)
Azithromycin, Amoxicillin, Augmentiin, Doxycycline, Levofloxacin

Pneumonia (severe, complicated)
IV medication is needed

Mild Skin Infections
Cephalexin, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin

Moderate Skin Infections
EITHER Clindamycin or Penicillin V potassium AND Doxycycline or Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole

Severe Skin Infections
If it is an extensive infection or very rapidly spreading, IV medication is needed

Erysipelas (Skin Infection)
Mild: Penicillin V potassium or Amoxicillin;  Severe: IV medication is needed

Bite Wounds (Mild): Animal Bites
Augmentin; Doxycyline or Trimeth.-sulfameth. or Penicillin VK PLUS Metronidazole or Clindamycin

Bite Wounds (Mild): Human Bites
Augmentin;  Doxycyline or Trimeth.-sulfameth. or Penicillin VK or Cipro. PLUS Metronidazole or Clindamycin

Bite Wounds:  Infected
IV medication is needed; Surgery is likely needed

Bacterial Inner Ear Infections
Amoxicillin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Augmentin

Bacterial Outer Ear Infections
Cipro HC Otic (ear), Cortisporin Otic Suspension/Solution (ear)

Bacterial Eye Infections
Erythromycin Ophthalmic, Ciprofloxacin Ophthalmic Ointment

Urinary Tract Infections
Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin, Cephalexin, Doxycycline

Kidney Infections
Levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole PLUS Amoxicillin

Travelers Diarrhea
Ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, Azithromycin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole

Cholera
Oral rehydration therapy and/or IV rehydration is first line; Doxycycline, Ciprofloxacin

Giardia
Metronidazole

Serious GI Infections
Many of these infections will need IV medications;  Milder cases may benefit w/ Augmentin, Ciprofloxacin, Metronidazole

Tick-Borne Diseases
Doxycycline

Anthrax
Doxycycline, Levofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Clindamycin

Plague
Doxycycline, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Tetracycline
« Last Edit: March 19, 2010, 06:53:00 PM by Doc K »

Offline Doc K

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2010, 06:48:41 PM »
ANTIBIOTICS

Amoxicillin (Amoxil)
Community Acquired Pneumonia:  500-1,000 mg PO three times daily for 7-10 days
Bacterial Inner Ear Infection:  Mild-Mod: 500 mg PO twice daily or 250 mg PO three times daily;  Severe: 875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily


Amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium (Augmentin)
Bacterial Inner Ear Infection:  875 mg PO twice daily
Acute bacterial sinus infection:  Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for 10 days
Community Acquired Pneumonia:  Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for 7-10 days
Skin abscess:  875 mg PO twice daily
Bite Wounds (Human/animal):  875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily
Kidney Infection (uncomplicated):  875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily
Diverticulitis, Perirectal abscess:  Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for 7-10 days


Azithromycin (Zithromax)
Mild-to-mod respiratory tract, skin, soft tissue infxns:  500 mg PO in a single loading dose on day 1 followed by 250 mg PO daily on days 2-5
Community Acquired Pneumonia:  500 mg IV daily for at least 2 days, then 500 mg PO daily to complete a 7- to 10-day course of therapy
Bacterial Sinus Infection:  500 mg PO daily for 3 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Traveler's Diarrhea:  500 mg PO daily for 1-3 days or 1 gram PO in a single dose
STD Infections (Chlamydia, Chancroid, Gonorrhea):  Chlamydia, Chancroid: 1 gram PO one time;   Gonorrhea 2 grams PO one time


Cephalexin (Keflex)
Mild skin infection (small abscess, boils, etc.):  250 mg PO four times daily (max 4,000 mg in 24 hrs)
Moderate skin infection (mastitis, cellulitis, etc.):  500 mg PO four times daily (max 4,000 mg in 24 hrs)
Acute bacterial pharyngitis ("Strep throat"):  500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Uncomplicated Urinary Tract (Bladder) Infections:  500 mg PO twice daily for 7-14 days


Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
Anthrax (inhalational - prophylaxis):  500 mg PO twice daily for 60 days or 400 mg IV twice daily for 60 days
Anthrax (inhalational, GI, skin - treatment):  400 mg IV twice daily initially then transition to 500 mg PO twice daily for total of 60 days
Bone/Joint Infection:  Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400 mg IV twice daily for 4-6 weeks; Severe: 400 mg IV three times daily for 4-6 weeks
Skin Infections:  Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days; Severe: 400 mg IV three times daily for 7-14 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Travelers Diarrhea:  Mild: 750 mg PO x 1 dose; Severe: 500 mg PO twice daily for 3 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Shigella or Salmonella:  500 mg PO twice daily for 3-7 days
Infectious Diarrhea – Cholera:  1 gram PO x one dose
Abdominal Infections (Diverticulitis, Abscess, etc.):  500 mg PO twice daily or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days
Lung Infections:  Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400  mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days; Severe: 400 mg IV three times daily for 7-14 days
Typhoid Fever:  500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Bacterial Sinus Infection:  500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Urinary Tract (Bladder) / Kidney Infection:  Mild: 250 mg PO or 200  mg IV twice daily for 3 days; Severe: 500 mg PO twice daily or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days


Clindamycin (Cleosin)
Anthrax:  900 mg IV every 8 hours with ciprofloxacin or doxycycline
Bite wounds (canine):  300 mg PO four times daily; take with a fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin)
Skin infections:  150-300 mg PO four times daily; Use with Doxycycline or Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra)
Severe nose/throat infections:  150-450 mg PO four times daily for at least 7 days (max 1,800 mg per 24 hrs)


Doxycycline
Tick borne diseases:  100 mg PO twice daily for 14-21 days
Infectious Diarrhea – Cholera:  300 mg PO as a single dose
STD, Urinary Infections:  100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 7-28 days
Lung infections:  100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 7-14 days
Anthrax (inhalational - prophylaxis):  100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 60 days (PO preferred)
Anthrax (inhalational, GI, skin - treatment):  100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 60 days (IV for initial treatment, then switch to PO)


Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
Skin Infections:  Uncomplicated: 500 mg PO daily for 7-10 days; Complicated: 750 mg PO daily for 7-14 days
Lung Infections (community acquired pneumonia):  500 mg PO/IV daily for 7-14 days or 750 mg PO/IV daily for 5 days
Lung Infections (serious lung infections/pneumonia):  750 mg PO/IV daily for 7-14 days
Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections:  250 mg PO/IV daily for 3 days
Complicated: Urinary Tract /Kidney Infections:  250 mg PO/IV daily for 10 days or 750 PO/IV daily for 5 days
Anthrax (inhalational):  500 mg PO daily for 60 days beginning ASAP after exposure


Metronidazole (Flagyl)
Bacterial Vaginosis:  500 mg PO twice daily for 7 days
Trichomonas Infection:  250 mg PO three times daily for 7 days or 2 grams PO as a single dose
Anaerobic GI Infection (Diverticulitis, Abscess, etc.):  500 mg PO/IV every 6-8 hrs (max dose 4 grams daily)
Giardia Infection:  500 mg PO twice daily for 5-7 days
Amoeba Infection:  500-750 mg PO three times daily for 5-10 days


Penicillin VK (Penicillin V potassium)
Acute bacterial pharyngitis ("Strep throat"):  500 mg PO 3-4 times daily for 10 days
Skin infections (Erysipelas):  500 mg PO four times daily  


Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra)
DOSING
Single Strength (SS) Tablet: Sulfamethoxazole 400 mg and trimethoprim 80 mg
Double Strength (DS) Tablet is 2 SS tabs in one tablet
USE
Urinary Tract /Kidney Infections:  1 DS Tablet PO twice a day for 3-5 days (Mild); for 7-10 days (complicated); for 14 days (Kidney Infection)
Infectious Diarrhea - Travelers Diarrhea/Shigella:  1 DS Tablet PO twice a day for 5 days
Skin Infections (including MRSA):  1-2 DS Tablets PO twice a day
« Last Edit: March 19, 2010, 06:51:24 PM by Doc K »

Offline Heavy G

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #15 on: March 19, 2010, 07:03:44 PM »
+1, Doc.  Actually, +2.  Outstanding.  This is why this forum is so awesome.

Offline antsyaunt

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2010, 07:26:09 PM »
Unbelievable!  What a treasure.  wow.  Thanks so much.  Now it's time to try to find some of these products. 

Offline Docwatmo

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2010, 07:37:00 PM »
Amazing!  That is a 1000% better than anything I've found online or in books to date.  I've been compiling a list of "must have" stuff for my kits and didnt' even scratch the surface.

+1 x infinity squared. :)

Thank you for this.

Offline CGFxColoneill

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2010, 07:44:07 PM »
awesome thread...very useful information

thanks for putting all this work into it +1

Offline LvsChant

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2010, 07:52:03 PM »
+1... really wish I could give you +100! This is great information.

Offline Orionblade

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2010, 08:45:07 PM »
Awesome listing.

Quick question - Any more info on alternate therapies for tick bites would be appreciated, since this was several years ago that I was treated, but I'm allergic to Doxycycline! (o noez!)

I found out the hard way. Woke up unable to move after a tick bite, nurse practitioner prescribed doxy, woke up the next morning feeling 100% better, but had bumps everywhere. IIRC, the alternate treatment was penicillin for something ridiculous like 6 or 8 weeks, but again, it was a couple years ago, and not the most pleasant few weeks of recovering from epithelial bumpies (did I mention they were everywhere?)

Thanks!!!!


+1x10^10



Offline kiteflyer

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2010, 08:49:49 PM »
  Thanks Doc! One thing a nurse recommended was a hot water bottle with an edema attachment for dehydration when too ill to drink. A salt solution if I remember right right up the &*^$% and the colon will absorb the solution and save your life.

          kiteflyer

Offline Doc K

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2010, 08:55:10 PM »
 Thanks Doc! One thing a nurse recommended was a hot water bottle with an edema attachment for dehydration when too ill to drink. A salt solution if I remember right right up the &*^$% and the colon will absorb the solution and save your life.

          kiteflyer

Yep!  Transrectal rehydration.  If you don't have the ability (or knowledge) to give an IV, you can give an enema (without purging) to rehydrate.  There was an article on this last year in Wilderness and Environmental Medicine.  I'll see if I can find it...

Offline Schmidt

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2010, 09:48:35 PM »

OVER THE COUNTER

...

Ibuprofen (Motrin)
Pain, Fever
400 mg - 800 mg PO every 4-8 hrs (max 3,200 mg in 24 hrs)

...

PRESCRIPTION

...

Naproxen (Naprosyn)
Pain
500 mg PO initially, then 250 mg every 6-8 hrs (max 1250 mg per 24 hrs)

...



Thanks for writing this out.

I have a few of medicine related questions:

I have seen both ibuprofen and naproxen sold both over the counter and with prescription. I assumed it had something to do with health insurance paying for the prescription and not the over the counter. But Claritin used to be prescription but is now over the counter and not available as a prescription. So why is ibuprofen and naproxen sold with prescription if Claritin isn't?

Second, I was prescribed codeine after a wisdom tooth extraction, took as recommended, and it didn't abate the pain at all. Also, a time when I was having my arm sew shut a nurse told me I could have double the max dosage recommended on the over the counter ibuprofen bottle. I am roughly twice the size of a normal person. Can I double the amount of most medications? Is that dangerous or ineffectual? Of if self medicating start at the recommended and increase till it's effective.

Offline Rorschach

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2010, 10:01:08 PM »
Some of the medications in the list can be purchase generically for $4 for a treatment quantity or for a months worth at Wal-mart (http://i.walmart.com/i/if/hmp/fusion/genericdruglist.pdf).  For instance in antibiotics are penicillin, amoxicillin, cephalexin (Keflex), ciprofloxin, doxycyline, erythromycin, metronidzole(Flagyl), SMZ-TMP(Bactrim), and Tetracycline.  Some of the medicines, such as the antibiotics are listed in both pills and liquids, so they can be dosed for kids also.  If you are going to get an extra prescription in liquid they are often powder that is reconstituted.  If you would like to store them long term, except tetracycline, when you get to the pharmacy you will need to ask them not to mix it for you.  Having a Sanford Antibiotic Guide (www.sanfordguide.com/) and a Portable book or electronic dosing resource (http://www.tarascon.com/products/) would be helpful for your BOB.

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2010, 10:36:12 PM »
+1(00)! Doc! This is a great list! Good job! Thanks!

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2010, 11:33:19 PM »
Thank you Doc K =)

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #27 on: March 20, 2010, 05:17:07 AM »
Yep!  Transrectal rehydration.  If you don't have the ability (or knowledge) to give an IV, you can give an enema (without purging) to rehydrate.  There was an article on this last year in Wilderness and Environmental Medicine.  I'll see if I can find it...

That sounds like it's got to be at least the second or third most comfortable thing to do in all the Galaxy.


Offline Doc K

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #28 on: March 20, 2010, 07:27:31 AM »
I have seen both ibuprofen and naproxen sold both over the counter and with prescription.... So why is ibuprofen and naproxen sold with prescription if Claritin isn't?

Ibuprofen is sold OTC in 200 mg doses.  Ibuprofen 400 mg , 600 mg , and 800 mg dose tablets are usually "prescription" strength and therefore requires a prescription.  There are some places (like military pharmacies) that will prescribe the 200 mg tablets (and other OTC meds, like Tylenol) so that the retiree can get them for free.

I did have an accidental ommission in the OTC Pain meds.  Naproxen sodium (Aleve) is sold over the counter:

Naproxen sodium (Aleve)
Pain
200 mg PO every 8-12 hrs (max 600 mg per 24 hrs)

Napoxen sodium (Aleve) is OTC and Naproxen (Naprosyn) is prescription strength.

The other reason some meds are sold by prescription and some are not are the potential for harm that the average sheeple could do to themselves.
I also would not discount a capitalistic and/or bureaucrat component to the whole thing.  ;)



I was prescribed codeine...and it didn't abate the pain at all. Also, a time when I was having my arm sew shut a nurse told me I could have double the max dosage recommended on the over the counter ibuprofen bottle. I am roughly twice the size of a normal person. Can I double the amount of most medications? Is that dangerous or ineffectual? Of if self medicating start at the recommended and increase till it's effective.

I, too am larger than the average person.  Certain medications are weight based, but many are not.  When it comes to pain medicine, these usually have a weight based component for effect but not always with side effects.  Meaning:  It may take more pain meds to get the pain-relieving effects, but that dose could cause liver or kidney damage.  Next time you see your doc, ask about the appropriate dosing "for future reference" if you ever need it.



Quick question - Any more info on alternate therapies for tick bites would be appreciated, since this was several years ago that I was treated, but I'm allergic to Doxycycline! (o noez!)

Doxycyline really is the drug of choice for a lot of the Tick Borne Diseases (e.g. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever).  Chloamphenicol 20 mg/kg IV every 6 hrs (max 4 grams in 24 hrs) is the only other verified medication.  However, the modern flouroquinolones (like Ciprofloxacin and Levofloxacin) show some likely coverage in vitro (test tube) testing only.  My thoughts are to get the IV meds while you can, but use flouroquinolones if you can't get Chloamphenicol.


Doc K

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Re: DOC K'S MEDICINE LIST
« Reply #29 on: March 20, 2010, 11:02:33 AM »
Thanks Doc K - this is incredibly helpful. +1 for a great post.  I've been working on our first aid kit (which is huge and we take it on every trip farther than just around our local area) and I will now go through it again and add what is not there from your list.  One question (and maybe I already missed your answer to this?) how does one acquire some of these meds that are prescription?  My Doc is great in that he gives me prescriptions for a couple of different antibotics to keep on hand (with Lupus something minor can turn major in just a day or two) but beyond that I am stumped.  I've talked to him a little about survivalism and prepping - he gets some of it but I fear he is afraid to prescribe anything more than my regular meds and antibotics so as not to get in any trouble. Thanks again for absolutely great post.  TBM