Author Topic: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments  (Read 6703 times)

Offline BerserkerPrime

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Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« on: December 03, 2008, 12:04:12 PM »
Just wanted to throw out a topic near and dear to my heart and pic your collective brains. 

Living in Alaska has forced me to take steps perhaps above/beyond those in fairer weather climates.   It would be great to hear from you cold weather folks and compare some of the additional prep that you do. 

For example: I would love to be able to just rely on just my wood stove, but since I operate on a well system, I have to make sure the water stays flowing and doesn't freeze in an outage.  I installed a 7kw NG generator to the house w/an automatic switch over in the event of power failure. 
Then, in my ever paranoid state, I thought about our earth quake problems up here and have been wondering if I can add a dual valve that would allow an LP tank to connect to the gennie as well in the event that gas lines are disrupted. 

So speak up you MNs, NDs, MTs, Canadians, Scandinavians, etc!

Any thoughts from you all would be well received. 

V/r Berserker Prime

Offline BerserkerPrime

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2008, 09:56:46 PM »
If any of you lookyloos have advise on storing gasoline and diesel fuel, I'd love to hear from you.  I have a plastic jerry cans and a large 25 Gal barral to use.  Any idea how long gas and diesel can be stored and are there some other pointers out there? 

v/r BP

Lucretius

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2008, 07:22:17 AM »
If any of you lookyloos have advise on storing gasoline and diesel fuel, I'd love to hear from you.  I have a plastic jerry cans and a large 25 Gal barral to use.  Any idea how long gas and diesel can be stored and are there some other pointers out there? 

v/r BP

Good ventilation is always a good idea... and there are stabilizers you can buy and add to the gasoline, to extend the shelf life.

I live in scandinavia, and thus have some cold weather experience. Not knowing the extent of your own experience makes it hard for me to know what you want to know about. I wouldn't want to sound as if I thought you were totally clueless... ;) ...like you probably know that cotton kills, right?

Bonehead

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2008, 11:00:53 AM »
If any of you lookyloos have advise on storing gasoline and diesel fuel, I'd love to hear from you.  I have a plastic jerry cans and a large 25 Gal barral to use.  Any idea how long gas and diesel can be stored and are there some other pointers out there? 

Add Pri-G and Pri-D according to the directions, and you are good to go.  Available online at lots of places, as well as Camping World and their competitors.  I am in the same boat, have a small steel shed in the corner of the property with MFC cans stored, don't have enough land to get away with a large (e.g. 300 gal) farm tank.


millerized1

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2008, 12:34:37 PM »
It falls into the "other stuff" but my brother spent 2 seasons on the ice in Antarctica.  He said his calorie count per day was some ungodly 4000 calories or something like that during his extended forrays out on the ice.  The body makes it's own warmth, using calories as fuel.  He was eating all day long and still lost 30some pounds down there in a few short months.  He's not a big guy, either. (buck fitty or so)  So, fuel for your generator and fuel for YOU as well.

Of course, he could have been drinking light beer and just not known it ;)

Offline archer

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2008, 02:51:35 PM »
Eww, light beer while in Antarctica??? I think that's illegal...

millerized1

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2008, 02:57:18 PM »
So's the barrel time, but when in Rome.......





:D

Offline archer

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2008, 04:55:12 PM »
4000 calories is a hell of a lot. Did he feel hungry all day? Or did he just know he had to eat and did so?

millerized1

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2008, 05:35:21 PM »
He said he just ate.  Kinda like drinking water while you're working, you just do it.  He was around 160something when he went down, and around 130 something when he left. Those are  solid weights, he's not a flabby boy like me.  He said water went right through him as well.  He did a lot of field work, spending a few nights "out" before heading back to McMurdo.  Interesting history, since they can't use water to drill sample wells (it'd freeze), they used diesel to lubricate the bits.  Makes for a nice environmental mess in a pristine location.  He'd go out to bail out the fuel until he got mostly water, then do it again in a few days.)

Offline BerserkerPrime

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2008, 09:27:41 PM »
Lucretius,

I've got a lot of years in cold so I feel very comfortable with my abilities in general.  My questions come about as a result of understandinding that I can not think of everything and am always concerned that there is an eventuallity that I did not anticipate.  And as you know, when dealing with cold weater, the most well laid preperations can go to hell in a hurry based on a seemingly small oversite.  I think my current focus will be on storing fuel as even though gas prices are down again, they can just as easily go up and stay up. 

V/r BP

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2008, 10:12:30 AM »
Thanks Bonehead!  That's the kind of info I need!  I'll give it a try.....

V/r BP

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2008, 12:50:57 PM »
He said he just ate.  Kinda like drinking water while you're working, you just do it.  He was around 160something when he went down, and around 130 something when he left. Those are  solid weights, he's not a flabby boy like me.  He said water went right through him as well.  He did a lot of field work, spending a few nights "out" before heading back to McMurdo.  Interesting history, since they can't use water to drill sample wells (it'd freeze), they used diesel to lubricate the bits.  Makes for a nice environmental mess in a pristine location.  He'd go out to bail out the fuel until he got mostly water, then do it again in a few days.)
Wow. Thats a lot of food.... Imagine how that would alter your preparations.

Lucretius

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2008, 06:18:15 AM »
Notice every thing that can freeze shut. Make sure you have the means to prevent or cure that.

In my case:

padlocks
car locks
car doors
garden shed door


Offline BerserkerPrime

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2008, 04:55:32 PM »
Good Call Lud!

I've got padlocks on 2 gates and a shed.  have had to use a hammer to 'loosen' them up! 

BP

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2008, 12:19:13 AM »
Notice every thing that can freeze shut. Make sure you have the means to prevent or cure that.

In my case:

padlocks
car locks
car doors
garden shed door



Don't forget your front and back door! If they have storm doors that open out, a 6 inch drift could be enough to lock you into the house. My dad told me stories about how one year people had to jump out the 2nd story windows because the houses drifted up so bad one blizzardy night.

I am watching my sliding glass door. Even though it's a slider, there is enough of a lip on the door that if it drifted up tight to the glass, I wouldn't be able open it if the snow was not really soft and loose.

Lucretius

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2008, 03:26:46 AM »
Good Call Lud!

I've got padlocks on 2 gates and a shed.  have had to use a hammer to 'loosen' them up! 

BP

Alternative method:

1) Pee in plastic bag
2) Hold bag against padlock
3) Open padlock
4) Empty bag in garden, preferably where you plan to grow nitrogen hungry plants

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2008, 10:43:43 AM »
Thanks guys!  I told my wife that she should pee in the back and boy did I get a look.   :D  I know she'd do it in a pinch though.  I will go buy lockmelt today! 

Fortunately I'm in the woods so drifting here isn't too much of a problem although I know what you mean about drifts as I was stationed at Minot AFB ND and I've never seen such big drifts! 

Thanks again guys, these are the 'little' things that can be very problematic at the absolute worst times!

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2008, 02:03:42 PM »
Oh, lubes for locks. Don't use oils or grease. Use graphite.

Oil and grease get stiff, and can effectively freeze when it gets REALLY cold. Graphite won't.

Graphite doesn't evaporate like WD40 will over time.

Got snowshoes? I just walked to Taco Bell - I had to walk down the street, they evedently don't shovel sidewalks in this town. I am going to wear my snowshoes to Taco Bell next time I go. Just to be a dick and to make a point.

Offline DIM TIM

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2008, 10:45:21 PM »
Just wanted to throw out a topic near and dear to my heart and pic your collective brains. 

Living in Alaska has forced me to take steps perhaps above/beyond those in fairer weather climates.   It would be great to hear from you cold weather folks and compare some of the additional prep that you do. 

For example: I would love to be able to just rely on just my wood stove, but since I operate on a well system, I have to make sure the water stays flowing and doesn't freeze in an outage.  I installed a 7kw NG generator to the house w/an automatic switch over in the event of power failure. 
Then, in my ever paranoid state, I thought about our earth quake problems up here and have been wondering if I can add a dual valve that would allow an LP tank to connect to the gennie as well in the event that gas lines are disrupted. 

So speak up you MNs, NDs, MTs, Canadians, Scandinavians, etc!

Any thoughts from you all would be well received. 

V/r Berserker Prime

In answer to your original post, Have a source, a back-up source, and a back-up for your back-up. I live in SW  Ohio, and even though our winters are very tame compared to some others around the country and the world, we still can get snowfalls measured in feet as well as inches, and temp. swings that can go to - 40 or more for weeks at a time.

Like everything that these forum boards, and the others out there like them as well try to stress, the whole idea is to be prepared. Expect the best, but prepare for the worst.
If you have a wood stove.......good for you, you can produce your own heat, and as long as there is fuel to last. Same with natural gas, as long as you have a supply.......propane, same.......kerosene, still the same.......SUPPLY is what it all comes down to when you are talking BTU's.

But, as I said in the first line of this post....... A SOURCE, A BACK-UP, AND A BACK-UP FOR YOUR BACK-UP !!!   ;)

Offline BerserkerPrime

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2008, 11:46:08 PM »
Oh, lubes for locks. Don't use oils or grease. Use graphite.

Oil and grease get stiff, and can effectively freeze when it gets REALLY cold. Graphite won't.

Graphite doesn't evaporate like WD40 will over time.

Got snowshoes? I just walked to Taco Bell - I had to walk down the street, they evedently don't shovel sidewalks in this town. I am going to wear my snowshoes to Taco Bell next time I go. Just to be a dick and to make a point.

Have some one film it or take picts!  That would be a riot!

BP

Kara

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Re: Prepping for extreme cold weather environments
« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2008, 04:20:16 PM »
Don't forget your front and back door! If they have storm doors that open out, a 6 inch drift could be enough to lock you into the house. My dad told me stories about how one year people had to jump out the 2nd story windows because the houses drifted up so bad one blizzardy night.

I am watching my sliding glass door. Even though it's a slider, there is enough of a lip on the door that if it drifted up tight to the glass, I wouldn't be able open it if the snow was not really soft and loose.

That's no joking...During the last blizzard of '97, we were stationed in GFAFB, and the drifts curled up so high, they I could have easily stepped out of my 2nd story bedroom window w/out falling. That was an extreme winter all the way around, but it doesn't take but one night of wind, snow and (God forbid) ice to make escape from your own home a real bitch.