Author Topic: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?  (Read 12982 times)

Offline RonH2K

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Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« on: December 24, 2008, 03:59:23 PM »
Hello, friends and Merry Christmas!

I'm diligently working on my BOB and need to throw a good First Aid book in there.  I've received a good deal of medical training over the years, but am constantly amazed at how much my memory can let me down sometimes!

Any recommendations?

Thanks and, again, Merry Christmas!

P.S. - I'm also asking about a good Survival book in a separate thread.  I separated these requests in order to best capture this information for any future users looking for this same info!  Thanks!

rmcculloch

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2008, 10:22:25 AM »
The best book I have found is "Where there are no Doctors"  I'm a firefighter/paramedic and this is the book that was handed to me multiple times as a quick refresher when going on medical rescue trips after natural/man-made disasters.  It is great at improvising in less than ideal situations and explains everything in layman terms.  Also available in many different languages if you were to need something like that

Offline firetoad

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2008, 11:58:18 AM »
You can download "Where there is no Doctor" and "Where there is no Dentist" legally and free in pdf format.  Check here for where to look...

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=941.0

James Yeager

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Offline RonH2K

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2008, 08:22:36 PM »
Good recommendations.  Thanks!

Keep em' coming, please?


docdredd

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2009, 07:28:32 PM »
BY far the best all around book for any med bag is the special forces medical handbook. i spent 4 years as a medic in the army and i went through several of them, i even bought one for every new medic that joined my squad. It is slap full of a wide assortment of information everything from child birth to alternative medical practices.

http://www.amazon.com/U-S-Special-Forces-Medical-Handbook/dp/0873644549

 it has some medical terminolgy but is written in a very easy to read format, so with a med dictionary even someone with limited training should be able to get the gist of it.

Offline Taylor3006

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2009, 11:47:40 PM »
I agree with Doc Dread. If I could only have one medical reference it would be the SF Medical Handbook. BUT like Doc, I have a medical background (corpsman) and it may be a bit technical for the layman. If you have some basic medical training (EMT or better) stick with it, if not get "Where there is No Doctor" or better yet, both books. Ditch Medicine is a great book as well. A couple of my other favorites are "Medicine for the Outdoors" by Auerbach, "A Barefoot Doctor's Manual" (American translation of a Chinese paramedics book with good info on alternative therapies), and the current "Red Cross Textbook of Nursing". Since you want one for your BOB and have medical training, go for the SF book or "Where there is No Doctor".

Offline Nate

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2009, 10:07:34 PM »
You may want to check out the Wilderness Medical Associated Field Guide.  This has a lot of information that would be applicable in a BO situation.  It is printed on waterproof paper, spiral bound and about the size of a 1/4 sheet of paper.  It covers how to treat problems with the three critical body systems.  It also includes heat and cold injuries, common ailments, toxins, helicopter evacuation, water purification, and med kits.  I recieved a copy when I took my Wilderness First Responder course 6 years ago.  I start the class again tomorrow and I hope I get another copy!   ;D

http://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-Wilderness-Rescue-Medicine/dp/0970464673

Well worth the investment, but the information contained is not a substitute for the training received in a WFR course.  Enjoy!

Offline RonH2K

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2009, 08:01:25 AM »
I'll check those out!  Thanks, gang!

Keep 'em coming!

 8)

Offline AGreyMan

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2009, 05:32:49 PM »
Take a look at NOLS Wilderness First Aid by Todd Schimelpfenig




It does not presume a great deal of medical training. It does presume a long interval until advanced help can be reached. It also presumes minimal equipment.

Stay Safe,
AGreyMan

Offline quietmike

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2009, 12:39:24 AM »

Greenjeans

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2009, 07:25:05 AM »
I stuffed an old copy of US Army TM 8-230 Corpsman in my first aid bag.  I printed out this PDF Survival and Austere
Medicine as well.

www.aussurvivalist.com/downloads/AM%20Final%202.pdf -

I have some of the other texts referenced in the other replies, but would not be without my Merck Manual for home/retreat reference.

HumeMan

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2009, 07:22:58 PM »
Without a medical background the Special Forces Medical Handbook is too much.  I spent some time reading it at the surplus store; it was over my head.  It also assumes that you access to tools a field doctor would have.

A good BOB Med Book should have easy, step by step instructions for the layman.

Offline Alan Halcon

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2009, 09:23:35 AM »
In my opinion, "Wilderness Medicine", by Paul S. Auerbach is the creme de la creme in wilderness first aid books. It is expensive... about 150 dollars

http://www.amazon.com/Wilderness-Medicine-5th-Paul-Auerbach/dp/0323032281

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2009, 07:51:33 PM »
(This thread has been selected as a “best of” thread by Heavy G.  You can search for “best of” threads by using that term in the search mode.  Everyone on the forum is encouraged to reply to a post they think is “best of” worthy so we can all search for them.  For more information on the “best of” thing, see http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3423.0 )

Offline Ken325

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2009, 11:21:57 PM »
I have a app for my i phone called pocket first aid and CPR.  Not as comprehensive as a lot of these books but I always have it on me and you can find things quickly.

I miss Dixie

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2009, 03:33:09 PM »
As long as you have power anyway. Remember the electronics ony work as long as you can re charge them. In the wilderness how long will that be?
I like the SF book, but I am an Army medic and real world Paramedic so......

Offline Ken325

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #17 on: May 15, 2009, 04:06:47 PM »
I was an army medic but that was during the first gulf war.  I still need a first aid book because I don't have a perfect memory.  I would prefer a paper copy but I don't carry my library withe me all the time.  My i phone is always with me and it has a few hundred books on it. 

About charging electronics:  I think that this is something that people need to pay more attention to.  I have worked on a few emergency responses (Hurricanes Ike and Katrina) and one lesson that I learned is that you need multiple forms of communication.  Cell phones will almost always go down or the system will be overloaded.  You can sometimes route calls to another state and  have that person deliver your message.  Another trick is to use text messaging.  The thing that I like about my phone is it does voice, text, data, and email.  It also has a GPS, the previously mentioned reference books,weather reports, contacts, compass, and an app that lets you use it as a flashlight.  I have had good success in finding a working wifi hot spot in impacted areas (Starbucks, McDonalds, Hotels, Airports)  and the email function has been very useful.  I am working on a HAM license but that isn't something that everyone can use like email.   The problem as you state is that you have to charge the things.  My suggestion is to carry a charger that will work on 12 V or AC.  My charger is one of the Igo systems (radio shack sells them) where you can change the tips and use one charger for everything.  I have tips for all my electronics.  I have also standardized on AA batteries and I carry rechargeable batteries with a charger.  I am planning on buying a solar charger eventually.  I like this one http://www.solio.com/charger/ because it uses the igo tips.  The problem is that it doesn't generate enough power for multiple devices.  I am also considering one of the briefcase chargers.  In my car I carry a AC converter.  I also carry a Belkin Mini Surge protector because it is small, has 3 outlets, and 2 USB outlets.  On multiple occasions I have needed to charge multiple things when there were limited outlets.  The surge protector is a bonus because a barely functioning power grid is likely to have lots of surges on it. 

One difference between me and other people is that I go to disaster areas to work.  I am not just trying to survive and get out of town.  If you want to do things you need communication and the ability to charge your equipment. 

walker

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2009, 09:44:50 PM »
I was an army medic but that was during the first gulf war.  I still need a first aid book because I don't have a perfect memory.

Well I am a Physician Assistant, and I treat folks in an urgent care every week, and I still carry a first-aid book in my kit.  I even used it while in clinic one day.  I was having a really hard time putting a dislocated shoulder back in place, none of my usual techniques were working.  I went to my Jeep kit, pulled out my book, and tried another method that worked like a charm.  The Doc I work with looked at me like "Were the fark did you come up with THAT!" 

Some of the books already mentioned sound like good ones, but the one I carry is: A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine, Eric A. Weiss, MD 3rd Edition
http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/product.php?catname=Manuals%20/%20DVDs&prodname=A%20Comprehensive%20Guide%20to%20Wilderness%20&%20Travel%20Medicine&product=63
I like that it is small, concise, and provides some higher level care options along with travel medicine dosages.  I wish it was spiral bound and water proof.

Regarding the 1988 SF medical handbook, you should know that the old edition is significantly outdated and has some hazardous information.  It is now called the SOF medical handbook.  Here is a 2001 version for free:  http://www.nh-tems.com/documents/Manuals/SOF_Medical_Handbook.pdf
They continue to update this manual more frequently now, very good info for trained medical professionals.
If you want the most current (2008) water-resistant one go here: http://bookstore.gpo.gov/actions/GetPublication.do?stocknumber=008-070-00810-6
I don't have the new one.  It is too big for me to pack around in a kit.

The Ranger Medic Handbook is another good one (I have an electronic version), and it is an actual "handbook" not a large "manual".  Very nice from a military medic standpoint.
http://www.narescue.com/Ranger-Medic-Handbook-P183C144.aspx

Understand that about 1/4 of the material in military medical manuals contain operational doctrine, not very useful in civilian life or SHTF senarios, unless you have a buddy with a CH47 coming to extract your mass casualties.

Finally, I will second the link to Survival and Austere Medicine:
http://www.aussurvivalist.com/downloads/AM%20Final%202.pdf
I have this printed on my shelf.  I will say I don't agree with everything in it (from a medical standpoint), but it is very very good.

« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:10:44 AM by Archer »

Offline Ken325

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #19 on: May 20, 2009, 01:02:21 AM »
Excellent information scrubs.  I will get the Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine the next time I buy something from Amazon.  Appreciate the links also. 
I am a big fan of e books for reference materials because you can carry a thousand books on a big flash drive.  The problem is that you could wind up in a situation where electronic devices don't work.  Personally I think that this is unlikely if you prepare as I described in my previous post.  To me the benefits of having a huge library on just about any topic that is portable make this a no brainier.  Carrying electronic and print versions of critical documents is not a bad idea either.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:10:55 AM by Archer »

Offline JPH

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Re: Good First Aid Book for Bug Out Bag?
« Reply #20 on: May 20, 2009, 09:21:21 AM »
http://bookstore.gpo.gov/actions/GetPublication.do?stocknumber=008-070-00810-6

If you have a strong medical background and understand how to read a protocol and then researcher the hows and whys then you can follow this book.

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