Author Topic: Ground turkey gravel  (Read 4515 times)

Offline javabrewer

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Ground turkey gravel
« on: July 22, 2010, 02:46:30 PM »
I preserve lean ground turkey to stay on the shelf and be used for spaghetti, tacos, dips, and other dishes that require ground turkey or beef.  It doesn't work well for burgers but makes a decent meat loaf when used with a little extra egg.  It should be good on the shelf for a year if vacuum sealed or with an oxygen absorber and could stay in the freezer in food saver bags for two to three years, but we usually use it up well before then anyhow.

Here is how I process it:

First I start with extra lean ground turkey, this is 93% lean:



Then I cook it thoroughly until almost dry:





Then I give it a good rinse under HOT water to remove excess fats (you could use boiling water but I haven't found it to be necessary):



Next I toss it in the dehydrator at 135 F for about 12-16 hours, until it is completely dry and crumbly:



When it is done it looks like this:



10 pounds produces about 3 full quarts (I used a little bit for dinner this evening but it would have fit nicely):



I forgot to take a picture of how it looks when reconstituted but basically it looks like freshly browned ground turkey but a little lighter in color.

Offline sdcharger

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Re: Ground turkey gravel
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2010, 10:57:26 AM »
Nice presentation!  +1 for you :)


So do you dry store it in the pantry?

Offline javabrewer

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Re: Ground turkey gravel
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2010, 02:29:41 PM »
Yup, vacuum seal and store it on the shelves.  You can freeze it too, though, and it won't get freezer burn so easily if it's sealed nicely.

Offline sdcharger

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Re: Ground turkey gravel
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2010, 09:01:50 PM »
Thanks for the idea.  Next time that stuff is on sale I'm all over it.

Have you dried pork or beef also?

Offline javabrewer

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Re: Ground turkey gravel
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2010, 08:59:56 PM »
Thanks for the idea.  Next time that stuff is on sale I'm all over it.

Have you dried pork or beef also?

Never done pork but I did do beef for a camping trip.  In that case I wasn't too concerned with the fat content as it would be for a very short term and wouldn't have a chance to go rancid.  And yes, wait for a sale.  This stuff goes for over $5 a pound usually.  I got it on sale for $1.99 for 1.25 pounds and considered it a steal.

Offline CountryRootsCityJob

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Re: Ground turkey gravel
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2010, 02:04:23 PM »
I've done it with burger for camping as well... maybe I didn't let it hydrate long enough, it was still kinda tough.  But it beat not having any red meat!  What is the longest you have stored the turkey and do you store it in mason jars, mylar, or something else?

~CRCJ

Offline Prag

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Re: Ground turkey gravel
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2010, 05:08:25 PM »
Excellent tutorial and a good idea.

Thank you.

I'll be watching the sales paper for a good price on this.  :)

Offline javabrewer

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Re: Ground turkey gravel
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2010, 02:55:20 PM »
I've done it with burger for camping as well... maybe I didn't let it hydrate long enough, it was still kinda tough.  But it beat not having any red meat!  What is the longest you have stored the turkey and do you store it in mason jars, mylar, or something else?

~CRCJ

The longest I've stored it is with this batch, which if I remember right I did around mid-late July.  I've got almost one full quart left over and I used some last week, it was still really good.  Maybe your experience with it being tough was because it was beef.  This turkey rehydrates very well.  I'll usually toss it into a pot with tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, dried peppers, dried zucchini, and various spices and let it cook on low heat for an hour.  Or when I make tacos I'll put a cup in a bowl with 2 parts water and microwave it on high for 3 minutes and let it rest for another 7 or 8 before cooking on the stove top with other taco spices.  It is very close to fresh in taste and texture (but it does not stick well for burgers etc).