Author Topic: Honey for wound care  (Read 45312 times)

Offline Russet

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Honey for wound care
« on: October 12, 2010, 04:48:18 PM »
Split to new topic per HeavyG's suggestion. Original thread: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=15348.0


This is a great thread! Thanks Doc K
 Hope it's ok to post this here. =) Would like to add a link for something any prepper can keep in their bag. Hubby and I are bee-keepers, and we use Manuka honey for wound care. It  pretty much keeps forever and works better than man- made anti-biotics, while helping the wounds heal quicker.It is now being used in surgical bandages especially in 3rd world countries. It's all I use now at home and in my 1st aid kits. Friends who have gone thru surgeries now swear by it as well. Wish we could have OUR bees make this for us, but it only comes from the New Zealand/Australia part of the world.
http://www.manukahoneyusa.com/manuka-honey-research.htm
http://bio.waikato.ac.nz/honey/special.shtml
http://www.manukahoneyusa.com/BurnsWoundsUlcersSores.htm
« Last Edit: October 26, 2010, 04:43:29 PM by Archer »

Offline Lara

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Honey for wound care
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2010, 03:16:40 PM »
Russet-

Here's what the Cochrane Library has to say about honey.  Cochrane reviews current literature and helps us determine the level of evidence, and whether the evidence is strong enough to change what is considered "best practice."  http://www2.cochrane.org/reviews/en/ab005083.html

I believe the reason honey is useful with burns is because bacteria cannot thrive in the high sugar environment.  In traditional Western medicine, Silvadene is often used on burns because bacteria cannot thrive in silver--same type of mechanism. 

In a small study in the European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, the abstract describes the use of a polyethylene glycol and sugar paste that had good results in healing chronically infected abdominal and perineal wounds.  Since I can't read the full text, I can't comment on the reliability of the study itself, but it's promising.  http://www.springerlink.com/content/u77w511108821133/

Thanks for adding those links.  I think if the world changed today, and we had limited access to medical supplies, many of these alternatives would be considered very useful.  Heck, they're useful even without SHTF.  :)

Lara

Offline 1022

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2010, 01:50:15 PM »
I believe honey works in s few ways to kill bacteria. One is osmotic pressure, and the other is that the peroxidases in honey form hydrogen peroxide when they mix with water.

I don't have the reference but I have read research on honey used to kill MRSA.

In my own practice I have used honey to alleviate coughs. It has worked it most cases. Where it has not worked is with intractable coughing, and then only aerosolised morphine was able to stop the coughing.

Offline Koldsteel

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2010, 10:02:44 PM »
I have also read about propolis being effective against MRSA.

Kold

Offline buffalosoldier

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2011, 09:44:04 PM »
Having been used in ethnic poultices for centuries, I buy it... plus, if you consume it, and it is locally grown, there is some evidence that suggests that it helps with allergies.... I am in, getting some this week.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2011, 01:01:43 PM »
I was a veterinary technician for 22 years so of course after I didn't work for one there was a stray cat which showed up that recently had kittens and she had severe mastitis and and had necrotic tissue (and loss) over two huge sections of her mammary system on both sides. Thinking back on it, I think she lost 5 of 8 nipples. I do medieval studies and knew the Romans soldiers used honey for instant energy as well as wound packing, so I thought I would give it a try on this stray cat since I did not want to spend $500 on her.

Debriding the necrotic tissue with hemostadts and then cleaning with diluted Betadine solution, I then did a honey pack over the top of the open, covered with a Kotex pad and then Vetwrapped it.

Although I could have used Pen-G antibiotic on her, I chose not to for a couple reasons. I did not want to kill off the good flora in her system and I also wanted to see what the honey would do on it's own. If things had not improved I would have. But honey I knew had antimicrobial action against a broad spectrum of bacteria and fungus. If it was good enough for those Romans, it ought to be at least good enough for the cat.

I changed the bandage and applied more honey twice a a day. It was slow going as over half the cats mammary system was pretty much GONE, but I could see improvement on it daily. It healed in a matter of 4 weeks. Had it been less severe of a wound and not through so many layers of tissue well into muscle, I know it would have healed alot faster. Since that time I have used honey for packing wounds on horses and goats and did not use any other antibiotics although again, I could have as I always have it on hand in the refrigerator. From my experience, I do believe if there was similar wounds and I could test 'normal medical products' on one and honey on the other, I think the honey treated one would be the one which healed the fastest.

The only human I have used honey on has been me this last week. I had day surgery 14 days ago, then ripped open my suture line open the day after I had the sutures taken out and it totally ripped wide open (which is why I am here on the sofa doing so many posts these last 2 days) and instead of going to get the edges refreshed and resutured, I have chosen not to as I am pretty sure they would just rip out again. So out came the honey and the telfa pads. Since I can't actually see the location very well, I can't see 100% how it is healing, but I know it is healing, it is not infected and what minimal of it I can see is looking pretty good.

So yeah.. I would recommend it. It never goes bad if it is properly cured by the bees (some people harvest too early).. they pulled some out of King Tut's tomb 2,000 years later and it was still edible. So give it a try if you are curious. If you have a small wound, use a Q-tip to apply it, otherwise on a large wound like the cat or horse, you can put it into a 20 cc syringe without a needle and squeeze it in. In the beginning I was just flipping the top on the honey dispenser and squeezing it onto the cat.

Cedar

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2011, 07:24:22 AM »
Just this week I burned my elbow on a hot crockpot in the kitchen.  I thought it was no big deal but it kept stinging so I figured I better put something on it.  I put the manuka honey on it with a band-aid and the next morning, it was all healed up and no pain at all.  I also use it on my dog when he gets skin flare-ups due to his allergies.  It works great for him as well.  I bought two tubes of it.  One for the medicine cabinet and the other is in my bugout bag first aid kit.

Offline welshman

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2011, 09:16:22 AM »
don't know that much about honey for a wound but my grandfather was a firm believer in coal oil (kerosene)on a wound, cut or puncture.Still don't know why it worked

Offline Gadget

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2011, 08:37:17 PM »
Sorry for hijacking the thread, but like Welshman posted, petroleum solvents work great on cuts. WD40 is one of the best due to the smell, but gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, etc. are in the same family. My daughter had a cut on her hand from a wreck that she couldn't keep a dressing on. I had her spray WD40 on it and it stopped bleeding immediately and quit hurting. I use it all the time. By the way, it doesn't sting either.

Offline Robinelli

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2011, 09:38:21 PM »
I'm confused, will ANY honey work for this purpose?

Offline Cedar

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2011, 09:42:42 PM »
I'm confused, will ANY honey work for this purpose?

Yes, but that said, there are some that some people think work better than others... I use (used to) from my own hive, from my friends hive across the counry and run of the mill from Costco.

Cedar

Offline drthumbs

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2011, 12:08:42 PM »
The wound care department at our hospital is using  Medihoney.  It is a patch dressing using Manuka honey.  It is produced by bees servicing the Manuka flower in New Zealand ans is reported to have the best antimicrobial and properties., however, all honey is said to be effective.  The staff at the wound care have told me that they were very impressed with the results

http://www.shoppri.com/store/cosmetics/wound-care/medihoney-2x2-dressings

As far as Honeys use in relieving allergies, I  have first hand knowledge of this.  When I cam back to Texas after the Marine Corps, my allergies were killing me.  My mother gave me a quart of local honey and instructed me to eat at least one table spoon (in food or straight)three time a day till I fished the quart.  It took me about two weeks and with in a week or two I was not having problems any longer.   That  lasted about 2 years and then I did it again and that lasted about 4 years.  I now consume about a pint or so a year of LOCAL honey.  I have not had allergy problems in 10 years.

The key seems to be to source your honey as close to where you live as possible.  I also prefer raw honey.  I have no evidence that it is any better  at all, but it is my prefrence

Offline Robinelli

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2011, 02:14:48 PM »
I've done a lot of reading on this now and I am VERY impressed. Thanks so much for this wonderful topic! I'm in nursing school now working on my BSN (not long and I'll be done) and these topics are my passion. I'm so excited about this and I will definitely try it.

Offline arrowbreaker

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2011, 09:00:17 AM »
Honey is amazing, if I remember correctly the only bacteria that can survive in it is botulism - but everything else will die

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2011, 11:29:04 PM »
Sorry for hijacking the thread, but like Welshman posted, petroleum solvents work great on cuts. WD40 is one of the best due to the smell, but gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, etc. are in the same family. My daughter had a cut on her hand from a wreck that she couldn't keep a dressing on. I had her spray WD40 on it and it stopped bleeding immediately and quit hurting. I use it all the time. By the way, it doesn't sting either.

Umm--I wouldn't recommend using gasoline for any kind of first aid. Modern gasoline has much more vicious chemistry in it than the leaded variety of old. 

I find it burns/blisters my skin on contact, and when it gets into an open cut it hurts worse than Sabre-tooth Crotch Crickets.

I'm brave enough to give WD-40 a fair shot (gonna try it next time I spring a leak) but I'll pass on the BP Super premium.

Which I wouldn't buy anyway.

Offline arrowbreaker

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2011, 11:53:38 PM »
Yeah I seem to remember when we first had our child we were told by people not to let her have honey until she was older because it can contain botulism bacteria.
I think where they got their wires crossed was about the only bacteria that can survive in honey is botulism, but it's gonna be very rare and the pros outweigh the unlikelly cons

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2011, 07:12:25 AM »
Just to mention, the reason honey is so good on wounds is that it contains an enzyme that creates hydrogen peroxide when the honey comes in contact with water.

Slathering it in a wound oxygenates the tissues, and speeds healing as it kills off bad bacteria and fungi.

I read an account of an Alaskan with advanced gangrene who bagged his entire foot in a sack of honey. The foot healed completely in a couple of weeks, without even losing any toes.

In that instance antibiotics were not available, and the only other treatment would have been to lacerate the affected areas with a scalpel to allow more oxygen to perfuse into the tissues.

That's a technique that hasn't been used since WWI.

Had the honey not worked, amputation or death would have been the only remaining alternatives.


Offline archer

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2011, 04:54:50 PM »
Honey is amazing stuff.

Offline RPZ

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2011, 10:58:56 PM »
Is this from where the phrase originated ".... Licking their wounds"?  ???

Offline TexasGirl

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #19 on: December 08, 2011, 12:15:42 AM »
"Will any honey work for this purpose?"

I don't have a handy link, but most likely any enzymes would be destroyed in a pasteurization process.  While the sugar/anti-bacteria affect would be the same in either honey, the peroxide may only develop with raw honey.

FWIW, WD40 may not be ideal to use on humans.  Due to the penetrating effects (like DMSO) any compound or chemical on the skin's surface may be driven deep into tissues.  There was an article many years ago about elderly patients using WD40 with analgesic creams to push the analgesics down into muscles and joints.  As a result, high levels of the chemicals and petroleum distillates from WD40 were found in bloodstreams of WD40 "users."
 
Always be careful when using products other than directed.

~TG   

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2011, 06:38:41 AM »
Good points, TG.

As time goes by, it gets more and more clear that there are a lot of things in out environment that we are simply not evolved to deal with.

(Other than politicians, I mean.)

I've heard of people becoming allergic to "everything", including a few who had to literally take refuge on uninhabited islands in order to survive.

That's called Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) or Environmental Sensitivity, and it is seen in quite a few Gulf War survivors.

Petroleum sensitivity is a major element of MCS.

There is a link to high levels of nitrites (food preservative) in the blood as a triggering mechanism for MCS, which just goes to show that the harmful effects of commercial poison in factory foods are much more widespread and subtle than most people realize.

Offline SaltyHobbit

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2012, 01:35:21 PM »
I received this in an email today and made me think how I had not been on here lately due to school. I thought I would share this and get some feedback.

Honey is the only food on the planet that will not spoil or rot. What it will do is what some call 'turning to sugar'. In reality, honey is always honey. However, when left in a cool dark place for a long time it will "crystallize". When this happens loosen the lid, boil some water and sit the honey container in the hot water, but turn off the heat and let it liquefy naturally. It is then as good as it ever was. Never boil honey or put it in a microwave. This will kill the enzymes in the honey.

Cinnamon and Honey
Bet the drug companies won't like this one getting around. Facts on Honey and Cinnamon:

It is found that a mixture of honey and Cinnamon cures most diseases. Honey is produced in most of the countries of the world. Scientists of today also accept honey as a 'Ram Ban' (very effective) medicine for all kinds of diseases. Honey can be used without side effects for any kind of diseases.
Today's science says that even though honey is sweet, when it is taken in the right dosage as a medicine, it does not harm even diabetic patients. Weekly World News, a magazine in Canada, in its issue dated 17 January,1995 has given the following list of diseases that can be cured by honey and cinnamon, as researched by western scientists:

HEART DISEASES:
Make a paste of honey and cinnamon powder, apply it on bread instead of jelly and jam and eat it regularly for breakfast. It reduces the cholesterol in the arteries and saves the patient from heart attack. Also, those who have already had an attack, when they do this process daily, they are kept miles away from the next attack. Regular use of the above process relieves loss of breath and strengthens the heart beat. In America andCanada, various nursing homes have treated patients successfully and have found that as one ages the arteries and veins lose their flexibility and get clogged; honey and cinnamon revitalize the arteries and the veins.
ARTHRITIS:
Arthritis patients may take daily (morning and night) one cup of hot water with two tablespoons of honey and one small teaspoon of cinnamon powder. When taken regularly even chronic arthritis can be cured. In a recent research conducted at the Copenhagen University, it was found that when the doctors treated their patients with a mixture of one tablespoon Honey and half teaspoon Cinnamon powder before breakfast, they found that within a week (out of the 200 people so treated) practically 73 patients were totally relieved of pain -- and within a month, most all the patients who could not walk or move around because of arthritis now started walking without pain.

BLADDER INFECTIONS:
Take two tablespoons of cinnamon powder and one teaspoon of honey in a glass of lukewarm water and drink it. It destroys the germs in the bladder..

CHOLESTEROL:
Two tablespoons of honey and three teaspoons of Cinnamon Powder mixed in 16 ounces of tea water given to a cholesterol patient was found to reduce the level of cholesterol in the blood by 10 percent within two hours. As mentioned for arthritic patients, when taken three times a day, any chronic cholesterol is cured. According to information received in the said Journal, pure honey taken with food daily relieves complaints of cholesterol.

COLDS:
Those suffering from common or severe colds should take one tablespoon lukewarm honey with 1/4 spoon cinnamon powder daily for three days. This process will cure most chronic cough, cold, and, clear the sinuses.

UPSET STOMACH:
Honey taken with cinnamon powder cures stomach ache and also clears stomach ulcers from its root.

GAS:
According to the studies done in India and Japan, it is revealed that when Honey is taken with cinnamon powder the stomach is relieved of gas.

IMMUNE SYSTEM:
Daily use of honey and cinnamon powder strengthens the immune system and protects the body from bacterial and viral attacks. Scientists have found that honey has various vitamins and iron in large amounts. Constant use of Honey strengthens the white blood corpuscles (where DNA is contained) to fight bacterial and viral diseases.

INDIGESTION:
Cinnamon powder sprinkled on two tablespoons of honey taken before food is eaten relieves acidity and digests the heaviest of meals.

INFLUENZA:
A scientist in Spain has proved that honey contains a natural 'Ingredient' which kills the influenza germs and saves the patient from flu.

LONGEVITY:
Tea made with honey and cinnamon powder, when taken regularly, arrests the ravages of old age. Use four teaspoons of honey, one teaspoon of cinnamon powder, and three cups of water and boil to make a tea. Drink 1/4 cup, three to four times a day. It keeps the skin fresh and soft and arrests old age. Life spans increase and even a 100 year old will start performing the chores of a 20-year-old..

RASPY OR SORE THROAT:

When throat has a tickle or is raspy, take one tablespoon of honey and sip until gone. Repeat every three hours until throat is without symptoms.

PIMPLES:
Three tablespoons of honey and one teaspoon of cinnamon powder paste. Apply this paste on the pimples before sleeping and wash it off the next morning with warm water. When done daily for two weeks, it removes all pimples from the root.

SKIN INFECTIONS:
Applying honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts on the affected parts cures eczema, ringworm and all types of skin infections.

WEIGHT LOSS:
Daily in the morning one half hour before breakfast and on an empty stomach, and at night before sleeping, drink honey and cinnamon powder boiled in one cup of water. When taken regularly, it reduces the weight of even the most obese person. Also, drinking this mixture regularly does not allow the fat to accumulate in the body even though the person may eat a high calorie diet.

CANCER:
Recent research in Japan and Australia has revealed that advanced cancer of the stomach and bones have been cured successfully. Patients suffering from these kinds of cancer should daily take one tablespoon of honey with one teaspoon of cinnamon powder three times a day for one month .

FATIGUE:
Recent studies have shown that the sugar content of honey is more helpful rather than being detrimental to the strength of the body. Senior citizens who take honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts are more alert and flexible. Dr. Milton, who has done research, says that a half tablespoon of honey taken in a glass of water and sprinkled with cinnamon powder, even when the vitality of the body starts to decrease, when taken daily after brushing and in the afternoon at about 3:00 P.M., the vitality of the body increases within a week.

BAD BREATH:
People of South America, gargle with one teaspoon of honey and cinnamon powder mixed in hot water first thing in the morning so their breath stays fresh throughout the day.

HEARING LOSS:
Daily morning and night honey and cinnamon powder, taken in equal parts restores hearing. Remember when we were kids? We had toast with real butter and cinnamon sprinkled on it!

Offline Robinelli

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2012, 07:43:50 PM »
I just wanted to update I have used this TWICE now with quite amazing results (honey>neosporin by a long shot). I will continue to use it.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2012, 08:04:40 PM by Robinelli »

Offline nicole_angel24

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #23 on: March 05, 2012, 06:41:39 AM »
Honey paired with cinnamon also is a powerful remedy. It's been proven to help/cure heart diseases, insect bites, arthritis, bladder infections, toothache, fatigue and acne.Here's a link explaining more http://www.angelfire.com/az/sthurston/

I learned this earlier today and combined with what I've read on this thread I can't wait to add honey to my bug out bag.



Offline cdhm22

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #24 on: March 05, 2012, 10:25:28 AM »
We use honey exclusively for wound care out our house. I tried it after reading a post at the doctor's office about honey being as effective as neosporin. Recently we used honey with minced garlic to help with my son's rash. He has antibiotic ointment that we have been applying for 3 weeks now, and it helps but hasn't gone away, so I thought we'd try some home remedies and see how that works. I definitely think it helped. We also use honey in place of cough syrup, again after reading an article posted at the doctor's office that it is as effective or more effective than cough syrup using the same dosage. I also have an easier time getting our son to take honey over cough syrup. The allergies have also been remedied at our house because of honey, my wife had horrible allergies the first year we moved to Iowa and after taking Zyrtec every day for months tried honey and now doesn't have any problems (3 years later).

Offline Loki

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2012, 05:55:40 PM »
I received this in an email today and made me think how I had not been on here lately due to school. I thought I would share this and get some feedback.

Cinnamon and Honey
Bet the drug companies won't like this one getting around. Facts on Honey and Cinnamon:

It is found that a mixture of honey and Cinnamon cures most diseases. Honey is produced in most of the countries of the world. Scientists of today also accept honey as a 'Ram Ban' (very effective) medicine for all kinds of diseases. Honey can be used without side effects for any kind of diseases.
Today's science says that even though honey is sweet, when it is taken in the right dosage as a medicine, it does not harm even diabetic patients. Weekly World News, a magazine in Canada, in its issue dated 17 January,1995 has given the following list of diseases that can be cured by honey and cinnamon, as researched by western scientists.

I call bullshit. Weekly World News has quite a reputatation for not being the most trustworthy news source on the planet. It's probably best considered satire than a news source. Their claims ranged from germinating the Tree of Knowledge from it's seeds to Saddam Hussein living in a personal nuclear submarine in Lake Michigan. I wouldn't believe a word of that email.

Makes for a good laugh though. ;D

Offline LetMBee

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #26 on: March 14, 2012, 07:11:07 AM »
I have also read about propolis being effective against MRSA.

Kold

I have been using propolis as a topical wound treatment for several years now.  It works well.

Offline technicalanarchy

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2012, 03:14:52 PM »
Wow, I read this thread several months ago, two days ago my idiot self picked up a pan, bare handed, that JUST came out of the oven at 450 degrees.

I ran cold water over the burned fingers 1st, checked it and 1st degree so I'm OK except for the pain. Cold water again and again. That helped until I got dish pan hands. Took it out of the water and I'm OK for about 5 minutes then OWWWWWW. Burns hurt!

So I tried burn cremes and sprays and they all helped for about 5 minutes then intense pain.

So I remembered this thread and we had just gotten some local non-filtered honey. I figured no time like the present to try honey on a burn. So I put it on and took two Aleve as well.

The pain was gone as soon as I put the honey on it! Just as good as the cold water or lidocaine spray on it. Would it hold? The other stuff I tried went away 5 or so minutes? Would the honey? No! It worked great for hours and until the pain finally went away permanently! Sometimes a little pain would creep back in and I'd rub the honey lightly to that area and the pain would go away. I did not cover the burn and ended up getting honey everywhere so cover the burn,

The only side effect from honey is it doesn't make the wife happy to have honey all over everything.

NIH even says honey is good for burns!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20484914

Offline archer

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #28 on: March 23, 2012, 03:16:51 PM »
as a hobbyist bee-keeper, i can attest that honey has legs of it's own and ends up all over the place...
i''m glad to hear that honey helped with your burn...

Offline Nationalist Girl

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Re: Honey for wound care
« Reply #29 on: April 12, 2012, 02:52:51 PM »
I watched the documentary 'The Beautiful Truth' the other day and it mentioned crushed garlic mixed with honey to get rid of foot fungal infections. Thanks to everyone for all of the great info.