Author Topic: yurt platform/land pics  (Read 90213 times)

Offline MaddoginMass

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #30 on: December 11, 2010, 05:45:52 AM »
Thanks for the pics.  I think I just found the structure to put up on my BOL when I buy it........

Offline d0j0w0

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #31 on: December 11, 2010, 03:43:15 PM »
Love the yurt,  For the floor insulation, could you use plastic as a vapor barrier covered with chicken wire or rabbit wire to keep the mice out?

Offline fratermus

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #32 on: December 13, 2010, 08:08:35 PM »
at some point possibly .. You have to put plywood underneath so mice won't get into the insulation

If you get enough of 'em in there they probably will increase the R-value.  :-)

Offline akdentist

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #33 on: December 30, 2010, 05:44:29 PM »
We set up a 16' yurt in 2002 when we bought some raw land.  Stayed in it on weekends for several years until our house was built.



We like the whole idea so much that we had our home designed based on a yurt.


The round design is great for airflow and with the open interior, it feels huge. 

We still use the yurt as a guest house in the summers.  I don't think it would make a good long term home, but I know of people who do live in them, but in our climate, it would not work out so well.  Ours was made in Homer, AK by
http://www.nomadshelter.com/
The 16' model takes about 4 hours to take down or set up and fits in a pickup truck bed.  As a temporary home, it is a great idea and you could plant one on a level piece of ground with a canvas tarp as a floor.  Much better idea than a tent and you could carry it into places that you could not get an RV or travel trailer.




Offline archer

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #34 on: December 30, 2010, 07:07:13 PM »
Vert cool AKdentist, I'd love to hear more of your experiences living in a yurt. And I like your perm house design. What is that like to live in?

Offline TOWcritter

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #35 on: January 02, 2011, 07:34:03 AM »
I really have to check these out a bit more intensely.  Great pics.  Keep them coming,.

Offline akdentist

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #36 on: January 02, 2011, 10:36:14 AM »
I really have to check these out a bit more intensely.  Great pics.  Keep them coming,.

Are you wanting photos of the yurt or the home?  Our home was built in Canada from http://mandalahomes.com/ and there are many photos on their website that show different variations on the "yurt" platform.  The engineering principle of beams held by a center hub and a cable on the circumference is common to both the yurt and the Mandala.  Back when we bought our home, the exchange rate was very favorable - not so much anymore.

Cheers.

Offline archer

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #37 on: January 02, 2011, 02:15:27 PM »
Are you wanting photos of the yurt or the home?  Our home was built in Canada from http://mandalahomes.com/ and there are many photos on their website that show different variations on the "yurt" platform.  The engineering principle of beams held by a center hub and a cable on the circumference is common to both the yurt and the Mandala.  Back when we bought our home, the exchange rate was very favorable - not so much anymore.

Cheers.
thanks for the link (i think), something new to drool/dream over.

Offline UA8

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #38 on: January 03, 2011, 01:20:42 PM »
I realize that it make take away some of the quick tear down and go appeal that it currently has but I would say the ideal way to go for insulation would be the blue spray foam in between your joists. It's self adhering and I doubt mice would have any interest in it.  In addition it would seal any air leakage through the floor.  Also it would be quick to apply get a crew in there it would be done in a few hours. I'm not even sure you would have to cover it.  Some more research might be required though.

Offline Dadgumit

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #39 on: February 05, 2011, 11:08:59 PM »
I want to insulate the floor. The boards underneath are 2x6 with about 14-15 inches between them. I am looking for recommendations one what type of plywood to use underneath to hold the insulation and create a sandwich of insulation ..



First, AWESOME pics. Very inspiring.

Don't know if anyone has mentioned this (and I am by no means an expert), but I have heard it is bad to use batting as insulation on wooden floors. Something about condensation forming on the wood and it rotting. Perhaps someone here knows more. If I recall correctly, one good solution is spray on insulation as it connects with the wood and leaves no room for condensate.

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #40 on: February 06, 2011, 08:21:04 AM »

First, AWESOME pics. Very inspiring.

Don't know if anyone has mentioned this (and I am by no means an expert), but I have heard it is bad to use batting as insulation on wooden floors. Something about condensation forming on the wood and it rotting. Perhaps someone here knows more. If I recall correctly, one good solution is spray on insulation as it connects with the wood and leaves no room for condensate.

 Does it matter if it's not always heated ? I'm pretty much finished installing the insulation ..

Offline mobilus

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #41 on: February 06, 2011, 11:18:46 AM »
http://www.cracktwo.com/2011/01/woman-built-rocket-mass-heater.html

This site has a bunch of photos of a rocket mass heater under a yurt floor.  It leaves a lot of questions unanswered, since there is no commentary.  But if a picture is worth a thousand words, this site is worth about 60K of them.  Take a look and gather what you will from the pictures.  There are some good ideas for those with yurt ambitions. 

Congrats on your yurt, surfivor!

 

Offline Dadgumit

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #42 on: February 06, 2011, 03:38:51 PM »
Does it matter if it's not always heated ? I'm pretty much finished installing the insulation ..

yeah, i have no idea man... I would suppose that would depend on how often it is heated... maybe humidity isn't a problem in your area like it is mine.

That being said, talking to my father in law, there are a ton of people who do use the batting around here so probably not that big of a deal.


Offline Tactical Hippie

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #43 on: February 06, 2011, 03:54:31 PM »
http://www.cracktwo.com/2011/01/woman-built-rocket-mass-heater.html

This site has a bunch of photos of a rocket mass heater under a yurt floor.  It leaves a lot of questions unanswered, since there is no commentary.  But if a picture is worth a thousand words, this site is worth about 60K of them.  Take a look and gather what you will from the pictures.  There are some good ideas for those with yurt ambitions. 

Congrats on your yurt, surfivor!

 
Looking through those pics I never say a connection to the in-floor vent pipes to the actual heater.  The vet stack runs up into the yurt and they have a cover over it.? 

I must have missed something...lol  ???

Offline mobilus

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #44 on: February 06, 2011, 06:54:41 PM »
TH, here's a picture I got off of www.richsoil.com and modified it a little to show how the exhaust is tied into the exhaust ducting.  And there's a lot more about it: http://www.richsoil.com/rocket-stove-mass-heater.jsp

I'm experimenting with a rocket heater now...

Offline Tactical Hippie

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #45 on: February 06, 2011, 07:05:26 PM »
TH, here's a picture I got off of www.richsoil.com and modified it a little to show how the exhaust is tied into the exhaust ducting.  And there's a lot more about it: http://www.richsoil.com/rocket-stove-mass-heater.jsp

I'm experimenting with a rocket heater now...

Mobilus nice link!  Thanks!!  ;)

Offline mobilus

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #46 on: February 06, 2011, 07:36:49 PM »


I can't believe I forgot to add the picture i modified...but here it is.

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #47 on: February 07, 2011, 06:21:13 AM »

 The yurt is just heated with a wood stove. I also have a portable kerosene heater. For some reason if I run the stove and heater together and it starts to warm up, I can start to smell kerosene or something.

 There is no radiant floor heat or anything like that ..

Offline hillclimber

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #48 on: February 07, 2011, 02:23:13 PM »
Add a little vanilla extract to that kerosene. Takes much of the odor away ;)

Make sure you crack a vent a little. After a while you won't smell the kerosene as bad.

Offline EarthbagDude

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #49 on: July 14, 2011, 01:08:56 PM »
I didn't read all of the comments, so I hope you haven't already answered this...But roughly how much did you spend to construct it?
It looks like it's 3-400 sq ft is that right?
Also, where are you located?

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #50 on: July 15, 2011, 02:32:19 AM »
I didn't read all of the comments, so I hope you haven't already answered this...But roughly how much did you spend to construct it?
It looks like it's 3-400 sq ft is that right?
Also, where are you located?

 The yurt is in Maine where there can be 3-4 of snow. It is about 310 square feet. I think it ended up being close to 16k for all the construction costs. (not including stuff like the wood stove which I bought used and installed or the insulation under the floor which I also did). That cost includes the platform it sits on which was 1k in materials and close to 1k to pay a contractor to build. The canvass type roof is guaranteed to last 15 years and I forget what they told me a new roof will cost, the canvass type wall will last 10 years. I think I had figured the cost to replace those after the 15 years will be around 2k or 3k.

 It has a kind of reflective insulation on the walls. Using the wood stove plus a portable kerosene heater, I think I can raise the temperature inside the yurt 40 degrees or so from the outside temperature. I bought a small Jotul wood stove which is not very big. In the summer you can remove
some of the insulation panels to open windows, and it has a couple of large 8 foot windows so that it can start to almost become part screen house in the summer .. but you have to get on a ladder and if it rains, a little water comes in through the window.

 The yurt was kind of a novelty, what I did like about it is that the whole thing arrived pulled in a utility trailer with a small truck. If I ever bought land in a different part of Maine or anyplace really, the yurt might be easier to move than a cabin. Though it would still take work to move it. Potentially the yurt could also be sold separately if I ever wanted to sell the land or move someplace else.

 It took a contractor 2 days to build the platform and the yurt went up in one day once the yurt company assembled all the materials at their shop. It did seem it needed a little bit of expert skills for them to put the yurt up. It is based on a Colorado yurt company yurt. The canvass wall and roof are made by Colorado yurt company. The yurt company (White Mountain Yurts in Wakefield NH) basically builds the lattice wall and rafters in their shop and orders the canvas from Colorado yurts. They are a small company run by one guy and his nephews on the side. It seems his business is doing well and he has been very busy putting up yurts everywhere in New England from what I hear.

 Also, in regard to spending money or borrowing money to build stuff on your BOL. I regard my yurt as sort of my second home or a place that I live or may potentially live even though it is a 3.5 to 4 hour drive there (200+ miles). I own a small 500 square foot condo which I could refer to as my base camp rather than my home. I paid about 50k for that in 2000 and still owe money, but my mortgage payment is about $375 a month right now. It is a place to live in an area that has a hi tech job market, but I am not %100 satisfied with living there in many ways. I have no yard and no porch and one large window that is about 10 x 4 and that is it. I spend alot of time at my friends house and my mother's house or away at the yurt when I can.  For many years my truck camper was my second home and I spent alot of time in my camper that way.  I have always felt a need for 4 vacations a year, typically a week to 10 days for each - one for each season (spring,summer,fall,winter) for some reason that seems to help keep my stress at acceptable levels. Having the yurt can potentially fulfill that need and more (such as between jobs) without having to drive very far or spend extra money on accommodations and travel costs. The truck camper is not really that great for winter vacations in New England, so I often had to drive the camper to North Carolina or fly someplace in the winter. The yurt seems suitable for a 10 day winter vacation though it can be a little cold there as well, but I used to get a little bummed out contemplating winter vacations in the little popup camper. One trick is doing the vacation either in December or March when it is a little warmer than January of February

Those are some of my considerations when people may say it's ok to borrow money to buy a "home" but other types of debt are highly questionable .. because what is a home really ?





« Last Edit: July 15, 2011, 03:31:49 AM by surfivor »

Offline survival_food

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #51 on: July 15, 2011, 01:33:04 PM »
I have to show this thread to my husband -- he's a huge fan of the yurt concept. Some of these look amazing -- thanks for all the pics.

Offline YoungPrepper

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #52 on: August 31, 2011, 09:06:03 AM »
I am so glad that I found this post. My husband and I have been considering purchasing a three yurts to have as our permanent home. We live in Maine also. We seem to have settled on a the plan of building a garage with a basement and a flat platform for a roof, and having the three yurts attached to the top of the garage. We want to use a 30' yurt for all the common rooms(living room, kitchen, 1/2 bath, pantry, and laundry room) and use each 16' yurt for a bedroom with private bath.

Offline suzysurvivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #53 on: April 18, 2012, 10:11:44 PM »
any updates from yurt livers???   We are 75% decided on a yurt and would love to hear others' experiences and advice...especially from surfivor as he has already lived our dream...a yurt in rural Maine.


Offline donhutch

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #54 on: May 11, 2012, 09:12:10 PM »
Awesome post. My wife and I live in Penobscot county. We are looking to buy some rural acreage and putting up a yurt to live in while we save up to build our house. Right now I am waiting for the library to get The Complete Yurt Handbook from interlibrary loan then I am hoping to start building the walls for the yurt soon after. I would like to have most of it ready by the time we buy the property and then i can build the platform and have it set up before snowfall maybe even before my lease is up in August!

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #55 on: May 14, 2012, 02:22:39 AM »
 
 The yurt thing seems to have pluses and minuses. What appealed to me about the yurt is the portability. It is easier to move than a bigger structure. There is also some factor of the novelty of such a thing.

 Any kind of structure has some maintenance involved. The yurt canvas needs replacement after 10-15 years is my understanding.

 My particular yurt is a little shy on insulation. I have a kind of bubble insulation which does a decent job (and wasn't cheap), but when the outside temperature is 10 below zero, the inside of the yurt is not as toasty as some other people's structures by any means. I also have a pretty small wood stove. However, when the coldest winter temps hit, I am less likely to want to head up there unless I am really gung ho on getting out of suburbia, which is certainly a likely possibility at times.

 All that is fine for now and if I had to I could easily live there comfortably from late winter to early winter (mid march - mid december) or improve my current set up as far as warmth. In reality I have always felt a need for a place to vacation any time of year. A place where I can spend a week to 10 days. With the current economy, I am no longer comfortable with much Air travel and crossing alot of borders and will likely vacation closer to home at the yurt. I do sometimes need a winter vacation, and with my current setup I would probably do that either early or late winter when the temps tend to moderate and avoid mid January and February for those week long excursions.






Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #56 on: May 14, 2012, 04:37:28 AM »

 A little more on what I said .. My wood stove is kind of small. I have seen bigger ones that put out alot more heat probably or you can use propane also.

 I think there is some better insulation options, but I never really looked into it. The bubble wrap is fairly portable and lightweight type of insulation. I am happy with it for now based on my needs with the yurt as a camp/getaway.

 When the sun hits the thing, it can also get a little hot in there in the summer during the day. I have some large windows that I can open, but I still have no electric and no fans of any kind. When it gets too hot and  I want to have a nap in the afternoon, I just have a small tent or screen house that I can set up somewhere in the shade.

 My yurt is elevated several feet off the ground and I insulated the platform floor myself. It cost my about $1000 in wood and $1000 in labor to put up the platform for a 20 foot yurt which is about 310 square feet. I installed the wood stove and stove pipe myself.

I was onsite during the entire yurt construction and learned a little bit from that. The platform was constructed in 2 days and the yurt upon delivery went up in a day.

 I think I am actually comfortable with the idea of a one week winter stay up there until about the first week in January. The coldest weather seems to be from mid January to the end of February. I would go up there for a weekend during that time, but with my current set up, I would probably shy away from staying there for a full week during those coldest times if possible.

 We also get alot of snow and I made sure that my rafters are extra heavy duty, I have a snow load kit and even a center support which I did myself.


Offline Vulcan

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #57 on: May 14, 2012, 12:38:39 PM »
Awesome topic! Definitely something to look at for a potential temp. shelter at a BOL.

Offline suzysurvivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #58 on: May 21, 2012, 08:26:41 PM »
thanks, surf,  for updating us.  I am just waiting for clearance on the land to start putting our yurt plan in motion.  We would use our yurt much as you use yours...long weekends and vacations in all but the coldest, snowiest part of winter.   I am planning to 'extra insulate' the yurt much as a medieval castle--rugs on the floors, fabrics on the walls for extra layers, lots of blankets and throws for keeping warm at night.  I will remember to look for a bigger woodstove...it will be our cooktop as well so it needs to be a moderate size.   

Do you have electricity yet?  We would like to do solar...we don't even want the 'powers' to know our lil place exists.  I don't want electric lines, etc on the land. 

We will also keep camping gear there for warm weather like you said and for family members who come up as well.

ANy other yurt dirt will be great appreciated. :)

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #59 on: May 23, 2012, 09:22:14 PM »
thanks, surf,  for updating us.  I am just waiting for clearance on the land to start putting our yurt plan in motion.  We would use our yurt much as you use yours...long weekends and vacations in all but the coldest, snowiest part of winter.   I am planning to 'extra insulate' the yurt much as a medieval castle--rugs on the floors, fabrics on the walls for extra layers, lots of blankets and throws for keeping warm at night.  I will remember to look for a bigger woodstove...it will be our cooktop as well so it needs to be a moderate size.   

Do you have electricity yet?  We would like to do solar...we don't even want the 'powers' to know our lil place exists.  I don't want electric lines, etc on the land. 

We will also keep camping gear there for warm weather like you said and for family members who come up as well.

ANy other yurt dirt will be great appreciated. :)

 Hi Suzy,

 I had some guys put a suitable cedar log in the ground standing up for the electric line and it was approved by the power company, but I never put the electric in. It would cost me $8/month regardless if I used any electricity.

 I use petzl head lamps which are hands free lighting as they go on your head. These can't be beat for all kinds of uses and they never break. They are the best head lamps you can find. The cheaper models are like $20 and work well. I also use a cheap oil lamp that I got from Reny's.

 The bubble insulation also is a metalic reflector that reflects heat waves.