Author Topic: yurt platform/land pics  (Read 90052 times)

Offline hillclimber

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #60 on: May 24, 2012, 03:07:56 AM »
Reny's, yeah  ;)
I bet it was the three story Reny's in Farmington too. LOL 8)

Offline suzysurvivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #61 on: May 24, 2012, 09:57:18 AM »
i'm gonna HAVE to go to Reny's next time i'm up there.

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #62 on: May 26, 2012, 09:09:54 AM »

 I have been all over the state of maine. I think you can get an oil lamp for $8. There is a Reny's in wells, bridgton, topsham, bath, madison, farmington and other places. Those are the ones I am familiar with or have been to. A complete map here:

http://www.renys.com/renysmap.html

Petzl headlamps can be found at kittery trading post or places like that .. They rule ..

Offline Jeremiah J

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #63 on: June 09, 2012, 05:28:52 PM »
Here is one that my wife and I built using cedar logs. The building is at least 10-15 years old now. The technique is referred to as cordwood building.
There is actually an air gap between the inner and outer walls. Some folks fill it with insulation. Some use sawdust with lime mixed in to retard bugs.

The roof was the fun part. We started with a phone pole in the center and built it to that. When the roof was complete, we just cut the pole away. :)








Offline archer

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #64 on: June 09, 2012, 10:16:31 PM »
cool !!!

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #65 on: June 10, 2012, 07:11:18 AM »
Here is one that my wife and I built using cedar logs. The building is at least 10-15 years old now. The technique is referred to as cordwood building.
There is actually an air gap between the inner and outer walls. Some folks fill it with insulation. Some use sawdust with lime mixed in to retard bugs.

The roof was the fun part. We started with a phone pole in the center and built it to that. When the roof was complete, we just cut the pole away. :)

cool.  I like it.  I am guessing you are in the southwest somewhere?  that scenery looks awfully familiar to this Utah gal.  :)  I love how it blends into the scenery.  totally matches!

oh, and I would love to see pictures of the inside!

Offline Jeremiah J

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #66 on: June 10, 2012, 02:26:39 PM »
cool.  I like it.  I am guessing you are in the southwest somewhere?  that scenery looks awfully familiar to this Utah gal.  :)  I love how it blends into the scenery.  totally matches!

oh, and I would love to see pictures of the inside!
Thank you, both.
We are in Northern AZ.
This building has been being used as storage for a number of years. We have finally gotten the time to straighten it up, and weed it out. It's slowly becoming our workshop. I'll be doing welding, wood working and general tinkering. The wife will get a bench set up for her jewelry making possibly this week.
We just got done hanging cabinets, and sorting mountains of misc screws, nuts, bolts and the likes into cans. I'll try to get some pics of the interior up soon.

Offline flippydidit

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #67 on: October 12, 2012, 02:19:33 AM »
Great yurt Surfvivor!

They look cool, but I imagine they would include much suffering if set up where I live in Florida.  For anyone considering the insulation, I strongly recommend closed cell spray foam.  It is a water vapor barrier, radiant heat barrier, noise reducer, and makes your construction more rigid once set.  If one were to apply double sided mirror plastic to the wood first, then apply the foam, you could get quite a high R-value out of very little material.  Check this site out:

http://www.mirrorsheeting.com/

I'd imagine if you were to use hardware cloth or "chicken wire" it could become very strong.  I really like the spray on foam since it really does a great job insulating and also keeps rodents out.  You can find DIY kits and cans for locations you don't want a contractor at.  Just an additional reminder to go for the "closed cell" foam.  The "open cell" foam is cheaper, but it allows moisture to accumulate and for mold to grow.  The "open cell" is also much more spongy and doesn't do much to add solidity to the structure.

Offline offbeatbassist

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #68 on: October 21, 2012, 07:05:46 PM »
I didn't read all of the comments, so I hope you haven't already answered this...But roughly how much did you spend to construct it?
It looks like it's 3-400 sq ft is that right?
Also, where are you located?

I havent finished reading all of the replies since #49 but I thought I would mention another yurt made mostly without the kit.. I think this yurt only has the dome, canvas roof, and canvas wall.. Everything else we constructed with other materials.

 hutchsteaders---->   http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=38025

for some reason this url takes me to partway down the page.. more pictures at the top..

edit: archer: corrected url to go to the top
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 08:23:34 AM by Archer »

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #69 on: October 25, 2012, 01:16:00 PM »
I havent finished reading all of the replies since #49 but I thought I would mention another yurt made mostly without the kit.. I think this yurt only has the dome, canvas roof, and canvas wall.. Everything else we constructed with other materials.

 hutchsteaders---->   http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=38025

for some reason this url takes me to partway down the page.. more pictures at the top..

edit: archer: corrected url to go to the top

 Hi, yes I recognize the canvass as the colorado yurt material exactly like mine practically even same colors.

 Your lattice is held together with plastic ties ?

 That looks like alot of work anyway and pretty crafty. I have extra heavy rafters and snow supports as well as a deadman in the middle just to be extra safe.
 The deadman is basd on this idea and spans the ceiling hole:



 Do you have a big enough woodstove ? If you are not going to be there all the time, you might want improved supports for snow loads. What is holding those two sticks in place that go up to the ceiling ?
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 01:25:21 PM by surfivor »

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #70 on: October 25, 2012, 02:18:37 PM »
snow kit has vertical side supports that look like this on the inside and connect the rafter to the floor directly:

Offline offbeatbassist

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #71 on: October 26, 2012, 02:27:45 PM »
The yurt actually belongs to my brother - donhutch posted earlier on this string mentioning he lived in Penobscot county and was hoping to buy some acreage. They are living in the yurt now. I believe he intends to put in some uprights similar to those in the picture you posted. The lattice in the wall is zip ties - he drilled each tree 10 times and connected each x section with 2 hd zip ties. The wood stove isnt particularly large, but i think they got it for free, so it works for now. I dont know if theyll look for a larger one or not. Those 2 center supports are just wedged into place. I dont think those will remain there. I know he has other improvements on the yurt that he intends to do, but I should let him share it.

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #72 on: October 27, 2012, 02:26:41 AM »
The yurt actually belongs to my brother - donhutch posted earlier on this string mentioning he lived in Penobscot county and was hoping to buy some acreage. They are living in the yurt now. I believe he intends to put in some uprights similar to those in the picture you posted. The lattice in the wall is zip ties - he drilled each tree 10 times and connected each x section with 2 hd zip ties. The wood stove isnt particularly large, but i think they got it for free, so it works for now. I dont know if theyll look for a larger one or not. Those 2 center supports are just wedged into place. I dont think those will remain there. I know he has other improvements on the yurt that he intends to do, but I should let him share it.

 my wood stove is even smaller, but I tend to not go up so much when it gets below zero or really cold for long periods ..

 I am really curious how the rafters are connected to the center ring. I didn't see that in the pictures ..

 What kind of wood was used for the rafters and lattice ?

 He should post some pictures of how the stove pipe is supported on the outside ..

 I also wonder how he solved the problem of building the frame just right so that the canvass would fit. The lattice wall height seems variable depending on how the poles might settle and all and the angle and length of the rafters seems also a bit complex. Even though I contracted most of the work, I did study yurt construction from some books and contemplated the challenges involved. Some people who work in construction probably have advantages that I don't. Yurts are interesting in that they are lightweight and much different than a house or cabin and require less wood etc.

 I'd be curious to see how the lattice wall is connected to the bender board at the bottom.


 The other interesting thing about yurts is the portability. A yurt that is say 12 feet in diameter would be about 113 square feet.
Something like that could be set up on some land temporarily for a season and easily moved on small trailer. I could see spending a summer in Alaska, or a winter down south etc. Yurt lattice walls are also very strong and supposedly are not easy for a bear to break into. I wouldn't store food in one, but it might be a little peace of mind for camping out in Alaska say ..






« Last Edit: October 27, 2012, 03:01:22 AM by surfivor »

Offline JustGreg

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #73 on: April 14, 2013, 10:35:53 PM »
I think the pics are so helpful, that even sans text/explanation, its practically a 50$ or even 100$ class all by itself.

The only "mistake" I saw was no backsplash next to the tub.  The yurt/gher houses I've been in almost always have a moisture problem.

G.

Offline offbeatbassist

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #74 on: May 03, 2013, 10:14:46 PM »

 I am really curious how the rafters are connected to the center ring. I didn't see that in the pictures ..

 What kind of wood was used for the rafters and lattice ?

 He should post some pictures of how the stove pipe is supported on the outside ..

 I also wonder how he solved the problem of building the frame just right so that the canvass would fit. The lattice wall height seems variable depending on how the poles might settle and all and the angle and length of the rafters seems also a bit complex. Even though I contracted most of the work, I did study yurt construction from some books and contemplated the challenges involved. Some people who work in construction probably have advantages that I don't. Yurts are interesting in that they are lightweight and much different than a house or cabin and require less wood etc.

 I'd be curious to see how the lattice wall is connected to the bender board at the bottom.


 The other interesting thing about yurts is the portability. A yurt that is say 12 feet in diameter would be about 113 square feet.
Something like that could be set up on some land temporarily for a season and easily moved on small trailer. I could see spending a summer in Alaska, or a winter down south etc. Yurt lattice walls are also very strong and supposedly are not easy for a bear to break into. I wouldn't store food in one, but it might be a little peace of mind for camping out in Alaska say ..

The rafters we shaved down with a draw knife to fit holes he drilled into the dome support ring. Unfortunately, he drilled them by sight so the angles were all off. As we were putting the rafters in, the ring was pivotting, and because we were trying to keep the ring level, the ring was starting to get stressed. After putting it up for the 3rd time ( we had it resting on a 12' ladder until we had enough rafters up (it actually lifted it off the ladder as we put in more rafters). Finally we realized the holes were cut off angle and once we allowed the ring to pivot slightly it all went up pretty quick and easy. We also had the ends cut to form a 'u' to sit on the cord, but in between tries in getting the dome ring in place, we had to trim the length slightly and adjust the 'u' so that one side angled out at 45 degrees, allowing us to slide the rafters down onto the cord with the weight of the rafter and ring keeping it from popping up off the cord.

   Im not sure specifically of what type of wood he was using for the lattice and rafters. He picked them all off his land, I know that much. I know there were several types especially in the rafters. I think there were small maples and birch. The rafters were about 3" at the base, and the lattice was 1" I think. The lattice initially wasnt connected to the base or bender board at all, but he ended up attaching some blocks to the floor and screwing the lattice in place because the base of the lattice was creeping in a little bit.

   I dont recall what he did with the stove pipe, but I do know he upgraded his stove mid-winter. It was too small and had an air-tight (?) stove given to him. It was a bit bigger and more efficient. Ill mention to him about getting some pictures up of those things specifically. They didn't have electricity run out so they have to run into town for internet.

   As for the portability, I dont think his is very portable. Even if it were capable of being moved, I dont think he would want to. As for how he got the size right, we were doing math the entire time of building it, not to mention the 6 months of planning he put on paper and building the lattice before he started actually building.

What I have determined is that I have too much stuff to live in a yurt. At least the more traditional sizes - 16', 20', 24'... We are apartment hunting right now and 800 sq ft is too small (which I think is about the size of his, but I could be mistaken- 24' yurt?). If I were to get/build a yurt I would either contract it out or just get a kit.

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #75 on: July 29, 2013, 08:47:31 AM »
 I finally sold my condo and bought a canon digital camera. Here is a mini video tour of my yurt on u-tube.
It was a hot day, so I have all the windows open (screened). I have no electricity there, but recently bought a small battery powered fan that uses 8 D batteries as we have had some bad hot weather:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tFaRvIYsno&feature=youtu.be

 Ground nuts on my land up there seem to be spreading and doing well

Offline Cedar

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #76 on: July 29, 2013, 09:12:09 AM »
Do you get mouse issues in the yurt? Looks pretty open-ish. Nice looking property and sharp sounding guitar.

Cedar

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #77 on: July 29, 2013, 09:26:42 AM »
Do you get mouse issues in the yurt? Looks pretty open-ish. Nice looking property and sharp sounding guitar.

Cedar

 Thanks, I'll post some videos of me playing my flying V guitar some time on my u tube. I trapped some mice last year in the fall. I used some poisin, some regular mouse traps and I have a tin cat as well. All of that stuff is set up again for this fall. That was the first time it was ever an issue, the year before it wasn't. After I caught or poisened about 6 mice I didn't see any more through the winter. It had to be dealt with or they would be destroying stuff building nests

Offline chuck_3

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #78 on: July 29, 2013, 01:08:49 PM »
I am always leery of poisons.  Have you tried glue traps?  They are good with mice, but not so much with rats.  They also work well on spiders and other small pests.  They are also cleaner on mice in my experience.  I just leave them flat.  A friend ties his down with a tack or a nail when he uses them since a rat got into one of his one time and he had to find the trap and clean up the stuff the trap, rat and glue had adhered to. 

Offline PalmettoPrepper

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #79 on: May 21, 2014, 11:50:24 AM »
Looks like you did a great job!

Offline Knecht

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #80 on: July 03, 2014, 05:45:24 AM »
Hey, fellow yurter! Nice yurt. I'm in the middle of making one for myself.

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #81 on: November 08, 2015, 01:09:10 AM »
This is a picture of one of the supports holding up the yurt to get an idea what these look like. They are just sitting on the ground. The picture is taken through wire mesh (hardware cloth) that surround the yurt to keep animals from living under the platform:



As you can see from this picture, the yurt is not on level ground. These structures holding up the yurt are no longer 100%
straight vertical. You can see from the eye that there is an ever so slight angle to a few of these supports towards the downhill. Other still seem straight however. It can get very muddy in here in the spring, though more to the left where the driveway area is. I am going to have my neighbor look at it to see what he thinks. I am thinking I might have to get some kind of a jack to straighten some of these out at some point. It doesn't seem to bad currently, but it might be good for my piece of mind. The platform was built 5 years ago by a contractor. He indicated that the circular shape of the platform has extra strength



Also, there is black plastic sheets around much of the uphill side and on the side where the picture is which you can plainly see. I put it there to kill of Japanese Knotweed because it was growing there. The site was a landfill at one time and that is why it was growing there probably. However, I may leave the plastic sheets because I read someplace that things of this sort can help reduce the risk of frost heaves in the ground which can disrupt structures. There is no plastic on the opposite side or on the downhill side

 The slant actually may look worse in the picture, I am not sure if this is part of an optical illusion because when I was looking at them last Halloween, it didn't seem so bad.

 could I just use a car jack and a board on the ground shimmied to be close to level to jack up parts of the structure and try to straighten out the supports ? 

Edit:

 I feel a little more worried thinking about it now, I tend to be a worrier at times .. There is not a ton of weight or heavy furniture in the yurt but if it concerns me if the supports are not perfectly straight and I feel I should do something about it soon. Hopefully I can do it by myself with a jack which seems doable

 I am also concerned about long term because I was looking at sites about decks which have similar issues and with the ground shifting it seems like it could keep happening and does it reach a point where it starts to have other problems because things have shifted alot from the original places where the supports where ?

This web site for instance mentions that for decks if too much shifting happens, eventually the deck may need to be replaced:
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/jack-up-deck-36641.html

 The yurt platform is kind of like a giant deck



« Last Edit: November 08, 2015, 01:33:55 AM by surfivor »

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #82 on: November 08, 2015, 01:59:33 AM »
 Maybe I should try to add additional supports instead of just trying to raise the deck up and adjust the supports that are currently there. Moving the supports that are there means they will want to resettle again and I am in effect destabilizing the existing supports. Having extra supports might be a good idea since the ground is slanted as well. I would have to buy a bunch more footings at home depot or someplace along with pressure treated wood and head up there next weekend or around thanksgiving. I also need to figure out with nearly 100% certainty how to I cut the wood with a cross cut saw so they are perfectly square. I think I just use a square and pencil a line. I think they also sell plastic things that make it easy.

Digging into the ground could be problematic though is a possibility for some parts. I have been having a problem with my knee so that moving alot of concrete could also be a problem. Carrying alot of heavy weight effects my knee. Maybe I should consider hiring someone to install a few below the ground supports in a few places ? The downhill side has more room to get in there and work. Even if there was just a few more stable supports would that have the effect of stabilizing the platform better for the longterm ?

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #83 on: November 08, 2015, 07:20:21 AM »

 I think what I would do is get several more concrete footings and wooden supports. I would measure the best I could the length of support I need for any particular section. Then I would jack up that area with a car jack and try to fit in in there. If it ended up being a bit loose I would use thin boards to shim it on the bottom or top. I would bring 1/2" and 1/4" thick boards to use as shims.

Offline Knecht

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #84 on: November 09, 2015, 07:11:17 PM »
Good luck.
I'm currently trying to fight the condensation problem in our yurt. Other than that, it's a great place to live.

Offline spud

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #85 on: November 16, 2015, 09:34:39 PM »
There are a  couple of thought processes with how your deck is supported.  The two are, first is the supports close enough together to keep your joist from sagging and second, are your post stationary enough and how are they handling frost heave. 

You should be able to find some tables from deck building that states the proper floor joist for the spans that you have. Another way would be pull a string along side of the bottom of  your furthest span without touching it and putting weight on it and measuring the deflection of it.  You would need to determine what a reasonable maximum weight it would likely encounter and put that on there.  With your bad knee(bummer), this doesn't sound like a great option for ya. 

Second, your post where just set on the ground, bummer, kind of a poor practice and it is pretty easy to make holes for your posts when you're building the darn thing. Just setting them on the ground might be OK if ya really level ground that drains nicely. It's best to have post below frost line to stop any heaving.  Having a yurt like yours is pretty cool cause a little frost heave here and there won't likely hurt a darn thing except make the door stick if it's heaving in that area.  There are many opinions on how to back fill posts, from using concrete, gravel, sand, gravel and concrete, you name it, it's out there. If it were me, I would have put post pretty deep in ground and back filled with gravel and maybe brace some posts with some posts angled at a 45, if ya know what I mean.  Every site is different, drainage, soil type, etc. 

More supports might not be needed, just remove some that ya have and place posts deeper. Fun with that is getting your post in there and tipping them in place without them being too short. I would have to scratch my head little and find a creative way to make that work, like maybe jacking it up a smidge higher than needed so when you come down it won't be too low.

When you shim it, give yourself the option of boards of many different thickness.  If you have a bud with a table saw or planer, you could make 5/8th, 3/8th's, etc.  I guess my anal tendencies are coming out of me doing too much finish carpentry in the past.  Not sure how much compression you will get, make sure your shims are good and dry and you could choose a denser wood and that wouldn't compress as much.

Don't know what type of soil ya got to dig but I use a twist type post digger here in my nice soil and I ya wanted, you could put different length (shorter) handle on it.  Also, I've used a bottle jack for that in the past and it worked nicely, don't know what kind of jack that you have available.

Good luck, I think you'll get it figured out. 

Jeff

Offline ponycity

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #86 on: December 07, 2015, 11:25:27 AM »
I don't own a yurt, but I've stayed in a WeatherPort yurt once when I went camping (even though I would LOVE to live in one). I don't know a ton about them, but looking over this thread has been nice and informative.

Where I stayed, there was a concrete base with radiant heat. There were tubes with solar banks and it was nice and cozy inside. Without it on, it did drop significantly in a few hours.

It was really cool and I would love to see more pics if anyone has more to share. Thanks!

Offline Black November

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #87 on: April 25, 2016, 11:12:12 AM »

Offline Cronezilla

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #88 on: January 19, 2017, 12:16:21 AM »
the Yurt looks super cool! but it also seems a little pricey. I guess I have more questions. Is it semi-permanent structure? how portable would you say for like a refugee scenario? Is there advantages to a wall tent?

a more permanent alternative that has more thermal mass for heating and cooling would be earthbag house. you could make it round if you don't like angles.  8)

Offline surfivor

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Re: yurt platform/land pics
« Reply #89 on: January 19, 2017, 07:01:57 AM »
the Yurt looks super cool! but it also seems a little pricey. I guess I have more questions. Is it semi-permanent structure? how portable would you say for like a refugee scenario? Is there advantages to a wall tent?

a more permanent alternative that has more thermal mass for heating and cooling would be earthbag house. you could make it round if you don't like angles.  8)

 The yurt technically is semi-permanent .. It is a 20 foot yurt, obviously smaller ones are more movable. The platform itself is made of wood and a few feet off of the ground. It would be a little harder to move the platform than the yurt itself, but certainly could be done if it was disassembled. The yurt arrived as canvas and rafters on a small utility trailer pulled by a small truck and went up in a day. The platform was built a month or so before the yurt arrived.

 Building a yurt is not that difficult as I had studied it, although it would be time consuming. I believe the trickiest part is the center hole at the top as well as fitting the canvas exactly, though you can buy the canvas part from yurt companies. The frame itself consists mainly of a few simple boards, rafters, and lattice wall which can be taken apart. If portability was the main thing and living in the winter was not important, I think a smaller yurt between 11 and 15 feet or so would be a possibility ..

 I think the yurt is pretty sturdy and can withstand strong winds and heavy snow loads. It has rafters that are 2x6 and other points to hold a snow load and I installed a deadman as well even though I was told it was not necessary